Module 7 - 261
Table 7.1  General land use and land cover categories
General land use categories
General land cover categories
agriculture/aquaculture
residential
commercial
industrial
transportation & utilities
recreation
wildlife and related activities
forestry
hazardous waste sites
water management activities
resource protection & research activities
energy and heat generation
mineral and petroleum extraction
no apparent use (open space)
built-up areas
forest (various types)
wetland
upland herbs
upland shrubs
alpine
water
mineral
snow and ice
Imperviousness can be calculated using either land use or land cover
maps, but the combination of land use and land cover provides the most
meaningful information for a particular area. While land cover provides in
theory the most accurate information for calculating imperviousness,
quite frequently land cover maps do not distinguish between various
types  of  built-up  areas,  which  are  required  for  imperviousness
calculations. For example, a land cover map will identify all built-up areas
as  one  category,  but  these  will  include  a  wide  range  of  activities,
including residential, industrial etc. Also, land cover maps do not show
inclusions or individual built-up areas very well (e.g. houses, roads, and
driveways within large green areas such as parks).
Therefore, land use based on zoning information and aerial photographs
is  most  commonly  used  for  imperviousness  calculations.  The  main
advantage of using land use information is that it describes the various
types of built-up areas in great detail, which make up most of the
impervious areas in a watershed. The main disadvantage of using land
use information is that it identifies a number of activities which do not
necessarily provide a good indication of what the actual land surface
looks like (and therefore the level of imperviousness that should be
attributed to them). For example, land use categories such as open
space, recreation and resource protection can contain a variety of land
cover types, including forest, grass, shrubs, and bare land (a substantial
amount of buildings can also be found in recreation areas).
It should be noted that for most areas, land use maps are not created on
a regular basis; instead they are created by a wide range of organisations
with many different purposes. As a result, there is little consistency in the
general approach and scale of existing land use information.
Pdf rotate single page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate all pages in pdf; pdf reverse page order preview
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate one page in pdf reader; pdf rotate pages separately
Module 7 - 262
Recommended Land Use/Cover Classification
This manual recommends two possible classifications for determining
imperviousness:
ɷ  Using only land use.
ɷ  Using a combination of land use and land cover.
The use of only land cover is discouraged, since it provides limited detail
within the urban built-up areas. Using only land use is feasible, but
somewhat incomplete. Using a combination of land use and cover will
provide  the  most  appropriate  and  complete  information  for
imperviousness calculations.  Table 8.2 lists the recommended land use
and cover classifications for imperviousness analysis.
Table 7.2  Recommended land use and land cover categories
General land use categories
General land cover categories
agriculture
single family residential – low density
single family residential – medium density
single family residential – high density
townhouse residential
multifamily residential
commercial
industrial
institutional
transportation (highways)
utilities & special infrastructure
recreation & parks
forestry
open space (no apparent use)
built-up areas
forest
shrubs
grass / lawns
bare / exposed soil
water
In  the  case  of  ground  surveys  and  stereo-photogrammetry,
imperviousness is measured directly by summing up the roofs, roads and
other paved areas. Some assumptions still need to be made regarding the
level of imperviousness for other cover categories, such as grass, shrubs,
forest and bare areas.
Imagery Interpretation and Database Development
Figure  8.6  shows  the  various  steps  involved  in  interpreting  the
orthophoto  image  and  developing  the  GIS  database  required  for
imperviousness calculations.
ɷ  Open up the orthophoto in your GIS software - familiarize
yourself with the types of features visible on the image.
ɷ  Create polygons that are uniform in use and cover.
ɷ  Give each polygon an ID number and attach the appropriate
use and cover codes.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
pdf rotate just one page; pdf page order reverse
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
rotate one page in pdf; rotate pdf pages individually
Module 7 - 263
Minimum Polygon Size
There is no point in mapping really small polygons – too much effort for
too little gain. Minimum polygon size and scale are closely related – at
smaller scales (e.g. 1:20,000 or 1:50,000) the minimum polygon size
would be much larger than at larger scales (e.g. 1:1,000 or 1:5,000). As a
general guide, a scale of 1:5,000 corresponds to a minimum polygon size
of approximately 0.05 ha, meaning that any area smaller than 0.05 ha
will not be mapped as a unique polygon. For example, a very small area
of open space (an undeveloped lot) in the middle of a residential area,
will be mapped as part of that residential polygon. When mapping at a
scale of 1:20,000, a minimum polygon size of 0.5 ha is more appropriate.
It is very important to realize that a good orthophoto will allow for the
identification  of an  area much  smaller  than  0.05  ha,  but  that  the
consistent use of the same minimum polygon size to be mapped is
critical for consistency among different areas.
Uniformity of Polygons
Polygons have to be created with respect to uniformity in land use and
cover.  For  example,  from  a  land  cover  perspective,  residential  and
commercial areas are equal (built-up), but they are different in land use,
so they should be mapped as separate polygons. Similarly, a forested
park and a golf course are the same from a use perspective (recreation),
but are different in cover (forest vs. grass), so they should be mapped as
separate  polygons.  Figure  8.7  provides  a  few  examples  of  these
classifications.
Field Verification
In the early stages or leaning how to interpret orthophoto imagery, it is
useful to make a printout of some sections, and see what they look like in
the field. After some initial field verifications, very little fieldwork is
typically required, since a good orthophoto provides a lot of detail. Some
field verification may be required for unusual features.
Use of Zoning Information
To assist in determining land use, a zoning map can be very useful.
Zoning information is often used to determine the density of residential
areas  and  distinguish  between  very  similar  land  uses,  such  as
commercial, industrial and institutional. If zoning information is available
in digital format and is up-to-date, it could be used as the basis for the
land use/cover map (i.e. the actual polygons of the zoning map could be
used). However, each boundary has to be verified visually, and each
polygon has to be checked for land use and land cover. Many zoning
polygons will have to be broken up to accurately reflect the actual use
and cover. The use of the digital zoning map is most useful in highly
developed areas, where actual land use and zoning are pretty close – in
other areas, it may be more effective to start creating polygons from
scratch.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to change page orientation in pdf document; reverse page order pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
rotate pages in pdf permanently; rotate individual pages in pdf
Module 7 - 264
Orthophoto image
Polygons
Land use classification
Land cover classification
Polygons with ID numbers
Database
Figure 7.6  Example of imagery interpretation
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
change orientation of pdf page; how to reverse pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; rotate pdf pages by degrees
Module 7 - 265
Orthophoto image
Land use
Land cover
Figure 7.7  Example of land use versus cover.
Step 4  Determine Imperviousness Factors
Sources of Information for Imperviousness Factors
Determining imperviousness on the basis of land use and/or cover maps
requires  the  use  of  imperviousness  factors  to  calculate  the
imperviousness for a watershed. Imperviousness factors can be derived
through various means:
ɷ  open literature: % values are provided in several guidebooks.
ɷ  stereo-photogrammetry: even if this type data is not available
for the entire study area, it can provide accurate estimates for
imperviousness factors for a specific region.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; save pdf after rotating pages
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
how to rotate one page in pdf document; how to rotate page in pdf and save
Module 7 - 266
ɷ  ground survey: as with stereo-photogrammetry, it is rare to
have this information available for large areas, but smaller
areas can provide accurate estimates for imperviousness
factors.
ɷ  air photo interpretation of test areas, using a higher level
of detail than used in the land cover/use mapping: this
essentially involves a manual approach to determining the
outlines of buildings, roads and other paved areas, similar to
what stereo-photogrammetry does automatically for large
areas; if the scale of the air-photos is sufficiently large, this
method can give quite accurate results.
Recommended imperviousness factors
Existing studies vary greatly in the imperviousness factors used, which
limit  the  ability  to  compare  results  from  different  areas.  Selecting
imperviousness factors is not an easy task and should be given proper
attention. A set of “typical” imperviousness factors is presented in Table
8.3.
Table 7.3  Recommended imperviousness factors.
code
Land use
imperviousness
A000
Agriculture
3%
S110
Single family
n/a
1
S120
Suburban
12%
S130
Townhouse
65%
S135
Multifamily
65%
S200
Commercial
80%
S300
Industrial
80%
S400
Institutional
80%
S500
Transport
90%
R100
Recreation
3%
U100
Open space
3%
F100
Forestry
1%
W000
Water
0%
Land cover
Forest
1%
clear-cut
3%
grass
3%
shrub
3%
bare
3%
 No typical imperviousness factor is assigned to single family residential as this value varies greatly with housing density – details
discussed further below.
One of the most difficult land use categories for which to establish
imperviousness  factors  is  single-family  residential  areas,  for  which
imperviousness can vary from 20 to 65% depending on the type of
housing, the overall housing density, and the design of the road network.
For this reason, no “typical” value is given in Table 8.3. Instead, overall
housing  density  should  be  used  as  a  guide  to  selecting  the
imperviousness for this category. This can be done using zoning and
Module 7 - 267
cadastral information and/or aerial photographs. Given the often large
contribution residential areas make to the total urbanised area of a
watershed,  establishing  an  appropriate  imperviousness  factor  for
residential  areas  is  critical  to  the  accuracy  for  the  imperviousness
calculations.
Developing Test Areas
An alternative to using only density as a guide, the use of test areas is a
common way in to determine appropriate imperviousness factors. In this
approach, small residential areas (a few blocks or between 3 and 10
hectares  in  size)  are  mapped  in  great  detail,  including  rooftops,
driveways, sidewalks, parking areas, roads and other paved areas. This
can be achieved using ground surveys, stereo-photogrammetry or air
photos. This level of detail is often not feasible for large areas, but can be
carried  out  for  test  areas  to  determine  appropriate  imperviousness
factors for a specific area. While it is feasible to do this for all types of
land uses, the variability among different areas for most land uses is
often not substantial enough to warrant the effort. Given the variability
for single family residential areas, the accuracy of the imperviousness
estimate for a watershed is likely to improve substantially when using test
areas.
Example of Test Areas
As an example, Figure 8.8 shows the imperviousness factors developed
by UBC (1999) for three watersheds in the Lower Mainland based on test
areas using 1995 1-meter pixel orthophotos. These values for residential
areas in the Salmon River, Brunette River and Hoy Creek watershed
correspond fairly closely to the values reported in the frequently used
USDA urban hydrology manual (USDA, 1975), lending support to the use
of density as an alternative to test areas (which can be labour intensive).
However, depending on the design of the area (road network, road width,
parking spaces, layout of lots, house sizes), certain regions may deviate
from this general pattern.
Module 7 - 268
Total Impervious Area (%)
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
residential density (units/acre)
Brunette River
Hoy Creek
Salmon River
USDA manual
Figure 7.8  Single family residential factors  (linear regression corresponds to
USDA datapoints)
Step 5  Carry Out Calculations
Basics of Imperviousness Calculation
Simply put, imperviousness factors for different land use and/or land
cover categories are multiplied with the areas for each of these categories
within a watershed and summed up to obtain the overall imperviousness
(as illustrated in Figure 8.9). This procedure is the same for any general
land use or land cover map, irrespective of the source of the information.
Module 7 - 269
Figure 7.9  Land use map of Hoy Creek.
Module 7 - 270
Table 7.4  Land use and cover for Hoy Creek (km
2
).
code
description
TIA (%)
use
cover
use/cover
S110
single family
47%
1.712
-
1.712
S120
suburban
12%
0.028
-
0.028
S130
townhouse
65%
0.161
-
0.161
S135
multifamily
65%
0.259
-
0.259
S200
commercial
80%
0.082
-
0.082
S300
industrial
80%
0.016
-
0.016
S400
institutional
80%
0.409
-
0.409
R100
recreation
3%
1.407
-
-
U100
open
3%
1.758
-
-
D000
under development
3%
1.079
-
-
W000
open water
0%
0.035
-
-
U
urban
n/a
-
2.667
-
B
bare
3%
-
1.079
1.079
F
forest
1%
-
2.147
2.147
G
grass/shrubs
3%
-
1.017
1.017
W
water
0%
-
0.035
0.035
total area
6.945
6.945
6.945
TIA
23.3%
22.61%
Effective Impervious Area
As mentioned in the introduction, a distinction is made between Total
Impervious Area (TIA) and Effective Impervious Area (EIA). The approach
described so far only addresses TIA. One approach to measuring EIA is
the use of general conversion formulas. Field research has been done on
the  relationship  between  TIA  and  EIA.  Alley  and  Veenhuis  (1983)
developed a relationship based on a number of drainages in the Denver
area: EIA = 0.15 * TIA
1.41
. The formula suggests that at low levels of TIA,
the EIA value is substantially lower (less than half). This makes sense
intuitively, since in low density areas there are many possibilities for roof
and road runoff to infiltrate into pervious areas. At high levels of TIA, the
formula suggests there is almost no difference between TIA and EIA.
Again, this makes sense, because for high developed areas, there will be
very limited infiltration, whether or not the imperviousness surfaces are
directly connected or not. Examples of estimates for EIA based on this
formula are shown in Table 8.5 – these estimates may not be very
appropriate for all areas.
Table 7.5  Example of EIA estimates.
land use
TIA (%)
EIA (%)
low density single family residential
10
4
medium density single family residential
20
10
high density single family residential
35
23
multifamily
60
48
commercial/industrial
90
86
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested