display pdf byte array in browser c# : How to save a pdf after rotating pages control application system azure web page winforms console CancerEpi-140-part1369

305
In the previous chapter we discussed briefly how confounding could be
dealt with at both the design stage of a study and during the analysis of
the results. We then mentioned that there are two main statistical proce-
dures that we can use in the analysis: stratification and regression modelling.
In  this  chapter  we  will  discuss  these  two  approaches  in  more  detail.
Obviously, these techniques can be applied only if data on potential con-
founding factors are available. Thus, potential confounding variables have
to be identified at the design stage of the study to ensure that valid infor-
mation on them is collected.
A confounding factor is one that is related to both the exposure and the
outcome variables and that does not lie on the causal pathway between
them (see Section 13.2). Ignoring confounding when assessing the associ-
ation between an exposure and an outcome variable can lead to an over-
estimate or underestimate of the true association between exposure and
outcome and can even change the direction of the observed effect.
In 
, women with ovarian cancer had a much lower preva-
lence of smoking (24/60  =  40%) compared with the  controls (58/98  =
59%). This suggests that smoking protects against ovarian cancer (odds
ratio (OR) = 0.46). As discussed in the previous chapter, there are several
possible explanations for this finding:
Chapter 14 
Example 14.1. In a hypothetical case–control study to examine the rela-
tionship between smoking and ovarian cancer among nulliparous women,
the results shown in Table 14.1 were obtained.
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
24 (a)
36 (b)
60 (n
1
)
Controls
58 (c)
40 (d)
98 (n
0
)
Total
82 (m
1
)
76 (m
0
)
158 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (24/36) / (58/40)=0.46
95% confidence interval = 0.23–0.93
χ2 = 5.45 on 1d.f.; P = 0.02
Results of a case–control study on
smoking and ovarian cancer: hypothet-
ical data.
14.1 Introduction to stratification
Example 14.1
Dealing with confounding
in the analysis
Example 14.1. In a hypothetical case–control study to examine the rela-
tionship between smoking and ovarian cancer among nulliparous women,
the results shown in Table 14.1 were obtained.
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
24 (a)
36 (b)
60 (n
1
)
Controls
58 (c)
40 (d)
98 (n
0
)
Total
82 (m
1
)
76 (m
0
)
158 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (24/36) / (58/40)=0.46
95% confidence interval = 0.23–0.93
χ2 = 5.45 on 1d.f.; P = 0.02
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
24 (a)
36 (b)
60 (n
1
)
Controls
58 (c)
40 (d)
98 (n
0
)
Total
82 (m
1
)
76 (m
0
)
158 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (24/36) / (58/40)=0.46
95% confidence interval = 0.23–0.93
χ2 = 5.45 on 1d.f.; P = 0.02
Table 14.1.
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
save pdf rotated pages; pdf expert rotate page
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf expert
(i) Bias: the observed odds ratio of 0.46 does not accurately repre-
sent the true  odds ratio  because  of either  selection or measurement
bias.
(ii) Chance: the observed association between smoking and ovarian
cancer  arose  by  chance.  The  95%  confidence  interval  around  the
observed odds ratio is equal to 0.23–0.93 and the χ
2
test yields P=0.02.
Thus, chance is an unlikely explanation for the finding.
(iii) Confounding: the observed odds ratio of 0.46 is due to the effect
of another variable. For example, it may be that women who smoked
were different  in other respects  from non-smokers  and less likely  to
develop ovarian cancer because of this, rather than because of smoking.
(iv) Causation: smoking reduces the risk of ovarian cancer and the
95% confidence interval  indicates how precisely the sample  estimate
corresponds to the true effect in the population.
In 
, it is possible that the association between smoking
and ovarian cancer arose because of the confounding effect of other fac-
tors such as oral contraceptive use. The results shown in
are 
for all women combined regardless of their history of oral contraceptive
use. To assess whether oral contraceptive use is a confounder, we need 
to look at the association between smoking and ovarian cancer sepa-
rately  for oral  contraceptive  users  and never-users.  This is  shown  in
.
In each category (or stratum) of oral contraceptive use, the prevalence
of  smoking  was  similar  in  women  with  and without  ovarian  cancer
(22% versus 22% among never-users and 79% versus 81% among users).
However,  when  both  oral  contraceptive  users  and  never-users  were
combined (
), there was a marked difference in the prevalence
of smoking between cases and controls (40% versus 59%). Two factors
were responsible for this finding:
Chapter 14
306
Never-users of oral contraceptives
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
9 (a
1
)
32 (b
1
)
41 (n
11
)
Controls
8 (c
1
)
28 (d
1
)
36 (n
01
)
Total
17 (m
11
)
60 (m
01
)
77 (N
1
)
Odds ratio = 0.98 (95% confidence interval = 0.30–3.37)
Ever-users of oral contraceptives
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
15 (a
2
)
4 (b
2
)
19 (n
12
)
Controls
50 (c
2
)
12 (d
2
)
62 (n
02
)
Total
65 (m
12
)
16 (m
02
)
81 (N
2
)
Odds ratio = 0.90 (95% confidence interval = 0.23–4.40)
Hypothetical case–control study on
smoking and ovarian cancer described
in Example 14.1: results presented
separately for never-users and ever-
users of oral contraceptives.
Example 14.1
Table 14.1
Table 14.2
Table 14.1
Never-users of oral contraceptives
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
9 (a
1
)
32 (b
1
)
41 (n
11
)
Controls
8 (c
1
)
28 (d
1
)
36 (n
01
)
Total
17 (m
11
)
60 (m
01
)
77 (N
1
)
Odds ratio = 0.98 (95% confidence interval = 0.30–3.37)
Ever-users of oral contraceptives
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
Ovarian cancer cases
15 (a
2
)
4 (b
2
)
19 (n
12
)
Controls
50 (c
2
)
12 (d
2
)
62 (n
02
)
Total
65 (m
12
)
16 (m
02
)
81 (N
2
)
Odds ratio = 0.90 (95% confidence interval = 0.23–4.40)
Table 14.2.
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial Without losing any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; pdf rotate one page
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image That is to say, after you run following powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate all pages in pdf file; pdf rotate all pages
1. Among the controls, smokers had a much higher prevalence of oral
contraceptive use (50/58 = 86%) than non-smokers (12/40 = 30%), that is
there was an association between these two variables (
).
Note that the association between smoking and oral contraceptive
use was examined among the controls rather than the cases, or the
two groups taken together. This is because controls should represent
the  population  from  which  the  cases  were  drawn  and  we  need  to
assess that association in the general population. In a cohort or inter-
vention study, the association would be looked at by constructing a
similar table, replacing the number of controls with person-years at
risk if the appropriate measure of effect was a rate ratio or numbers of
persons at risk at the start of the follow-up if the measure of effect was
a risk ratio. 
2. Oral contraceptive use is considerably lower among ovarian can-
cer  cases  than  among  controls.  The  data  from 
can  be
rearranged so that smoking is ignored (
).
Only  32% (=19/60) of  the  women with ovarian  cancer  were oral
contraceptive users, whereas 63% (=62/98) of the controls were users.
Since oral contraceptive use in these data was associated with both
the exposure (smoking) and the outcome of interest (ovarian cancer),
it acted as a confounding factor. As a result, when the data for both
users and never-users were combined, the result suggested an associa-
tion  between  smoking  and  ovarian  cancer  far  stronger  than  really
existed (positive confounding). In other situations (as in 
;
see next section), combining strata in the presence of a confounder
may mask an effect that really exists (negative confounding), or even
show an effect in the opposite direction to the true one.
When we analyse the results of a study to look for evidence of a particu-
lar exposure–outcome association, we usually start by including in the analy-
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
307
Oral contraceptive use
Total
Ever
Never
Yes
50
8
58
Smoking
No
12
28
40
Total
62
36
98
Hypothetical case–control study
described in Example 14.1: distribution
of controls by smoking habits and oral
contraceptive use.
Oral contraceptive use
Total
Ever
Never
Ovarian cancer cases
19
41
60
Controls
62
36
98
Total
81
77
158
Hypothetical case–control study
described in Example 14.1: distribution
of cases and controls by oral contra-
ceptive use.
Table 14.3
Table  14.2
Table 14.4
Example 14.2
14.2 The Mantel–Haenszel summary measures of effect
Oral contraceptive use
Total
Ever
Never
Yes
50
8
58
Smoking
No
12
28
40
Total
62
36
98
Table 14.3.
Oral contraceptive use
Total
Ever
Never
Ovarian cancer cases
19
41
60
Controls
62
36
98
Total
81
77
158
Table 14.4.
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
and print such documents and images as JPEG, BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF, PDF, etc. Upload, Open, Save & Download Images & Docs with Web Viewer. After creating a
pdf page order reverse; pdf rotate single page reader
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
of this VB.NET image cropping process: decode the source image file to bitmap, crop bitmap and save cropped bitmap to original image format. After you run this
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate pdf pages by degrees
sis all the subjects in our study sample. This analysis provides a crude esti-
mate of the effect of the exposure on the outcome of interest. The next log-
ical step is  to  divide  our  study sample into  several  subgroups  or strata,
defined by a potential confounding variable, to see if the results are consis-
tent across the strata. This approach is very informative, as it describes how
the effect of the exposure on the outcome of interest varies across subgroups
of subjects with different characteristics. We can simply report the stratum-
specific effect estimates and their confidence intervals. Each of these stra-
tum-specific estimates is supposed to be homogeneous in relation to the
potential confounding variable and therefore they are unconfounded.
Usually, however, we are not much interested in the stratum-specific
results  per se and would rather have a single overall estimate. In other
words, we would like to be able to calculate a summary effect estimate
which, in contrast to the crude estimate, would take into account the con-
founding effect of the stratifying variable. Such adjusted estimates can be
calculated by pooling results across strata. But even if the true effect is the
same in all strata, we would expect our estimates to differ because of ran-
dom variation. Pooling takes this into account by giving greater weight to
effect estimates from larger strata. It involves calculating a weighted average
of the individual stratum-specific estimates by choosing a set of weights
that  maximizes the statistical  precision of the adjusted  effect estimate.
There are several alternative weighting procedures which achieve precise
summary effect estimates. In this section, we concentrate on a procedure
derived by Mantel and Haenszel which is widely used and relatively sim-
ple to apply.
Let us consider again 
. Since oral contraceptive use is a
confounder of the relationship between smoking and ovarian cancer, we
should  not  combine  the  data  from  ever-users  and  never-users  for  the
analysis. Thus, the crude odds ratio of 0.46 obtained from 
is not
appropriate. We could just calculate separate odds ratios and their 95%
confidence intervals for each group of oral contraceptive users, as shown
in 
. But we would like to be able to summarize the overall results
of the study in a way that removes the confounding effect of oral contra-
ceptive use. The Mantel–Haenszel odds ratio, denoted OR
MH
, gives a weight-
ed average of the odds ratios in the different strata, where those from larger
strata are given more weight.
To calculate the OR
MH
, we start by constructing 2 × 2 tables of exposure
by  outcome for  the separate  strata  of  the confounder, as  illustrated  in
. The OR
MH
can then be obtained by applying the following for-
mula:
a
1
d
1
/N
1
+ a
2
d
2
/N
2
OR
MH
b
1
c
1
/N
1
+ b
2
c
2
/N
2
Chapter 14
308
14.2.1 Mantel–Haenszel odds ratio
Example 14.1
Table 14.1
Table 14.2
Table 14.2
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Q 2: After I apply various image processing functions to source image file editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image
rotate pages in pdf online; reverse page order pdf
VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
hotspot annotation styles before and after its activation img = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName & & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate pdf pages in reader; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
If  we  apply  this  formula  to  the  data  from  our  ovarian  cancer
case–control study (
), we obtain
(9 × 28)/77 + (15 × 12)/81     5.49
OR
MH
          = 0.95
(32 × 8)/77 + (4 × 50)/81      5.79
Thus, the odds ratio for smoking adjusted for oral contraceptive use is 0.95.
This  adjusted  odds  ratio  contrasts  with  the  crude  odds  ratio of  0.46
obtained from 
. Adjusting for oral contraceptive use gives an
odds ratio much closer to unity, which means that the protection afford-
ed by smoking, if any, is far less strong than the initial result led us to
think.
The above formula can easily be extended to more than two strata, by
summing both the numerator and the denominator over all strata:
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
OR
MH
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
In this formula, Σ means sum and the subscript i stands for the sub-
scripts 1, 2, 3, ..., which represent each of the strata.
We  can  calculate  a  confidence  interval  around  the  OR
MH
and  a
Mantel–Haenszel χ
2
test by using the formulae given in Appendix 14.1,
Section A14.1.1. In our ovarian cancer  example, the 95% confidence
interval is 0.42–2.16. The χ
2
is equal to 0.016 with one degree of free-
dom, which corresponds to P = 0.93. Thus, after adjusting for oral con-
traceptive use, the effect of smoking on ovarian cancer is no longer ‘sta-
tistically significant’.
The Mantel–Haenszel method can also be used to obtain an adjusted
risk  ratio.  In 
 the  crude  analysis  shows  that  workers
exposed to the particular chemical substance had a 52% higher risk of
developing lung cancer than those not exposed (
). Before con-
cluding that the chemical substance is associated with an increased risk
of lung cancer, we need to exclude the possibility that smoking, rather
than  the  occupational  exposure,  is  the  explanation  for  the  observed
association. To do this, we need to examine the data separately for smok-
ers and non-smokers.
shows that the stratum-specific risk ratios are higher than
the crude risk ratio (2.0 versus 1.52). This is an example of negative con-
founding. It arose because the prevalence of smoking, an important risk
factor for lung cancer, was much lower among workers exposed to the
chemical substance (4000/84 000=5%) than among those not exposed
(16 000/96 000=17%) (
).
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
309
Table 14.2
Table 14.1
14.2.2 Mantel–Haenszel risk ratio
Example  14.2
Table 14.5
Table 14.6
Table 14.7
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
on image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document Method for Drawing Rubber Stamp Annotation. After you have
reverse page order pdf online; rotate all pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
What's more, after you have created a basic PDF document viewer in your VB.NET Windows application, more imaging viewer Save current PDF page or the
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages and save
Chapter 14
310
Example  14.2. Suppose  that  a  cohort  study  was  set  up  to  investigate
whether occupational exposure to a particular chemical substance was asso-
ciated with an increased risk of lung cancer. All study subjects were followed
up for five years after entry into the study (or until diagnosis of lung cancer
if earlier). The results of this study are shown in Table 14.5.
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
480 (a)
360 (b)
840 (n
1
)
No
83 520 (c)
95 640 (d)
179 160 (n
0
)
Total
84000 (m
1
)
96000 (m
0
)
180000 (N)
Crude risk ratio = (480/84 000)/(360/96 000) = 5.71 per 1000/3.75 per 1000 = 1.52
95% confidence interval = 1.33–1.75
χ2 = 37.21 on 1d.f.; P < 0.0001
Results from a cohort study on occupa-
tional exposure to a particular chemical
substance and lung cancer: hypotheti-
cal data.
Smokers
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
80 (a
1
)
160 (b
1
)
240 (n
11
)
No
3920 (c
1
)
15840 (d
1
)
19760 (n
01
)
Total
4000 (m
11
)
16000 (m
01
)
20000 (N
1
)
Risk ratio = (80/4000)/(160/16 000) = 20 per 1000 / 10 per 1000 = 2.0
95% confidence interval = 1.53–2.61
Non-smokers
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
400 (a
2
)
200 (b
2
)
600 (n
12
)
No
79 600 (c
2
)
79800 (d
2
)
159400 (n
02
)
Total
80000 (m
12
)
80000 (m
02
)
160000 (N
2
)
Risk ratio = (400/80 000)/(200/80 000) = 5.0 per 1000 / 2.5 per 1000 = 2.0
95% confidence interval = 1.69–2.37
Hypothetical cohort study on occupa-
tional exposure to a particular chemical
substance and lung cancer described in
Example 14.2: results presented sepa-
rately for smokers and non-smokers.
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Smoking
Yes
4000
16000
20 000
No
80000
80000
160 000
Total
84000
96000
180000
Hypothetical cohort study described in
Example 14.2: distribution of study
subjects by occupational exposure and
smoking habits.
Example  14.2. Suppose  that  a  cohort  study  was  set  up  to  investigate
whether occupational exposure to a particular chemical substance was asso-
ciated with an increased risk of lung cancer. All study subjects were followed
up for five years after entry into the study (or until diagnosis of lung cancer
if earlier). The results of this study are shown in Table 14.5.
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
480 (a)
360 (b)
840 (n
1
)
No
83 520 (c)
95 640 (d)
179 160 (n
0
)
Total
84000 (m
1
)
96000 (m
0
)
180000 (N)
Crude risk ratio = (480/84 000)/(360/96 000) = 5.71 per 1000/3.75 per 1000 = 1.52
95% confidence interval = 1.33–1.75
χ2 = 37.21 on 1d.f.; P < 0.0001
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
480 (a)
360 (b)
840 (n
1
)
No
83 520 (c)
95 640 (d)
179 160 (n
0
)
Total
84000 (m
1
)
96000 (m
0
)
180000 (N)
Crude risk ratio = (480/84 000)/(360/96 000) = 5.71 per 1000/3.75 per 1000 = 1.52
95% confidence interval = 1.33–1.75
χ2 = 37.21 on 1d.f.; P < 0.0001
Table 14.5.
Smokers
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
80 (a
1
)
160 (b
1
)
240 (n
11
)
No
3920 (c
1
)
15840 (d
1
)
19760 (n
01
)
Total
4000 (m
11
)
16000 (m
01
)
20000 (N
1
)
Risk ratio = (80/4000)/(160/16 000) = 20 per 1000 / 10 per 1000 = 2.0
95% confidence interval = 1.53–2.61
Non-smokers
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Lung cancer
Yes
400 (a
2
)
200 (b
2
)
600 (n
12
)
No
79 600 (c
2
)
79800 (d
2
)
159400 (n
02
)
Total
80000 (m
12
)
80000 (m
02
)
160000 (N
2
)
Risk ratio = (400/80 000)/(200/80 000) = 5.0 per 1000 / 2.5 per 1000 = 2.0
95% confidence interval = 1.69–2.37
Table 14.6.
Exposure to chemical substance
Total
Yes
No
Smoking
Yes
4000
16000
20 000
No
80000
80000
160 000
Total
84000
96000
180000
Table 14.7.
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Draw and Write Text and Graphics on
After creating text on Word page, users are able doc, fileNameadd, New WordEncoder()) 'save word End powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to rotate just one page in pdf
We can obtain a Mantel–Haenszel summary estimate of the common
risk ratio (R
MH
) by applying the following formula to our data
Σa
i
m
0i
/N
i
R
MH
Σb
i
m
1i
/N
i
Thus,
(80 × 16 000)/20 000 + (400 × 80 000)/160 000
264
R
MH
=
= 2.0
(160 × 4 000)/20 000 + (200 × 80 000)/160 000
132
The calculation of confidence intervals around R
MH
and of the Mantel-
Haenszel χ
2
is presented in Section A14.1.2. In our example, the 95%
confidence interval is 1.73 to 2.30. The χ
2
is equal to 92.99 with one
degree of freedom, which gives P < 0.0001. Thus, there is strong evidence
that the occupational exposure was associated with an increased risk of
lung cancer and this effect was even stronger when differences in smok-
ing  habits  between  exposed  and  unexposed  workers  were  taken  into
account.
The Mantel–Haenszel method can also be applied when the appropri-
ate measure of effect is the rate ratio rather than the risk ratio. It gives
an adjusted rate ratio (denoted RR
MH
) by calculating a weighted average of
the rate ratios in the different strata.
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
311
Example 14.3. Suppose that a cohort of healthy women aged 45–50 years
was followed up to examine risk factors for various female cancers. At the
time  of  entry  into  the  study,  the  women  completed  a  questionnaire  on
sociodemographic variables and gynaecological and reproductive history. A
total of 1141 cervical cancer cases occurred during the follow-up period. The
relationship between cervical cancer and having ever had a Pap smear test
(as reported in the initial questionnaire) is shown in Table 14.8.
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
17 (a)
1124 (b)
1141 (n)
Person-years at risk
71184 (y
1
)
1518 701 (y
0
)
1589885 (y)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
23.9 (r
1
)
74.0 (r
0
)
71.8 (r)
Crude rate ratio = (17/71 184)/(1 124/1 518 701) = 0.32
95% confidence interval = 0.20 – 0.52
χ2 = 23.69 on 1d.f.; P < 0.001
Results from a cohort study on Pap
smear testing and cervical cancer:
hypothetical data.
14.2.3 Mantel–Haenszel rate ratio
Example 14.3. Suppose that a cohort of healthy women aged 45–50 years
was followed up to examine risk factors for various female cancers. At the
time  of  entry  into  the  study,  the  women  completed  a  questionnaire  on
sociodemographic variables and gynaecological and reproductive history. A
total of 1141 cervical cancer cases occurred during the follow-up period. The
relationship between cervical cancer and having ever had a Pap smear test
(as reported in the initial questionnaire) is shown in Table 14.8.
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
17 (a)
1124 (b)
1141 (n)
Person-years at risk
71184 (y
1
)
1518 701 (y
0
)
1589885 (y)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
23.9 (r
1
)
74.0 (r
0
)
71.8 (r)
Crude rate ratio = (17/71 184)/(1 124/1 518 701) = 0.32
95% confidence interval = 0.20 – 0.52
χ2 = 23.69 on 1d.f.; P < 0.001
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
17 (a)
1124 (b)
1141 (n)
Person-years at risk
71184 (y
1
)
1518 701 (y
0
)
1589885 (y)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
23.9 (r
1
)
74.0 (r
0
)
71.8 (r)
Crude rate ratio = (17/71 184)/(1 124/1 518 701) = 0.32
95% confidence interval = 0.20 – 0.52
χ2 = 23.69 on 1d.f.; P < 0.001
Table 14.8.
In 
, the crude rate ratio and its confidence interval are
consistent  with  a  decrease  in  the  incidence  of  cervical  cancer  among
women who reported in the initial questionnaire having ever had a Pap
smear test. Other studies have shown that there is a socioeconomic gradi-
ent in the incidence of cervical cancer, with women from poor socioeco-
nomic  backgrounds  being  at  higher  risk.  Thus,  socioeconomic  factors
might have confounded the association between Pap smear testing and
cervical cancer if, for instance, women from a high social background were
more likely to visit their doctors and had a Pap smear as part of their reg-
ular medical examination. To clarify this issue, we need to examine the
relationship between Pap smear testing and cervical cancer separately for
women from different socioeconomic backgrounds. This is shown in 
, where a woman’s educational level is used as a marker of socioeco-
nomic status.
The formula for the Mantel–Haenszel summary estimate of the com-
mon rate ratio is
Σa
i
y
0i
/y
i
RR
MH
Σb
i
y
1i
/y
i
Thus, in our example,
(13 × 828 149)/866 495 + (4 ×690 552)/723390
16.24
RR
MH
= 0.32
(697 × 38 346)/866 495 + (427 ×32 838)/723 390
50.23
Thus, educational level was not a confounder of the effect of Pap smear
on cervical  cancer in these data,  since the crude and  the adjusted rate
ratios have exactly the same value (0.32).
Chapter 14
312
High educational level
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
13 (a
1
)
697 (b
1
)
710 (n
1
)
Person-years at risk
38346 (y
11
)
828149 (y
01
)
866495 (y
1
)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
33.9 (r
11
)
84.2 (r
01
)
81.9 (r
1
)
Rate ratio = 0.40; 95% confidence interval = 0.23–0.69
Low educational level
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
4 (a
2
)
427 (b
2
)
431 (n
2
)
Person-years at risk
32 838 (y
12
)
690552 (y
02
)
723390 (y
2
)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
12.2 (r
12
)
61.8 (r
02
)
59.6 (r
2
)
Rate ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.08–0.54
Hypothetical cohort study on Pap
smear testing and cervical cancer
described in Example 14.3: results
stratified by women’s educational level.
Example 14.3
Table
14.9
High educational level
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
13 (a
1
)
697 (b
1
)
710 (n
1
)
Person-years at risk
38346 (y
11
)
828149 (y
01
)
866495 (y
1
)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
33.9 (r
11
)
84.2 (r
01
)
81.9 (r
1
)
Rate ratio = 0.40; 95% confidence interval = 0.23–0.69
Low educational level
Pap smear
Total
Ever
Never
Cases
4 (a
2
)
427 (b
2
)
431 (n
2
)
Person-years at risk
32 838 (y
12
)
690552 (y
02
)
723390 (y
2
)
Rate per 100 000 pyrs
12.2 (r
12
)
61.8 (r
02
)
59.6 (r
2
)
Rate ratio = 0.20; 95% confidence interval = 0.08–0.54
Table 14.9.
By applying the formulae given in the Appendix (see Section A14.1.3),
we obtain a Mantel–Haenszel χ
2
of 23.73 with one degree of freedom, cor-
responding to P < 0.001. The 95% confidence interval is 0.20 to 0.52.
Thus, chance is an unlikely explanation of this finding.
Note that the Mantel–Haenszel method of controlling for confounding
is similar to the method of standardization used to calculate age-adjusted
rates in Chapter 4. Both these methods are referred to as stratified analy-
ses, because we look at an exposure by a response for the different strata
(levels) of a confounder. They differ, however, in the set of weights used
to calculate the weighted average of the rate ratios in the different strata
(see Section 4.3.3).
In order  to be able to examine the effect of potential confounding
variables in an analysis, we need to identify them at the design stage of
the study. This should be done by taking into account findings from pre-
vious epidemiological studies and what is known about the possible eti-
ological  mechanisms  of  the disease  under  study.  Age and  gender are
obvious potential confounders in  practically all studies.  Smoking will
also be a potential confounder in any study examining the relationship
between a particular exposure and lung cancer. It would be necessary to
exclude the  possibility  that smoking  rather  than  the exposure  under
study is responsible  for  any association that may  be  found.  Potential
confounding variables should also include factors such as socioeconom-
ic status or place of residence, which are just proxy measures of more
direct but unknown causes of disease.
Not all factors suspected of being potential confounding factors will
actually lead to confounding of the exposure–outcome relationship in a
particular study. But how do we know if a particular variable really is a
confounder? We defined a confounder as a factor that is associated with
both exposure and disease (and is not on the causal pathway). However,
this may be difficult to assess in practice. For instance, with a large sam-
ple,  small  but  statistically  significant  associations  could  be  found
between the confounder and the exposure, and between the confounder
and the disease; however, they may not be strong enough to lead to con-
founding. Thus, the presence of or absence of confounding should not
be assessed by using a statistical test of significance. The magnitude of
confounding in any study should be evaluated by observing the degree
of discrepancy between the crude and adjusted estimates. If there is no
difference between these two estimates, the observed exposure–outcome
effect  was  not  confounded by  the  potential  confounding  variable.  A
large difference, as seen in 
, indicates the presence of con-
founding and implies that the adjusted summary measure is a better esti-
mate of the effect of the exposure on the outcome of interest than the
crude summary measure, since it removes the effect of the confounder.
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
313
14.3 How to identify confounders
Example 14.1
Two other aspects of stratification should be noted. First, factors that are
on the causal pathway between an exposure and a disease should not be
regarded as confounding the association between the exposure and the
outcome. Controlling for a factor that is on the causal pathway leads to
underestimation of the strength of the effect of the exposure on the out-
come under study. Occasionally, a variable that lies on the causal pathway
may be adjusted for in the analysis if we want to assess whether the effect
of the exposure on the outcome under study is entirely mediated through
that intermediate variable or whether there may be other independent
biological mechanisms. For instance, if we believe that human papillo-
mavirus infection is on the causal pathway between number  of sexual
partners and cervical cancer, the association with number of sexual part-
ners should disappear after adjusting for HPV infection. If the effect does
not disappear completely, it would suggest that the effect of number of
sexual partners on cervical cancer may be mediated through other biolog-
ical mechanisms not directly related to HPV infection. In practice, this rea-
soning may not be so straightforward because of errors in the measure-
ment of the intermediate variable.
Secondly, it is important to note that stratification assumes that each
stratum  is homogeneous  in  relation to  the confounding  variable. This
assumption depends on both the validity of the data on the confounding
variable (see Section 13.2) and the way strata are defined. For instance, if
we control for age through stratification, this is better achieved if the stra-
ta are  relatively  narrow.  Stratification into very broad  age groups (e.g.,
0–45 and 46+ years) is unlikely to be fully effective since, within each stra-
tum, there are likely to be substantial differences in the age distribution of
cases and controls (in a case–control study) or exposed and unexposed (in
a cohort or intervention study).
An underlying assumption in the calculation of a summary effect esti-
mate is that the true effect is the same across strata and that any departures
from this uniform effect are assumed to be due to random sampling varia-
tion. If there is substantial variation between the stratum-specific estimates
of effect, this indicates the presence of interaction (also called effect modifi-
cation) between the exposure of interest and the so-called confounding fac-
tor.
If there is  interaction between  the exposures  under  study  and the
confounder, a Mantel–Haenszel summary estimate of effect will be mis-
leading, as it does not convey the full form of the exposure–outcome
association, that is, that it varies according to the level of the stratify-
ing  variable.  Thus,  only  if  we  are  satisfied  that  the  stratum-specific
effect measures do not vary between themselves (i.e., there is no inter-
action), should we calculate an adjusted summary estimate of effect by
taking a weighted mean of stratum-specific estimates. This concept is
Chapter 14
314
14.4 Confounding and interaction
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested