display first page of pdf as image in c# : Rotate pdf pages by degrees SDK Library API wpf .net winforms sharepoint 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks7-part119

Module 3 - 61
3.8.6  Spawning Habitat
Anadromous
Potential
Resident
None
Unknown
If fish spawning is known or observed to occur in the stream segment,
this should be noted as a characteristic of the segment. Alternatively, the
presence of spawning habitat can be recorded as a point feature (see
Section 3.10.6, Spawning Habitat below). You should note if potential
spawning  habitat,  in  the  form  of  suitable  gravel,  is  observed.  An
additional note should be made of whether the habitat is available to
anadromous or resident salmonids (i.e., is there an impassable barrier
downstream). It is assumed that resident populations will exist wherever
anadromous populations are found.
3.8.7  Livestock Access
Record livestock access as an attribute of a stream segment. If the entire
segment is not accessible to livestock it should be recorded as a point
feature only.
Figure 3.14  A stream segment disturbed by livestock.
3.8.8  Bars
Watercourse bars consist of exposed bed materials deposited by the flow
within  the  channel.  Bars  are  sparsely  to  moderately  vegetated,  as
opposed to islands, which are heavily vegetated and more stable. Bar type
may be used to estimate watercourse stability. The dominant bar type for
each site is determined visually and designated as illustrated in Figure
3.14.
Watercourse bars are classified as:
ɷ  Longitudinal and crescentric (least stable) (LC)
ɷ  Transverse (TR)
ɷ  Medial (ME)
Rotate pdf pages by degrees - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pages in pdf and save
Rotate pdf pages by degrees - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
reverse pdf page order online; saving rotated pdf pages
Module 3 - 62
ɷ  Diagonal (DI)
ɷ  Point or lateral (most stable)(PT)
From Church and Jones (1992)
Figure 3.15  Types of gravel – channel bars associated with a stream channel.
3.8.9  Substrate Composition
The stream bed materials or substrates may include a range of different-
sized materials. Visually estimate the percentage of the substrate that is
made up on each class of materials, according to Table 3.5.
Table 3.6  Bed material (substrate) size classes.
Class
Size (mm)
Description
Fines (F)
Clay
Silt & Sand
<2
<0.06
0.06−2
Smaller than ladybug size.
Not gritty between fingers.
Visible as particles, gritty between fingers.
Gravels (G)
Small gravels
Large gravels
2−64
2−16
16−64
Ladybug to tennis ball size.
Cobbles (C)
Small cobbles
Large cobbles
64−256
64−128
128−256
Tennis ball to basketball size.
Boulders (B)
256−4,000
Larger than a basketball.
Rock (R)
>4,000
Includes boulders and blocks larger than 4 m, and bedrock.
Size descriptions from Kaufmann and Robison (1993)
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB In general, you are able to rotate any page of
rotate pages in pdf expert; pdf rotate single page reader
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Roate90: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 90 degrees clockwise. Rotate180: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 180 degrees clockwise.
rotate single page in pdf reader; pdf rotate one page
Module 3 - 63
3.8.10  Substrate Compaction
The  degree  of  compaction  describes  the  relative  looseness  of  bed
material in a reach or habitat unit. This assessment provides an indication
of fish habitat quality, especially with regard to spawning habitat. Visually
assess the degree of substrate compaction as:
ɷ  Low (L),
ɷ  Moderate (M), or
ɷ  High (H)
Compaction is routinely measured by kicking or prodding the substrate
with the foot or other implement at a representative site within the
segment.
3.8.11  Channel Dimensions
A standard SHIM survey involves collection of stream channel wetted,
bankfull and floodplain widths and depths as a general sample of stream
conditions along the channel (see Module 4, Section 4.11 for details).
When channel complexity increases, more detailed SHIM cross section
survey procedures and tools are needed to sample and describe these
channel areas. Cross section and channel dimensions are valuable survey
information to describe watercourses.
Channel dimensions and cross sections are measured with tape measure
stretched perpendicular to the direction of stream flow. Required channel
dimensions include:
ɷ  Bankfull width
ɷ  Wetted widths
ɷ  Active floodplain width
ɷ  Bankfull depth
ɷ  Unstable banks
ɷ  Instream cover.
Channel dimensions and cross-sectional measurements of stream channel
widths, depths and elevations as well as upland riparian features are
based on the survey points defined in Figure 3.16.
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx reImage1, 100) REFile.SaveImageFile( reImage1, "c:/rotate.png", New TIFF page(s), reorder TIFF pages ordered or
rotate individual pages in pdf; pdf reverse page order online
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
to rotate all MS Word document pages by 90 viewer application which can help me rotate Word page by powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
Module 3 - 64
Figure 3.16  Channel dimensions and cross-section of a stream showing bankfull
width, wetted width, wetted depth, and bankfull depth (from SHIM Module
4.11.1, Figure 4.5).
Bankfull Width
Bankfull width (W
b
) is the width that the channel would have if it were
flooded  to  the  top  of  its banks  (Fig.  3.16).  Record  the  W
b
of  the
watercourse to the nearest 0.1m.
A number of criteria can be used to define W
b
in the field [see: Fish
Watercourse Identification Guidebook (FPC, 1995), Channel Assessment
Procedure Field Guidebook (FPC, 1996), Stream Field Inventory − Site Card
Field Guide (BC Fisheries, 1999), etc.]. Only those criteria that are relevant
to a particular field site need be used.
Boundaries of the W
b
can be defined in the following ways:
ɷ  a point of transition between the zone without rooted
vegetation and the zone of rooted vegetation. This might
appear as the transition from bare ground to vegetated
ground, from no moss to moss-covered ground, or from bare
ground to grass-covered ground, particularly in range lands;
ɷ  a topographic break from steep valley wall to flat floodplain;
ɷ  a topographic break from steep bank to a more gently sloping
area;
ɷ  the highest point on the bank at which fine woody debris
(needles, leaves, cones, or seeds) deposition occurs; and
ɷ  a change in the texture of deposited sediment (e.g., from clay
to sand, or sand to gravels, or gravels to cobbles).
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial and multi 0 to 360 degrees using VB code; Able to rotate multiple desired Word pages at the
how to rotate just one page in pdf; save pdf rotate pages
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
web viewer, users can click rotation button to rotate PDF page 90, 180 and 270 degrees in clockwise erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online
rotate pdf pages and save; how to rotate pdf pages and save
Module 3 - 65
To measure the W
b
of a watercourse:
ɷ  Use a fibre survey chain or nylon tape measure for all length
measurements.
ɷ  Include all unvegetated gravel bars in the measurement. These
generally show signs of recent scouring or deposition.
ɷ  Where multiple channels are separated by one or more
vegetated islands, the width is the sum of all the separate
channel widths. The islands are excluded from the width
measurement.
ɷ  Widths should be measured at right angles to the direction of
flow at a minimum of six sites, taken at equally spaced
intervals. The interval between measurement stations should
be approximately equal to the channel width at the first
measurement.
ɷ  Generally, watercourse widths should not be taken near
watercourse crossings, unusually wide or narrow areas [e.g.,
impoundments or disturbances; see the 
Fish-Stream
Identification Guidebook
(FPC, 1995)]. However, width
estimates for these areas should be outlined in the comments
section of the Site Card.
Wetted Width
Measure the wetted width of the watercourse to the nearest 0.1m (Fig.
3.16). Wetted width is the width of the wetted portion of the channel,
measured at right angles to the direction of flow. If multiple channels
occur, then the separate widths should be added together, [refer to the
Riparian Management Area Guidebook
(FPC, 1995) and the 
Fish-Stream
Identification Guidebook
(FPC, 1995)]. Water beneath undercut banks,
protruding  rocks,  logs,  stumps,  and  bars  surrounded  by  water  are
included in the wetted width measurement.
Active Floodplain Width
The presence of flood signs indicates the extent of historic flooding
events, where the watercourse’s flow has exceeded its bankfull channel
capacity. Typical flood signs are debris on the banks outside the bankfull
width, recent scarring of trees or other vegetation, and newly deposited
fluvial sediments on the forest floor, tree trunks, or vegetation. Using a
metre stick or other measuring rod, measure the height (in metres) of the
flood signs above the bankfull height. Using a fibre tape or tight chain,
measure the horizontal extent that the flood signs extend beyond the W
b
on each side of the channel. Sum these measurements with the W
b
to
determine the active floodplain width.
Document under “comments” the type of flooding evidence observed.
Bankfull Depth
Record the bankfull depth of the watercourse to the nearest 0.1m (Fig.
3.16). Bankfull depth is the depth that the watercourse would have if its
channel were flooded to the top of the banks.
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Click "Flip Vertical" to rotate images 180 degrees vertically; More Tutorials! Find more user guides with RasteEdge .NET Image in .NET Winforms applications!
change orientation of pdf page; rotate pdf pages in reader
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
the order of images & file pages by dragging & used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page This JavaScript API is used to rotate the current
reverse page order pdf online; rotate all pages in pdf file
Module 3 - 66
To measure the bankfull depth, once you have determined the tops of
both banks (see above), extend a metre tape horizontally across the
channel bed from one bankfull boundary to the other. Use a metre stick
to measure the maximum height between the channel bed and the tape.
Depth should be measured to the nearest 0.1m. The depth of the water at
the  time  of  the  inventory,  or  its  absence,  does  not  affect  this
measurement.  Depending  upon  the  channel  morphology,  this  depth
should be measured at a step-pool break (immediately upstream of a
step) or a riffle-pool crest (immediately upstream of a riffle).
Unstable Banks
Unstable  banks  exhibit  signs  of  failure  (e.g.,  erosion,  slumpage,
trampling). Points of bank erosion along a watercourse normally alternate
from side to side following the meander pattern, or occur at areas of
disturbance,  encroachment,  or  access.  Characteristics  of  unstable,
actively  eroding  banks  include:  raw  appearance,  slumpage  of  bank
material into the channel, steep, non-vegetated dirt banks, and extensive
areas that are trampled and denuded of vegetation due to disturbance
and access.
Figure 3.17  Unstable and eroding stream banks.
Instream Cover
Visually estimate the types and amounts of in-channel cover (Table 3.7)
that are available for fish. Record the total percentage (to the nearest 5%)
of the wetted area of the watercourse that is occupied by cover. Then
estimate the percentages of this total that are occupied by each particular
C# Image: C# Image Web Viewer Processing Tutorial; Process Web Doc
Basic .NET program and process web pages within image In order to rotate a current web image or powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
save pdf rotated pages; rotate one page in pdf reader
Module 3 - 67
type of cover (e.g., deep pool, LWD, boulder, etc.). These component
percentages should also be recorded to the nearest 5%. The sum of cover
components  must  equal  100%.  Cover  therefore  includes  two
measurements: i) the total amount of cover; and ii) the percentage of the
specific cover types within the total amount of cover.
Table 3.7  Watercourse instream cover descriptions.
Type
Description
Deep Pool (DP)
A portion of the watercourse with reduced current velocity at low flow,
deeper than the surrounding area, and usable by fish for resting or
cover (therefore containing some surface cover of flow turbulence).
Large Woody
Debris (LWD)
LWD is any large piece of relatively stable woody material having a
minimum diameter of greater than 10 cm, and a minimum length of
over 2 m, that intrudes into or lies within the bankfull channel. Root
wads are included.
Small Woody
Debris (SWD)
Woody debris smaller than LWD which lies within the bankfull
channel.
Boulder (B)
Watercourse substrate particles >256 mm (10 inches) in diameter that
block watercourse flow to provide surface turbulence, shade and
escape from higher velocity and predation.
Instream
Vegetation (IV)
Vegetative materials such as attached, filamentous algae or other
aquatic plants that provide protection for fish.
Overstream
Vegetation (OV)
Any vegetation that projects over the watercourse that is less than 1 m
above the water surface.
Riparian Areas
The following methods for describing characteristics of riparian areas are
extracted  from  the  Cross-Section  methods  in  Module  4,  with  the
exception of dominant bank material and top-of-bank. The categories for
dominant bank  material  include:  fines,  gravel,  cobble,  boulder,  and
bedrock.
The top-of-bank characteristic should be measured to determine whether
the edge of the riparian band being described also happens to represent
the  estimated  top  of  the  bank.  However,  top-of-bank  is  a  difficult
attribute to  measure  with any degree  of certainty. Nonetheless  this
measurement will assist planners in estimating the location of top of
bank for the purposes of adhering to the provincial 
Fish Protection Act
(REF) and other legislation.
Stage refers to the structural stage of the dominant vegetation, and is
divided into the following categories:
ɷ  low shrubs (height <2 m)
ɷ  tall shrubs (height 2−10 m)
ɷ  sapling (height >10 m)
ɷ  young forest (<40 years)
ɷ  mature forest (40−80 years)
ɷ  old forest (>80 years)
Module 3 - 68
ɷ  The shrub layer of vegetation is critical for many species of
wildlife, providing food and valuable cover. The density of
shrubs is estimated visually and assigned to one of the
following categories:
ɷ  <5%
ɷ  5−33%
ɷ  34−66%
ɷ  67−100%
A mature tree that is significantly older than the dominant forest cover is
referred to as a veteran tree. Providing valuable microhabitat for wildlife,
veteran trees also indicate structural diversity within a vegetated area,
and are an important source of regeneration.
A snag is defined as a dead, standing tree. Snags are used by a variety of
wildlife species, including raptors, woodpeckers, small and mid-sized
mammals, and bats. The presence and approximate quantity of snags
and veteran trees are noted using the following categories:
ɷ  none
ɷ  <5
ɷ  ≥5
3.9  Points Of Reference
The data dictionary allows for several types of point data to be collected. Only
the start and end points of a survey are mandatory, but others can be added
depending on the specific needs of the user. For example, location points and
reference points must be collected if attribute information is collected using field
cards rather than a data dictionary.
ɷ  Start Point – the point where the survey begins.
ɷ  End Point – the point where the survey ends.
ɷ  Location Point – a point recorded to mark the location of a
particular feature or site (e.g., a site where a data card is
completed).
ɷ  Reference Point – a fixed point established to provide a point
of reference from which measurements are taken.
ɷ  Bench Mark – a permanent fixture which provides a reference
point from which measurements are taken.
ɷ  Monument – a permanent and recoverable marker that is set
to establish boundary and area information for record-deed
descriptions, and for plotting parcels of real property.
Monuments are typically metal pins or plates, but stone
markers or wooden pegs may also be used.
ɷ  Map Tie Point – a discrete feature that is recognisable both on
a map (or orthophoto), and in the field, which can be used to
“tie” field data to a known point on a map.
ɷ  Segment Break – the point where one survey segment is
ended, and the next begun.
Module 3 - 69
ɷ  Section Break – the point where one survey section is ended,
and the next begun.
ɷ  Reach Break – the point where one reach ends and the next
begins. A reach has various technical definitions, but is
generally defined as a length of watercourse >100 m long,
that has homogeneous, or regularly repeating (e.g., riffle-pool)
habitat characteristics.
ɷ  Elevation – a point where the height above mean sea level is
measured.
Start and End Points
The start point of the survey must be captured to mark the beginning of the
survey, and should also be recorded at the beginning of each day that the survey
is conducted. An end point marks the end of each day’s survey. At the start and
end points, a minimum of 45 positions must be collected using the GPS. The
location of the first start point must be marked in the field using a semi-
permanent benchmark. This benchmark should consist of a wooden or metal
stake driven into the ground at the downstream boundary of the site. The marker
should be offset 2m from the bankfull channel margin of the left bank. The
benchmark must specify the site and project number, the date, crew, and
company name. Aluminum plates or other methods can be used to provide a
permanent information record.
3.10 Habitat Feature Mapping
Habitat feature mapping can be done most quickly and effectively by using the
SHIM data dictionary and the Trimble Pathfinder GPS unit. Features are point
data, which are nested within line segments. A range of information, including
the type, code and measurements, is required for each feature (Table 3.8).
Module 3 - 70
Table 3.8  Watercourse measurements required for each stream feature type during field mapping.
Feature Type
Code
Bank
Length
Width
Depth
Height
Diam.
H2O
Temp
Slope
(%)
Screen
Size
Other
Waterbody
Tributary >10 m
HMTL
X
X
X
X
X
X
Tributary <10 m
HMTS
X
X
X
X
X
X
Ditch
FRT
X
X
X
X
X
Wetland
HMW
X
X
X
X
X
Side Channel
SC
X
X
X
X
X
Discontinued
Waterbody
HMD
X
X
X
X
X
X
Natural
Springs/Seeps
HMS
X
X
Other Waterbody
HM
X
X
X
X
X
X
Artificial Modification
Dam **
HOD
X
X
X
X (pp)
Dredging
HBDD
X
X
X
Bridge
BR
X
X
X
X
Channelization
HOC
X
X
X
Culvert **
HOCV
X
X
i/a
X (pp)
i/a
X
X
i/a
H2O velocity (m/s)
Retaining Wall/
Bank Stabilization
EHB
X
X
X
Fence **
HOF
X
X
X
X
X
Pipeline Crossing
PL
X
X
X
Other
HOO
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Obstruction
Culvert **
CV
X
X
X
i/a
X (pp)
X
X
i/a
H2O velocity (m/s)
Logjam
X
X
X
X
X
X
Dam **
D
X
X
X
X (pp)
Beaver Dam
BD
X
X
X
X
X
Falls
F
X
X
X
X (pp)
X
Fence **
FE
X
X
X
X
X
Other
OFO
X
X
X
X
X
H2O velocity (m/s)
Discharge
Tile Drain
WPI
X
X
X
X
Storm Drain
WPD
X
X
X
X
Septic Effluent
WPMP
X
X
X
X
Trench
WPE
X
X
X
X
X
Pulp
Mill/Industrial
WPP
X
X
X
X
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested