devexpress pdf viewer control asp.net : Rotate pdf pages in reader control SDK platform web page .net windows web browser 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks21-part104

Module 5 - 201
Figure 5.21  Visual quality analysis for line features (original data)
Figure 5.21 illustrates an acceptable analysis of information.  In many
cases  visual  quality  analysis  will  help  easily  distinguish  acceptable,
marginal  or  unacceptable  interpreted  features  according  to  SHIM
mapping specifications.  This common-sense analysis can be a basis for
assessing the quality of GPS data for stream mapping.
Components of Overall GPS Quality
When assessing the quality of geographic data derived from GPS, there
are three components which must be considered: Accuracy, Reliability,
and Completeness.
Accuracy describes how close the  geographic entities (points, lines,
areas) derived from the GPS survey are to their true values.  Of course,
the true position of a feature is probably never known (otherwise, a
survey would not be required in the first place).
True accuracy is very difficult to test and is seldom done since it requires
a re-survey to a much higher level of accuracy (e.g. using total stations).
However, a reasonable test for accuracy is to visually examine the data
and assess the overall error.
Reliability describes how reliable the derived features are.  That is, can
their depiction  on the  map be trusted throughout?  There may be
deficiencies in the field data collection such as too few position fixes at a
point feature or too far between position fixes along part of a line
feature.  Careful field procedures (supplemented by Quality Control at the
processing and mapping stages) are necessary to ensure reliability.
Reliability can be easily tested through simple QA procedures by checking
for compliance with certain specifications for stream mapping such as
minimum time for static point features and maximum gap along dynamic
line features.
Completeness is a management issue, rather than a technical issue.
Many stream  mapping  projects  are very  complicated  and  important
details may be omitted or incorrectly represented.  Although the GPS data
may be accurate and reliable, the final map may not properly represent
10 m diameter circles
for scale reference
“interpreted” line
individual position fixes
Rotate pdf pages in reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate just one page; rotate pdf page and save
Rotate pdf pages in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
reverse pdf page order online; rotate pdf pages and save
Module 5 - 202
the location on the ground - this is perhaps the most common cause for
large area errors since entire sections may be missing or wrong.
For example, a stream system may be several kilometres long, with many
reaches, confluences and tributaries.  Ephemeral channels and tributaries
often must be mapped, and headwaters as well.  Often during the course
of a stream survey, there will be re-surveys and amendments as crews
become more experienced and new attributes become important.  The
final dataset may come from GPS data captured by several different
crews, using different equipment and methods, over quite a few months.
Given these complications, it is not uncommon for a segment or tributary
to be missed.  It is also not uncommon for features to be included
mistakenly (for example approximate locations and features for planning
from existing, inaccurate information).
It is vital that systematic records of data capture are kept, and that
somebody  very  familiar  with  the  stream  network  assume  overall
responsibility that all features are properly mapped in the field and at the
mapping stage.
5.8.3  The Nature of Errors in GPS Positions
GPS positions, just like all measurable quantities, cannot be determined
exactly - there will always be some error, even if it is very small.  The
methods  used for  forestry  GPS surveying  can yield,  using  the  best
equipment and under the most ideal conditions, accuracy of 1 metre or
better.  However, in typical field conditions (forest cover  and steep
terrain), errors of 5 metres or more are common even using the best
equipment.   Using lower-quality equipment, errors of more than  10
metres are not uncommon.
There are three general classes of errors in GPS positions:  gross errors,
systematic errors, and random errors.  There are different ways of dealing
with these different types of errors.  It is essential that the errors be
recognised for what they are and properly handled.
Gross Errors
Gross errors are usually the result of some avoidable mistake and hence
are often known as “blunders”.  One common blunder is transposing
numbers, for example writing 27 when 72 was actually the number
observed.  With GPS positions, gross errors are usually the result of signal
tracking problems with the GPS receiver - these sometimes happen,
especially in difficult observing conditions.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF.
how to rotate page in pdf and save; rotate single page in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages individually
Module 5 - 203
Figure 5.22  An example of gross, systematic, and random errors on line
features.
Figure 5.23  An example of gross, systematic, and random errors on point
features.
Gross errors in GPS positions are usually very easy to identify, as they are
usually quite large and of very short duration (a second or two) (Fig. 5.22,
5.23).  They usually show up as “zingers” where one position fix is
obviously in error compared to the rest of the fixes.  Gross errors are
usually tens or even of hundreds of metres different from the adjacent
fixes (Fig 5.24).
Figure 5.24  An example of gross errors in line features (actual data)
To  help  identify  gross  errors,  it  is  important  that  redundant
measurements are available.  With enough information, gross errors
become obvious visually and those fixes can be easily ignored or deleted
during the interpretation stage.  Some software packages will attempt to
automatically identify and eliminate gross errors.  Gross errors in line can
often be identified automatically since they imply a ridiculous condition,
Random Errors (Noise)
Systematic Error (Bias)
)
Gross Error (“Zinger”)
T
r
u
e
L
i
n
e
S
y
s
t
e
m
a
t
i
c
E
r
r
o
r
Gross Error
Random Error
10 m diameter circles
for scale reference
obvious “zingers”
smaller gross errors
200 m
150 m
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Delete Existing PDF Pages. Provide C# Users with Mature .NET PDF Document Manipulating Library for Deleting PDF Pages in C#.
rotate pdf page few degrees; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
pdf rotate all pages; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
Module 5 - 204
such as a field operator suddenly moving 50 metres in one second, then
moving 50 metres back the next.
Point features do not seem to be as susceptible to gross errors as are
dynamic lines.  Actually, the effect is more a combination of gross and
systematic errors - instead of one or two individual fixes which are out, it
is a series of fixes.
Systematic Errors
Systematic errors follow some pattern which affect the measurements or
calculations.  There is a bias which is usually about the same magnitude
(size) and direction or else, follows an obvious trend.  Systematic errors
in  measurements  are  usually  the  result  of  some  sort  of  natural
phenomenon, equipment calibration, or observer bias.  Systematic errors
can also be introduced during the calculation process by ignoring - or
incorrectly assuming - certain factors.
A common systematic error is the magnetic declination - the compass
needle points towards local Magnetic North, whereas grid or UTM North
is the reference for most resource-grade maps (which includes another
error, the grid convergence).  If these factors are not accounted for,
compass observations are many degrees in error.  With GPS positions, the
main systematic error is due to a phenomenon known as multipath (see
section 5.8.4.), which is often exacerbated by receiver or processing
software.
If the cause of the systematic error is well-known, the errors can often be
modeled, where a mathematical formula is applied to correct the errors -
for example, compass  declination is based on a model.  Observing
techniques can also correct for known systematic errors - for example,
simple differential correction accounts for most of the common-mode
errors in GPS observations (see section 5.7.2.).
The problem with systematic errors is that they can be very difficult to
detect if the cause is not known and well understood.  With GPS data in
difficult conditions (e.g. under forest canopy or around buildings), the
position fixes may look right, but be many metres in error.  Undetected
systematic errors are one of the main causes of poor quality in GPS
surveys.
Figure 5.25  An example of systematic errors in point features (actual data)
Figure 5.25 shows systematic errors for point features, although it is an
extreme example.  The obvious trend in the error is very typical of
systematic error for point features.  In this instance, there are a few (8
true location
averaged point
trend of
systematic error
large errors with a
systematic component
80 metres
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
rotate pdf page; pdf reverse page order online
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
how to change page orientation in pdf document; pdf page order reverse
Module 5 - 205
out of 160) position fixes which are seem to be gross errors, although
they have a systematic component (that is, they follow the pattern or
trend of the errors).
Figure 5.26  An example of systematic error in line features (actual data)
Figure 5.26 shows an example of systematic errors for a line feature.
This is also  an extreme example, but it illustrates the difficulty of
detecting systematic  errors.   The GPS  position fixes give  a smooth
appearance, and actually look like very good data.  Only when the true
location of the feature is known do these systematic errors become
obvious.  There is no visual or statistical clue that the data has such large
errors.
In this case, the only reliable clue to the existence of large systematic
errors is the brand of receiver since it is the receiver and software
combination  which  has  caused  the  error  (other  receivers  tested
simultaneously did not have the same errors).  It should be noted that the
receivers most commonly used in stream mapping in BC seldom exhibit
such  systematic  errors  in  dynamic  lines  -  and  then,  of  very  small
magnitude (usually much less than 5 metres).
Random Errors
If there are no gross or systematic errors in a data set, random errors are
what remain.  Random errors are residual noise in the data caused by
unavoidable  effects  including  environmental  effects  and  the
measurement resolution of the equipment.  Truly random errors are
easily identified visually as there is no definite pattern to them - that is,
the size and direction of random errors cannot be predicted by what has
come before or what comes after.
Usually, random errors are small and are just as likely to be positive as
negative (or for line features, just as likely to be off to the right as to the
left of the line).  Because of this, truly random errors will average out if
there is enough redundant data.
Figure 5.27 shows random errors in a point feature, although it is an
extreme example.  There is no particular pattern to the errors, although a
slight NNW trend can be seen.  Usually the most prevalent error in point
features  under  forest  canopy  is  systematic,  but  with  enough  data,
averaging can produce a good estimate for the true location.
10 m diameter circles
for scale reference
G
P
S
-
d
erived line
true line
consistent systematic errors
of up to 20 metres
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pdf page and save
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET
rotate all pages in pdf file; rotate single page in pdf reader
Module 5 - 206
Figure 5.27  An example of random errors in point features (actual data)
The best estimate for the true position of a static point with random
errors is simply the mean, or average of the point.  This is based on a
statistical method, which minimises the sum of  the squares of the
residuals, known as least squares.  All GPS software that will handle point
features will compute averaged points thus, dealing with random errors
in point features is very straightforward.
Some software however, may apply some other processing to the point
features.  One method is known as outlier testing where any individual
position fix which is more than a certain distance from the computed
average  is  rejected, and a  new  average is computed.   Usually that
distance is set at two times the standard deviation of the averaged point.
Such processing schemes can cause problems since they assume that the
errors are truly random when in fact usually the most prevalent error is
systematic in point features under forest canopy.
Figure 5.28 shows random errors in a dynamic line feature, also an
extreme example.  Although the data is very “noisy” there is no particular
trend to the errors.  Ignoring the obvious gross errors, a line which best
fits the position fixes is actually quite close to the true location – within 5
metres even though the errors in the data are an order of magnitude
larger.
If the errors are truly random, then the best estimate of the true location
of the line feature is a line of best-fit.  There are well-known methods for
computing a line of best-fit using statistical means such as least-squares
analysis or adaptive filters.  However, most of these automated methods
do not work well with GPS data under forest canopy, and usually will
create a best-fit line which has significant systematic errors.
Operationally, a subjective best-fit line is usually drawn by an operator
using the GPS-derived line feature as a guide.  With a bit of knowledge,
experience, and especially common sense, a human operator can produce
a subjective best-fit line which is a much better estimate of the true
location than automated statistical methods available to date.
true location
averaged point
30 m
etres
Module 5 - 207
Figure 5.28  An example of random errors in line features (actual data)
5.8.4 GPS Under Forest Canopy
The effects of forest canopy can significantly degrade the accuracy of GPS
positions (Fig. 5.29).  The signals are affected by the canopy and this of
course affects the quality of the computed position.  Forest canopy
effects on the GPS signal include obstruction, attenuation, and reflection.
Figure 5.29  An example of the impact of forest canopy  on GPS signal reception.
The GPS signal is a line-of-sight signal and is obstructed by most solid
objects.  The signal is blocked by the trunks of trees, larger branches,
and terrain features such mountains or local gullies.  The main effect of
signal  obstruction  is  to  increase  the  Dilution  of  Position.    This  is
especially  true  of  the  vertical  DoP  (VDOP)  -  and  hence  the  three
D
irect S
ig
na
l
Reflected Signal
Obstructed
Signal
Signal
Attenuated
GPS-derived line(!)
10m diameter circles
for scale reference
true line
Module 5 - 208
dimensional PDOP.  Often in forested conditions the HDOP is acceptable
when the PDOP is not.
The signals are weakened or attenuated by leaves and small branches.
This attenuation can make it very difficult for a GPS receiver to track the
signals.  At some point, the receiver will not be able to track the signal at
all and the effect will be the same as if the signal were obstructed.  Even
if the signal can be tracked, some receivers will have difficulty accurately
measuring the pseudoranges.
Like light waves, signals will be reflected by solid objects they cannot
pass through.  The phenomenon of a satellite signal reaching an antenna
by more than  one  path (direct and some  reflected  paths)  is called
multipath.  This multipath can cause large variations in position and is
perhaps the largest cause of large errors in position fixes under forest
canopy.
Stand Conditions and GPS Data Quality
Naturally, forest stand conditions have a very important effect on the
errors in GPS positions.  The testing done to date has been limited to
coastal conditions, but canopy conditions vary widely throughout the test
range.  Some stands are very high volume coastal stands, and others are
more  typical  of  interior  conditions  (some  testing  in  the  interior  is
planned).  High-density immature stands, forest fringe conditions, coastal
riparian zones, and entirely open conditions are also present throughout
the test range.
For all receivers tested, volume seems to be much more of a factor than
density or canopy closure.  The large trunks obstruct the signal, meaning
that often there are not enough satellites for a position fix or the dilution
of precision is too high.  This means far less position fixes for point and
line features.  Even though there are maximum allowable gaps, there will
be much less redundancy.  It will be more difficult to create interpreted
lines because there are less fixes to act as a guide - it is also more
difficult to assess the overall quality of the data.
Signal reflection from the large trunks and branches in high volume
stands is also a problem.  The data is far more suspect to multipath
effects which can often cause positions to be tens of metres or more out -
this is especially a problem with point features, as explained in section
5.8.4.
In  dense,  immature  stands  even  though  crown  closure  can  be
significantly higher, most receivers seem to track signals well enough.  In
these cases, data noise (random error) is the main problem.
The GPS signal is absorbed by water molecules which means that if there
is moisture in the leaves (especially standing water on the leaves during
or after heavy rain), there is much more attenuation of the signals.  Wet
canopy conditions mean that it is very difficult for the receiver to track
sufficient signals, and like in high volume conditions, there will be fewer
fixes and hence less redundancy.  Again, field operators will ensure that
there is sufficient data, but it is much more difficult to interpret the lines
in the mapping process.
Module 5 - 209
Handling Errors in Static (Point) Features
Conventional wisdom has it that averaged point features are inherently
more accurate than dynamic line features.  This is certainly true in ideal,
low-multipath conditions.  If a line is sufficiently straight that it can be
defined as a line connecting two points (for example a curb line), it may
be more accurate to collect it as a series of points.
However, under moderate to heavy forest cover, all receivers tested to
date have been less accurate in static mode than in dynamic mode.  This
is because the systematic effect of multipath is much more pronounced
when the antenna is static.  The geometric relationship between the
satellites, the GPS antenna, and the interfering trees and leaves does not
change appreciably over short time periods.  Simple multipath effects in
GPS follow a well-known cycle of around 8 minutes and long occupations
are required to ensure that the errors average out during a static point
feature.
Although not all point features under canopy are subject to systematic
errors, all features should be examined carefully and the errors resolved
satisfactorily.  Plotting the individual position fixes for point features
usually helps greatly in identifying systematic errors, although most GPS
software does not provide this information (the MoF has developed some
tools to access this information from common software).  If there is
dynamic data available (for example  bridges  along  a  trail  or falling
corners on a cutting boundary), systematic errors will also be evident
when the averaged point is not on the line as expected.
Figure 5.30  Systematic Errors in Static Point Features (actual data)
Figure 5.30 shows typical multipath characteristics for three different
points.  One thing that is noticeable with most receivers is the trend to
the systematic errors.  There is a noticeable wander to the points - it is
often as if the operator slowly walked a line during the static occupation.
Although this phenomenon is not  universal, it  is  probably the best
indicator of problems with point features.
If trends are noticeable, the true location of the point feature usually lies
somewhere  along  the  trend  line.    When  there  is  supplementary
information (e.g. a dynamic line survey which the point is expected to be
on), the most likely location is where the trend in the point fixes meet the
dynamic line feature.  For surveys where there are point features only, it
is often better to stay longer at points, or do two occupations separated
by a few minutes.
True Location
True Location
Averaged Point
Averaged Point
Pt 3
Pt 1
Pt 2
(8m error)
(4m error)
(5m error)
Module 5 - 210
A field procedure, which may help to minimize systematic errors, is to
move the GPS antenna around slightly during static occupations.  Under
forest canopy, where tree trunks and branches are the main cause of
multipath, this technique can cause the multipath effect to become more
random  than  systematic.    Recently  (March  2000),  a  very  limited
preliminary test gave encouraging results for this method, but more
extensive testing is required before any conclusions can be made.
Figure 5.31  Resolving Systematic Errors in Point Features (actual data)
Handling Errors in Dynamic (Line) Features
Dynamic line features under forest canopy can have significant random,
systematic, and gross errors.  Normally, the errors in line features are
predominately  random, with  perhaps  a  few  easily  identifiable  gross
errors.  This is because, contrary  to static  surveys, the  antenna is
constantly moving and the multipath conditions are constantly changing.
The systematic effect is usually of quite short duration and only affects a
few metres of the line feature.  Large homogeneous features such as rock
faces or building walls can cause systematic error in dynamic features
over longer sections.
Figure 5.32  Minor Random Errors in Dynamic Line Feature
d
a
ta
 tre
n
d
True Location
dynamic line
Averaged Point
Errors mostly random, and small
10 m diameter circles
for scale reference
Very short periods of minor systematic error
Some gaps in data (field procedures)
gap
minor systematic error,
very short period
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested