display pdf byte array in browser c# : Rotate pdf page permanently Library application component asp.net html web page mvc CancerEpi-141-part1370

not new. We discussed it briefly in Section 4.3.3 when we mentioned
that age-standardized rates were an appropriate summary of the data
only if the effect was homogeneous across the age-strata.
The first step in any stratified analysis is to assess whether interaction is
present (
). In most circumstances, this decision should be
based on visual inspection of the data to examine the observed patterns of
variation in the stratum-specific estimates. If they are the same, there is no
interaction. In this situation, however, confounding may occur if the stra-
tum-specific effects differ from the crude effect. If the stratum-specific esti-
mates differ from each other, interaction is present and the emphasis in
the analysis should be on describing  how the association of  interest is
modified  by  the stratifying  factor and all  stratum-specific  estimates  of
effect, and their confidence intervals, should be reported separately.
Deciding whether interaction exists or not in any particular analysis is
often  difficult,  since  the  stratum-specific  estimates  are  likely  to  vary
because of random variation, even if the true effect is similar. For instance,
the effect of Pap smear testing on cervical cancer in
was more
marked for women of low educational level (RR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.08–0.54)
than for women of high educational level (RR = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.23–0.69),
suggesting a weak interaction between Pap smear and educational level.
However, this difference between the stratum-specific rate ratios may just
reflect random variation. A variety of χ
2
tests of heterogeneity are available
to test the null hypothesis that the degree of variability in the series of stra-
tum-specific  estimates is  consistent  with  random  variation.  In  practice,
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
315
Example  14.4. Suppose  we are  interested in examining the relationship
between an exposure A and a certain outcome B in a cohort study. We start
by calculating the crude rate ratio, which gives a value of 2.0. We then
decide to examine the relationship between A and B separately for those who
were exposed to a third variable C (stratum 1) and those who were not (stra-
tum 2). Table 14.10 shows three possible results of this study and how they
should be interpreted. In situation I, there is no confounding, because the
crude and adjusted rate ratios are similar, and no interaction, because the
rate ratios are similar for both strata. In situation II, there is confounding,
because the crude and the adjusted rate ratios differ, but no interaction,
because the effect is similar in the two strata. In situation III, there is strong
interaction between A and C because the stratum-specific rate ratios are
markedly different for those exposed and those not exposed to C.
Crude
Rate ratio in Rate ratio in Adjusted
rate ratio
stratum 1
stratum 2
rate ratio
Situation I
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
No confounding
No interaction
Situation II
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Confounding present
No interaction
Situation III
2.0
4.0
0.5
Strong interaction
Example of confounding and interac-
tion.
Example 14.4
Example 14.3
Example  14.4. Suppose  we are  interested in examining the relationship
between an exposure A and a certain outcome B in a cohort study. We start
by calculating the crude rate ratio, which gives a value of 2.0. We then
decide to examine the relationship between A and B separately for those who
were exposed to a third variable C (stratum 1) and those who were not (stra-
tum 2). Table 14.10 shows three possible results of this study and how they
should be interpreted. In situation I, there is no confounding, because the
crude and adjusted rate ratios are similar, and no interaction, because the
rate ratios are similar for both strata. In situation II, there is confounding,
because the crude and the adjusted rate ratios differ, but no interaction,
because the effect is similar in the two strata. In situation III, there is strong
interaction between A and C because the stratum-specific rate ratios are
markedly different for those exposed and those not exposed to C.
Crude
Rate ratio in Rate ratio in Adjusted
rate ratio
stratum 1
stratum 2
rate ratio
Situation I
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
No confounding
No interaction
Situation II
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Confounding present
No interaction
Situation III
2.0
4.0
0.5
Strong interaction
Crude
Rate ratio in Rate ratio in Adjusted
rate ratio
stratum 1
stratum 2
rate ratio
Situation I
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
No confounding
No interaction
Situation II
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Confounding present
No interaction
Situation III
2.0
4.0
0.5
Strong interaction
Table 14.10.
Rotate pdf page permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate single page in pdf
Rotate pdf page permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pdf page by page
however, these tests are not very powerful. Epidemiological studies, unless
they  are  specifically designed  to  do  this,  rarely  have  enough  statistical
power to detect interactions (see Section 15.4.4). Thus, more  is usually
gained by visual inspection of the size and pattern of the effect estimates
across strata than from tests for interaction (effect modification).
In practice, it is frequently necessary to examine and possibly adjust for
several confounders. This can be achieved by using the Mantel–Haenszel
method, although, as the number of confounders increases, this method
becomes impractical because most strata will have very sparse data. As we
shall see later in this chapter, regression modelling techniques are more
efficient methods in these circumstances.
In 
, the crude odds ratio is 1.54. The 95% confidence
interval and the P-value suggest that chance is an unlikely explana-
tion of this finding. Thus, women who smoked were more likely to be
HPV-positive than those who did not.
Number of sexual partners is a well known risk factor for HPV infec-
tion and it may have confounded the association between smoking
and HPV infection. 
shows the association found between
smoking  and  HPV  stratified  by  reported  number  of  lifetime sexual
partners (categorized as < 2 partners and ≥ 2 partners).
Examination of  the  stratum-specific  odds  ratios  (and  their  confi-
dence intervals) suggests that the effect of smoking on HPV infection
in women who reported less than two sexual partners is similar to the
Chapter 14
316
Example 14.5. Assume that a case–control study was carried out to examine
risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the cervix uteri. A
standard questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on sociodemo-
graphic variables and sexual behaviour from 188 HPV-positive female cases
and 571 HPV-negative female controls. Table 14.11 shows the distribution of
cases and controls by smoking and HPV infection.
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
42 (a)
146 (b)
188 (n
1
)
HPV-negative
90 (c)
481 (d)
571 (n
0
)
Total
132 (m
1
)
627 (m
0
)
759 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (42/146) / (90/481) = 1.54
95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.32
χ2 = 4.25 on 1d.f.; P = 0.039
Results from a case-control study on
smoking and HPV infection: hypotheti-
cal data.
14.5 Using the Mantel–Haenszel method to adjust  for
several confounders
Example 14.5
Table 14.12
Example 14.5. Assume that a case–control study was carried out to examine
risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the cervix uteri. A
standard questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on sociodemo-
graphic variables and sexual behaviour from 188 HPV-positive female cases
and 571 HPV-negative female controls. Table 14.11 shows the distribution of
cases and controls by smoking and HPV infection.
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
42 (a)
146 (b)
188 (n
1
)
HPV-negative
90 (c)
481 (d)
571 (n
0
)
Total
132 (m
1
)
627 (m
0
)
759 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (42/146) / (90/481) = 1.54
95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.32
χ2 = 4.25 on 1d.f.; P = 0.039
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
42 (a)
146 (b)
188 (n
1
)
HPV-negative
90 (c)
481 (d)
571 (n
0
)
Total
132 (m
1
)
627 (m
0
)
759 (N)
Crude odds ratio = (42/146) / (90/481) = 1.54
95% confidence interval = 1.02–2.32
χ2 = 4.25 on 1d.f.; P = 0.039
Table 14.11.
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document inputFilePath) ' get the 1st page Dim page
how to rotate one page in pdf document; pdf reverse page order online
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
this VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate pdf page permanently
effect in those who reported two or more. This is confirmed by the χ
2
test for heterogeneity. Since the effect of smoking on HPV infection is
uniform across the two strata, it is appropriate to calculate a pooled
adjusted odds ratio. Thus, after adjusting for number of sexual part-
ners, the odds ratio of smoking is reduced a little from 1.54 to 1.47.
This result suggests that this variable was a weak confounder of the
association  between  smoking  and  HPV  infection.  But  even  after
adjusting for number of sexual partners, the 95% confidence interval
is still consistent with an effect of smoking on HPV infection. Thus,
these results suggest that smoking increased the risk of HPV infection,
but this risk was marginally weaker after allowing for the confound-
ing effect of number of sexual partners.
The same technique can be used to obtain an odds ratio adjusted for
age. In this hypothetical study, age (in years) was categorized into six
groups (<  20, 20–24, 25–29,  30–34,  35–44, ≥ 45). Thus, we  need to
construct six 2 × 2 tables of smoking and HPV infection, one for each
age-group. The cells of these 2 × 2 tables are shown in 
.
The OR
MH
adjusted for age is slightly lower than the crude odds ratio
(1.47 versus 1.54), suggesting that age was also a weak confounder of
the association between smoking and HPV infection.
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
317
< 2 sexual partners
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
31 (a
1
)
124 (b
1
)
155 (n
11
)
HPV-negative
78 (c
1
)
437 (d
1
)
515 (n
01
)
Total
109 (m
11
)
561 (m
01
)
670 (N
1
)
Odds ratio = 1.40
95% confidence interval = 0.88–2.22
≥2 sexual partners
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
11 (a
2
)
22 (b
2
)
33 (n
12
)
HPV-negative
12 (c
2
)
44 (d
2
)
56 (n
02
)
Total
23 (m
12
)
66 (m
02
)
89 (N
2
)
Odds ratio = 1.83
95% confidence interval = 0.70–4.80
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 0.24 on 1 d.f.; P = 0.63
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
(31×437)/670 + (11×44)/89         25.66
OR
MH
            = 1.47
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
(124×78)/670 + (22×12)/89         17.40
95% confidence interval = 0.95–2.26
χ2 = 2.97 on 1d.f.; P = 0.09
Hypothetical case–control study on
smoking and HPV infection described
in Example 14.5: results stratified by
number of lifetime sexual partners.
Table 14.13
< 2 sexual partners
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
31 (a
1
)
124 (b
1
)
155 (n
11
)
HPV-negative
78 (c
1
)
437 (d
1
)
515 (n
01
)
Total
109 (m
11
)
561 (m
01
)
670 (N
1
)
Odds ratio = 1.40
95% confidence interval = 0.88–2.22
≥2 sexual partners
Smoking
Total
Yes
No
HPV-positive
11 (a
2
)
22 (b
2
)
33 (n
12
)
HPV-negative
12 (c
2
)
44 (d
2
)
56 (n
02
)
Total
23 (m
12
)
66 (m
02
)
89 (N
2
)
Odds ratio = 1.83
95% confidence interval = 0.70–4.80
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 0.24 on 1 d.f.; P = 0.63
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
(31×437)/670 + (11×44)/89
25.66
OR
MH
=
=
= 1.47
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
(124×78)/670 + (22×12)/89
17.40
95% confidence interval = 0.95–2.26
χ2 = 2.97 on 1d.f.; P = 0.09
Table 14.12.
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
commonly used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in display 90 permanently burn drawn annotation on page in web
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate pdf page few degrees
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document inputFilePath); // get the 1st page PDFPage page
rotate pdf pages on ipad; rotate pdf page and save
Thus, so far, we have estimated the effect of smoking on HPV infection
adjusted for number of sexual partners and the effect of smoking adjust-
ed for age. We could estimate the effect of smoking on HPV infection
adjusted  simultaneously for  number  of  partners  and  age  using  the
Mantel–Haenzsel method. To do this, we need to construct a 2 × 2 table
of smoking by HPV infection for every possible combination of number
of partners and age-group. Since number of partners forms two strata (<2
and ≥2) and age forms six strata (< 20, 20–24, 25–29, 30–34, 35–44, ≥ 45),
we need to construct 2 × 6 =12 such 2 × 2 tables. The cells of the 2 × 2
tables for smoking for these 12 strata are shown in 
. Thus,
after adjusting for the confounding effects of number of partners and age,
the effect of smoking on HPV infection is even smaller (OR
MH
= 1.41).
The Mantel–Haenszel method can be extended to adjust simultaneous-
ly for more than two confounders. For example, to estimate the effect of
smoking on HPV infection, allowing for number of sexual partners (two
strata), age (six strata), marital status (three strata: married, single, wid-
owed/divorced) and educational level (three strata), we would construct
2×6×3×3=108 2×2 tables. Clearly, in 108 tables formed from a data-set of
188 cases and 571 controls, some strata will have very small numbers of
observations, if any.
 further  problem  with  the  Mantel–Haenszel  method  is  that  each
explanatory variable included in the analysis has to be classified as either
an exposure or a confounder, and there may be only one exposure. For
example, smoking was our exposure, and number of partners and age
were our confounders. We therefore obtained an odds ratio for smoking
adjusted for number of partners and age. These results did not give us the
odds ratio for number of partners adjusted for smoking and age, or the
odds ratios for age adjusted for smoking and number of partners. These
would have required further Mantel–Haenszel analyses.
Chapter 14
318
Stratum
Age (years) a
i
b
i
c
i
d
i
N
i
a
i
d
i
/N
i
b
i
c
i
/N
i
1
<20
3
10
16
79
108
2.19
1.48
2
20–24
13
44
16
92
165
7.25
4.27
3
25–29
6
33
22
62
123
3.02
5.90
4
30–34
8
25
10
75
118
5.08
2.12
5
35–44
8
22
18
89
137
5.20
2.89
6
≥45
4
12
8
84
108
3.11
0.89
All strata
42
146
90
481
759
25.85
17.55
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 7.37 on 5 d.f.;P = 0.20
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
25.85
OR
MH
= 1.47
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
17.55
95% confidence interval = 0.96–2.32
χ2 = 3.06 on 1d.f.; P = 0.08
Hypothetical case–control study on
smoking and HPV infection described
in Example 14.5: results stratified by
age-group.
Table 14.14
Stratum
Age (years) a
i
b
i
c
i
d
i
N
i
a
i
d
i
/N
i
b
i
c
i
/N
i
1
<20
3
10
16
79
108
2.19
1.48
2
20–24
13
44
16
92
165
7.25
4.27
3
25–29
6
33
22
62
123
3.02
5.90
4
30–34
8
25
10
75
118
5.08
2.12
5
35–44
8
22
18
89
137
5.20
2.89
6
≥45
4
12
8
84
108
3.11
0.89
All strata
42
146
90
481
759
25.85
17.55
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 7.37 on 5 d.f.;P = 0.20
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
25.85
OR
MH
=
=
= 1.47
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
17.55
95% confidence interval = 0.96–2.32
χ2 = 3.06 on 1d.f.; P = 0.08
Table 14.13.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
able to change view orientation by clicking rotate button C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export to HTML file and create multi-page tiff file
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate single page
How to C#: Cleanup Images
property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the To identify blank page through the property BlankPageDetected, if there is a blank page
rotate all pages in pdf preview; save pdf after rotating pages
Regression models summarize the relationship between an outcome
(also called dependent) variable and several explanatory (independent)
variables as a mathematical equation. The general form of this equation
is
Outcome variable = function (explanatory variables)
There are many types of regression model. The choice of any particu-
lar model depends on the characteristics of the outcome variable (i.e.,
continuous or categorical) and on the way it is mathematically related to
the explanatory variables. The simplest mathematical model we could
use has already been introduced in Section 11.2.1 to describe the rela-
tionship between two quantitative variables.
A discussion of these models and the assumptions underlying them is
beyond the scope of this chapter. However, these modelling techniques
are commonly used in epidemiological studies and, therefore, in the rest
of this chapter we will try to illustrate how these techniques relate to the
Mantel–Haenszel method, to allow the reader to understand and inter-
pret results from published work where they have been used.
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
319
Stratum
Age
Number 
a
i
b
i
c
i
d
i
N
i
a
i
d
/N
i
b
i
c
/N
i
(yrs)
of partners
1
<20
<2
2
8
11
67
88
1.52
1.00
2
20–24
<2
10
36
14
85
145
5.86
3.48
3
25–29
<2
3
28
19
59
109
1.62
4.88
4
30–34
<2
5
21
10
65
101
3.22
2.08
5
35–44
<2
7
19
17
78
121
4.51
2.67
6
≥45
<2
4
12
7
83
106
3.13
0.79
7
<20
≥2
1
2
5
12
20
0.60
0.50
8
20–24
≥2
3
8
2
7
20
1.05
0.80
9
25–29
≥2
3
5
3
3
14
0.64
1.07
10
30–34
≥2
3
4
0
10
17
1.76
0.00
11
35–44
≥2
1
3
1
11
16
0.69
0.19
12
≥45
≥2
0
0
1
1
2
0.00
0.00
All strata
42
146
90
481
759
24.60
17.46
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 12.44 on 10 d.f.;P = 0.26
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
24.60
OR
MH
= 1.41
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
17.46
95% confidence interval = 0.91–2.24
χ2 = 2.62 on 1 d.f.; P = 0.132
Hypothetical case–control study on
smoking and HPV infection described
in Example 14.5: results stratified by
age and lifetime number of sexual part-
ners.
14.6 Using regression modelling to adjust for the
effect of confounders
Stratum
Age
Number
a
i
b
i
c
i
d
i
N
i
a
i
d
i
/N
i
b
i
c
i
/N
i
(yrs)
of partners
1
<20
<2
2
8
11
67
88
1.52
1.00
2
20–24
<2
10
36
14
85
145
5.86
3.48
3
25–29
<2
3
28
19
59
109
1.62
4.88
4
30–34
<2
5
21
10
65
101
3.22
2.08
5
35–44
<2
7
19
17
78
121
4.51
2.67
6
≥45
<2
4
12
7
83
106
3.13
0.79
7
<20
≥2
1
2
5
12
20
0.60
0.50
8
20–24
≥2
3
8
2
7
20
1.05
0.80
9
25–29
≥2
3
5
3
3
14
0.64
1.07
10
30–34
≥2
3
4
0
10
17
1.76
0.00
11
35–44
≥2
1
3
1
11
16
0.69
0.19
12
≥45
≥2
0
0
1
1
2
0.00
0.00
All strata
42
146
90
481
759
24.60
17.46
χ2 test for heterogeneity = 12.44 on 10 d.f.;P = 0.26
Σa
i
d
i
/N
i
24.60
OR
MH
=
=
= 1.41
Σb
i
c
i
/N
i
17.46
95% confidence interval = 0.91–2.24
χ2 = 2.62 on 1 d.f.; P = 0.132
Table 14.14.
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB 4, false); //only posterize the second page of
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; how to rotate all pages in pdf
Let us consider again the hypothetical case–control study described in
. We can use a particular regression technique, called logistic
regression, to analyse data from unmatched case–control studies. In this
analysis, we start by using a logistic regression model which includes as
explanatory variables only the exposure under study–smoking. The results
are shown in 
(model 1). The odds ratio estimated by this logis-
tic regression model is the same as the crude odds ratio we obtained in
.
We then move on to use a model which includes both smoking and
number  of  sexual  partners  as  explanatory  variables  (model  2  in 
). This model gives
Odds ratio for smoking versus non-smoking adjusted for number of 
sexual partners = 1.47 (95% CI = 0.97–2.23)
Thus, after adjusting for number of sexual partners, the effect of smok-
ing on HPV infection became smaller (1.47 versus 1.54). This result is sim-
ilar to that obtained earlier when we used the Mantel–Haenszel technique
to control for the effect of number of sexual partners (
). But in
contrast to this technique, this regression model also gives us the odds
ratio for number of sexual partners adjusted for smoking:
Odds ratio for ≥2 sexual partners versus <2, adjusted for smoking 
= 1.90 (95% CI = 1.19–3.03)
Chapter 14
320
Variable
Odds ratio
95% confidence interval
Model 1
smokinga
1.54
1.02–2.32
Model 2
smokinga
1.47
0.97–2.23
partnersb
1.90
1.19–3.03
Model 3
smokinga
1.43
0.93–2.19
partnersb
1.95
1.19–3.17
age 2c
4.14
2.12–8.12
age 3
3.58
1.77–7.24
age 4
3.01
1.47–6.15
age 5
2.18
1.07–4.46
age 6
1.49
0.67–3.33
Categorized as ‘non-smokers’(baseline) and ‘smokers’.
Categorized as ‘< 2 partners’(baseline) and ‘≥2 partners’
Categorized as age1 = <20 (baseline); age2 = 20–24; age3 = 25–29; age4 = 30–34; 
age5 = 35–44; age6 = 45+ years.
Hypothetical case–control study on risk
factors for HPV cervical infection
described in Example 14.5. Results
obtained from logistic regression mod-
els which included an increasing num-
ber of explanatory variables: smoking,
lifetime number of sexual partners and
age. (The values underlined corre-
spond to those obtained earlier with the
Mantel–Haenszel technique shown in
Table 14.11, 14.12 and 14.14.)
Example 14.5
Table 14.15
Table 14.11
Table
14.15
Table 14.12
Variable
Odds ratio
95% confidence interval
Model 1
smokinga
1.54
1.02–2.32
Model 2
smokinga
1.47
0.97–2.23
partnersb
1.90
1.19–3.03
Model 3
smokinga
1.43
0.93–2.19
partnersb
1.95
1.19–3.17
age 2c
4.14
2.12–8.12
age 3
3.58
1.77–7.24
age 4
3.01
1.47–6.15
age 5
2.18
1.07–4.46
age 6
1.49
0.67–3.33
Categorized as ‘non-smokers’(baseline) and ‘smokers’.
Categorized as ‘< 2 partners’(baseline) and ‘≥2 partners’
Categorized as age1 = <20 (baseline); age2 = 20–24; age3 = 25–29; age4 = 30–34;
age5 = 35–44; age6 = 45+ years.
Table 14.15.
Thus, there is a statistically significant increased risk of HPV infection
associated with two or more sexual partners, even after taking differences
in smoking into account.
We can use a more complex model which includes smoking, number of
sexual partners and age (model 3, 
). This model gives us an
estimate of the effect of smoking on HPV infection adjusted for number of
sexual partners and age of 1.43 (95% CI = 0.93–2.19), which is similar to
that obtained  before  with the  Mantel–Haenszel  method  (OR
MH
=  1.41;
95%  CI  =  0.91–2.24)  (see 
).  However,  unlike  the
Mantel–Haenszel analysis, the logistic regression analysis also gives the
following extra odds ratios:
Odds ratio for ≥ 2 sexual partners versus < 2, adjusted for smoking and age 
= 1.95 (95% CI = 1.19–3.17)
Odds ratio for age 20–24 versus age <20, adjusted for smoking and partners 
= 4.14 (95% CI = 2.12–8.12)
Odds ratio for age 25–29 versus age <20, adjusted for smoking and partners 
= 3.58 (95% CI = 1.77–7.24)
Odds ratio for age 30–34 versus age <20, adjusted for smoking and partners 
= 3.01 (95% CI = 1.47–6.15)
Odds ratio for age 35–44 versus age <20, adjusted for smoking and partners 
= 2.18 (95% CI = 1.07–4.46)
Odds ratio for age 45+ versus age <20, adjusted for smoking and partners
= 1.49 (95% CI = 0.67–3.33)
One  of the main advantages of regression modelling is that it does  not
require us to define which explanatory variable is the exposure and which ones
are the potential confounders, since all explanatory variables are treated in the
same way. This is particularly important in studies designed to examine the
effect of a wide range of exposures rather than just the effect of a specific one.
Similar regression models can be applied to data from studies of other
designs. Let us consider again the hypothetical cohort study on Pap smear
use and cervical cancer described in 
(Section 14.2.3). In
, we calculated the crude rate ratio to measure the effect of Pap smear
testing on cervical cancer. We then went on to calculate the effect of Pap
smear  adjusting  for  educational  level  (
 using  the
Mantel–Haenszel  technique. We  can  also  use  the  Mantel–Haenszel  tech-
nique to adjust simultaneously for educational level, marital status and age
at first intercourse. The results are shown in 
.
Using the Mantel–Haenszel technique to adjust simultaneously for edu-
cational level, marital status and age at first intercourse involved the forma-
tion of 18 (=2×3×3) strata. However, only seventeen cervical cancer cases
occurred  in  women  who  reported  having  ever  had  a  Pap  smear.
Consequently, there were empty cells in several strata.
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
321
Table 14.15
Table  14.14
Example 14.3
Table
14.8
Table  14.9
Table 14.16
We can use a special regression modelling technique, called Poisson
regression, to analyse the data from this hypothetical cohort study on
Pap smear and cervical cancer. The results are shown in 
.
As with logistic regression, we start by using a model which includes
only one explanatory variable, Pap smear use (model 1 in 
).
This model gives us the Poisson estimate of the cervical cancer rate ratio
for Pap smear use. This value corresponds to the crude cervical cancer rate
ratio obtained earlier. This model gives us another value called ‘constant’,
which corresponds to the cervical cancer incidence rate in women who
reported never having had a Pap smear (see 
). From these val-
ues, we can calculate the incidence rate in the exposed as 0.00074 × 0.32
=  0.0002368  =  24  per  100 000  person-years  (the  same  as  the  value
obtained in 
).
We then move on to add to our model another explanatory variable,
for instance, educational level (model 2 in 
). This model gives
us the Poisson estimate of the cervical cancer rate ratio for Pap smear use
adjusted for educational level, which is 0.32 (95% CI = 0.20–0.52). This is
the same value obtained when the Mantel–Haenszel technique was used
to  control  for  educational  level  (
).  In  contrast  with  the
Mantel–Haenszel technique, this model also gives us
Cervical cancer rate ratio for high versus low educational level adjusted for Pap smear
use = 0.73 (95% CI = 0.65–0.82)
In the last model (model 4) shown in
, we included Pap smear
use, educational level, marital status and age at first intercourse as explana-
tory variables. The Poisson estimate of the rate  ratio for Pap smear use
adjusted for educational level, marital status and age at first intercourse is
0.46  (95%  CI  =  0.29–0.75),  similar  to  that  obtained  with  the
Mantel–Haenszel method (RR
MH
= 0.43; 95% CI = 0.27–0.72) (
).
But with the Poisson regression, we also obtained the following additional
rate ratios:
Cervical cancer  rate ratio  for high versus low educational level adjusted  for Pap
smear use, marital status and age at first intercourse = 0.77 (95% CI = 0.68–0.87)
Chapter 14
322
Variables adjusted for
Cervical cancer rate 
95% confidence 
ratio for Pap smear use
interval
None
0.32 (crude)
0.20–0.52
Educational levela
0.32
0.20–0.52
Educational level 
0.40
0.25–0.66
and marital statusb
Educational level, marital status 
0.43
0.27–0.72
and age at first intercoursec
Categorized as ‘low educational level’and ‘high educational level’.
Categorized as marital status 1=married; 2=single; 3=divorced/widowed.
Categorized as age at first intercourse 1=<18 years; 2=18–22 years; 3=22+ years.
Hypothetical cohort study on Pap
smear testing and cervical cancer
described in Example 14.3. Results
obtained using the Mantel–Haenszel
technique.
Table 14.17
Table 14.17
Table 14.8
Table 14.8
Table 14.17
Table  14.16
Table 14.17
Table 14.16
Variables adjusted for
Cervical cancer rate
95% confidence
ratio for Pap smear use
interval
None
0.32 (crude)
0.20–0.52
Educational levela
0.32
0.20–0.52
Educational level
0.40
0.25–0.66
and marital statusb
Educational level, marital status
0.43
0.27–0.72
and age at first intercoursec
Categorized as ‘low educational level’and ‘high educational level’.
Categorized as marital status 1=married; 2=single; 3=divorced/widowed.
Categorized as age at first intercourse 1=<18 years; 2=18–22 years; 3=22+ years.
Table 14.16.
Cervical cancer rate ratio for single versus married women adjusted for Pap smear use,
educational level and age at first intercourse = 2.68 (95% CI = 2.27–3.15)
Cervical cancer rate ratio for divorced/widowed versus married women adjusted for Pap
smear use, educational level and age at first intercourse = 1.60 (95% CI = 1.36–1.87)
Cervical cancer rate ratio for age at first intercourse 18–22 versus < 18 years adjusted for
Pap smear use, educational level and marital status = 0.52 (95% CI = 0.46–0.59)
Cervical cancer rate ratio for age at first intercourse 22+ versus < 18 years adjusted for
Pap smear use, educational level and marital status = 0.13 (95% CI = 0.09–0.19)
Logistic regression is used for estimating odds ratios. It may therefore be
used in a case–control study, a cross-sectional study, or if estimating ‘risks’
rather than ‘rates’, in a cohort study. Poisson regression models are used for
estimating  rate  ratios  using  person-time  data.  Other  commonly  used
regression models in epidemiology are:
Dealing with confounding in the analysis
323
Variable
Baseline rate 
Cervical cancer 95% confidence 
(per person year)
rate ratio
interval
Model 1
constant
0.00074
0.0007–0.0008
Pap smear usea
0.32
0.20–0.52
Model 2
constant
0.008
0.008–0.009
Pap smear usea
0.32
0.20–0.52
Educational levelb
0.73
0.65–0.82
Model 3
constant
0.005
0.004–0.005
Pap smear usea
0.41
0.25–0.66
Educational levelb
0.74
0.66–0.84
Marital status2c
2.68
2.28–3.15
Marital status3
1.89
1.61–2.21
Model 4
constant
0.008
0.006–0.009
Pap smear usea
0.46
0.29–0.75
Educational levelb
0.77
0.68–0.87
Marital status2c
2.68
2.27–3.15
Marital status3
1.60
1.36–1.87
Age at first intercourse2d
0.52
0.46–0.59
Age at first intercourse3
0.13
0.09–0.19
Categorized as ‘never’(baseline) and ‘ever’.
Categorized as ‘low educational level’(baseline) and ‘high educational level’.
Categorized as marital status 1=married (baseline), 2=single, 3=divorced/widowed.
Categorized as age at first intercourse 1= < 18 years (baseline), 2=18–22 years, 3=22+ years.
Hypothetical cohort study on Pap
smear and cervical cancer described in
Example 14.3. Results obtained from
Poisson regression models with
increasing numbers of explanatory
variables. (The values underlined cor-
respond to those obtained with the
Mantel–Haenszel technique shown in
Table 14.16.)
Variable
Baseline rate
Cervical cancer 95% confidence
(per person year)
rate ratio
interval
Model 1
constant
0.00074
0.0007–0.0008
Pap smear usea
0.32
0.20–0.52
Model 2
constant
0.008
0.008–0.009
Pap smear usea
0.32
0.20–0.52
Educational levelb
0.73
0.65–0.82
Model 3
constant
0.005
0.004–0.005
Pap smear usea
0.41
0.25–0.66
Educational levelb
0.74
0.66–0.84
Marital status2c
2.68
2.28–3.15
Marital status3
1.89
1.61–2.21
Model 4
constant
0.008
0.006–0.009
Pap smear usea
0.46
0.29–0.75
Educational levelb
0.77
0.68–0.87
Marital status2c
2.68
2.27–3.15
Marital status3
1.60
1.36–1.87
Age at first intercourse2d
0.52
0.46–0.59
Age at first intercourse3
0.13
0.09–0.19
Categorized as ‘never’(baseline) and ‘ever’.
Categorized as ‘low educational level’(baseline) and ‘high educational level’.
Categorized as marital status 1=married (baseline), 2=single, 3=divorced/widowed.
Categorized as age at first intercourse 1= < 18 years (baseline), 2=18–22 years, 3=22+ years.
Table 14.17.
Conditional logistic regression: logistic regression analysis is suitable for
unmatched case–control studies or frequency-matched case–control stud-
ies. Individually matched case–control studies require a slightly different
approach  called  conditional logistic regression analysis. This modelling
technique is the only way we can adjust for confounders other than the
matching factor(s) used in the design of these studies.
Cox’s proportional hazards model: this type of regression model is used
when the time to an event is of particular interest (as in survival analysis).
In summary, the Mantel–Haenszel method is a very useful technique to
adjust for confounders, and this approach is often adequate for data with
few confounders. However, in order to adjust simultaneously for several
confounders, regression modelling methods may be necessary.
It is important, however, to stress that any analysis should start by using
the Mantel–Haenszel method to obtain preliminary crude effect estimates
and effect estimates adjusted for each confounder separately. The cross-
tabulations used for stratification in this technique allow the investigator
to observe most of the important relationships and interactions that are
present and to detect errors and inconsistencies in the data that might not
otherwise be evident.
Regression models can then be used in a second stage of the analysis to
adjust simultaneously for several confounders. One of the main disadvan-
tages of regression modelling is that we lose sight of the data, so that it is
often regarded as a ‘black box’ approach. Statistical modelling should not
be used by people who are not familiar with it and who do not understand
the assumptions upon which it is based.
Chapter 14
324
14.7 Conclusions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested