display first page of pdf as image in c# : Rotate pages in pdf and save SDK application service wpf azure .net dnn Artwork0-part1170

AUTHOR
ARTWORK
INSTRUCTIONS
Version 1.2
July 2012
Dear Author,
Help us reproduce your artwork to the highest 
possible standards in both paper and digital 
formats.
Submitting your illustrations, pictures, and other 
artwork (such as multimedia and supplementary 
files) in an electronic format helps us produce 
your work to the best possible standards, 
ensuring accuracy, clarity and a high level of 
detail.
These pages show how to prepare your artwork 
for electronic submission and include informa-
tion on image types, color, sizing and other 
relevant background information.
About the Elsevier WebShop
Elsevier’s WebShop offers a range of products and servic-
es at all stages of the publishing process to support and 
professionalize scien瑩fic research and its presenta瑩on.
The WebShop provides anything from language 
edi瑩ng services for your manuscripts up to 
reprin瑩ng services including personal copies of 
Elsevier published ar瑩cles and journal issues.
• Ar瑩cle services
• Language edi瑩ng
• Illustra瑩on services
• Subscrip瑩ons
• Special content
To learn more about all our offerings take a tour through 
the site and we hope to find your interest.
Figure manipulation
Whilst it is accepted that authors sometimes need to manipu-
late images for clarity, manipulation for purposes of deception 
or fraud will be seen as scientific ethical abuse and will be 
dealt with accordingly.
For graphical images, journals published by Elsevier apply 
the following policy: no specific feature within an image may 
be enhanced, obscured, moved, removed, or introduced.
Adjustments of brightness, contrast, or color balance are 
acceptable if and as long as they do not obscure or eliminate 
any information present in the original. Nonlinear adjustments 
(e.g. changes to gamma settings) must be disclosed in the 
figure legend.
Did you visit Elsevier’s
One stop resource for scientists
We offer support and advancement of your 
research at all stages of the publica瑩on process.
Did you visit Elsevier’s
WebShop
Artwork Guidelines
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Contact
Generic Information
Products    Alerts     
User Resource s  
About Us
Support & Contact
Elsevier Websites
ELSEVIER
Rotate pages in pdf and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate individual pages in pdf; save pdf rotated pages
Rotate pages in pdf and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf expert rotate page; pdf rotate single page
Recommended file formats
Elsevier recommends that only EPS, PDF, TIFF 
or JPEG formats are used for electronic artwork. 
Microsoft Office files (Word, Excel and Power-
Point) are also accepted. See artwork guidelines 
for further details.
EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) is the preferred 
format for vector graphics (charts, graphs, tech-
nical drawings, annotated images).
Adobe Acrobat PDF format (PDF) is an increas-
ingly common file format used for distribution of 
files intended primarily for printing, this format can 
also be used for the submission of any artwork 
type to Elsevier.
TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) is the recom-
mended file format for bitmap (line art), grayscale 
and color halftone images.
JPEG files are accepted for grayscale and color 
halftone images (photographs, micrographs, etc.).
MS Office files (Word, Excel and PowerPoint): 
Microsoft Office® is essentially a family of appli-
cations that can be used to produce a variety of 
document types, including written documents, 
spreadsheets, presentations and databases.  
Although we prefer artwork files in EPS, PDF, 
TIFF or JPEG format, we are also aware that 
a number of authors already (for convenience) 
submit their artwork in MS Office formats. There-
fore, we will continue to support these submission 
types, now and in the future.
Image from other applications
Almost all other common imaging programs allow 
you to export graphs and images in all kinds of 
formats.
Normally you can either do a Save As action or 
an Export Images As action, and select a proper 
document type, such as EPS or TIFF.
For EPS export you are likely asked for post-
script version (choose the highest level shown) 
and inclusion of fonts (choose for all fonts to be 
embedded). Some applications may not provide 
you with these export actions but do allow 
export to PDF, or perhaps it is possible to print 
to the Adobe PDF virtual printer if you have that 
installed. Please check the export options or PDF 
printer settings to ensure that images are not 
downsampled.
For TIFF export you are likely asked for an output 
resolution, then pick the highest one from the list 
or fill in for a graph 1000 dpi and others 500 dpi.
If all of the above is not possible, then please 
embed your image as an image object in 
Microsoft Word.
Font information
To ensure that the published version (in print 
and online) matches your electronic source file 
as closely as possible, make sure that you only 
use the following recommended fonts (Type 1 or 
TrueType) in the creation of your artwork, where 
possible:
•  Arial (or Helvetica)
•  Courier
•  Symbol
•  Times (or Times New Roman)
If your artwork contains other, non-standard 
fonts, Elsevier may substitute these fonts with an 
Elsevier standard font (to match the style of the 
journal), and that may lead to problems such as 
missing symbols or overlapping type.
File naming
To enable Elsevier to easily identify author source 
files please ensure numbering, type and format is 
reflected in the file name. Some examples:
•  FIG1.TIF = figure 1 in TIFF format
•  SC4.EPS = scheme 4 in EPS format
•  PL2.TIF = plate 2 in TIFF format
Always ensure that the file extension is present to 
enable quick and easy format identification.
• 
Recommended File Formats
• 
Font Information
• 
File Naming
•Recommended file formats
•Font Information
•File naming
Generic Information
1/1
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
how to rotate one page in pdf document; pdf rotate single page and save
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate individual pdf pages reader
Sizing of artwork
Elsevier’s aim is to have a uniform look for all 
artwork contained in a single article. It is impor-
tant to be aware of the journal style, as some of 
our publications have special instructions beyond 
the common guidelines given here. Please check 
the journal-specific Guide for Authors.
As a general rule, the lettering on the artwork 
should have a finished, printed size of 7 pt for 
normal text and no smaller than 6 pt for subscript 
and superscript characters. Smaller lettering 
will yield text that is hardly legible. This is a 
rule-of-thumb rather than a strict rule. There 
are instances where other factors in the artwork 
(e.g., tints and shadings) dictate a finished size of 
perhaps 10 pt.
When Elsevier decides on the size of a line art 
graphic, in addition to the lettering, there are 
several other factors to assess. These all have 
a bearing on the reproducibility/readability of 
the final artwork. Tints and shadings have to be 
printable at finished size. All relevant detail in the 
illustration, the graph symbols (squares, triangles, 
circles, etc) and a key to the diagram (explaining 
the symbols used) must be discernible.
Sizing of halftones (photographs, micrographs, 
etc) can normally cause more problems than 
line art. It is sometimes difficult to know what an 
author is trying to emphasize on a photograph, so 
you can help us by identifying the important parts 
of the image, perhaps by highlighting the relevant 
areas on a photocopy. The best advice that we 
give to our graphics suppliers is to not over-
reduce halftones, and pay attention to magnifi-
cation factors or scale bars on the artwork and 
compare them with the details given in the artwork 
itself. If a collection of artwork contains more 
than one halftone, again make sure that there is 
consistency in size between similar diagrams. 
Halftone/line art combinations are difficult to size, 
as factors for one may be detrimental for the 
other part. In these cases, the author can help by 
suggesting an appropriate final size for the combi-
nation (single, 1.5, two column).
Number of pixels versus resolution and print 
size, for bitmap images
Image resolution, number of pixels and print size 
are related mathematically:  
Pixels = Resolution (DPI) × Print size (in inches)
Target size
Image width
300 DPI
500 DPI
1000 DPI
Minimal size
30 mm
354
591
1181
Single column
90 mm
1063
1772
3543
1.5 column
140 mm
1654
2756
5512
Full width
190 mm
2244
3740
7480
300 DPI for halftone images; 500 DPI for combi-
nation art; 1000 DPI for line art.
240 mm
This general sizing indication can be used for the most 
forthcoming Elsevier journals.  
Example image size
One and a half page width
+/- 140 mm width 
Example image size
Small column size
+/- 90 mm width 
Example image size
Full page width
+/- 190 mm 
•Sizing of artwork
•Line art images
•Grayscale images
•Color images
•Combination art
•Figure captions
•Accepted file formats
•Checklist
•Images downsampled in PDF
Artwork Guidelines
1/4
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
pdf reverse page order; rotate all pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
pdf rotate just one page; rotate single page in pdf file
Line art - EPS (vector based)
Vector graphics formats are complementary to 
raster graphics (images as an array of pixels, like 
photographs).
A vector image does not use pixels in images but 
mathematical expressions (e.g., “draw a line with 
this color and thickness between these two coor-
dinates”). Such images are typically graphs, bar 
charts, chemical formulae, and plots (pure vector 
images, and resolution independent).
Hybrid vector images are annotated bitmap 
images like photographs. Such a hybrid vector 
image can, for instance, be created in MS 
PowerPoint, when you import an image (bitmap) 
and then annotate that image with text, lines and 
arrows.
Most drawing programs offer an EPS “Save As 
...” option. MS Office documents are treated as 
hybrid vector artwork by Elsevier.
Requirements
•  Always include a preview/document thumbnail
•  Always include/embed fonts and use the 
recommended fonts where possible: Arial, 
Helvetica, Courier, Times, Symbol
•  No data should be present outside the actual 
illustration area
•  Line weights range from 0.10 pt to 1.5 pt
Line art - TIFF (bitmap)
This is the artwork type commonly used for 
graphs and charts. Information contained in black 
and white line art images is purely black and white 
with no tints or gradations present in the image.
A bitmap is an image format that defines an image 
only in terms of black and white. A bitmapped 
image is used normally for line art because its 
elements can only be black and white, unlike a 
grayscale image.
Line art should comply with the following require-
ments regardless of the software and hardware 
used during the process.
Requirements
•  Images should be in Bitmap (black and white) 
mode
•  Images should have a minimum resolution of 
1000 dpi (or 1200 dpi if the image contains very 
fine line weights)
•  Images should be tightly cropped
•  If applicable please re-label your artwork with a 
font recommended by Elsevier and ensure it is 
an appropriate font size
•  Save your image in TIFF format
Grayscale images in TIFF/JPEG format
Grayscale images are distinct from black-and-
white images, which in the context of computer 
imaging are images with only two colors, black 
and white. Grayscale images have many shades 
of gray in between.
In computing, a grayscale image is an image in 
which the value of each pixel is a single sample, 
that is, it carries the full (and only) information 
about its intensity.
Grayscale is an image type that defines how 
the information in the image is to be stored and 
imaged. A grayscale image is sometimes referred 
to as an eight-bit image. This format is generally 
used for halftones because it stores the informa-
tion for each pixel as a level of gray. There are 
256 levels of gray in a halftone.
Requirements
•  Images should be in grayscale mode
•  Images should have a minimum resolution of 
300 dpi
•  Images should be tightly cropped
•  If applicable please re-label your artwork with a 
font recommended by Elsevier and ensure it is 
an appropriate font size
•  Save your image in TIFF format (or as JPEG, 
maximum quality)
•Sizing of artwork
•Line art images
•Grayscale images
•Color images
•Combination art
•Figure captions
•Accepted file formats
•Checklist
•Images downsampled in PDF
Artwork Guidelines
2/4
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
rotate pdf page and save; rotate all pages in pdf and save
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Steps to Rotate image.
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate a pdf page
RGB images in TIFF/JPEG format
RGB images are made of three color chan-
nels (Red, Green, Blue). An 8-bit per pixel RGB 
image has 256 possible values for each channel 
which means it has over 16 million possible color 
values. RGB images with 8 bits per channel are 
sometimes called 24-bit images (8 bits x 3 chan-
nels = 24 bits of data for each pixel).
RGB artwork should comply with the following 
requirements regardless of the software and 
hardware used in the process.
Requirements
•  Images should be in RGB mode, preferably.
•  Images should have a minimum resolution of 
300 dpi.
•  Images should be tightly cropped.
•   If applicable please re-label your artwork with 
a font supported by Elsevier and ensure it is an 
appropriate font size.
•   Save your image in TIFF format (or as JPEG, 
maximum quality).
Combination Art - TIFF/JPEG format
This is an image type that is a combination of 
both a halftone (gray or/and color) and line art 
elements: combination artwork.
The most common occurrences are images where 
the labelling of the image is outside of the half-
tone area, or where there is a graph next to the 
halftone area. The requirements for this particular 
type of image are that the text is as clear as 
possible, with unchanged quality of the halftone. 
The only way to do this is by combining the prop-
erties of the two image types, and this normally 
results in files that are larger.
Combination (line and halftone) artwork should 
comply with the following requirements regardless 
of the software and hardware used in the process.
Requirements
•  The tonal areas of the image should be in RGB 
mode for color (preferably), or grayscale for 
black-and-white halftone images.
•  Resolution 500 dpi.
•  If applicable please re-label your artwork with a 
font supported by Elsevier and ensure it is an 
appropriate font size.
•  Save your image in TIFF format (or as JPEG, 
maximum quality).
Combination Art - EPS format
When vector based images also contain images, 
such as photographs, or line art images, this is 
called combination artwork (hybrid vector images).
The most common cases are images where the 
labelling of the image is outside of the halftone 
area, or where there is a graph next to the half-
tone area. The text should be as clear as possible, 
and the halftone has to have a proper resolution 
(300 (500) dpi for halftones and 1000 dpi for line 
art). The only way to achieve this is by combining 
both image types into a hybrid vector image with 
industry-standard applications like Adobe Illus-
trator, or in MS Office (Word/PowerPoint).
It may be difficult to verify the embedded bitmap 
image’s resolution within the hybrid vector image.
Requirements
•  When color is involved, it should be encoded as 
RGB, preferably.
•  Always include/embed fonts and use the 
preferred fonts (Arial (Helvetica), Courier,  
Symbol, Times (or Times New Roman) where 
possible.
•  No data should be present outside the actual 
illustration area.
•  Line weights range from 0.1 to 1.5 pt.
Artwork Guidelines
3/4
•Sizing of artwork
•Line art images
•Grayscale images
•Color images
•Combination art
•Figure captions
•Accepted file formats
•Checklist
•Images downsampled in PDF
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; pdf page order reverse
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate pages and save
Figure captions
Submit figure captions with your EES submission.
There are a few ways to submit figure captions 
with your submission: (1) if the journal provides 
for a submission item type called Figure Caption, 
submit your caption here in the form of a text file; 
(2) if there is no such submission item type, you 
should list your figure captions at the end of your 
manuscript text file.
Preferred and accepted file formats for 
artwork submission
Applica瑩on/ format
Extension
Accepted
Tagged Image File 
Format (TIFF)
TIF, TIFF
Allowed image format for 
hal晴ones and bitmaps
Joint Photographic 
Experts Group (JPEG)
JPG, JPEG
Allowed image format for 
hal晴ones
Encapsulated Post-
Script  (EPS)
EPS
Allowed image format 
for vector-based images 
(*and embedded images)
Portable Document 
Format  (PDF)
PDF
Allowed format for 
texts, notes, documents, 
vectors
Microso晴 Word
DOC, 
DOCX
Allowed format for texts, 
notes, documents
Microso晴 Excel
XLS, XLSX
Allowed format
Microso晴 Powerpoint
PPT, PPTX
Allowed format
Checklist
Before you submit your artwork, make sure you 
can answer ‘yes’ to the following:
•  My files are in the correct format - EPS, PDF, 
TIFF or JPEG, or Microsoft Office files (Word, 
PowerPoint, Excel).
•  My color images are provided in the preferred 
RGB colorspace (unless the journal’s Guide for 
authors prescribes otherwise).
•  The physical dimensions of the artwork match 
the dimensions of the journal to which I am 
submitting. See Sizing of Artwork.
•  The lettering used in the artwork does not vary 
too much in size. See Sizing of Artwork.
I have used the recommended file-naming 
conventions. See File Naming.
•  All illustrations are provided as separate 
files (unless the journal’s Guide for authors 
prescribes otherwise).
•  All artwork is numbered according to its 
sequence in the text.
•  Figures, schemes and plates have captions 
and these are provided on a separate sheet 
along with the manuscript, in addition all figures 
are referred to in the text.
•  If required, I have specified the preferred 
magnification factor of my artwork on the sheet 
with filenames that accompany the submission.
Are all the rights cleared both for print and elec-
tronic publication?
Please click here to see the guide for Elsevier 
authors to obtain/seek permission to use third 
party material:
Journals Submission Checklist
Please click here for the journals-specific submis-
sion checklist.
Question: I submitted high resolution halftone 
images and bitmap files, but in the PDF they 
are 200 dpi (JPEG) and 800 dpi, why?
All halftone images in the web PDF files are 
downsampled to 200 dpi, to reduce the overall file 
size. Bitmap images in the PDF are reduced to 
800 dpi for the same reason.
Please note that the high-resolution image is 
available separately on our web platforms in the 
HTML rendering of the article via dedicated links.
The smaller Web PDF file size allows for easier 
handling (e-mail, downloads from websites, etc.). 
For print the full resolution of the image file will be 
used, of course.
Artwork Guidelines
4/4
•Sizing of artwork
•Line art images
•Grayscale images
•Color images
•Combination art
•Figure captions
•Accepted file formats
•Checklist
•Images Downsampled in PDF
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Illustration Services
Elsevier WebShop, the one stop resource for 
publishing related services, provides easy access 
to experienced scientific and medical illustra-
tors. Our long history of publishing peer-reviewed 
journals will ensure that your illustrations are 
matching all submission requirements.
Elsevier illustration services offers:
DFree quote in 24 business hours
DEasy self-service website
DFast turnaround times and delivery
DKeep your illustration’s Copyrights
DPrices starting from $35 / € 25 / ¥ 2600
DSecure payment
Why should you choose Elsevier?
DProfessional, experienced illustrators
DFast, easy review and commenting
DGuided by Elsevier publishing expertise
DSubject matter expertise
Click on image to visit Elsevier’s WebShop for 
information about this illustration services and 
more
Illustration service gallery
View the sample catalogue and get an idea of our 
work. Choose the category of services that comes 
closest to what you have in mind with your illustra-
tions. We can always provide our expert advice if 
needed.
Keep in mind that the sample catalogue is only 
showing a small portion of our capabilities. We 
can do a lot more.
Before    After
Before    After
Before    After
Before    After
Before    After
Samples
One stop resource for scientists
We offer support and advancement of your research 
at all stages of the publica瑩on process.
•Illustration Services
•Illustration service gallery
•Samples
Illustration Services
Did you visit Elsevier’s
Medical
Technical
Technical
Graphs & Charts
Scientific
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Dear Author,
Help us reproduce your multimedia content to the 
highest possible standards.
These pages show how to prepare your multimedia 
files for electronic submission and include informa-
tion on common problems and suggestions on how 
to ensure the best results.
Instructions for submitting video content to be 
include within the body of an article
Authors who have video and/or audio clips that they 
wish to submit with their article are strongly encour-
aged to include these within the body of the article. 
This can be done in the same way as a figure or 
table by referring to the multi-media content and 
noting in the body text where it should be placed 
with its associated caption.
Please note: Since video and audio cannot be 
embedded in the print version of the journal, the 
author should provide text for both the electronic and 
the print version for the portions of the article that 
refer to the multimedia content.
All submitted files should be properly labelled so 
that they directly relate to the file’s content. This will 
ensure that the files are fully searchable by users.
Instructions for submitting multimedia as 
supplementary data
If the content being submitted is truly “supplemen-
tary” (not essential to the content of the article or 
only of supplementary interest to the reader), it 
can be included as Supplementary Content, i.e., 
accessible only electronically via an active link in the 
article.
Note: Multimedia files included as Supplementary 
Content should be referred to at an appropriate place 
in the text. If this is not done, any Supplementary 
Content will be referred to in an appendix without 
specifying exactly what it is.
Supplying thumbnail images
For videos, authors should choose a relevant frame 
still (thumbnail) from the actual video clip that they 
feel is representative of the content of the video. 
This will be used as an image that ScienceDirect 
users can click on to start playback of the video. This 
should be done at the time of the initial submission of 
the file to ensure a smooth workflow through produc-
tion. The still  image should have the same pixel 
dimensions as the source video file.
For audio clips, authors can optionally include a 
thumbnail image that they feel is representative of 
the content of the audio clip. For example, a photo-
graph of a bird could be used for a sound clip of bird 
song.
Example of a photograph which can be used for a sound 
clip
Example of a frame still used for a video clip
•Instructions  for submitting multimedia to be included within the body of an article
•Instructions for submitting multimedia as supplementary data
•Supplying thumbnail images
•Elsevier preferred specifications
•Recommended upper limit
•Tips for video abstracts
Multimedia
1/2
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Elsevier preferred specifications
To ensure that the majority of potential users are 
able to access, view and playback the data, Elsevier 
recommends the submission of material in the speci-
fied ‘preferred’ formats.
Audio
Format
Extension
Details
MP3
MP3
MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 format re-
quired; highest possible quality 
required; a
udio bit rate at 
least 128 kbps
Video
Format
Extension
Details
MP4
MP4
Preferred video format; 
H.264+AAC, max target 720p
MPG
MPG
Acceptable video format; 
MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 format 
required; highest possible 
quality required
Apple QuickTime
MOV
Acceptable video format
Microsoft Audio/
Video Interlaced
AVI
Acceptable video format
Compuserve GIF
GIF
Expected to be non-photo-
graphic animation-based data
If submitting video, the following specifications are a 
guideline for authors/contributors
•  Frame rate: 15 frames per second minimum
•  Video codec: H.264 (+AAC) preferred
•  Video Bit rate: at least 260 kbps (750 kbps 
preferred)
•  Recommended frame size: 492x276
•  Duration: no more than 5 minutes
If the software used for the creation of your video(s)/
animation(s) cannot deliver one of the above 
formats, then please save them in one of the 
accepted formats. Any alternative format supplied 
may be subject to conversion (if technically possible) 
prior to online publication.
Recommended upper limit
For ease of download, the recommended upper 
limit for the size of a single video/animation file is 
50 MB. When the size of a single file is bigger than 
this, some users may experience problems when 
downloading.
Tips for making a video abstracts
A video abstract is a type of video in which you 
briefly discuss and explain your paper in a short 
presentation. It should be within the conceptual 
scope of the article and directly support its conclu-
sions. Note that video abstracts are subject to peer 
review.
•  If you decide to use an interview setting, the 
person doing the interview should be someone 
other than the one doing the filming.
•  The person being interviewed doesn’t have to look 
straight at the camera; a slight angle often works 
better.
•  Use a tripod as this will make your video steady.
•  Tell a whole story and talk about your article with 
feeling; act as if you are addressing a class of 
students.
•  Use different techniques, such as animations, to 
explain your article. You can also make scene 
shots of your surroundings like your institute, 
building, environment, etc.
•  Use enough light during recording, but avoid any 
bright light coming from behind the person being 
interviewed (windows, sunlight). A light source 
coming from behind the camera gives the best 
results.
•  Anyone speaking should not stand too close to 
walls to avoid shadow and possible echo effects.
•  Speak clearly and loudly enough for recording. 
Use of a microphone is recommended, but don’t 
place it too close to your mouth: breathing noises 
should be avoided.
•  Clearly state the names of the spokespersons and 
provide legends, titles etc.
•  Edit your video to improve the recording. You can 
make use of software such as Adobe Premiere 
Elements, Windows Movie Maker, iMovie, Final 
Cut Pro, Cinelerra and others.
Many of the points described can be found in videos 
in the following examples:
• 
• 
• 
• 
Multimedia
2/2
•Instructions  for submitting multimedia to be included within the body of an article
•Instructions for submitting multimedia as supplementary data
•Supplying thumbnail images
•Elsevier preferred specifications
•Recommended upper limit
•Tips for video abstracts
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Why don’t you accept PNG files?
We will constantly review technological developments in the 
graphics industry including emerging file formats - new recom-
mended formats will be introduced where appropriate.
Why can’t I supply in native format (CorelDraw, 
ChemDraw etc.)?
We prefer your artwork in TIFF or EPS format because these 
common interchange formats are readable by a wide number 
of applications. Virtually all image creation/manipulation soft-
ware can ‘Save As…’ or ‘Export…’ to these common formats.
Can I supply an EPS file created in CorelDraw?
We only currently accept TIFF files written by CorelDraw which 
are exported at the appropriate resolution: 300 dpi for half-
tones, 500 dpi for combinations (line art and halftone together) 
and 1000 dpi for line art. This is due to know problems with fills 
and patterns when processing such images for print.
Can I supply artwork in Postscript format?
Most of the time Postscript files behave well and can be treated 
just like EPS files. Postscript files can have multiple pages, and 
this can lead to confusion. Please stick to single-page files.
I can’t figure out what the resolution of my figures/
tables is in my MS Word document, where can I find 
this?
Unfortunately it is not possible to check image resolutions in 
MS Word directly. We will provide feedback after acceptance of 
your manuscript.
The figures and tables were primarily created in MS 
Excel.  When I copied and pasted an image into Paint 
it indicated that the resolution was too low
It is not necessary to copy MS Excel figures and/or tables into 
Paint and then export to TIFF. You should submit MS Office 
documents directly, as they are an allowed artwork format 
(hybrid vectors images).
My black and white line art is only 300 dpi, yet your 
site stipulates a minimum of 1000 dpi, can I just 
increase the resolution in Photoshop?
No, increasing the image resolution will never improve the 
quality of the image. It may be possible for us to proceed with 
this image as a grayscale image. If the resolution is too low, the 
image will appear jagged or have a stair-stepped effect. Once 
the print size and resolution has been set, either by scanning or 
by saving in an image-manipulation software package, it cannot 
be upsampled to the desired resolution without affecting the 
quality negatively.
What line weights should I use on my artwork?
Any line work should use a recommended line width of 0.25 pt 
(absolute minimum line width is 0.1 pt), high-quality reproduc-
tion of line work below this width in print cannot be guaranteed 
(lower resolution output devices such as office laser printers 
should not be used as indicators in such cases). For prominent 
lines (e.g. plot lines on graphs) the weight should be approxi-
mately 1 pt.
Can I provide screen dumps as electronic artwork?
Screen dumps are not recommended as artwork, but in some 
cases it is unavoidable, for instance when  you would like to 
illustrate a screen/settings from a software application. You may 
get a low-resolution warning for these images on submission, 
but you may ignore that. It will be helpful if you label these 
images as screen dumps.
I submitted high resolution halftone images, but in the 
PDF they are 200 dpi JPEG, why?
All halftone images are converted and down sampled regard-
less of source file image resolution to a JPEG with a resolution 
of 200 dpi so that the PDF can be send more easily via e-mail 
and is not too large on the web sites. For print purposes, the 
hi-resolution file will be used.
What tints of black should I use on my graphs?
It is recommended that you only use 3 or 4 variations of color or 
tone on one piece of artwork to avoid problems in distinguishing 
between lines - a good alternative is to color all lines solid black 
and use dashed/dotted lines to show a prominent difference.
What colors can I use on my graphs?
If your artwork is to be printed in color then use bold, solid 
colors as those will reproduce well. If your artwork is to be 
printed in black and white you must ensure that a conversion 
will not result in similar shades of gray - if this is the case then 
make use of patterns for boxes or dotted/dashed lines.
Why do you recommend RGB for color artwork?
We ask for RGB in order to ensure that your color artwork can 
be published online at the highest possible quality. RGB is the 
color space that has the highest number of available colors.
I’ve sent “bright and colorful” RGB files, but these 
colors look different in the printed version, how is this 
possible?
As normal, the RGB files will be converted to the CMYK (Cyan, 
Magenta, Yellow, blacK) color space for the print process. The 
CMYK color space has a far smaller ‘gamut’ than RGB, and 
hence it is not possible to accurately produce all RGB colors in 
print (CMYK)
Color Figures
When an accepted paper is received by Elsevier production 
for publication, a letter will be sent to the corresponding author 
advising of the number of figures to be published in color and 
the color costs for that journal. The corresponding author must 
indicate if he wishes to pay for color or if he just wants web 
color. If an author doesn’t respond within a certain number of 
days, the paper will be processed for web color only.
Color Figure Reproduction Charge
For the majority of journals if the author wishes color illustra-
tions to appear as color in print then they much cover part of 
the printing cost. In the online version the figures will appear in 
•Frequently Asked Questions
Frequently Asked Questions
1/2
Illustration Services
Multimedia
FAQ
Glossary
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested