D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.9 
Figure 8.12 shows the traditional sensor conditioning solution to this problem, where an 
instrumentation amplifier is used to amplify the 10-mV fullscale bridge output signal to 
2.5 V, which is compatible with the input of the14+ bit ADC. This approach requires a 
low-noise, low-drift in amp such as the AD620 precision in amp (Reference 4) which has 
a 0.1-Hz to 10-Hz peak-to-peak noise of 280 nV, approximately 280 nV ÷ 6.6 = 42-nV 
rms.  
Figure 8.12: Traditional Approach to Design 
Another critical requirement of the system is a lowpass filter to remove noise and  
50/60-Hz pickup. Assuming a signal 3-dB bandwidth of 10 Hz, the filter should be down 
at least 60 dB at 50 Hz—a challenging filter design to put it mildly! There are many other 
considerations in the design including the stability of the two reference voltages, the 
VREF1 buffer op amp, etc. 
Finally, the ADC presents another serious challenge, requiring 14.3-bit noise-free code 
performance with a 2.5-V fullscale input signal—implying a 16-bit ADC with no more 
than approximately 3-LSBs peak-to-peak (0.45-LSBs rms) input-referred noise.  
In order to avoid these traditional signal conditioning design problems, the AD7730-
based design shown in Figure 8.13 represents a truly elegant solution requiring no 
instrumentation amplifier, reference, or filter. Note that the bridge interfaces directly with 
the AD7730 as previously shown in Figure 8.7. The AD7730 input PGA eliminates the 
need for an external in amp, providing a fullscale input range of 10 mV as a 
programmable option. Kelvin sensing is used to eliminate errors due to the wiring 
resistance in the bridge excitation lines. The bridge is driven directly from the  
+5-V supply, and the sense lines serve as the ADC reference voltage—thereby ensuring 
fully ratiometric operation as previously described. The need for a complicated filter is 
also eliminated—simple ceramic capacitor decoupling on each analog and reference input 
(not shown on the diagram) is sufficient.  
ɿComplicated design
ɿLow pass filter is needed to keep low noise
zFor example, –3dB @ 10Hz, –60dB @ 50Hz (difficult filter design)
ɿInstrumentation amplifier performance is critical
zLow noise (AD620: 0.28µV p-p noise in 0.1Hz to 10Hz BW is 
approximately 42nV RMS), low offset, low gain error
VREF1
+9V
V
EXC
= 5V
10mV
GAIN = 250
2.5V
VREF2
2.5V
+5V
ADC
> 14-bit
HOST
SYSTEM
DIGITAL
IN AMP
Pdf rotate single page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf expert rotate page; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
Pdf rotate single page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages on ipad; how to rotate one page in pdf document
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.10 
Figure 8.13: Design Using AD7730 
System performance of the design can be determined by a detailed examination of the 
AD7730 data sheet, Table I and II, as shown in Figure 8.14. Table I shows the output rms 
noise in nV as a function of output data rate, digital filter 3-dB frequency, and input range 
(chopping mode enabled in all cases). An output data rate of 200-Hz yields a filter corner 
frequency of 7.9Hz which is reasonable for the application at hand. With an input range 
of ±10 mV, the output rms noise is 80 nV. This corresponds to a peak-to-peak noise, V
PP
= 80 nV × 6.6 = 528 nV. The number of noise-free counts is obtained as  
V
FS
/V
PP
= 10 mV/ 528 nV =18,940. The system resolution for a 2-kg load is therefore  
2 kg / 18,940 = 0.105 g, which is approximately the required specification of 0.1 g.  
Figure 8.14: AD7730 Resolution Determination From Data Sheet 
‹ AD7730 was designed for bridge transducers
‹
Chopper, Buffer, PGA, Digital filter, tare DAC, Calibrations, … 
‹ Fully Ratiometric, changes on V
EXC
= V
REF
eliminated
‹
Load ≈ V
OUT 
/ V
EXC
   AD7730 Data ≈ V
IN 
/ V
REF
, V
REF
= V
EXC
V
EXC 
= +5V
V
REF
= +5V
AIN = 10mV
ADC
24-BIT
CALIBRATION
HOST
SYSTEM
DIGITAL
AD7730
+5V
V
DD
= +5V
FORCE
FORCE
SENSE
SENSE
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
rotate all pages in pdf file; rotate pdf page by page
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
How to delete a single page from a PDF document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(filepath); // Detele page 2 (actually the third page).
pdf reverse page order preview; how to reverse pages in pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.11 
Table II can be also used to determine the noise-free code resolution which is 40,000 
counts (15.5 noise-free bits) for a  ±10-mV input range. This must be divided by a factor 
of 2 because only one-half the input range is used. Therefore, the actual design will 
provide approximately 20,000 counts (14.5 noise-free bits), which agrees closely with the 
previous calculation. The various calculations are summarized in Figure 8.15. 
Figure 8.15: AD7730 Resolution @ 200-Hz Data Rate 
Note that overall resolution can be increased by dropping back to lower output data rates 
with correspondingly lower digital filter corner frequencies.  
Evaluation of the design is simplified with the AD7730 evaluation board and software as 
shown in Figure 8.16. The evaluation board can be connected directly to the load cell and 
the PC. The software allows the various AD7730 options to be varied to evaluate 
different combinations of data rates, filter frequencies, input ranges, chopping options, 
etc. Other ADCs in the AD77xx family have similar evaluation boards and software.  
A summary of the final weigh scale design and specifications is shown in Figure 8.17. 
‹80nV RMS noise @ 200Hz
V
P-P
≈6.6 ×V
RMS
V
P-P
≈6.6 ×80nV = 528nV
V
FS
= 10mV
# Counts = V
FS
/ V
P-P
# Counts = 10mV / 0.000528 = 18,940
Resolution = full scale / # counts
Resolution = 2,000g / 18,940 = 0.105g
‹0.105 g Resolution
‹15.5 bits p-p in ±10mV
(Noise-free bits)
V
FS
= 10mV ~ ½of 20mV
Using only ½ of ADC input range
Losing 1 bit
‹14.5 bits p-p in 10mV
‹40,000 counts in ±10mV
V
FS
= 10mV ~ ½of 20mV
Using only ½ of ADC input range
‹20,000 counts  in 10mV
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
how to rotate page in pdf and save; rotate pages in pdf expert
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
pdf rotate pages and save; rotate all pages in pdf preview
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.12 
Figure 8.16: Evaluation of Design Using Evaluation Board and Software 
Figure 8.17: Final System Performance 
Thermocouple Conditioning Using the AD7793 
Thermocouples provide accurate temperature measurements over an extremely wide 
range, however their relatively small output voltage makes the signal conditioning circuit 
design difficult. For instance, a Type K thermocouple has a nominal temperature 
coefficient of 39 µV/°C, so a temperature change of 1000°C produces only a 39-mV 
output voltage. The thermocouple does not measure temperature directly—its output 
voltage is proportional to the temperature difference between the actual measuring 
junction and the "cold" junction where the thermocouple wires are connected to the 
measuring electronics. (Details of thermocouple operation are described in Reference 1). 
Accurate thermocouple measurements therefore require that the temperature of the "cold" 
junction be measured in some manner to compensate for changes in ambient temperature.  
HOST
SYSTEM
DIGITAL
V
EXC
= +5V
V
REF
= +5V
AIN = 10mV
+5V
V
DD
= +5V
AD7730
ADC
24-BIT
CALIBRATION
PC
LOAD CELLS
EVALUATION BOARD
OUTPUT DATA
RATE = 200Hz
Capacity
Sensitivity
Required
2 kg
0.1g
Sensor
Load Cell
2 kg
2mV / V
Circuit
AD7730
AIN Range
±10mV
Noise
80nV RMS
System
Weigh Scale
2 kg
0.105g
OUTPUT DATA
RATE = 200Hz
Capacity
Sensitivity
Required
2 kg
0.1g
Sensor
Load Cell
2 kg
2mV / V
Circuit
AD7730
AIN Range
±10mV
Noise
80nV RMS
System
Weigh Scale
2 kg
0.105g
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
file to the end of another and save to a Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions and then saved and output as a single PDF with user
reverse page order pdf online; pdf rotate single page and save
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Office 2003 and 2007, PDF. 4. -. 8. rotate page. In the mode of single page view, click to rotate file page 90 degrees in clockwise.
rotate pdf page few degrees; pdf rotate one page
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.13 
The AD7793 dual channel 24-bit Σ-∆ is ideally suited for direct thermocouple 
measurements, and a simplified block diagram is shown in Figure 8.18 (Reference 5).  
Figure 8.18: AD7793 24-bit 
Σ
-
ADC 
The AD7793 has two differential inputs, an on-chip in amp, reference voltage, bias 
voltage generator, and burnout/excitation current sources. Single-supply (+5 V) power 
supply current is 350-µA maximum.  
A complete solution to a thermocouple measurement design is shown in Figure 8.19. 
Notice that a thermistor is used to measure the temperature of the "cold" junction via 
AIN2, and the thermocouple is connected directly to the AIN1 differential input. Note 
that the internal VBIAS voltage is used to establish the thermocouple common-mode 
voltage. The R/C filters minimize noise pickup from the remote thermocouple leads, and 
typical values of 100 Ω and 0.1 µF are reasonable choices. 
The AD7793 is first programmed to measure the AIN1 thermocouple voltage using the 
internal 1.2-V bandgap voltage as a reference. This value is sent to a microcontroller 
connected to the serial interface. The voltage across the thermistor is established by the 
IOUT1 excitation current which also flows through a reference resistor, R
REF
. The 
voltage developed across R
REF 
drives the auxillary reference input, REFIN. The AD7793 
is programmed to use the REFIN reference when measuring the thermistor voltage at 
AIN2. The thermistor voltage is then sent to the microcontroller which performs the 
required calculations, including the correction for the temperature of the cold junction, 
T2. The thermistor is therefore connected in a ratiometric fashion such that variations in 
IOUT1 do not affect the accuracy of the thermistor measurement. Note that the powerful 
ratiometric technique will work with any resistive-based sensor including thermistors, 
bridges, strain gages, and RTDs.  
GND
V
DD
AD7793
SERIAL
INTERFACE
AND
CONTROL
LOGIC
INTERNAL
CLOCK
CLOCK
ADCCLOCK
MUX
SIGMA DELTA
ADC
REFIN
BANDGAP
REFERENCE
GND
IOVDD
AIN1
IOUT1
AIN2
MUX
IN-AMP
V
DD
GND
IOUT2
V
BIAS
SPI SERIAL
INTERFACE
EXCITATION
CURRENTS
‹Supply Current: 350 µA max
‹Embedded Reference 
(1.2 V +
10ppm/°C drift)
‹Excitation / Burnout Currents
‹Bias Voltage Generator
‹Internal / External Clock
‹16-Pin TSSOP
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
toolkit, designed particularly for manipulating and managing single-page and multi delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc.
how to rotate all pages in pdf; pdf rotate pages separately
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to reverse pages in pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.14 
Figure 8.19: Thermocouple Design with Cold Junction  
Compensation using the AD7793 
Direct Digital Temperature Measurements 
Temperature sensors which have digital outputs have a number of advantages over those 
with analog outputs, especially in remote applications. Opto-isolators can also be used to 
provide galvanic isolation between the remote sensor and the measurement system. A 
voltage-to-frequency converter driven by a voltage output temperature sensor 
accomplishes this function, however, more sophisticated ICs are now available which are 
more efficient and offer several performance advantages.  
The TMP05/TMP06 digital output sensor family includes a voltage reference, V
PTAT
generator, Σ-∆ ADC, and a clock source (see Figure 8.20). The sensor output is digitized 
by a first-order Σ-∆ modulator. This converter utilizes time-domain oversampling and a 
high accuracy comparator to deliver 12 bits of effective accuracy in an extremely 
compact circuit.  
The output of the Σ-∆ modulator is encoded using a proprietary technique which results 
in a serial digital output signal with a mark-space ratio format (see Figure 8.21) that is 
easily decoded by any microprocessor into either degrees centigrade or degrees 
Fahrenheit, and readily transmitted over a single wire. Most importantly, this encoding 
method avoids major error sources common to other modulation techniques, as it is 
clock-independent.  
EXCITATION
CURRENTS
VBIAS
AIN1
AIN2
THERMISTOR
IOUT1
R
REF
REFIN
R
R
C
C
AD7793
REMOTE
THERMOCOUPLE
JUNCTION
"COLD"
JUNCTIONS
BANDGAP
REFERENCE
‹Bias voltage generator used to generate a common mode voltage for   
AIN1
‹Current source provides current to thermistor for cold junction 
compensation and ratiometric operation using REFIN
MUX
TYPE K THERMOCOUPLE
SENSITIVITY ≈ 39µV/°C,
39mV FS FOR ∆T = 1000°C
∆T
T2
T1
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.15 
Figure 8.20: Digital Output Temperature Sensors: TMP05/06 
Figure 8.21: TMP05/TMP06 Output Format 
The TMP05/TMP06 output is a stream of digital pulses, and the temperature information 
is contained in the mark-space ratio per the equations shown in Figure 8.21. The 
TMP05/TMP06 has 3 modes of operation. These are continuously converting, daisy 
chain, and one shot. A tri-state FUNC input selects one of the three possible modes. In 
the one shot mode, the power consumption is reduced to 70 µW at one sample per 
second.  
REFERENCE
VOLTAGE
TEMP
SENSOR
VPTAT
SIGMA-DELTA
ADC
CLOCK
OUTPUT
TMP05/TMP06
+V
S
= 2.7 TO 5.5V
GND
CONV / IN
FUNC
TMP05
TMP06
‹ ±0.5°C Accuracy from 0°C to +70°C 
‹ 0.025°C Resolution
‹ T1 + T2  = 120ms,  100ms, or 30ms (depending on status of 
CONV/IN pin
‹ Specified –40°C to +150°C
‹ +2.7V to +5.5V supply
‹ 759µW Power Consumption @ 3.3V, Continuous Mode
‹ 70µW Power Consumption @ 3.3V, One-Shot Mode(1Hz rate)
‹ 5-pin SC-70 or SOT-23 Packages
T1
T2
TEMPERATURE (°C) = 406 –
731 ×T1
T2
TEMPERATURE (°C) = 406 –
91 ×T1
T2
FOR T1 + T2 = 30ms or 120ms
FOR T1 + T2 = 100ms
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.16 
The CONV/IN input is used to determine the rate with which the TMP05/TMP06 
measures temperature in the continuously converting and one shot mode. In the daisy 
chain mode, the CONV/IN pin operates as the input to the daisy chain. The daisy chain 
mode allows multiple TMP05/TMP06s to be connected together and thus allow one input 
line of the microcontroller to be the sole receiver of all temperature measurements (see 
Reference 6 for further details). 
Popular microcontrollers, such as the 80C51 and 68HC11, have on-chip timers which can 
easily decode the mark-space ratio of the TMP05/TMP06. A typical interface to the 
80C51 is shown in Figure 8.22. Two timers, labeled Timer 0 and Timer 1 are 16 bits in 
length. The 80C51's system clock, divided by twelve, provides the source for the timers. 
The system clock is normally derived from a crystal oscillator, so timing measurements 
are quite accurate. Since the sensor's output is ratiometric, the actual clock frequency is 
not important. This feature is important because the microcontroller's clock frequency  is 
often defined by some external timing constraint, such as the serial baud rate.  
Figure 8.22: Interfacing TMP06 to a Microcontroller 
Software for the sensor interface is straightforward. The microcontroller simply monitors 
I/O port P1.0, and starts Timer 0 on the rising edge of the sensor output. The 
microcontroller continues to monitor P1.0, stopping Timer 0 and starting Timer 1 when 
the sensor output goes low. When the output returns high, the sensor's T1 and T2 times 
are contained in registers Timer 0 and Timer 1, respectively. Further software routines 
can then apply the conversion factor shown in the equations above and calculate the 
temperature.  
The TMP05/TMP06 are ideal for monitoring the thermal environment within electronic 
equipment. For example, the surface mounted package will accurately reflect the thermal 
conditions which affect nearby integrated circuits.  
CPU
TIMER
CONTROL
OSCILLATOR
÷12
TIMER 0
TIMER 1
MICROCONTROLLER (e.g., 80C51)
TMP06
OUT
V+
GND
+5V
NOTE: ADDITIONAL
PINS OMITTED 
FOR CLARITY
XTAL
0.1µF
P1.0
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.17 
The TMP05 and TMP06 measure and convert the temperature at the surface of their own 
semiconductor chip. When they are used to measure the temperature of a nearby heat 
source, the thermal impedance between the heat source and the sensor must be 
considered. Often, a thermocouple or other temperature sensor is used to measure the 
temperature of the source, while the TMP05/TMP06 temperature is monitored by 
measuring the T1 and T2 pulse widths with a microcontroller. Once the thermal 
impedance is determined, the temperature of the heat source can be inferred from the 
TMP05/TMP06 output.  
Carrying the integration a step further, we will now look at true temperature-to-digital 
converters. The basic bandgap reference (see complete discussion in Chapter 6 of this 
book) has been a building block for ADCs and DACs for many years, and most 
converters have them integrated on-chip. Inside the bandgap reference circuit, there is 
invariably a voltage or current which is proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT). 
There is no fundamental reason why this voltage or current cannot be used to sense the 
temperature of the IC substrate within the ADC. There is also no fundamental reason why 
the ADC cannot convert this voltage into a digital output word which represents the chip 
temperature. In the early days of IC data converters, internal power dissipation was 
considerable, so an internal temperature sensor would measure a temperature greater than 
the ambient temperature. Modern low voltage, low power ICs make it quite practical to 
use such a concept to produce a true temperature-to-digital converter which accurately 
reflects the ambient or PC board temperature.  
This concept has expanded to an entire family of temperature-to-digital converters as well 
as ADCs with multiplexed inputs, where one input is the on-chip temperature sensor. 
This is a powerful feature, since modern microprocessor, DSP, and FPGA chips tend to 
dissipate lots of power, and most require a certain amount of airflow. A simple means of 
monitoring the PC board temperature is valuable in protecting these critical circuits 
against damage from excessive temperatures due to fault conditions.  
The ADT7301 is a 13-bit digital temperature sensor with a 14th bit as a sign bit 
(Reference 7). The part contains an on-chip bandgap reference, temperature sensor, a  
13-bit ADC, and serial interface logic functions in SOT-23 and MSOP packages. The 
ADC section consists of a conventional successive-approximation converter based on a 
switched capacitor DAC architecture. The parts are capable of running on a +2.7-V to 
+5.5-V power supply. The on-chip temperature sensor allows an accurate measurement 
of the ambient device temperature to be made. The specified measurement range of the 
ADT7301 is –40°C to +150°C. It is not recommended to operate the device at 
temperatures above +125°C for greater than a total of 5% of the projected lifetime of the 
device. Any exposure beyond this limit will affect device reliability. A simplified block 
diagram of the ADT7301 is given in Figure 8.23, and key specifications are summarized 
in Figure 8.24. 
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.18 
Figure 8.23: ADT7301 13-Bit, ±0.5°C Accurate, 
Micropower Digital Temperature Sensor 
Figure 8.24: ADT7301 Key Specifications 
The ADT7301 can be used for surface or air-temperature sensing applications. If the 
device is cemented to a surface with thermally conductive adhesive, the die temperature 
will be within about 0.1°C of the surface temperature, thanks to the device's low power 
consumption. Care should be taken to insulate the back and leads of the device from 
airflow, if the ambient air temperature is different from the surface temperature being 
measured. The ground pin provides the best thermal path to the die, so the temperature of 
the die will be close to that of the printed circuit ground track. Care should be taken to 
ensure that this is in good thermal contact with the surface being measured.  
13-BIT
SWITCHED CAP
SAR ADC
13-BIT
SWITCHED CAP
SAR ADC
‹ 13-Bit Temperature-to-Digital Conversion
‹ –40°C to +150°C Operating Temperature Range
‹ ±0.5°C Accuracy
‹ 0.03125°C Temperature Resolution
‹ +2.7V to +5.5V Supply
‹ 4.88µW Power Dissipation, for 1 sample/second Conversion Rate
‹ Serial Interface
‹ 6-Lead SOT-23 or 8-Lead SOIC Package
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested