display first page of pdf as image in c# : How to rotate just one page in pdf application SDK tool html .net windows online 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks5-part117

Module 3 - 41
We will explain  more  clearly  later  in  Section 3.8,  the  terms  primary  and
secondary  watercourse  class,  riparian  class,  and  hydraulic  type.  These
characteristics define biophysical habitat attributes and are used to classify
stream segments along the stream centreline (Figure 3.4).
Figure 3.4  Example of assigned watercourse centreline segments and some
associated habitat attributes.
The SHIM data dictionary can potentially collect data on up to 22 characteristics
of the stream channel and riparian area. These characteristics are defined in
detail in Section 3.8 (Table 3.5) and overviewed in Table 3.1. The decision
regarding which characteristics to use when defining segments is important in
ensuring  a  systematic  and  effective SHIM  survey.  While  there  is  a  strong
temptation to use as many of the characteristics as possible, only apply a few
relevant characteristics to keep survey design and implementation simple and
effective. Therefore, it is important to consider the types of characteristics that
are relevant to particular survey types in assigning centreline segments for a
particular survey type (Table  3.2). Common survey types  can include:  Fish
Habitat Inventories; Impact Assessment and Monitoring; Estimation of Productive
Capacity;  Land-Use  Planning;  and  Fisheries  Stock  Assessment/Escapement
Surveys.
How to rotate just one page in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf pages; pdf page order reverse
How to rotate just one page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf permanently; save pdf rotate pages
Module 3 - 42
Table 3.2  Characteristics which can be used to assign centreline segments for
different survey types.
Characteristic
Fish Habitat
Inventory
Impact
Assessment
Productivity
Estimation
Land-Use
Planning
Stock
Assessment
Primary Stream
Class
Secondary Stream
Class
Dominant Hydraulic
Type
Channel
Dimensions
Segment Gradient
Substrate
Composition
Substrate
Compaction
Instream Cover
Crown Closure
Spawning Habitat
Bars
Access for
Livestock
Riparian Class
Riparian Band
Width
Riparian Structural
Stage
Presence of Snags
Presence of
Veteran Trees
Density of Shrubs
Top of Bank
Bank Stability
Dominant Bank
Material
Bank Slope
3.4.1  Fish Habitat Inventories
For fish habitat inventories, it is desirable to collect as much information
as possible concerning habitat attributes, and to define segments with
high resolution to survey the complexity of the habitat and riparian zone.
For this reason, all potential segment characteristics can potentially be
used when assigning segments.
3.4.2  Impact Assessment and Monitoring
Biophysical baseline studies are often required to support environmental
assessments (EAs) required by federal and provincial legislation. These
studies describe existing environmental conditions in the area where a
project is proposed, and provide a basis for future impact prediction and
monitoring. Baseline studies are also carried out to characterize the
extent of existing impacts in a watercourse in the context of watershed
assessment  and  restoration  planning,  and  state-of-the-environment
reporting.
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
PDF page processing functions by just following attached for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate individual pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PDF document pages, or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an
how to rotate all pages in pdf; pdf rotate all pages
Module 3 - 43
In the context of baseline studies and monitoring, it is important to
determine  which  characteristics  are  likely to change  as  a  result  of
environmental impacts. It is often desirable to define stream segments
based on:
ɷ  primary and secondary stream class;
ɷ  dominant hydraulic type;
ɷ  channel dimensions;
ɷ  substrate composition and compaction;
ɷ  instream cover and presence of spawning habitat;
ɷ  bars;
ɷ  access for livestock;
ɷ  riparian characteristics (e.g., class, band width, structural
stage, shrub density);
ɷ  presence of snags and veteran trees; and
ɷ  bank characteristics (e.g., top of bank, bank stability,
dominant material, and slope).
3.4.3  Habitat Suitability and Productive Capacity
The habitat requirements of salmonids vary with their life history stage
and habitat use. Depending on the stream, time of year, and fish species,
any of the following stages may be present: (i) maturing anadromous
migrants (adults spawners), (ii) spawning adults, (iii) incubating eggs, (iv)
rearing juveniles and/or resident adults, and (v) juvenile outmigrants
(smolts).
Estimation of habitat suitability (i.e., Johnson and Slaney, 1996) and
productive capacity (i.e., Hankin and Reeves, 1988) generally focuses on:
ɷ  adult holding pools;
ɷ  spawning gravel (quantity and quality) requirements;
ɷ  area and frequency of rearing pools;
ɷ  cover in pools and riffles (complexity);
ɷ  large woody debris (frequency and distribution);
ɷ  stream bed substrate characteristics; and
ɷ  extent of off-channel habitat.
Therefore, in the context of habitat suitability studies, it is often desirable
to define stream segments based on:
ɷ  primary and secondary stream class;
ɷ  dominant hydraulic type;
ɷ  channel dimensions and gradient;
ɷ  substrate composition and compaction; and
ɷ  instream cover, crown closure, and spawning habitat.
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Easy to rotate the current picture or file page through just a button You can also process a multi-page document by deleting one or more page(s) from it
rotate pages in pdf and save; rotate all pages in pdf preview
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
can be easily integrated into many MS Visual Studio .NET applications to create PDF with just a few VB.NET: Create a New PDF Document with One Blank Page.
rotate a pdf page; save pdf after rotating pages
Module 3 - 44
3.4.4  Land Use Planning
Municipal  land  use  and  forestry  planners  are  concerned  with
characteristics used to determine the extent of protection to which a
watercourse  is entitled  under  streamside  protection  regulations.  For
example, under the provincial 
Forest Practices Code 
(FPC, 1995), a fish-
bearing stream 1.5−5.0m wide is entitled to Riparian Reserve Zone (where
harvesting is not permitted) for 30m on each side of the channel, and an
additional Riparian Management Zone (where harvesting is constrained by
regulations) for a further 20m on either side of the channel. Similarly, in
urban areas, the 
Land Development Guidelines 
(DFO and MELP, 1992)
call
for a 15m setback for single family dwellings adjacent to fish-bearing
streams,  and  a  30m  setback  for  multifamily  and  commercial
developments.
Characteristics used to define stream segments for surveys conducted in
support of land-use planning include:
ɷ  channel dimensions and gradient;
ɷ  riparian class and band width; and
ɷ  bank characteristics (e.g., slope, top of bank, stability,
dominant material).
Other types of data which are important to land-use planning include fish
presence or absence, and the presence of bird nests. However, these
types of data are generally recorded as points, and are therefore not used
to define stream segments.
3.4.5  Stock Assessment
Stock assessments are conducted to estimate fish populations, especially
populations  of  anadromous  salmonids.  Typically,  stock  assessments
involve walking, swimming or flying a section of a watercourse and
visually estimating the numbers of spawning (can include carcasses) fish.
To be most efficient, stock assessments can focus on key spawning
habitats. Characteristics used to define stream segments in the context
of stock assessment studies include:
ɷ  primary and secondary class
ɷ  dominant hydraulic type;
ɷ  channel dimensions and gradient;
ɷ  substrate composition and compaction; and
ɷ  spawning habitat.
Habitat  accessibility  (i.e.,  presence  of  barriers  to  upstream  fish
movement, whether a segment is upstream or downstream of a known
barrier) and presence of spawning and post-spawning fish should also be
taken into consideration when defining segments.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
functions, including extracting one or more page(s) from PDF document. To utilize the PDF page(s) extraction function in VB.NET application, you just need to
save pdf rotated pages; rotate one page in pdf
VB Imaging - VB MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
barcode.Resolution = 96 'set rotation barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 barcode It allows you to select one page from a Below is just an example of generating an
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
Module 3 - 45
3.5  Survey Logistics
3.5.1  Timing
It is recommended that field surveys be conducted under high-water flow
conditions when all streams are flowing. This enables the survey crew to
effectively identify all watercourses and potential fish habitats within the
survey area. Surveys conducted during periods of lower flow (e.g., during
the summer months) may fail to capture every watercourse in the area
because dense vegetation cover may obscure the stream channel, and
ephemeral and/or intermittent streams may not flow outside the high-
flow periods. On the other hand, the mainstems of larger streams may be
too deep to safely survey during some high-flow periods, and should be
surveyed when lower-flow conditions exist. If adequate project funds
allow, it is recommended that two surveys be conducted: one during the
high-flow period, and a second during the season with the lowest water
flows. This second survey can capture information not visible during high
flows (e.g., the locations of discharge pipes that were under water, the
way that the stream responded to high flows, the extent of bank erosion,
changes in wetland size, etc.).
3.5.2  Equipment
All survey equipment should be assembled and checked (Table 3.3).
Survey planning should include ordering more difficult equipment and
supplies well before planned survey periods.
Table 3.3  Recommended field equipment for SHIM mapping survey.
Item
Description
Purpose
Orthophoto, aerial photo, or
large-scale topographical map,
and permanent marking pen
ɷ 
1:5,000 scale
ɷ 
to locate landmarks and verify positions
Field cards and mechanical
pencils
ɷ 
cards on waterproof paper;
HB or softer pencils
ɷ 
for recording data when GPS
unavailable
SHIM manual and data
dictionary
ɷ 
Version 23.0
ɷ 
for field reference regarding
procedures, codes, etc.
Laminated code reference
cards
ɷ 
feature and vegetation codes ɷ 
to ensure correct field recording of data
codes
Landowner contact letters
ɷ 
for distributing to landowners
Identification (Survey team)
ɷ 
to show to landowners when on private
property
Fish collection permits and
fishing license (optional)
ɷ 
government issued
ɷ 
for setting traps and collecting fish, if
this is part of your survey
Binder or clipboard
ɷ 
to hold field cards and other reference
materials
Measuring tape or tight-chain ɷ 
at least 50m in length
ɷ 
for cross-sections, measuring channel
widths, etc.
Range finder (optional)
ɷ 
Bushnell 400m
ɷ 
to measure distances > 10m over
inaccessible terrain
Metre stick
ɷ 
wooden, plastic, or aluminum ɷ 
to measure water depth & hydraulic
head
Compass
ɷ 
e.g., Suunto KB14 4/360 R/D ɷ 
to measure bearings between two
points
Clinometer
ɷ 
e.g., Suunto PM-5/360PC
(716)
ɷ 
to measure gradients (degrees)
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
VB.NET methods for you to locate the target TIFF page(s) accurately and quickly; Rotate single or multiple TIFF page(s) at one time just as you wish;
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate pdf pages and save
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Resolution = 96;// set resolution barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0;// set It allows you to select one page from a PDF Below is just an example of generating an
pdf rotate single page reader; rotate all pages in pdf and save
Module 3 - 46
Item
Description
Purpose
Thermometer
ɷ 
alcohol, with double metal
casing
ɷ 
to measure water and air temperatures
GPS with real-time differential
correction
ɷ 
Trimble Pathfinder Pro XR
ɷ 
for precise location of stream centreline
Camera and spare film
ɷ 
digital cameras are
preferable, if available
ɷ 
for photodocumenting features, etc.
Flagging tape
ɷ 
for placing temporary benchmarks
9" spikes and hammer
ɷ 
for placing permanent benchmarks
Backpack or cruiser Vest
ɷ 
to carry equipment
Safety vests (optional)
ɷ 
for visibility
Chest waders with wading belt ɷ 
rubber or neoprene waders,
chest-height preferred
ɷ 
for taking in-stream measurements and
crossing watercourses
Stream cleats or felt-soled
wading boots (optional)
ɷ 
for safety when walking on slippery
substrates
Bear spray, bangers
ɷ 
for use against attacking animals
(emergency use only)
Whistle
ɷ 
for safety
Cell phone (optional)
ɷ 
for safety
Take a laminated copy of the relevant topographical map into the field
with you (or orthophoto - aerial photograph). This will help identify
landmarks  such  as  road  crossings,  buildings,  hydro  right-of-ways,
farmland, and riparian vegetation. Landmarks can be used to tie GPS
survey results to known locations noted on the map or photo. Aerial
photos are also useful for identifying new, unmapped tributaries and for
verifying the locations of existing mapped tributaries.
3.5.3  Legal Permission: Land Owners, Statutory
Agencies
Contact the planning department of your local government (Regional
District, Municipal) to identify watershed areas where development is
planned within the next five to ten years. Fisheries and Oceans Canada,
and the BC Ministry of Land, Water and Air Protection (MLWAP) will also
assist in determining priority areas for SHIM mapping.
Contact and obtain permission from any public, First Nation, or private
landowners in the survey area. In urban areas, riparian and upland areas
are typically privately owned. Respect landowners and take time to talk
with them about the benefits to be gained by mapping the stream and its
riparian corridor. Leave a pamphlet or an information sheet about your
project. Most landowners will be interested and supportive of the study.
In  situations  where  you  must  cross  private  property  to  access  a
watercourse,  contact  the  landowner  directly  and  obtain  his  or  her
permission before crossing their property. Ideally, this permission should
be sorted out well before the survey is undertaken, but it may be possible
to talk to the landowner in person on the day of the site visit.
The following information should be made available to landowners:
ɷ  name / affiliation for field surveyors / crew;
ɷ  contact information for client or government contact;
ɷ  purpose of the survey; and
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
How to Rotate, Merge Word Documents Within VB.NET Imaging the length of the web page, here we just describe each single or multiple Word pages at one time with
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; permanently rotate pdf pages
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
The last one is for rendering PowerPoint file to raster image Gif. This demo code just converts PowerPoint first page to Gif image.
rotate pdf page and save; how to reverse pages in pdf
Module 3 - 47
ɷ  the expected duration of the field visit.
Landowners  must  be  informed  about  the  possible  installation  of
benchmarks, as well as other effects that the sampling procedures may
cause to their property.
Never survey on private lands unless permission has been granted.
3.5.4  Note-Keeping
Even with use of a GPS and data logger, field notes / records are expected
to be collected and kept. It is important to take thorough and descriptive
notes and, where necessary, provide sketches of the area surveyed. Post
trip interpretation of GPS lines and features may be easier if field notes
and sketches are available, especially if the mapping specialist was not
involved in the field survey. An orthophoto (1:5,000) or maximum scale
map of the area should be taken into the field in order to reference and
sketch  the watercourse and/or any obvious features  observed  while
mapping.  Local  site  conditions  or  anomalies  on  the  feature  being
traversed should be noted in the field book. Since the procedure also
relies upon detailed comments, it is important to write these into your
notebook or on the cards provided. GPS receiver technology does not
allow easy recording of comments and is  often limited  to  only  40
characters. Short abbreviations and comment reference numbers should
be entered into Asset Surveyor. Field notes must later be entered into the
standard mapping database.
3.6  Mapping The Watercourse Centreline
The use of GPS in SHIM surveys is described in Module 5 (GPS  Surveying
Procedures). Below is a brief overview of the use of GPS for centreline mapping.
For our purposes, watercourses are defined as streams, ditches, culverts, swales,
or other natural or human modified drainage features with defined channels and
permanent,  intermittent,  or  seasonally  flowing  water.  The  centreline  of  a
watercourse is best mapped by walking along the centre of the stream channel,
or bankfull width (Figure 3.5).
Note: The centreline should not be mapped along the centre of the wetted
channel width.
As the surveyor walks upstream, the Trimble GPS unit automatically logs a
continuous series of location points that will be interpreted as the stream
centreline. If, for some reason, it is impossible to obtain adequate readings from
the stream channel itself (e.g., because it passes through a steep ravine with
dense vegetative cover – excessive multipath), the GPS can be set to offset the
readings so that the centreline can be mapped from one of the banks.
Once the centreline of the watercourse has been mapped with GPS, the line data
should be overlaid on a digital orthophoto and/or provincial TRIM map using GIS
or AutoCAD software. The value of the new information gained through GPS
surveys will become apparent through this analysis.
Module 3 - 48
Total Bankfull Width
wetted width
where to determine
UTM coordinates
Figure 3.5  Correct position within the watercourse channel to collect stream
channel centreline positions using GPS. Note: the wetted width is not used to
define the centreline of the watercourse.
Use of a GPS unit such as the Trimble Pathfinder requires training and practice,
therefore RIC Standard GPS training and Field Operators certification is required.
Similarly,  individuals  involved  in  mapping  and  interpreting  watercourse
centrelines from field GPS data also have the appropriate certification (e.g., RIC
Standard Comprehensive Training for Resource Mapping). To maintain high data
quality and precision, the interpretation of GPS data requires a considerable level
of  skill, expertise, and  experience, and should  only be done  by  qualified
personnel.
3.7  Survey Reference Information
Record watercourse reference information at the beginning of each new survey,
or when some characteristic of the survey changes (e.g., new GPS surveyor).
The following reference information should be recorded at the beginning of each
new survey and re-entered whenever any of the information changes. If a data-
logger is used, the date and time are automatically registered each time field
information is recorded.
Stream Name
Air Temperature
Watershed Code
Water Temperature
Tributary Code
Stage
Organisation
Date
Crew
Time
Weather
3.7.1  Watercourse Name
Most of the streams that are mapped using SHIM are too small to have
formal names. However, for the larger watercourses, it should be decided
at the beginning of  the  survey whether stream  naming  will include
Module 3 - 49
gazetted names only, or gazetted names and local names. A stream’s
official gazetted name
is the name that appears on existing maps. Many
of the smaller streams that lack gazetted names have been given local
names by residents of the watershed, but these names are not present on
official maps (e.g., TRIM, NTS), and may have little meaning outside a
given watershed.
3.7.2  Watershed Code and Tributary Code
The BC watershed coding system was created by the provincial Ministry of
Sustainable Resources as a means of referencing streams in the provincial
Watershed Atlas
. Any watercourse in the province of BC, visible on a
1:50,000 scale NTS map, has been assigned a unique, 45-digit watershed
code (BC Fisheries, 1997).
The watershed coding system is hierarchical, meaning that you can tell
which stream a watercourse flows into, simply by examining its code. The
following table provides examples of watershed codes.
Table 3.4  Example of the BC provincial watershed coding system.
Watercourse Name and/or
Description
Watershed Code
Peace River
230-000000-00000-00000-0000-0000-000-000-000-
000-000-000
Carbon Creek, a tributary to the
Peace River
230-846900-00000-00000-0000-0000-000-000-000-
000-000-000
Eleven Mile Creek, a tributary to
Carbon Creek
230-846900-10700-00000-0000-0000-000-000-000-
000-000-000
An unnamed tributary to Eleven Mile
Creek
230-846900-10700-05300-0000-0000-000-000-000-
000-000-000
It is important to note that for many areas of BC, watershed codes have
only been generated for watercourses visible on 1:50,000 scale NTS
maps, although in some areas watershed codes are also available for
streams visible on 1:20,000 scale TRIM maps. In general, watershed
codes are not currently available for many of the small streams where
SHIM mapping may be conducted.
To determine whether or not codes are available for the streams you are
surveying, it is best to consult BC Fisheries directly (see SHIM Module 2).
Ideally, BC Fisheries can generate codes for the streams once you have
mapped them, but the coding takes time and may not be complete until
some time after your field work is finished. In the short term, an interim
code must be generated.
This tributary code
must be unique to a given stream, and could be
generated by using the name of the stream into which the tributary flows,
followed by a four-digit number (e.g., an uncoded stream flowing into
Carbon Creek could be coded as Carbon0001).
Module 3 - 50
3.7.3  Other Information
For future reference and data quality control, record crewmember names,
general weather conditions, air temperature near the stream (start of the
survey), water temperature, date and time for each field survey. Also
record the stream stage (water level) as dry, low, moderate, high or flood.
Record your organisation name to ensure that you receive recognition for
data collection, interpretation and are able to provide a data source
contact for the future.
3.8  Recording Stream Segment Characteristics
As discussed in Section 3.4, the stream segment is the fundamental unit of the
SHIM centreline survey, and the criteria used to define segments should be
determined after careful consideration of the survey objectives and available
resources. In the following section definitions are given for the 22 characteristics
used to define stream segments.
Note: Only a subset of these characteristics may apply to a particular survey.
Table 3.5  Characteristics used to define individual stream segments within a
watercourse.
Stream
Characteristic
(Section)
Categories
Riparian
Characteristic
(Section)
Categories
Primary Stream
Class
ɷ 
Natural
ɷ 
Channelized
ɷ 
Ditch
ɷ 
Flume
ɷ 
Culvert
ɷ 
Modified
ɷ 
Discontinued
ɷ 
Other
Secondary
Stream
Class
ɷ 
Beaver pond
ɷ 
Ephemeral
ɷ 
Intermittent
ɷ 
Perennial
ɷ 
Side channel
ɷ 
Wetland
ɷ 
Other
Dominant
Hydraulic Type
ɷ 
Beaver pond
ɷ 
Wetland
ɷ 
Slough
ɷ 
Standing
ɷ 
Pool
ɷ 
Riffle
ɷ 
Riffle/pool
ɷ 
Cascade
ɷ 
Cascade/pool
ɷ 
Falls
ɷ 
Run
Crown Closure
ɷ 
0
ɷ 
1−20%
ɷ 
21−40%
ɷ 
41−70%
ɷ 
71−90%
ɷ 
> 90%
Spawning Habitat
ɷ 
Anadromous
ɷ 
Resident
ɷ 
Unknown
ɷ 
Potential
ɷ 
None
Riparian Class
ɷ 
Intensive Agriculture
ɷ 
Non-intensive
Agriculture
ɷ 
Broadleaf forest
ɷ 
Bryophytes
ɷ 
Coniferous forest
ɷ 
Christmas tree farms
ɷ 
Disturbed wetland
ɷ 
Dug out pond
ɷ 
Exposed soil
ɷ 
Flood plain
ɷ 
Gravel/soil roads
ɷ 
Hay field
ɷ 
Herbs/grasses
ɷ 
Impervious man-
made
ɷ 
Lawns &
Landscaping
ɷ 
Logged areas
ɷ 
Mixed forest
ɷ 
Natural wetland
ɷ 
Rock
ɷ 
Residential
med/high-density
ɷ 
Residential low-
density
ɷ 
Residential forested
ɷ 
Shrubs
Access for
Livestock
ɷ 
Many
ɷ 
Few
ɷ 
None
ɷ 
Unknown
Riparian Band
Width
ɷ 
Number of metres
Segment Gradient
ɷ 
Number of Degrees
Bank Slope
ɷ 
Number of degrees
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested