display pdf from byte array c# : Rotate pdf pages and save SDK application service wpf html asp.net dnn Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF11-part1426

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.109 
FM. An important point to notice about the above scheme is that there is one receiver 
required per channel, and only the antenna, prefilter, and LNA can be shared.  
It should be noted that in order to make the receiver diagrams more manageable, the 
interstage amplifiers are not shown. They are, however, an important part of the receiver, 
and the reader should be aware that they must be present.  
Receiver design is a complicated art, and there are many tradeoffs that can be made 
between IF frequencies, single-conversion vs. double-conversion or triple conversion, 
filter cost and complexity at each stage in the receiver, demodulation schemes, etc. There 
are many excellent references on the subject, and the purpose of this section is only to 
acquaint the design engineer with some of the emerging architectures, especially in the 
application of ADCs and DACs in the design of advanced communications receivers.  
A Receiver Using Digital Processing at Baseband 
With the availability of high performance high speed ADCs and DSPs, it is now 
becoming common practice to use digital techniques in at least part of the receive and 
transmit path, and various chipsets are available from Analog Devices to perform these 
functions for GSM and the other cellular standards. This is illustrated in Figure 8.111, 
where the output of the last IF stage is converted into a baseband in-phase (I) and 
quadrature (Q) signal using a quadrature demodulator. The I and Q signals are then 
digitized by a dual ADC. The RSPs/DSPs then perform the additional signal processing. 
The signal can then be converted into analog format using a DAC, or it can be processed, 
mixed with other signals, upconverted, and retransmitted.  
Figure 8.111: Digital Receiver Using 
Baseband Sampling and Digital Processing 
CHANNEL 1
SIN
COS
Q
I
Q
I
QVCO
SAME AS ABOVE
CHANNEL n
DSP
CHANNEL
1
CHANNEL
n
LPF
ADC
ADC
LPF
455kHz
3RDIF
RSP,
Rotate pdf pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf pages in reader; change orientation of pdf page
Rotate pdf pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate one pdf page; pdf expert rotate page
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.110 
At this point, we should make it clear that a digital receiver is not the same thing as 
digital modulation. In fact, a digital receiver will do an excellent job of receiving an 
analog signal such as AM or FM. Digital receivers can be used to receive any type of 
modulation standard including analog (AM, FM) or digital (QPSK, QAM, FSK, GMSK, 
etc.). Furthermore, since the core of a digital radio is its digital signal processor 
(RSP/DSP), the same receiver can be used for both analog and digitally modulated 
signals (simultaneously if necessary), assuming that the RF and IF hardware in front of 
the RSP/DSP is properly designed. Since it is software that determines the characteristics 
of the radio, changing the software changes the radio. For this reason, digital receivers 
are often referred to as software radios.  
The fact that a radio is software programmable offers many benefits. A radio 
manufacturer can design a generic radio in hardware. As air interface standards change 
(as from AMPS to IS-136, or IS-95), the manufacturer is able to make timely design 
changes to the radio by reprogramming the RSP/TSP/DSP. From a user or service-
provider's point of view, the software radio can be upgraded by loading the new software 
at a small cost, while retaining all of the initial hardware investment. Additionally, the 
receiver can be tailored for custom applications at very low cost, since only software 
costs are involved.  
A digital receiver performs the same function as an analog one with one difference; some 
of the analog functions have been replaced with their digital equivalent. The main 
difference between Figure 8.110 and Figure 8.111 is that the FM discriminator in the 
analog radio has been replaced with two ADCs and a RSP/DSP. While this is a very 
simple example, it shows the fundamental beginnings of a digital, or software radio.  
An added benefit of using digital techniques is that some of the filtering in the radio is 
now performed digitally. This eliminates the requirement of tight tolerances and 
matching for frequency-sensitive components such as inductors and capacitors. In 
addition, since filtering is performed within the RSP/ DSP, the filter characteristics can 
be implemented in software instead of costly and sensitive SAW, ceramic, or crystal 
filters. In fact, many filters can be synthesized digitally that could never be implemented 
in a strictly analog receiver. 
This simple example is only the beginning. With current technology, much more of the 
receiver and transmitter can be implemented in digital form. There are numerous 
advantages to moving the digital portion of the radio closer to the antenna. In fact, 
placing the ADC at the output of the RF section and performing direct RF sampling 
might seem attractive, but does have some serious drawbacks, particularly in terms of 
selectivity and out-of-band (image) rejection. However, the concept makes clear one key 
advantage of software radios: they are programmable and require little or no component 
selection or adjustments to attain the required receiver performance. 
Narrowband IF-Sampling Digital Receivers 
A reasonable compromise in many digital receivers is to convert the signal to digital form 
at the output of the first or the second IF stage. This allows for out-of-band signals to be 
filtered before reaching the ADC. It also allows for some automatic gain control (AGC) 
in the analog stage ahead of the ADC to reduce the possibility of in-band signals 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
pdf rotate just one page; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate pages in pdf expert
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.111 
overdriving the ADC and allows for maximum signal gain prior to the A/D conversion. 
This relieves some of the dynamic range requirements on the ADC. Additionally, IF 
sampling and digital receiver technology reduce costs by elimination of further IF stages 
(mixers, filters, and amplifiers) and adds flexibility by the replacement of fixed analog 
filter components with programmable digital ones.  
In analyzing an analog receiver design, much of the signal gain is after the first IF stage. 
This prevents front-end overdrive due to out-of-band signals or strong in-band signals. 
However, in an IF sampling digital receiver, all of the gain is in the front end, and great 
care must be taken to prevent in-band and out-of-band signals from saturating the ADC, 
which results in excessive distortion. Therefore, a method of attenuation must be 
provided when large in-band signals occur. While additional signal gain can be obtained 
digitally after the ADC, there are certain restrictions. Gain provided in the analog domain 
improves the SNR of the signal and only reduces the performance to the degree that the 
noise figure (NF) degrades noise performance.  
Figure 8.112 shows a detailed IF sampling digital receiver for the GSM/EDGE  
(900 MHz) system. The receiver has RF gain, automatic gain control (AGC), a high 
performance ADC, digital receive signal processor (RSP), and a DSP.  
Figure 8.112: Narrowband IF Sampling GSM/EDGE  
Digital Receiver 
The heart of the system is the 12-bit 26-MSPS ADC with AGC, the RSSI (Received 
Signal Strength Indicator), and the RSP. Various chipsets are available which perform 
these functions for GSM/EDGE (see AD6600, AD6650, AD6620, AD6624, and 
AD6634) and for WCDMA (see AD6634, and AD6652).  
SAME AS ABOVE
CHANNEL
1
900MHz
LO1
TUNED
70MHz
1ST IF
DSP
200kHz WIDE CHANNELS
 CALLERS/CHANNEL
CHANNEL
n
RSSI
ADC
AGC
12-BIT
ADC,
SNR = 65dB
30dB
RANGE
PROCESS GAIN = 18.1dB
RECEIVE
SIGNAL
PROCESSOR
(RSP)
f
s
= 26MSPS
SEE: AD6600, AD6650, AD6652
DYNAMIC RANGE = 30 + 65 + 18 = 113dB 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
pdf rotate single page reader; rotate pdf page by page
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate all pages in pdf; pdf reverse page order preview
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.112 
GSM/EDGE (Europe) and IS-136 (United States) are similar multicarrier time-division-
multiplexed-access (TDMA) systems, while IS-95, IS-95B, WCDMA, and CDMA2000 
are spread spectrum code-division-multiple-access systems (CDMA). The channel 
bandwidth for CDMA systems is either 1.25 MHz for IS-95, IS-95B, and CDMA2000, or 
5 MHz for WCDMA. There will be more details on these air standards later in this 
section.  
The GSM/EDGE 900-MHz air standard is one of the most stringent with respect to ADC 
dynamic range, and therefore a narrowband receiver design is most often implemented. In 
the system shown in Figure 8.112, the total dynamic range is 113 dB comprised by the 
AGC loop (30 dB), ADC SNR (65 dB), and the process gain (18.1 dB).  
The bandwidth of a single GSM channel is 200 kHz, and each channel can handle up to 8 
simultaneous callers. A typical basestation may be required to handle 50 to 60 
simultaneous callers, thereby requiring 8 separate signal processing channels.  
Figure 8.113 shows the IF frequency of 71.5 MHz centered in the 6
th
Nyquist zone 
sampled at a frequency of 26 MSPS. The RSP reverses the frequency sense of the signal 
when it is translated to the first Nyquist zone as shown.  
Figure 8.113: Narrowband GSM Receiver Bandpass Sampling of a 200-kHz 
Channel at 26 MSPS 
We now have a 200-kHz baseband signal (generated by undersampling) which is being 
sampled at 26 MSPS as shown in Figure 8.114A. The RSP then translates the signal to 
baseband as shown in Figure 8.114B. 
ZONE
1
ZONE
2
ZONE
3
ZONE
4
ZONE
5
ZONE
6
ZONE
7
f
s
2f
s
3f
s
78
65
52
39
26
13
0
FREQUENCY (MHz)
IF = 71.5MHz, CHANNEL BW = 200kHz
PROCESS GAIN = 10log
13
0.2
= 18.1dB
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
pdf reverse page order online; rotate a pdf page
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
how to reverse page order in pdf; pdf rotate all pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.113 
Figure 8.114: Digital Filtering and Decimation of the 200kHz GSM Channel 
The signal is then passed through a digital filter in the RSP which removes all frequency 
components above 200 kHz, including the quantization noise which falls in the region 
between 200 kHz and 13 MHz (the Nyquist frequency) as shown in Figure 8.114C. The 
resultant increase in SNR is 18.1 dB (processing gain). There is no information contained 
in the signal above 200 kHz, and the output data rate can be reduced (decimated) from  
26 MSPS to 541.7 kSPS, a data rate which the DSP can handle, as shown in Figure 
8.114D. The data corresponding to the 200-kHz channel is transmitted to the DSP over a 
simple 3-wire serial interface. The DSP then performs such functions as channel 
equalization, decoding, and spectral shaping.  
The concept of processing gain is common to all communications systems, analog or 
digital, and was discussed in Chapter 2 of this book. In a sampling system, the 
quantization noise produced by the ADC is spread over the entire Nyquist bandwidth 
which extends from dc to f
s
/2. If the signal bandwidth, BW, is less than f
s
/2, digital 
filtering can remove the noise components outside this bandwidth, thereby increasing the 
effective SNR. The processing gain in a sampling system can be calculated from the 
formula:  
Processing Gain = 
BW
2
f
log
10
s
  
Eq. 8.17 
The SNR (noise measured over f
s
/2 bandwidth) of the ADC at the bandwidth of the 
signal should be used to compute the actual narrowband SNR by adding the processing 
gain determined by the above equation. If the ADC is an ideal N-bit converter, then its 
SNR (measured over the Nyquist bandwidth) is 6.02N + 1.76 dB.  
f
s
= 541.7kSPS
f
s
/2
13MHz
13MHz
13MHz
13MHz
f
s
= 26MSPS
0
0
0
0
QUANTIZATION
NOISE
200kHz
AFTER DIGITAL FILTERING
PROCESSING GAIN = 18.1dB
AFTER DECIMATION (÷48)
AFTER FREQUENCY TRANSLATION
(A)
(B)
(C)
(D)
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
rotate pdf pages individually; save pdf rotate pages
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
rotate pages in pdf and save; reverse page order pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.114 
Notice that as shown in the previous narrowband receiver example, there can be 
processing gain even if the original signal is an undersampled one. The only requirement 
is that the signal bandwidth be less than f
s
/2, and that the noise outside the signal 
bandwidth be removed with a digital filter.  
Wideband IF-Sampling Digital Receivers 
Thus far, we have avoided a detailed discussion of narrowband versus wideband digital 
receivers. A digital receiver can be either, but more detailed definitions are important at 
this point. By narrowband, we mean that sufficient pre-filtering has been done such that 
all undesired signals have been eliminated and that only the signal of interest is presented 
to the ADC input. This is the case for the GSM/EDGE basestation example previously 
discussed. 
Wideband simply means that a number of channels are presented to the input of the ADC, 
and further filtering, tuning, and processing is performed digitally. Usually, a wideband 
receiver is designed to receive an entire band of cellular or other similar wireless 
services. In fact, one wideband digital receiver can be used to receive all channels within 
the band simultaneously, allowing almost all of the analog hardware (including the ADC) 
to be shared among all channels as shown in Figure 8.115, which compares the 
narrowband and the wideband approaches.  
Figure 8.115: Narrowband Versus Wideband Digital Receiver 
Note that in the narrowband digital radio, there is one front-end LO and mixer required 
per channel to provide individual channel tuning. In the wideband digital radio, however, 
the first LO frequency is fixed, and the "tuning" is done in the RSP circuits following the 
ADC. 
CHANNEL
1
TUNED
LO
BW: 30-200kHZ
CHANNEL
n
ADC
NARROWBAND
CHANNEL
1
CHANNEL
n
RF
FRONT
END
RF
FRONT
END
BW: 5-30MHz
TUNED
LO
ADC
ADC
WIDEBAND
DSP
DSP
FIXED
LO
RSP
RSP
RSP
RSP
IF
IF
IF
DSP
DSP
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.115 
A typical wideband digital receiver may process a 5-MHz to 30-MHz band of signals 
simultaneously. This approach is frequently called block conversion . In the wideband 
digital receiver, the variable local oscillator in the narrowband receiver has been replaced 
with a fixed oscillator, so tuning must be accomplished digitally. Tuning is performed 
using a digital down converter (DDC) and digital filter called a channelizer. The term 
channelizer is used because the purpose of these chips is to select one channel out of the 
many within the broadband spectrum actually present in the ADC output. A typical RSP 
is shown in Figure 8.116.  
Figure 8.116: Receive Signal Processing (RSP) 
in Wideband Receiver (Simplified) 
It consists of an NCO (Numerically Controlled Oscillator) with tuning capability, dual 
mixer, and matched digital filters. These are the same functions that would be required in 
an analog receiver, but implemented in digital form. The digital output from the 
channelizer is the demodulated signal in I and Q format, and all other signals have been 
filtered and removed. Since the channelizer output consists of one selected RF channel, 
one channelizer is required for each channel. The channelizer also serves to decimate the 
output data rate such that it can be processed by a DSP. The DSP extracts the signal 
information from the I and Q data and performs further processing. Another effect of the 
filtering provided by the channelizer is to increase the SNR by adding processing gain as 
previously described. 
The design of a complete wideband receiver is a major project and is highly dependent on 
the particular air standard. Figure 8.117 shows the approximate evolution of the wireless 
air standards starting with the first generation (1G) analog systems, progressing to the 
various TDMA/FDM (time-division-multiple-access, frequency-division-multiplex) and 
the CDMA (code-division-multiple-access) digital systems of the second-generation 
(2G), followed by an intermediate generation referred to as 2.5G, and through the 
projected 3G standards of the future. Details of this evolution can be found in Reference 
16.  
DATA FROM
WIDEBAND
ADC
SIN
COS
Q
I
Q
I
TUNING
NCO
TUNING
CONTROL
DECIMATION
FILTER
DECIMATION
FILTER
LOWPASS
FILTER
LOWPASS
FILTER
SERIAL
DATA
TO
DSP
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.116 
Figure 8.117: 1st Generation to 3rd Generation Wireless Evolution 
From a spectral standpoint, there are basically two types of digital air standards. The 
TDMA/FDM standards use various time slots to multiplex the data on the different 
channels, and the resulting carriers are then multiplexed in frequency (FDM), with a 
spacing between channels of either 30 kHz or 200 kHz depending upon the air standard. 
The total bandwidth allocation per provider for these systems can range from 5 MHz to 
15 MHz.  
The second class of standards are the ones which use code-division-multiple-access 
(CDMA) techniques, sometimes referred to as spread-spectrum . In these systems, a 
pseudo-random number sequence modulates the channel data frequency, and the receiver 
uses an identical sequence to recover the channel data. The combination of multiple 
channels appears approximately as random noise spread over a bandwidth of either  
1.25 MHz or 5 MHz depending on the air standard. Bandwidth allocations per provider of 
5 MHz to 20 MHz are typical for these systems.  
The wireless spectrum is very crowded and contains many large signals which cause 
"blockers" from one band to interfere with desired signals in another. Regardless of the 
air standard, there are many signals which can interfere with the desired carriers. Figure 
8.118 shows a typical RF spectrum where numerous narrowband signals surround the 
two CDMA2000 carriers located midband. The receiver must tolerate all of the 
narrowband signals while still maintaining the required sensitivity as defined by the 
particular air standard.  
AMPS
(U.S.)
TDMA
IS-136
CDMA
IS-95
CDMA
IS-95B
TACS-NMT
(EUROPE)
TDMA
GSM
GPRS
EDGE
HSCSD
WCDMA
UMTS
JTACS
(JAPAN)
TDMA
PDC
WCDMA
ARIB
CDMA
CDMA2000
1G
ANALOG
FM/FDM
2G
TDMA/FDM AND
CDMA DIGITAL
2.5G
TDMA AND
CDMA DIGITAL
3G
TDMA
PCS
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.117 
Figure 8.118: Typical RF Spectrum of a Multicarrier CDMA2000 Receiver 
We begin our brief look at receivers for various air standards with the AMPS analog 
system which is ideally suited to the wideband digital receiver design. A simplified 
diagram of a suitable wideband digital receiver is shown in Figure 8.119. The AD6645 
sampling frequency of 61.44 MSPS is chosen to be a power-of-two multiple of the 
channel bandwidth (30 kHz × 2024 = 61.44 MSPS). The choice of IF frequency is 
flexible, and a second IF stage may be required if lower IF frequencies are chosen.   
Figure 8.119: AMPS Wideband Digital Receiver 
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
CDMA2000 CHANNELS, BW = 1.25MHz EACH, SAMPLING RATE = 61.44MSPS
61.44
2×0.03
CHANNEL
1
900MHz
LO1
FIXED
IF
BW: 12.5MHz
DSP
416 CHANNELS
30kHz CHANNEL BW
1 CALLER/CHANNEL
CHANNEL
n
AD6645
LNA
DSP
NOTE:  THERE MAY BE
2 IF STAGES
f
s
61.44 MSPS
14-BIT
ADC
PROCESS GAIN = 10log
= 30.1dB
SNR = 75dBFS
SFDR = 96dBc
WITH DITHER
RSP
RSP
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.118 
With a sampling frequency of 61.44 MSPS, the 12.5-MHz bandwidth signal can be 
positioned in the first  Nyquist zone (dc to 30.72 MHz) with an IF frequency of  
15.36 MHz, or in the second  Nyquist zone (30.72 MHz to 61.44 MHz) with an IF 
frequency of 46.08 MHz.  
The receive signal processors (RSPs) provide the receiver tuning and demodulate the 
signal into the I and Q components. The output data rate to the DSPs after decimation is 
approximately 60 kSPS. The processing gain incurred for a sampling frequency of  
61.44 MSPS is calculated as follows: 
Processing Gain = 
30.1dB.
2 0.03
61.44
log
10
=
×
Eq. 8.18 
The SNR of the AD6645 over the Nyquist bandwidth is 75 dB, and when the process 
gain of 30.1 dB is added, the SNR in the 30-kHz bandwidth is 75 + 30.1 = 105.1 dB.  
The SFDR of the AD6645 is greater than 96 dBc for signals several dB below fullscale 
(with dither added). The following analysis shows that these values are more than 
adequate to meet the minimum AMPS requirements for sensitivity of –116 dBm with a 
blocker level of –26 dBm.  
The simplified AMPS receiver analysis for spurious requirements begins as shown in 
Figure 8.120.  
Figure 8.120: AMPS Spurious Requirements 
MAXIMUM SIGNAL LEVEL
SYSTEM SENSITIVITY
WORST INTERFERER
C/I
–116dBm
–26dBm
~ 6dB
–122dBm
ADC SFDR 
> 96dBc
(Based on Actual Antenna Observations,
Not in Specification)
AD6645 ~ 96dBc
WITH DITHER 
BLOCKER
INTERFERER
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested