display first page of pdf as image in c# : Rotate single page in pdf SDK application API wpf html winforms sharepoint 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks6-part118

Module 3 - 51
Stream
Characteristic
(Section)
Categories
Riparian
Characteristic
(Section)
Categories
Bars
ɷ 
Longitudinal
or Crescentic
(LC)
ɷ 
Transverse
(TR)
ɷ 
Medial (ME)
ɷ 
Diagonal (DI)
ɷ 
Point or
Lateral (PT)
ɷ 
None (NO)
Riparian
Structural Stage
ɷ 
Low shrubs [<2 m]
ɷ 
Tall shrubs [2−10 m]
ɷ 
Sapling [>10 m]
ɷ 
Young forest
ɷ 
Mature forest
ɷ 
Old forest
Substrate
Composition
ɷ 
Organic
ɷ 
Fines
ɷ 
Gravel
ɷ 
Cobble
ɷ 
Boulder
ɷ 
Bedrock
Record
percentages
of each substrate
material
Presence of
Snags
ɷ 
None
ɷ 
<5
ɷ 
≥5
Substrate
Compaction
ɷ 
Low
ɷ 
Medium
ɷ 
High
Presence of
Veteran Trees
ɷ 
None
ɷ 
< 5
ɷ 
≥ 5
Channel
Dimensions
ɷ 
Bankfull width (m)
ɷ 
Wetted width (m)
ɷ 
Active floodplain width (m)
ɷ 
Bankfull depth (m)
ɷ 
Unstable banks
Density of Shrubs
ɷ 
0−5 %
ɷ 
6−33%
ɷ 
34−66%
ɷ 
67−100%
Bank Stability
ɷ 
High, medium, or
low
Dominant Bank
Material
ɷ 
Fines
ɷ 
Gravel
ɷ 
Cobble
ɷ 
Boulder
ɷ 
Bedrock
Instream Cover
ɷ 
Total cover, and percentages of:
ɷ 
Boulder (B)
ɷ 
Deep pools (DP)
ɷ 
Instream vegetation (IV)
ɷ 
Large woody debris (LWD)
ɷ 
Overstream vegetation (OV)
ɷ 
Small woody debris (SWD)
ɷ 
Undercut bank (UB)
Top of Bank
ɷ 
Riparian band edge
represents the
estimated top of
bank
ɷ 
Riparian band edge
does not represent
top of bank
3.8.1  Primary Class
The  primary  class  divides  the  channel  character  into  the  following
categories:
Natural
Culvert
Channelized
Modified
Ditch
Discontinued
Flume
Other
Natural Stream
These are watercourses that historically have not been altered or have not
recently been altered. They can be high-gradient (e.g., in ravines) or low-
gradient (e.g., on farmland), and are characterised by having one or more
of the following characteristics:
ɷ  meandering channel or thalweg;
ɷ  riparian vegetative cover;
ɷ  instream submergent and emergent aquatic vegetation;
Rotate single page in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf pages; pdf reverse page order
Rotate single page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate one page in pdf reader
Module 3 - 52
ɷ  pool and/or riffle habitat;
ɷ  variations in channel bed morphology (e.g., organic materials,
sands, gravels, or combinations thereof);
ɷ  evidence of water flow at any time of the year;
ɷ  limited evidence of channelling, relocation, or other
manipulation of the watercourse;
ɷ  likely to support aquatic invertebrates.
Figure 3.6  A natural undisturbed stream channel.
Channelized or Relocated Watercourse
Channelized watercourses are permanent or relocated streams that have
been  diverted,  dredged,  straightened,  or  dyked.  They  can  be
distinguished from constructed watercourses by having more than one of
the following characteristics:
ɷ  have headwaters and may transport water from a spring or
natural wet area;
ɷ  are an integral part of the natural drainage and often have
good fish habitat;
ɷ  likely to have aquatic vegetation growth and support aquatic
invertebrates;
ɷ  have straight channels which may show signs of natural
channel processes (e.g., meandering, pool, and riffle
development) if left undisturbed for a number of years; and
ɷ  typically flow along property or field boundaries.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to rotate all pages in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf and save
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
pdf rotate pages separately; pdf rotate single page reader
Module 3 - 53
Figure 3.7  A channelized disturbed stream channel.
Ditch or Constructed Watercourse
Constructed watercourses (ditches) carry water from local surface areas
or  subsurface  drains,  usually  have  no  headwaters,  and  may  be
permanently or intermittently wetted. Ditches are excavated watercourses
that have been constructed primarily for the purpose of removing excess
water from farmland in order to improve crop production and farm
viability. During the summer months these channels may also be a source
of irrigation water for farmland. Constructed ditches include:
Dry Ditches – These channels are dry during the summer and early fall,
and are constructed mainly for allowing heavy winter rainfalls to drain
quickly from fields.  They  usually  do not support aquatic  vegetation
growth. Ditches that are normally dry, but which temporarily impound
water for irrigation, can be considered dry ditches. Irrigation channels
have the following characteristics:
ɷ  the presence of in-channel weirs, dams, stop-logs or other
structures which stop water flow and store it for irrigation;
ɷ  the presence of near bankfull water levels during portions of
the summer months.
Wet Ditches − these ditches are wet all year-round and carry water for
drainage and irrigation purposes. If a constructed ditch intercepts an
underground spring, special circumstances may apply. Groundwater-fed
channels have special habitat protection and mitigation considerations
because of the constant cool water temperatures that tend to attract
salmonids.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf expert rotate page; reverse pdf page order online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Single page. View PDF in single page display mode
rotate individual pages in pdf; pdf rotate one page
Module 3 - 54
Figure 3.8  An agricultural ditch / stream channel (dry above, wetted below).
Flume
A flumed section of stream runs through a concrete or metal channel.
Although there is generally little or no fish cover in a flumed section, it
may still allow fish passage if it has an appropriate gradient, water level,
and water velocity.
Figure 3.9  A flumed section of stream channel.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
pdf rotate page; rotate pages in pdf expert
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; how to reverse pages in pdf
Module 3 - 55
Culvert
A culvert is a pipe through which water passes beneath a roadway, trail,
railway track, or similar transportation corridor. Culverts are generally
made of concrete or corrugated metal, and are most often round in cross-
section, although square and “horseshoe” types are also used (see Fig.
3.24).
Figure 3.10  A culverted section of stream channel.
Modified Watercourse
Modified watercourses are those which have been altered from their
natural  state,  but  which  cannot  easily  be  classified  as  channelized
watercourses, ditches, flumes, or culverts.
Discontinued Watercourse
Channels deemed to be “discontinued” or lost have been filled in, de-
watered, or flow into or out of a pipe connected to an underground storm
drainage system. Usually the loss is due to human activities, but streams
may also be discontinued due to major natural events (e.g., landslides) or
climate changes (e.g., diminished local rainfall for several successive
years).
3.8.2  Secondary Class
The  secondary  classes  further  subdivide  the  primary  classes  into
additional categories, which are optional and should only be used under
applicable circumstances:
Beaver pond
Side channel
Ephemeral
Wetland
Flumed
Other
Intermittent
Beaver Ponds
A beaver pond is a specific type of natural channel in which a pond has
formed behind a dam built by beavers (
Castor canadensis
) (See Fig. 3.30).
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf rotate just one page; rotate pdf pages by degrees
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
pdf rotate single page; rotate pages in pdf
Module 3 - 56
Ephemeral
Ephemeral streams flow briefly after periods of local precipitation, or
during the spring freshet (snow-melt) but remain dry for the rest of the
time because their channels are entirely above the water table.
Figure 3.11  An ephemeral stream channel (dry - late summer).
Intermittent
Intermittent streams flow seasonally when groundwater levels (baseflows)
rise, or when seasonally flowing springs feed the channels. Ephemeral
and intermittent streams contribute to the overall water quantity and
quality of the stream system and should be mapped even when dry.
Perennial
Perennial streams flow year round.
Side Channel
Side channels provide important off-channel rearing or overwintering
habitat for salmonids and other species. They are connected to the main
channel seasonally or year-round at both the upstream and downstream
ends. There are generally four types:
ɷ  Flood − an intermittently flowing channel that normally dries
up in periods of lower flows. It is associated with gravel bars
adjacent to river mainstems. These channels usually have little
debris or vegetative cover, and are subject to the flushing
effect of peak flows. They generally lack stability, and may
change location from one year to the next.
ɷ  Active − a side channel that typically flows year-round, which
has a well-established riparian zone and contains large woody
debris (LWD) cover, and is often protected from the full effect
of peak flows by logjams or berms at the inlet end.
ɷ  Back − a perennial channel that usually contains standing
water on a permanent basis, and is directly open to slowly
Module 3 - 57
flowing (i.e., zero gradient) mainstem streams. Also known as
“finger” side channels.
ɷ  Relic − represents historic locations of where the mainstem
once flowed before shifting its course. Also known as
“oxbows." These channels do not generally respond to
mainstem flow fluctuations; water levels are commonly
controlled by the water table or by tributaries flowing in. They
are often developed for improved fish production because
they are not at risk from flooding.
Figure 3.12  Side channel types associated with a main stream channel.
Wetland
A wetland is an area inundated with water for all of part of the year,
characterised  by  water-saturated  soils  and  water-tolerant  vegetation.
Wetlands are vital to healthy stream ecosystems as they provide habitat
essential to fish and wildlife, reduce the impacts of floods and droughts,
and act as filters for sediment and chemicals. Seasonally, fields in low-
lying floodplain areas may flood and become wetlands, providing critical
off-channel or refuge habitat for rearing fish as well as open-water habitat
for birds. The perimeter of the area of influence of water should be
mapped.  The area of  influence is  determined by vegetation that is
dependent on wet soils.
Five  types  of  wetlands  are  distinguished  by  the  National  Wetlands
Working  Group  (although  it  should  be  noted  that  other  wetland
definitions exist:
ɷ  Swamps − forested wetlands (deciduous or coniferous trees,
shrubs, herbs and mosses) with standing or slow-moving
water in pools or channels.
Typical plant species: mountain alder, willows, western
red cedar, spruce, willows, skunk cabbage, lady fern, high
bush cranberry, horsetail.
ɷ  Bogs − peatlands with water table at or near surface, treed or
untreed, covered with sphagnum moss and heath shrubs.
Bogs are generally drier than fens.
Module 3 - 58
Typical plant species:   Labrador tea, bog- cranberry/
laurel/rosemary, creeping snowberry, sundew, cloudberry,
black spruce, shore pine.
ɷ  Fens − peatlands with water table at or above the substrate
surface, some shrubs, few trees, covered with brown-moss
peat, sedges, grasses, and reeds.
Typical plant  species:  water sedge,  marsh  cinquefoil,
hardhack, willow, sweet gale, golden fuzzy, fen moss.
ɷ  Ponds − shallow-water wetlands where at least 75% of the total
area is open water during the summer, and depth is less than
2 m. Also called pools, shallow lakes, oxbows.
Typical plant species: milfoils, pond-lilies, pondweeds,
watershield.
ɷ  Marshes - periodically flooded wetlands with standing or slow-
moving water that fluctuates in level seasonally, edged by
grassy meadows and narrow bands of trees and shrubs.
Typical  plant  species:  emergent  vegetation  such  as
cattails, bulrushes, grasses, horsetail.
3.8.3  Hydraulic Type
These categories help to define the dominant hydraulic type of each
stream segment:
beaver pond
riffle
wetland
riffle/pool
slough
cascade
standing
cascade/pool
pool
falls
run
other
Beaver Pond
Beaver ponds are areas of water impounded by a beaver dam (see Section
3.10.3, Beaver Dam). They typically contain standing water.
Wetland
Wetlands may or may not have visible surface water. When present,
surface water may appear to be standing (i.e., swamps, ponds, bogs,
marshes), or may show a slight flow (i.e., fens; see Section 3.10.1,
Wetland).
Slough
Water flows sluggishly or slowly through an area of low swampy ground.
Standing
A zero-gradient area where water is present, but there is no apparent
flow.
Module 3 - 59
Pool
Portions of a watercourse with reduced current velocity at low flow,
usually with deeper water than the surrounding areas.
Run
An area of swiftly flowing water, without surface waves, where the flow
appears to be uniform.
Riffle
A shallow set of rapids, where the water flows swiftly over completely or
partly submerged materials to produce surface agitation.
Riffle/Pool
A section of a watercourse with an undulating channel bed, characterised
by a repeating sequence of riffles and pools.
Cascade
A high-gradient section of stream, where the substrate is large (e.g., large
cobbles, boulders, bedrock), where water flows over and among substrate
particles.
Cascade/Pool
A stream section characterised by a regular sequence of high-gradient
cascades, separated by pools.
Falls
Free-falling water that drops vertically, or nearly vertically over an
obstruction.
3.8.4  Crown Closure
The term crown closure refers to the total percentage of land surface
covered by treed vegetation. One way to visualize crown closure is to
imagine a forest on a very bright, sunny day with the sun directly
overhead. The percentage of shadow cast on the ground is roughly
equivalent to the crown closure. For example, a very dense old-growth
forest might have 80 or 90% crown closure, while an area dominated by
blackberry with only a few scattered red alder and cottonwood might
have crown closure of only 5 or 10%.
Methods:  Obtain a visual estimate of crown closure. This is most easily
and accurately accomplished by determining first whether the vegetation
crown (or canopy) covers less than or greater than 50% of the surface
area. Then, split the estimate in half again (e.g., if it is clear that the
canopy covers less than 50%, determine whether it covers less than or
greater than 25%.)  Continue this process until you arrive at a reasonable
estimate. Have each field crewmember arrive at their own estimate of
crown closure and compare the results.
Module 3 - 60
Adjust as necessary to compromise on the estimates, and place the
measurement into one of the following categories:
ɷ  <1
ɷ  1–20
ɷ  21–40
ɷ  41–70
ɷ  71–90
ɷ  >90
Note: Visually estimating canopy closure can be subject to observer bias.
To  provide  a  more  quantitative  estimate  use  a  densitometer.  This
instrument uses a curved mirror inscribed with a grid measure area of
overhead vegetation cover.
3.8.5  Gradient
Gradient is a measure of the average slope of a stream segment, that is,
its rate of change in vertical elevation per unit of horizontal distance.
Gradient must be measured in a section of watercourse at least 60 m
long or along the longest sighting within the segment. However, sighting
distances along many small watercourses with thick riparian vegetation
may be 30 m or less. Therefore, where visibility is restricted, sightings in
both upstream and downstream directions can be taken from a given
point to maximize the length of watercourse used to calculate gradient.
For systematic surveys, at least 3–4 gradient measurements should be
taken and the average calculated for the segment. Gradient should be
expressed as a single measurement for the entire site.
Gradient can be measured using:
ɷ   surveyor’s level and stadia rod,
ɷ  Abney level, or
ɷ  clinometer.
Duplicate readings and measurements from both the upstream and
downstream observers will improve the accuracy of clinometer
measurements.
Figure 3.13  Channel gradient illustrated across successive stream segments.
Gradient <1.0%
Gradient >5.0%
Gradient 2.0%
Gradient 3.0%
1
2
3
4
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested