display pdf byte array in browser c# : Permanently rotate pdf pages software Library dll windows .net wpf web forms BU-News-Fall-2009-WEB_with-links-bookmarks0-part1277

A magazine for graduates and friends
No. 29 Fall 2009
Convocation 2009 and more ...
Permanently rotate pdf pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
save pdf after rotating pages; saving rotated pdf pages
Permanently rotate pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order online; rotate a pdf page
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009
You made music and drama happen for Andriana. She is a 
star in the University Singers, on the drama stage and in 
the classroom. Gifts to the Annual Fund support these 
important areas of her Bishop’s experience.
You made academics and student government 
happen for Brad. President of the SRC in 2009, 
Brad exemplifies what Bishop’s offers: student 
leadership, academic competitions, athletics, and an 
exceptional education – made possible thanks 
to gifts to the Annual Fund.
You made athletics and a second 
language happen for Melanie. A 
francophone student who came to 
Bishop’s with little English, Melanie 
is captain of the women’s basketball 
team and the recipient of numerous 
academic scholarships, prizes, and 
bursaries. Gifts to the Annual Fund 
have helped Melanie to excel in the 
classroom and on the court.
When you give to the Bishop’s 
Annual Fund, you make exciting 
things happen for all Bishop’s 
students. You enrich their education 
and give them opportunities to turn 
knowledge into action. Regardless 
of the amount, every gift is important 
and inspires our students to succeed. 
THE BISHOP’S ANNUAL FUND 
Toll free: 1-866-822-5210  
www.ubishops.ca/gift
Andriana Chobot
Jericho VT
Give today and support Bishop’s 
students as they strive to become 
the leaders of tomorrow.
You make it happen.
Mélanie Ouellet-Godcharles
Gatineau QC
Brad Leung
Ottawa ON
Photo by Maxime Picard
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET If you need to permanently removing visible text and our redact function API and redact entire PDF pages.
rotate all pages in pdf file; permanently rotate pdf pages
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Redaction is the process of permanently removing visible our redact function API to redact entire PDF pages.
rotate pdf page by page; save pdf rotate pages
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009 
3
Regular features
20
22
24
25
26
27
30
Gaiters News
Branch Briefs
Marriages
Births
Deaths and Tributes
Through the Years
Alumni Perspectives
Principal’s Page
Canada needs more universities like Bishop’s. 
Better funding is the answer.
Johnson gets a much-needed facelift
Federal and provincial governments grant 
$4.457 million to renovate science labs.
Convocation 2009
Get acquainted with this year’s honorary degree 
recipients, Turner Teaching Award winner and more.
Cover story: meet the Top 10 After 10
Ten accomplished graduates from the years 1988 
to 1998 form the Top 10 After 10 Class of 2009.
BU Notes
Canada Games will come to Sherbrooke, good-bye 
to semis in town, The Chimes of Freedom and more. 
Wade Felesky 
’92
and
Tom Allen 
’69
make news
Wade is named Top 40 Under 40 and Tom becomes 
President of the Alumni Association.
Magic Time on campus 
39 years later the cast and crew of the production 
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern reunite.
Special Insert: 2008-09 Donor Report
Dave McBride 
'93 
Director of University Advancement
I
n putting this magazine together 
one word kept coming to mind: 
celebration. Bishop’s has certainly 
had plenty to celebrate since our last issue 
hit your mailbox.
Convocation weekend brought together 
the graduating class, their families and 
Bishop’s faculty and staff on Friday night 
for a pleasant evening at the Granada 
Theatre in Sherbrooke. Then, at Saturday’s 
ceremonies, the Bishop’s community 
marked the passage of 465 newly minted 
graduates and four exceptional DCL 
candidates. Five of Bishop’s esteemed 
faculty were named professor emeritus. 
It was my 16
th
Convocation and my 
favourite, perhaps with the exception of 
my own graduation day.
Many faculty and students received 
generous research grants and scholarships. 
A distinguished panel of graduates chose 
the inaugural Top 10 After 10 group. Two 
Gaiters football players were picked 3rd 
and 4
th
in the CFL draft. Another graduate 
was named to Canada’s Top 40 Under 
40. A wildly successful spring musical 
delighted sold-out audiences on campus. 
We received a grant of $4.457 million from 
the Federal and Provincial governments to 
renovate the Johnson Science labs.
The 2008-09 Donor Report, bound to 
the middle of this publication, is our way 
to celebrate the impact of charitable giving 
at Bishop’s. Nearly everything that happens 
at Bishop’s benefits from this support, 
making the success of our students 
possible. Your generosity is a reminder of 
the strength of the Bishop’s community, 
which is our most important reason to 
celebrate. Thank you.
Bishop’s University News is designed and edited by 
Pam McPhail, pam@thewritelook.ca.
4
5
6
Inside
10
16
19
21
Photo by Maxime Picard
6
19
5
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to VB.NET image editor control SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; rotate pages in pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
to change view orientation by clicking rotate button. users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations permanently by clicking
pdf rotate pages separately; pdf expert rotate page
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009
C
anada has over 80 universities, but you can count 
on one hand those like Bishop’s. 
As a recipient of this magazine, you know the 
benefits of a Bishop’s education:
  the small classes, 
  the close relationships students have with their 
professors and with each other,
  the opportunities to study several academic disciplines
and apply learning across fields, and
  the chance to engage fully in a wide variety of extra-
curricular activities.
The Bishop’s model of a liberal arts, primarily 
undergraduate university that welcomes students in an 
intimate, residential setting is thriving in the United States. 
In Canada, however, it is exceptionally rare. Acadia, 
Mount Allison and St. Francis Xavier (all of which are in 
the Maritimes) are the only Canadian universities which 
resemble Bishop’s.
For 166 years the Bishop’s model has been successful. As 
is evidenced by our inaugural Top 10 After 10 inductees 
profiled in this issue, our graduates continue to make 
significant contributions in a wide range of fields. They excel 
at adapting to new situations, taking on leadership roles, 
and understanding issues from multiple perspectives.
For Canada to succeed in the coming decades it will need 
an abundance of people just like our graduates. To put it 
plainly: Canada needs more universities like Bishop’s.
The large, urban, research-intensive universities that 
educate Canada’s masters and doctoral students play a 
critical role in our society. But so too do small universities 
whose primary mission is to deliver the best possible 
education for undergraduates.
We know the Bishop’s model works. So why are there so 
few small, residential, liberal arts universities in Canada? 
The answer in a word: funding.
Current funding models in Quebec and across Canada 
allocate grants to universities based primarily on the number 
of students. Universities 
are therefore driven to 
grow their enrolment 
in order to maintain 
their financial health. 
A university like 
Bishop’s is consequently 
penalized for choosing 
to be small. 
In order to rectify 
this situation, we 
should:
1. Increase the base 
funding of our small 
universities, regardless 
of their enrolment. 
While enrolment should 
be a factor in funding, 
governments should do 
more to recognize that 
there are certain fixed costs 
which a university faces – 
whether it is large or small. 
2. Allow tuition fees 
to rise. While Quebec 
students will pay approximately $1,900 for tuition this year, 
the Canadian average is more than $5,000 per year. Tuition 
at many liberal arts colleges in New England, like Amherst, 
Middlebury or Williams, is more than $30,000. I am not 
suggesting $30,000 tuition at Bishop’s, but setting Quebec 
tuition at the national average could provide an additional 
$5 million to our University (a 12% increase in our 
operating budget). We would use a portion of the increased 
revenue to provide financial assistance to those who could 
not otherwise afford to attend Bishop’s.
3. Increase philanthropic support for our universities. 
Many of the small liberal arts colleges in the United States 
have endowments that are larger than the endowments of 
virtually every Canadian university. This source of funding 
ensures generous financial aid packages, lower student-
faculty ratios and state of the art facilities. We must enhance 
our philanthropic culture in Canada.
4. Do more to articulate, support and celebrate the 
distinct but complementary missions of our universities.
Canada’s five largest research-intensive universities 
have called for a paradigm shift in how our universities 
are funded. They want to focus even more intensively on 
research and the education of postgraduate students, but 
the current funding models have driven them to enrol large 
numbers of undergraduates.
Every university should be engaged in the creation and 
transmission of knowledge. Teaching and research are 
essential components to a dynamic university, but no 
university should strive to be all things to all people. We 
should encourage our universities to focus on what they do 
best. By supporting differentiation and specialization we 
will foster the outstanding universities that Canada requires.
In that emerging mosaic, we are confident that Bishop’s 
will distinguish itself as a university that is focused on 
its clearly defined mission of providing an exceptional 
educational experience to undergraduates.
We know the 
Bishop’s model 
works. So why are 
there so few small, 
residential, liberal 
arts universities in 
Canada? The answer 
in a word: funding.
Photo by Maxime Picard
Principal’s 
Page
Michael Goldbloom
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in burnAnnotationToImages: permanently burn drawn annotation on page in
how to change page orientation in pdf document; save pdf rotated pages
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
how to rotate one pdf page; rotate individual pdf pages reader
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009 
5
O
n July 17, at a press 
conference held in a 
Biology lab that looks very 
much like it did when it opened in 
1965, Bishop’s welcomed both 
Provincial and Federal politicians 
to announce $4.457 million to 
renovate and modernize its 
laboratories in the Johnson 
Science Building. The renovations 
will provide Bishop’s students and 
faculty with state-of-the-art facilities 
to engage in science education and 
pursue research. The refurbished 
labs will meet today’s improved 
safety standards, be more energy 
efficient and be able to accommodate 
additional students.
The bulk of this infrastructure 
investment will go towards 
renovations and modernization of 
the laboratories, as well as ensuring 
that the entire building meets 
current building code requirements. 
$385,000 has been allocated to 
purchase new equipment.
Natural Sciences have been taught 
at Bishop’s since the 1880s, with the 
first full-time professor appointed 
in 1913. In those early years physics 
and chemistry could only be taken 
as options within the traditional 
humanities-centred curriculum of 
the Bachelor of Arts. It was not until 
the 1930s that a Bachelor of Science 
degree became available.
Early laboratories were to be 
found in such unlikely places as the 
basement of the Old Library. Even 
so, Bishop’s soon developed a strong 
reputation for producing graduates 
who were in great demand because of 
their solid experimental training.
While Bishop’s continues to 
graduate students who are well-
prepared in the Natural Sciences, 
enrolment in the sciences is declining 
across North America. Governments 
and businesses understand the 
essential role that scientific literacy 
plays in a strong economy and 
society. This understanding has, 
in part, driven the creation of the 
$2-billion Knowledge Infrastructure 
Program for Canada’s universities 
and colleges.  
This funding comes at an 
opportune time as the University is 
committed to increasing its enrolment 
from 1740 students in September 
2008 to 2200 students by September 
2013. This significant investment 
will help Bishop’s rebuild its student 
enrolment in existing natural 
science programs, and will allow 
the growth of new programs such as 
Environmental Sciences. 
The process to choose an architect 
for the project is currently underway. 
The call for tenders will begin in 
early January 2010, with work slated 
to begin in Johnson in the spring.
“Bishop’s University has a rich 
tradition of science education, 
offering our undergraduate students 
more one-on-one time with tenured 
faculty and more individual access 
to research equipment than perhaps 
any other university in Quebec,” said 
Principal Goldbloom during the July 
press conference. “This investment 
will ensure that we maintain our 
high academic standards and that our 
science programs will be equipped to 
meet new challenges and priorities.”
In 1965 a new wing of the Johnson 
Building was opened which housed the 
science laboratories. State of the art when 
they were opened, these laboratories 
pictured above have seen little renovation 
or renewal in the ensuing years.
Michael Goldbloom, Principal, Honourable 
Monique Gagnon-Tremblay, President of the 
Treasury Board and MNA for Saint-François
Jacques Gourde, MP for Lotbinière-Chutes-
de-la-Chaudière, Sylvie Côté, Director of 
Research Services
Johnson science labs get much-needed facelift
Photos by Craig Leroux ‘04
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. Effect VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify
rotate pages in pdf online; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009
M
r. Chancellor, this day is a good day; 
on this day the people on this stage 
get to acknowledge and celebrate the 
accomplishments of the graduating students of 
Bishop’s University AND the accomplishments 
of distinguished Canadians who have served the 
public and the country with dignity, fairness and 
intelligence.  
Among those Canadians, on this day and 
on this stage, I am pleased to acknowledge the 
accomplishments of Chantal Hébert, national 
affairs columnist for the Toronto Star, political 
commentator on the CBC’s The National and Radio-
Canada’s Les coulisses du pouvoir. Ms. Hébert’s 
talents as a journalist include insightful commentary, 
timely analysis and astute political observation 
as demonstrated by her 2007 book, French Kiss:  
Stephen Harper’s Blind Date with Quebec. Her 
account of the Conservative Party’s electoral 
breakthrough in Quebec in 2006 has been praised as 
an objective and insightful analysis of the then state 
of Quebec-federal politics. 
Ms. Hébert is also passionate about her work.  
While on this day many Canadians view the world 
with a jaundiced eye, are paralyzed by cynicism and 
even despair about the state of politics in this country, 
Ms. Hébert’s writings and public discussions offer 
an alternative approach to political analysis, one that 
is based on fairness, dignity and respect for politics 
and politicians. Ms. Hébert  received the 2005 Public 
Service Citation of the Association of Professional 
Executives of the Public Service of Canada and in 
February 2006 the Public Policy Forum presented her 
with the Hyman Solomon Award for Excellence in 
Public Policy Journalism.  
As her peers and colleagues have acknowledged 
her talents and accomplishments, so too, on this day, 
does Bishop’s University. Monsieur le chancelier, il me 
fait plaisir de vous présenter madame Chantal Hébert 
pour un doctorat honorifique.
Dr. Jean Manore, History Department
I 
am privileged and honoured to introduce 
Nancy Knowlton ’75, one of Bishop’s most 
accomplished graduates. A cursory examination 
of Nancy’s achievements might lead one to believe 
her successes relate most particularly to the world of 
business, although it must be acknowledged that her 
decorations as an athlete are also impressive. 
As CEO and Co-Founder of SMART Technologies, 
she has been recognized as the Canadian Woman 
Entrepreneur of the Year in the Export category, 
winner of the Prairies Region Technology 
Entrepreneur of the Year Award, the Manning 
Innovation Award, the Alberta Centennial Medal 
recognizing the innovativeness of her work, and the 
TeleSpan Pace Award. 
Yet her achievements in education, and the promise 
those achievements hold, resound as strongly as her 
business successes and may come to be felt more 
deeply in society. Her involvement with educational 
review in Alberta and her generosity in the 
establishment of the SMARTer Kids Foundation are 
significant indications of her interest in linking her 
business endeavours to what happens in schools.
The Smart Board technology that stems from her 
entrepreneurial spirit, in her words, is meant to “put 
technology at the service of learning.”... Her notions 
of the “Classroom in the Twenty-First Century…
Today” have translated into contexts for teaching and 
learning that offer new ways for teachers to deliver 
courses and new ways for learners to interact with the 
materials and subject content... 
We recognize ... the far-sighted vision of Nancy... 
The combination of her entrepreneurial sense and 
innovative spirit, used in a commitment to worthy 
goals in education, has resulted in important changes 
in the way classrooms are now structured. 
Nancy has been a dynamic, determined and 
effective leader as an athlete, educator and 
entrepreneur... Mr. Chancellor, I present to you for 
the degree of Doctor of Civil Law (Honoris causa), 
Ms. Nancy Knowlton. 
Dr. Cathy Beauchamp, Dean, School of Education
Chantal Hébert
Nancy Knowlton
Convocation photos by Perry Beaton ‘72
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009 
7
M
r. Martin
is much-admired for two decades 
of eminent public service, beginning as a 
Member of Parliament for the LaSalle-Émard 
riding in 1988, coupled with a remarkable term as 
Minister of Finance from 1993-2002 and then as our 
country’s 21
st
Prime Minister in 2003. [His] many 
achievements as Prime Minister include a 41 billion-
dollar investment to improve health care across 
Canada; the signing of a landmark agreement with the 
provinces and territories for a national early learning 
and childcare program; the creation of a new financial 
deal for municipalities; and the redefinition of marriage 
to include same-sex couples. 
He also achieved an historic consensus, known as the 
Kelowna Accord, with the provinces, territories and 
Canada’s aboriginal leadership, to ensure the provision 
of equal opportunity for First Nations, Métis and Inuit 
people.
Before entering politics, Mr. Martin had a prominent 
career in the private sector as an executive at Power 
Corporation of Canada and as Chairman and CEO of 
The CSL Group Inc. ... 
He is responsible for the Martin Aboriginal 
Education Initiative, which funds educational 
programs that enable young Aboriginal Canadians to 
access the opportunities they need to succeed. With 
his son, David, Mr. Martin founded the Capital for 
Aboriginal Prosperity and Entrepreneurship Fund 
to help establish and grow successful Aboriginal 
businesses both on- and off-reserve.
He co-chairs, with Nobel Peace Prize laureate 
Wangari Maathai, a $200 million British-Norwegian 
poverty alleviation and sustainable development fund 
for the ten-nation Congo Basin Rainforest. He also sits 
on the advisory council of the Coalition for Dialogue 
on Africa, an initiative that examines critical issues 
facing the continent...
Mr. Chancellor, for his extraordinary contributions 
to our nation and to global society, we present to you 
for the degree of Doctor of Civil Law (Honoris Causa), 
The Right Honourable Paul Martin.
Dr. Steve Harvey, Dean, Williams School of Business
I
t is my honour to present to you Albert Schultz 
for the degree of Doctor of Civil Law.
Albert is an accomplished actor and director 
and leader in the performing arts in Canada. His 
passion created one of our country’s most successful 
theatre companies, Toronto’s Soulpepper Theatre. 
Albert is the Artistic Director of Soulpepper, 
producing over 70 productions while acting in and 
directing several. Soulpepper’s staggering growth 
over the past decade remains unrivalled in Canadian 
theatre history. Under Albert’s visionary leadership 
Soulpepper not only produces fine theatre all year 
long, it also runs an academy for the training of 
young actors, designers and playwrights.  
It has a youth outreach program and a summer 
mentorship program. No other theatre company does 
quite so much, but then no other company has Albert 
Shultz at the helm. 
Albert is also the general director of the Young 
Centre for the Performing Arts, a multi-purpose 
facility made a reality in 2006 thanks to Albert’s 
forward thinking and his tenacious fundraising. This 
facility is home to Soulpepper, houses George Brown 
Theatre School and welcomes artists from every field.
Albert’s vision clearly embraces the entire artistic 
community, creating a vibrant collection of theatre, 
dance and spoken word all under one roof. 
Albert’s life reflects what we, as a liberal arts 
university, believe in:
• pursuing one’s dreams with passion
• accepting the responsibility of leadership and 
• knowing that each of us can make a difference 
to society.
It seems fitting that today, as a new group of 
graduates prepares to go out into the world, that 
Bishop’s University would honour such a fine example 
of business savvy, passion and leadership. 
Mr. Chancellor it is my privilege to present to 
you for the degree of Doctor of Civil Law, (Honoris 
causa), Mr. Albert Shultz.
Prof. Jo Jo Rideout, Drama Department
The Right Honourable
Paul Martin
Albert Schultz
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009
S
ince taking his full time teaching position in 2004, 
Ambrose has been enthusiastic, dedicated and, most 
importantly, has positively impacted every student 
he has ever taught. He receives outstanding scores on student 
evaluations... Regardless if he is lecturing an introductory-level 
class in Bishop Williams Hall with 120 students, or an advanced 
macroeconomics class of ten, Ambrose learns each individual’s 
name. He also makes himself available for tutoring, often for 
hours at a time. Sometimes he even tutors spontaneously if he 
happens to meet students at the Library or Tim Horton’s. These 
are but a few of the many ways Ambrose demonstrates devotion 
to ensure every student has an equal opportunity to succeed.
Ambrose has a unique teaching ability that encourages students 
to learn far beyond the textbook and to understand that achieving 
excellent marks is not the sole ingredient to success in life. He also 
has exceptional knowledge of Economics. An active researcher, 
Ambrose has published many papers in areas such as the 
economics of crime, socioeconomics, and labour economics. He 
balances his research well with attention to teaching and students. 
A Bishop’s education provides a special student-professor 
relationship where knowledge and personality combine to give 
an outstanding experience. Though my knowledge obtained 
from Ambrose relates primarily to the field of economics, his 
mentorship and friendship exemplify the role professors can play 
at Bishop’s. Ambrose’s commitment to transferring his expansive 
knowledge to future professionals is of great benefit to students; 
my experience has been especially significant under his influence.
It has truly been an honour learning from Ambrose.... I 
have never before witnessed such devotion and commitment to 
teaching.... Bishop’s learning is about small class sizes and feeling 
a personal connection with your professors. Dr. Ambrose Leung 
truly takes this philosophy to heart. 
Simon Quick 
’09, Economics
Joanne Craig, Professor Emeritus of English
Years of service: 1977-2007
James Gray, Professor Emeritus of English 
Years of service: 1948-1972
Ken McLean, Professor Emeritus of English 
Years of service: 1977-2007
Arthur Motyer, Professor Emeritus of English
Years of service: 1950-1970
Gwendolyn Trottein, Professor Emeritus of Fine Arts
Years of service: 1986-2006
F
or all our lives, 
we have been 
doing the exact 
same thing: preparing.  
Education has been 
preparation.... Over 16 
years of preparing for 
a future that has finally 
become the present. It is 
with mixed feelings of 
sadness and excitement 
that we are gathered 
here to celebrate our 
graduation....      
We came here 
wondering how our lives 
would change in Lennoxville and now it’s hard to imagine 
life outside of it. Instead of searching for a familiar face, 
we see nothing but familiar faces; our professors who 
were once intimidating have become our mentors and our 
friends. Students go to university in search of knowledge, 
and at Bishop’s we have gained so much more.... 
On behalf of the Class of 2009, I want to thank our 
faculty for their patience and wisdom. We must also 
recognize and extend our gratitude to the rest of the 
Bishop’s and Lennoxville communities – as both academic 
and non academic experiences have shaped our characters.  
We leave older, wiser, better educated and more open-
minded than when we first arrived....   
We are the Class of 2009. We survived the flood. 
We’ve eaten Grec. We opened the Gait, and we’ll always 
close the Lion. We read The Campus and know the 
writers. We dominate theme parties. We remember early 
morning rez fire drills. We know our SRC personally. 
We’ve fantasized about painting the bridge purple. Every 
year we lose our voices cheering. We don’t need a menu 
at Pizzaville. We support our friends and our community. 
We bleed purple.... The only appropriate way to end this 
amazing adventure is to “Raise a Toast.”  
Caitlin McNamee-Lamb 
’09, English Honours
Nomination of Emeritus Professors
Simon Quick 
’09
cites
Ambrose Leung
Economics Professor, winner of the 
William & Nancy Turner Teaching Award
Caitlin McNamee-Lamb 
’09
invites 
graduating students to “Raise a Toast”
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009 
9
Degrees across the generations: 
alumni were 
proud to welcome their children and grandchildren as fellow graduates.
1.  Ken Allan 
’82
and 
daughter Meghan
2.  Rob Allen 
’73
and 
daughter Sandra
3.  Heather McAuley 
Banning 
’80
and daughter Caroline
4.  Lavergne Fequet
'77,
Cheryl Kouri
'77 
and son 
Daniel 
5.  Ross Findleton 
'71
, and 
daughters Emily 
'04
, and 
Amber
6.  Danielle Fisch 
'72
and 
son Antoine Reed
7.  Bruce Gandier 
'78
and daughter Lysa 
8.  Maureen Hallam-
Lemay 
'78 
and son 
Brent Loach
9.  Steve Harvey 
'89
and 
daughter Erin
10.  Brent Montgomery 
'75
and daughter Jenna 
11.  Stephen Moore 
'80 
and daughters Katelin 
'07
Shannon 
'05
, Meghan 
'03
and Erinn
12.  Alex Paterson 
'52, DCL '74
and grandson Alex 
13.  Lois Shepherd 
'69 
and son Joel Lefebvre
Class facts: 465 graduates
58% of the Class of 2009 
are female.
66% of Bachelor of Business 
Administration degrees were 
awarded to males.
Class facts: 
degrees by Division/School
23 %  Business
19 %  Education
25 %  Humanities
10 %  Natural Sciences
23 %  Social Sciences
1
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
2
3
10 
BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY NEWS FALL 2009
W
e take pride in the success of Bishop’s graduates – 
all of them. Our graduates are leaders in business, 
education, the arts, science, community and 
volunteer service…really, in every walk of life. We want to 
honour them and share their success stories with prospective 
and current students, as well as with fellow alumni. Their 
achievements not only demonstrate the quality of a Bishop’s 
education but also instill pride among all members of the 
Bishop’s community.
The Bishop’s Top 10 After 10 initiative highlights alumni 
successes. However, the program is not simply a recognition 
event; the University will provide networking occasions, 
professional and personal development for members of this 
special group, and mentoring opportunities among members 
and others in the Bishop’s community.
This year graduates from the years 1988 to 1998 were 
asked to nominate themselves or others to become part of 
the inaugural group: 140 names were put forward, with 90 
graduates completing the nomination process. Our advisory 
and selection committee – pictured below – faced the daunting 
task of narrowing the selection to ten. The following pages 
feature the Top 10 After 10 Class of 2009.
I know I speak for the entire committee in saying how 
impressive we found the nominations. Each individual 
nominated is worthy of recognition and proof of the high 
caliber of individuals who choose to attend – and graduate 
from – our fine University. We will celebrate this year’s class 
on campus at Homecoming and look forward to welcoming 
nominations from the classes of 1989 to 1999 next year, as we 
continue this exciting and rewarding program.
Scott Griffin
Chancellor
THE COMMITTEE
Nils Bodtker 
’65
CEO & Founder 
Great West Containers
Nick Busing 
’68
President & CEO
Assoc. of Faculties of 
Medicine of Canada
Nancy Knowlton 
’75
CEO & Co-Founder
SMART Technologies
Kelly Murumets 
’85
President & CEO
ParticipACTION
Jamie Saunders 
’70
Justice, Nova Scotia 
Court of Appeal
Norman Webster 
’62
DCL ’85
Former Editor-in-Chief 
Montreal Gazette
Chancellor chairs new program to 
honour accomplished graduates 
Scott Griffin 
’60
DCL ’02
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested