display first page of pdf as image in c# : How to rotate one pdf page Library application class asp.net html web page ajax 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks8-part120

Module 3 - 71
Feature Type
Code
Bank
Length
Width
Depth
Height
Diam.
H2O
Temp
Slope
(%)
Screen
Size
Other
Effluent
Other
WP
X
X
X
X
X
Existing Enhancement
LWD Placement
LWD
X
X
Incubation Box
ECNX
X
X
X
X
X
Hatchery
ECAH
X
Side
Channel/Pools
EHRS
X
X
X
X
X
Log/Rock Weirs
EHRI
X
X
Riparian
Plantings
EHBP
X
X
Riparian Zone
Fencing
EHBF
X
X
Spawning Gravel
Placements
EHSP
X
X
X
Substrate size/type
Fishway
EOF
X
X
X
X
H2O velocity (m/s)
Rip Rap/Rock
Work
EHBR
X
X
X
Boulder
Placement
(Instream)
EHRR
X
X
Other
Bank Erosion
HCEB
X
X
X
X
Bank composition / substrate
type
Lack of Riparian
Vegetation
WDL
X
X
Describe vegetation class change
Garbage/Pollution
WPB
X
X
X
X
Water Withdrawal
FUW
X
X
Pump Intake
FUP
X
X
Streamside
Grazing
WDG
X
X
X
(Bank)
Livestock
Crossing
WDC
X
X
X
X
X
(Bank)
Water Quality
Issues
W
X
X
X
X
X
Description/type of issue
Deep Pool
DP
X
X (pp)
Large Woody
Debris
LWD
X
Small Woody
Debris
SWD
X
Boulder
B
X
X
How to rotate one pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf file; rotate pages in pdf permanently
How to rotate one pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
reverse page order pdf; pdf reverse page order
Module 3 - 72
Feature Type
Code
Bank
Length
Width
Depth
Height
Diam.
H2O
Temp
Slope
(%)
Screen
Size
Other
Instream
Vegetation
IV
X
Overstream
Vegetation
OV
X
Cutbank
CU
X
X
X
Spawning Habitat
HS
X
X
X
X
X
Substrate size/type
Fish – unknown
species (Visual)
FSH
X
Age class; number observed
Salmonid
(Visual)
SA
X
Age class; number observed
Stickleback
(Visual)
SB
X
Age class; number observed
Sucker (Visual)
SU
X
Age class; number observed
Sculpin (Visual)
CC
X
Age class; number observed
** 
features marked by asterisks are duplicated in both the Artificial Modification and the Obstruction sections. The appropriate choice of code
is dependent on whether the feature is obstructing (Obstruction section) or non-obstructing (Artificial Modification section).
pp –
 plunge pool
i/a –
 if applicable
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying
rotate pdf pages on ipad; rotate single page in pdf reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
pdf save rotated pages; rotate a pdf page
Module 3 - 73
3.10.1  Watercourse Features
Descriptions of many of the waterbody categories are available under the
stream segment section of this module (Section 3.8).
Tributary Confluence (Waterbody) 
Code: HMT
A tributary is a branch of a stream system with a defined channel
containing alluvial substrates. Ephemeral and intermittent channels are
included and may be dry or flowing at the time of the survey. Ephemeral
streams flow in direct response to precipitation and are located above the
groundwater table (Millar et al., 1997). Intermittent streams are located
near the groundwater table and flow when snowmelt, precipitation, or
groundwater seepage raises the level of the water table above the bed of
the channel (Millar et al., 1997).
where to determine
bearing/UTM coordinates
Direction of Stream Flow
main stream
tributary
Figure 3.18  Locations for defining tributaries.
A tributary >10 m in length should be surveyed in its entirety, and logged
as a completely separate stream from the mainstem. If using a GPS data
dictionary, be sure to store the tributary’s features in a separate file from
that of the mainstem. Otherwise, take measurements and continue the
previous survey.
Methods:
ɷ  For tributaries <10 m in length, record them as features, note
their location using GPS, take the necessary measurements
and describe in comments. If the tributary is greater than 10
m in length, it should be mapped separately.
ɷ  It is recommended that all tributaries be mapped at the time
they are encountered. Start a new stream mapping field card
(or GPS file) for this tributary. In order to keep your field notes
(or GPS files) organised, fill out the Tributary ID on each new
field card. This ID should be unique. e.g., While surveying
Hatchery Creek mainstem (ID = H), heading upstream from the
mouth, you came across the first tributary that flows into the
mainstem of Hatchery and noted it as a feature. The ID on the
new field card for this tributary is H-1. The second tributary
that feeds into Hatchery mainstem is labelled H-2, the third is
H-3, and so on. If while surveying tributary H-1, you come
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Support to select PDF document scaling.
how to change page orientation in pdf document; save pdf rotate pages
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
A powerful .NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing in C#.NET. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
rotate pages in pdf expert; rotate all pages in pdf preview
Module 3 - 74
across a tributary feeding into it, the unique ID for that new
tributary would be H-1-1, the second would be H-1-2, and so
on. Note:  Features can be organized in the same way. For
example, H-2-P23 is the 23rd feature point on the field card
(or GPS file) for the 2nd tributary off the main stem of
Hatchery Creek.
ɷ  Conduct a cross-section that effectively represents this
tributary, usually at least 15 m upstream.
ɷ  Once you have completed surveying this tributary system,
return to its confluence with the original watercourse, and
continue with the original survey.
Example:  Hatchery Creek, source: LEPS
Figure 3.19  An example of tributary identification
.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (Left/Right) – facing downstream, note the bank from
which this new tributary enters.
ɷ  Length – you will need to survey the entire tributary before
you can determine this (in special cases you can derive it from
orthophotos, if clearly visible).
ɷ  Width – unless you are conducting a channel cross-section,
record a representative bankfull width.
ɷ  Depth – unless you are conducting a channel cross-section,
record a representative bankfull depth.
ɷ  Height – record only if there is a vertical drop from the
substrate of the tributary channel to the substrate of the
receiving watercourse.
ɷ  Temperature – if water is present, measure 2 m upstream in
both the feature tributary and the receiving watercourse to
determine the potential effect it may have on water
temperature in the receiving watercourse. Record temperature
of the receiving watercourse in the comments.
ɷ  Gradient – should be measured in degrees, between survey
points.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf rotate all pages; how to rotate pdf pages and save
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
to display it. Thus, PDFPage, derived from REPage, is a programming abstraction for representing one PDF page. Annotating Process.
pdf rotate page and save; pdf rotate one page
Module 3 - 75
Ditch (Waterbody ) 
Code: FRT
Description: “Ditches” are defined by DFO as “constructed watercourses
that carry storm flows and provide adequate drainage and irrigation" for
agricultural and roadside areas” (see Section 3.8.1, Ditch or Constructed
Watercourse). They are not fed by headwater areas (i.e., flows from other
ditches, artesian springs, or perched wetlands). Ditches may contain
water year-round (perennial), seasonally when groundwater levels are
high (intermittent), or they may dry up shortly after periods of local
precipitation (ephemeral). They provide potentially valuable off-channel
rearing or refuge habitat for salmonid and other fish species.
Channelized streams differ from ditches in that they convey natural flows
from upstream or headwater areas. Whereas ditches are constructed
solely for drainage purposes, channelized streams are straightened or
realigned natural watercourses. Trenches are miniature ditches.
Methods:
ɷ  Locate this feature at its confluence with the bankfull edge of
the watercourse you are surveying.
ɷ  Record the ditch as a feature (code = FRT).
Check storm drain maps available at your local municipal engineering
department for connections and sources of ditches and storm  drain
outlets. Do not completely rely on these maps as they are sometimes
incorrect.  Your  findings  will  help  to  correct  existing  maps  and
information.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R) – facing downstream on the watercourse you are
surveying, note the bank from which this ditch enters.
ɷ  Length – may be determined from orthophoto map, using
laser range finder or by surveying the ditch.
ɷ  Height – record only if there is a vertical drop from the
substrate of the ditch to the substrate of the receiving
watercourse.
ɷ  Temperature – if water is present, measure 2m upstream in
both the ditch and the receiving watercourse to determine the
potential affect the ditch may have on water temperature in
the receiving watercourse.
ɷ  Gradient (Slope) – should be measured in degrees, in
intervals as it changes.
If the ditch is only being noted as a feature (i.e., it does not provide fish
habitat during any time of the year), take the following measurements,
since a full channel cross-section is only required for a new stream
mapping form:
ɷ  Width – record bankfull width (i.e., the width of the actual
ditch, not of the water in the ditch) and note wetted width in
comments.
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF
rotate pdf pages; how to reverse page order in pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more PDF pages and delete it/them in both .NET web and Windows
rotate individual pdf pages reader; saving rotated pdf pages
Module 3 - 76
ɷ  Depth – record bankfull depth and note wetted depth in
comments.
Comments:
ɷ  along east/west/north/south side of which road or through
which property does the ditch run?
ɷ  substrate (e.g., organic muck, 100% fines, gravel, hard clay,
etc.)
ɷ  type of vegetation growing on the banks, instream, and in
canopy cover.
ɷ  source (a wetland, spring or wooded area, an agricultural field
or strictly road runoff)
ɷ  water quality issues (note oil slicks, algae, turbid or clear
water, soap suds, odour, etc.)
ɷ  potential access for fish (at any time of the year). If the ditch is
dry at time of survey, look for high water marks or rooted
vegetation to determine bankfull water levels. Determine
whether gradient and smoothness of the substrate could
prohibit fish usage due to high water velocities. Could fish
enter the ditch from the adjoining watercourse for refuge
during high flows?
Wetland (Waterbody) 
− 
Code: HMW
Description:  A wetland is an area inundated with water for all or part of
the year, which is characterised  by water-saturated soils and water-
tolerant vegetation (see Section 3.8.2, Wetland). Wetlands are vital to
healthy stream ecosystems, as they provide habitat essential to fish and
wildlife, reduce the impacts of floods and droughts, and act as filters for
sediment and chemicals. Seasonally, fields in low-lying floodplain areas
may flood, providing critical off-channel or refuge habitat for rearing fish
as well as open water habitat for birds.
Methods:
ɷ  It is crucial to identify the location of the wetland. Record the
measurements as listed below.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/Instream/Both) – choose according to whether the
wetland joins the main channel on one of the banks (L/R), runs
along both sides of the main channel (B), or the channel
becomes indistinguishable from the wetland (I).
ɷ  Length and Width – if the wetland is not clearly
distinguishable from an orthophoto image, walk the perimeter
with a GPS unit in line mode, 
or
measure using laser range
finder, or visually estimate as a last resort.
ɷ  Depth – if possible, use metre stick.
ɷ  Temperature – if there is open water, take substrate
temperature.
ɷ  Disturbance – yes/no
Module 3 - 77
ɷ  Optional - wetland type; select according to the descriptions
given in Section 3.8.2, Wetland, based on vegetation
communities you can identify.
Comments:
ɷ  Note disturbances in the area, such as domestic animals,
trails, invasive species, impacts from adjacent land use, etc.
ɷ  Note any wildlife seen or signs of wildlife presence.
ɷ  Optional:  note vegetation from most abundant to least
common, to help verify the type of wetland.
Side Channel (Waterbody) 
− 
Code: SC
Description:  see Section 3.8.2, Side Channel.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/I/B)
ɷ  Length
ɷ  Width (bankfull) – note wetted width in comments.
ɷ  Depth (bankfull) – note wetted depth in comments.
ɷ  Height – record only if there is a vertical drop from the
substrate of the side channel to the substrate of the main
channel.
ɷ  Temperature
ɷ  Gradient (= slope).
Discontinued/Lost Stream (Waterbody) 
Code: HMD
Description:  see Section 3.8.1, Discontinued Watercourse.
Methods:
ɷ  Most importantly, describe what you see. In the case where
the stream flows out of a storm drain, be sure to include the
storm drain as a feature, with the final feature being
“discontinued." The surrounding area should be thoroughly
inspected in case the watercourse re-emerges further
upstream. Existing maps of storm drain systems and mapped
watercourses can be helpful.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Complete whichever fields are pertinent.
Natural Spring (Waterbody) 
Code: HMS
Description: A spring is any flow of groundwater emerging naturally from
the solid earth, including from the bed of a stream. Springs provide cool
supplies of water that are critical for many species, including salmonids
(spawning, incubation, and summer rearing).
Module 3 - 78
Methods:
ɷ  Springs may be difficult to identify during or following periods
of heavy rain, when there is abundant groundwater seepage.
During dry summer months, springs are much more easily
identifiable from their constant flows and consistent
temperatures of 7−10ºC.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/I/B)
ɷ  Temperature
Comments:
ɷ  Water quality issues.
ɷ  General description.
Other Waterbody (Waterbody) 
Code: HM
Description:   If none  of the above  categories describes  the  feature
adequately, use this code and be sure to include detailed measurements
and descriptive comments. Take a photo if words cannot describe it well
enough.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Use whichever fields are pertinent.
3.10.2  Artificial Features
This  category  includes  any  modification  made  to  the  stream  or
surrounding riparian area, including: anthropogenic structures such as
dams, bridges, pipeline crossings,  culverts, retaining walls,  or  other
bank-stabilisation works that do not “enhance” fish habitat, but do not
obstruct fish passage. Artificial modifications can also include changes to
channel morphology, such as dredging (i.e., digging out a channel to
widen or deepen it for increased flow capacity), or channelization (i.e.,
straightening natural watercourses to conform to property boundaries or
roadsides).
Dam (Artificial Modification) 
Code: HOD
Description:  Dams are erected across stream channels to retain water,
usually for irrigation purposes. Dams may be permanent or seasonal, and
may or may not create a barrier for fish passage. Note all 
non-obstructing
dams should be recorded in the “Artificial Modification” category. If a dam
is suspected to pose even a partial or temporary barrier to fish passage, it
should be recorded in “Obstruction” category (code=D).
Module 3 - 79
Figure 3.20  A constructed dam.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Length – along the stream channel.
ɷ  Width – from bank to bank.
ɷ  Height – from the substrate of the stream on the downstream
side to the top of the dam (i.e., height a fish would have to
jump).
ɷ  Any other pertinent measurements.
Dredging (Artificial Modification) 
Code: HBDD
Description:  Dredging (also known as “ditch cleaning”) is conducted in
stream channels and ditches to maintain or increase the channel capacity.
Dredged channels are deepened to provide drainage of agricultural lands
or roadsides, for flood protection of nearby properties, and to convey
water more efficiently. Toxic sediments, or large amounts of sediments
released downstream, can cause irreparable damage and even death to
fish, while disturbance of the gravel or sandy substrates in fish-bearing
channels may affect spawning habitats.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/I/B)
ɷ  Length
Comments:
ɷ  Any additional descriptions or notes.
Module 3 - 80
Bridge (Artificial Modification) 
Code: BR
Description:  Bridges are typically constructed to allow roads, railways, or
footpaths to cross watercourses. Bridges constructed without regard for
fish habitat can result in habitat destruction and erosion. Other bridges
can provide good cover.
Methods:
ɷ  Record where bridge begins and ends.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/I/B)
ɷ  Length
Comments:  Any additional descriptions or notes
Figure 3.21  Example of a road bridge. Note the small waterfall downstream.
Channelization (Artificial Modification) 
Code: HOC
Description:  Channelized streams have been straightened or re-aligned,
usually along roads, property lines or agricultural fields (see Section
4.8.1b). Channelized watercourses lack meanders, pools, and riffles, and
generally do not have the habitat complexity that slows water flows and
creates ideal conditions for fish.
Methods:
ɷ  Record where channelization begins and ends.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested