display pdf from byte array c# : How to rotate one pdf page Library application component asp.net html wpf mvc Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF13-part1428

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.129 
The distortion components produced by the front end of the AD6645 up to about  
200-MHz analog input are negligible compared to those produced by the encoder. That 
is, the static non-linearity of the AD6645 transfer function is the chief limitation to 
SFDR.  
The goal is to select the proper amount of out-of-band dither so that the effect of  these 
small DNL errors are randomized across the ADC input range, thereby reducing the 
average DNL error. Experimentally, it was determined that making the peak-to-peak 
dither noise cover about two ADC1 transitions gives the best improvement in DNL. The 
DNL is not significantly improved with higher levels of noise. Two ADC1 transitions 
cover 1024 LSBs peak-to-peak, or approximately 155 LSBs rms (peak-to-peak gaussian 
noise is converted to rms by dividing by 6.6).  
The first plot shown in Figure 8.134 shows the undithered DNL over a small portion of 
the input signal range. The horizontal axis has been expanded to show two of the 
subranging points which are spaced 68.75-mV (512 LSBs) apart. The second plot shows 
the DNL after adding 155 LSBs rms dither. This amount of dither corresponds to 
approximately –20.6 dBm.  Note the dramatic improvement in the DNL. 
Figure 8.134: AD6645 Undithered and Dithered DNL 
Dither noise can be generated in a number of ways. Noise diodes can be used, but simply 
amplifying the input voltage noise of a wideband bipolar op amp provides a more 
economical solution. This approach has been described in detail (References 21-23) and 
will not be repeated here.  
The dramatic improvement in SFDR obtained with out-of-band dither is shown in Figure 
8.135 using a deep (1,048,576-point) FFT, where the AD6645 is sampling a –35-dBm,  
30.5-MHz signal at 80 MSPS. Note that the SFDR without dither is approximately  
92 dBFS compared to 108 dBFS with dither, representing a 16-dB improvement! Figure 
8.136 shows undithered and dithered SFDR as a function of input signal level and again 
shows the dramatic improvement.  
155 LSBs RMS DITHER
DNL
(LSBs)
+1.5
+1.0
+0.5
0
–0.5
UNDITHERED
UNDITHERED
512 LSBs
512 LSBs
OUTPUT CODE
OUTPUT CODE
How to rotate one pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf page order reverse; rotate single page in pdf
How to rotate one pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate individual pdf pages reader; pdf rotate just one page
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.130 
Figure 8.135: AD6645 Undithered and Dithered SFDR FFT Plot 
Figure 8.136: AD6645 Undithered and Dithered SFDR 
We conclude the discussion of single and multicarrier software receivers with a few 
current (2004) roadmaps of the receiver products available from Analog Devices. The 
single-carrier family is shown in Figure 8.137, and the multicarrier family in Figure 
8.138.  
1,048,576-POINT FFTs,
PROCESS GAIN = 60dB
SAMPLING RATE = 80MSPS
INPUT = 30.5MHz @ –35dBm
NO DITHER
SAMPLING RATE = 80MSPS
INPUT = 30.5MHz @ –35dBm
WITH DITHER @ –20.6dBm
SFDR = 
92dBFS
SFDR = 
108dBFS
NO DITHER
WITH DITHER
SAMPLING RATE = 80MSPS
INPUT = 30.5MHz
WITH DITHER @ –20.6dBm
SAMPLING RATE = 80MSPS
INPUT = 30.5MHz
NO DITHER
NO DITHER
WITH DITHER
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying
pdf rotate page and save; how to reverse page order in pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf expert rotate page
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.131 
Figure 8.137: Summary: Single Carrier Receivers 
Figure 8.138: Summary: Multicarrier Receivers 
Analog
Mixed-Signal
AD6652
ADC/RSP
AD6630
IF AMP
AD6650
GSM/EDGE
Diversity Rx 
AD6634
Quad/Dual Chan
GSM/WCDMA
Diversity RSP
W-CDMA,
IS-95++
MORE DYNAMIC RANGE FOR EDGE
AD8350
IF AMP
AD6640, AD9226,
AD9432
IF Sampling
ADCs
AD6620
Diversity RSP
AD6600
Diversity ADC
AD6624 
Single/Dual/Quad
80MSPS RSP
GSM/EDGE
WCDMA Diversity Rx
Digital
SINGLE-CHIP Rx
AD6634
GSM/WCDMA 
Quad/Dual RSP
AD6624
GSM Quad RSP
80 MSPS
AD6640
12-Bit IF ADC
65 MSPS
AD6644
14-Bit ADC
65 MSPS
AD9245/AD9444
14-bit 80 MSPS
Indoor/Pico ADCs
Low Power
AD9444/45
14-bit 80 MSPS
Extended Range
ADC
AD6645
14-Bit IF ADC
80/105 MSPS
AD6620
RSP
65 MSPS
AD9226, AD9432
12-Bit IF ADCs
65/105 MSPS
AD9235/38
12-Bit 
IF ADCs
AD6652
Dual 12-bit
ADC/RSP
2 Channels
AD6635 
GSM/WCDMA 
Octal/Quad RSP
Bipolar 65 MSPS–80 MSPS
CMOS, BiCMOS 65 MSPS–105 MSPS
More RSPs/chip
WCDMA 
Diversity 
Receiver
AD6654
14-bit 80MSPS
ADC/RSP
6 Channels
AD6636 
WCDMA
125 MSPS
6 Chan RSP
WCDMA Multi-
Carrier
Receiver
Mixed-Signal
Digital
Macro to Pico ADCs
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Support to select PDF document scaling.
change orientation of pdf page; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
A powerful .NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing in C#.NET. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
rotate a pdf page; how to rotate pdf pages and save
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.132 
Wideband Radio Transmitter Considerations 
Many of the same concepts discussed in the previous wideband receiver sections apply to 
wideband transmitters as well. Two basic transmit architectures are shown in 8.139. In 
quadrature-based modulation schemes, such as QPSK and QAM, mixers are used to mix 
the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q-90 degree out of phase) signals into a composite 
single-sideband signal for transmission. Figure 8.139A demonstrates a baseband transmit 
architecture that performs an analog mix of the I and Q. In this example, two DACs are 
required per transmit channel. This is the traditional architecture used in single-carrier 
systems. Even at the low output frequencies used in many baseband applications, the 
TxDAC family are the best choice because all family members combine (1) high SFDR 
at low output frequencies; (2) low power consumption, single-supply operation to 
enhance system power efficiency; (3) lower overall cost by oversampling the signal 
(interpolation) to reduce the DACs' in-band aliased images, thus easing the complexity of 
the analog bandpass filter; and (4) the variety of resolutions offered in the same pin-out 
allows ultimate cost/performance trade-offs. For example, in many of the TxDAC beta-
site applications, users started with one resolution model and later designed-in either a 
higher- or lower-resolution device based on actual system performance. Details of the 
TxDAC family can be found in References 24 and 25.  
Figure 8.139: Simplified Wireless Transmitter Architectures 
The system architecture in Figure 8.139B uses digital mixing of I and Q signals within 
the transmit signal processor (TSP) and sends the modulated signal directly to a single 
DAC. In this case, the bandwidth requirements of the DAC are more stringent. This 
approach is best for multicarrier systems. Current TxDACs can receive data at up to  
160 MSPS. With digital modulation, intermediate frequencies (IFs) up to 70 MHz can be 
generated using TxDAC chips. Here, too, high SFDR, low price, low power, and family 
pin-compatibility are desirable (required) attributes. If multiple digital I and Q 
modulators are fed into the single DAC depicted in Figure 8.139B, the system becomes a 
DSP
TSP
TxDAC
DAC
BPF
BPF
BPF
BPF
CONTROL LOOP
PA
LO
RF
(B) UPCONVERSION
USING DIGITAL I/Q
MIXING
DSP
TSP
TxDAC
DAC
BPF
BPF
CONTROL LOOP
PA
RF
TxDAC
DAC
BPF
BPF
QVCO
LO
I
Q
Σ
I
Q
(A) DIRECT ANALOG RF 
UPCONVERSION USING
ANALOG I/Q MIXING
(DUAL)
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate pages in pdf and save
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
to display it. Thus, PDFPage, derived from REPage, is a programming abstraction for representing one PDF page. Annotating Process.
rotate all pages in pdf and save; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.133 
wideband multicarrier transmit architecture, for which the superior multi-tone 
performance of the TxDAC family of products is a major performance attribute. 
The transmit signal processor is a numeric post-processor for the DSP. The purpose of 
the TSP is to replace the first local oscillator, quadrature modulator, channel filtering and 
data interpolation. Like the RSP in the receiver, the TSP sets the transmitter apart from 
traditional designs because all channel characteristics are now programmable. This 
includes data rate, channel bandwidth and channel shape. Since modulation, channel 
filtering and other aspects of the modulation are done digitally, the filters will always 
perform exactly alike across all boards, unlike analog solutions that always have 
tolerances. 
There are several specifications that are important when selecting a TSP. First, the device 
must be capable of generating data at the rates required to preserve the Nyquist 
bandwidth over the spectrum of interest. As with the ADC's sample rate, the sample rate 
of the DAC determines how much spectrum can be faithfully generated. Therefore, the 
TSP must be capable of generating data at least twice as fast as the band of interest and 
preferably three times faster as reasoned earlier for antialiasing filter response. 
Similar to RSPs, the bus widths are also important, yet for different reasons. In the 
transmit direction, there are two different issues. If the TSP is used in a single-channel 
mode, then the issue is simply quantization and thermal noise. It is usually not desirable 
to transmit excess in-band or out-of-band noise, since this wastes valuable transmitter 
efficiency and causes interference. In a multicarrier application, the concern is slightly 
different. Here, many channels would be digitally summed before reconstruction with a 
D/A converter. Therefore, each time the number of channels is doubled, an additional bit 
should be added so that the dynamic range is not taken from one channel when another is 
added. 
Finally, the ability to frequency hop is vital. Since a TSP implements frequency control 
with an NCO and a mixer, frequency hopping can be very fast, allowing the 
implementation of the most demanding hopping applications as found in the GSM 
specification. 
Basically, a DAC is similar to an ADC when considering performance requirements. 
Therefore, the first specification of interest is the signal-to-noise ratio. As with an ADC, 
SNR is primarily determined by quantization and thermal noise. If either is too large, then 
the noise figure of the DAC will begin to contribute to the overall signal chain noise. 
While noise is not necessarily a concern spectrally, the issue does become important 
when the DAC is used to reconstruct multiple signals. In this case, the DAC output signal 
swing ("power") is shared among the carriers. The theoretical SNR of a DAC is 
determined by the same set of equations that govern ADC, and the noise figure can be 
derived given a specific SNR.  
The AD9786 is one of the latest TxDACs suitable for a variety of air standards. A 
simplified block diagram is shown in Figure 8.140. The device accepts I and Q input data 
at a rate up to 160 MSPS, and provides on-chip interpolation of  2, 4, and 8. I and Q 
modulation is performed digitally within the device. The interpolated output sampling 
rate can be as high as 400 MSPS. Direct IF output frequencies up to 70 MHz are possible.  
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; pdf reverse page order online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more PDF pages and delete it/them in both .NET web and Windows
reverse pdf page order online; pdf rotate single page and save
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.134 
Figure 8.140: AD9786 16-Bit, 160-MSPS TxDAC+
®
with 2×/4×/8×  
Interpolation and Signal Processing 
As explained in Chapter 2, oversampling by interpolation relaxes the requirements on the 
anti-imaging output filter as well as reduces the effects of "sin x/x" rolloff.  
The AD9786 has a noise floor of –163 dBm/Hz up to 100 MHz. IMD performance to  
300 MHz is less than –80 dBc, and 10-MHz SFDR is 90 dBc. These and other key 
specifications are summarized in Figure 8.141. Overall performance is more than 
sufficient to meet the exacting transmitter requirements of all multicarrier air standards, 
including GSM and WCDMA.  A summary of the TxDAC family is shown in Figure 
8.142. Figure 8.143 shows a summary of the entire Analog Devices' receiver and 
transmitter "Softcell" family.  
For applications requiring analog I/Q modulation, the AD8349 is a silicon monolithic RF 
IC quadrature modulator, designed for use from 0.8 GHz to 2.7 GHz. Its excellent phase 
accuracy and amplitude balance enable high performance direct RF modulation. A 
functional diagram is shown in Figure 8.144. The differential LO signal first passes 
through a polyphase phase splitter. The I- and Q-channel outputs of the phase splitter are 
buffered to drive the LO inputs of two Gilbert cell mixers. Two differential V-to-I 
converters connected to the I- and Q-channel baseband inputs provide the tail currents for 
the mixers. The outputs of the two mixers are summed together by a differential buffer to 
drive 50-Ω loads. The device also features an output disable function. The AD8349 can 
be used as a direct-to-RF transmit modulator in digital communication systems such as 
GSM, CDMA, WCDMA basestations and QPSK or QAM broadband wireless access 
transmitters. It can also be used as the IF modulator within LMDS transmitters. 
Additionally, this quadrature modulator can be used with direct digital synthesizers in 
hybrid phase-locked loops to generate signals over a wide frequency range with 
millihertz resolution. The AD8349 is supplied in a 16-lead exposed-paddle TSSOP 
AD9786
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.135 
package. Its performance is specified over a –40°C to +85°C temperature range. This 
device is fabricated on Analog Devices' advanced complementary silicon bipolar process. 
Figure 8.141: AD978x 16-Bit Interpolating TxDAC+ Family Key Specifications 
Figure 8.142: Multicarrier Transmitters 
AD6622
Quad TSP
65 MSPS
AD6623
Quad TSP
80 MSPS
AD6633
WCDMA
TSP w/PPR
125 MSPS
AD9744
14-Bit TxDAC
165 MSPS
AD9772
14-Bit TxDAC+
300 MSPS
AD9772A
14-Bit TxDAC+
300 MSPS
AD9777
14-Bit TxDAC+
400 MSPS
AD9784/86
14/16-Bit TxDAC+
400 MSPS
Mixed-Signal
Digital
‹ Targeted at the most demanding Multi-Carrier Macro GSM/WCDMA 
basestation applications
‹ 16-/14-/12-Bit resolution with up to 400MSPS DAC Update Rate
‹ Selectable 2×/4×/8×High Performance Interpolation filters 160MSPS Data 
Rate
‹ Direct IF Transmission Frequencies 70MHz and Higher
‹ 2's Complement/Straight Binary Selectable Data Format
‹ LVTTL/CMOS Compatible Inputs
‹ Programmable via SPI Port
‹ Noise Floor Performance: –163dBm/Hz out to 100MHz
‹ IMD to 300MHz: < –80dBc 
‹ SFDR @ 10MHz:  90dBc
‹ Versatile Clock Interface
‹ Power Dissipation: ~800mW, Single Supply (+2.5 V / +3 V)
‹ 80 pin LQFP Package
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.136 
Figure 8.143: Multicarrier Transceiver Summary 
Figure 8.144: AD8349 800-MHz to 2.7-GHz Quadrature Modulator 
Cellular Telephone Handsets 
One of the fastest growing and rapidly changing high volume applications of digital radio 
is the cellular telephone handset. Each new generation of handsets has a lower 
components count, lower power, and more features than the previous models. Because of 
the different air standards, multimode and multiband operation is required. In order to 
give an overview of the cellular telephone handset, we will limit the discussion to 
GSM—with the additional understanding that the product examples shown do not 
necessarily represent the latest generation Analog Devices' product offerings due to 
proprietary considerations.  
Figure 8.145 shows a simplified block diagram of the GSM Digital Cellular Telephone 
System. The speech encoder and decoder  and discontinuous transmission function will 
be described in detail. Up conversion and downconversion portions of the system contain 
mixed signal functions and will be described later. Similar functions are performed 
PHASE
SPLITTER
Σ
Σ
V
OUT
+
+
+
I TxDAC
Q TxDAC
LO
BPF
BPF
LNA
BPF
BPF
AD6640/44/45
AD9226, AD9244
AD9432/33
AD9444
AD6620,
AD6624/24A,
AD6634
AD6635
AD6636
AD9754
AD9772A
AD974x
AD978x
AD6622
AD6623
AD6633
DSP
BPF
BPF
BPF
BPF
PA
RX
TX
SOFTCELL™
ADC Technology
RSP Family
TSP Family
DAC Technology
LO
LO
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.137 
digitally such as equalization, convolutional coding, Viterbi decoding, modulation and 
demodulation.  
Figure 8.145: GSM Handset Block Diagram 
The standard for encoding voice signals has been set in the T-Carrier digital transmission 
system. In this system, speech is logarithmically encoded to 8 bits at a sampling rate of  
8 kSPS. The logarithmic encoding and decoding to 8 bits is equivalent to linear encoding 
and decoding to 13-bits of resolution. This produces a bit-rate of 104 kb/s. In most 
handsets, a 16-bit Σ-∆ ADC is used, so the effective bit-rate is 128 kb/s. The Speech 
Encoder portion of the GSM system compresses the speech signal to 13 kb/s, and the 
decoder expands the compressed signal at the receiver. The speech encoder is based on 
an enhanced version of linear predictive coding (LPC). The LPC algorithm uses a model 
of the human vocal tract that represents the throat as a series of concentric cylinders of 
various diameters. An excitation (breath) is forced into the cylinders. This model can be 
mathematically represented by a series of simultaneous equations which describe the 
cylinders.  
The excitation signal is passed through the cylinders, producing an output signal. In the 
human body, the excitation signal is air moving over the vocal cords or through a 
constriction in the vocal tract. In a digital system, the excitation signal is a series of 
pulses for vocal excitation, or noise for a constriction. The signal is input to a digital 
lattice filter. Each filter coefficient represents the size of a cylinder.  
An LPC system is characterized by the number of cylinders it uses in the model. Eight 
cylinders are used in the GSM system, and eight reflection coefficients must be 
generated.  
Early LPC systems worked well enough to understand the encoded speech, but often the 
quality was too poor to recognize the voice of the speaker. The GSM LPC system 
ADC
LPC AND
SHORT TERM
ANALYSIS
LONG TERM
PREDICTION
COEFFICIENT AVERAGING FOR
COMFORT NOISE INSERTION
VOICE ACTIVITY
DETECTOR
DISCONTINUOUS
TRANSMISSION
CONTROL
ADD ERROR
CORRECTION &
REDUNDANCY BITS
UP
CONVERT
RF AMP
×
RF
INPUT
DOWN
CONVERT
REMOVE ERROR
CORRECTION &
REDUNDANCY BITS
DISCONTINUOUS
TRANSMISSION
CONTROL
COMFORT NOISE INSERTION
PSEUDO RANDOM EXCITATION
SHORT TERM
SYNTHESIS
LONG TERM
PREDICTION
DAC
DTMF
DIALING
PHONE NUMBER
DISPLAY
13Kbits/s
13Kbits/s
128Kbits/s
128Kbits/s
SPEECH ENCODER
SPEECH DECODER
TRANSMIT FUNCTIONS
RECEIVE FUNCTIONS
VOICE
FLAG
MICROPHONE
SPEAKER
MIXED SIGNAL
DACs
ADCs
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.138 
employs two advanced techniques that improve the quality of the encoded speech. These 
techniques are regular pulse excitation (RPE) and long term prediction  (LTP). When 
these techniques are used, the resulting quality of encoded speech is nearly equal to that 
of logarithmic pulse code modulation (companded PCM as in the T-Carrier system).  
The actual input to the speech encoder is a series of 16-bit samples of uniform PCM 
speech data. The sampling rate is 8 kSPS. The speech encoder operates on a 20-ms 
window (160 samples) and reduces it to 76 coefficients (260 bits total), resulting in an 
encoded data rate of 13 kb/s.  
Discontinuous transmission (DTX) allows the system to shut off transmission during the 
pauses between words. This reduces transmitter power consumption and increases the 
overall GSM system's capacity.  
Low power consumption prolongs battery life in the handset and is an important 
consideration for hand-held portable phones. Call capacity is increased by reducing the 
interference between channels, leading to better spectral efficiency. In a typical 
conversation each speaker talks for less than 40% of the time, and it has been estimated 
that DTX can approximately double the call capacity of the radio system.  
The voice activity detector (VAD) is located at the transmitter. Its job is to distinguish 
between speech superimposed on the background noise and noise with no speech present. 
The input to the voice activity detector is a set of parameters computed by the speech 
encoder. The VAD uses this information to decide whether or not each 20-ms frame of 
the encoder contains speech.  
Comfort noise insertion (CNI) is performed at the receiver. The comfort noise is 
generated when the DTX has switched off the transmitter; it is similar in amplitude and 
spectrum to the background noise at the transmitter. The purpose of the CNI is to 
eliminate the unpleasant effect of switching between speech with noise, and silence. If 
you were listening to a transmission without CNI, you would hear rapid alternating 
between speech in a high-noise background (i.e. in a car), and silence. This effect greatly 
reduces the intelligibility of the conversation.  
When DTX is in operation, each burst of speech is transmitted followed by a silence 
descriptor (SID) frame before the transmission is switched off. The SID serves as an end 
of speech marker for the receive side. It contains characteristic parameters of the 
background noise at the transmitter, such as spectrum information derived through the 
use of linear predictive coding. 
The SID frame is used by the receiver's comfort noise generator to obtain a digital filter 
which, when excited by pseudo-random noise, will produce noise similar to the 
background noise at the transmitter. This comfort noise is inserted into the gaps between 
received speech bursts. The comfort noise characteristics are updated at regular intervals 
by the transmission of SID frames during speech pauses.  
Redundant bits are then added by the processor for error detection and correction at the 
receiver, increasing the final encoded bit rate to 22.8 kb/s. The bits within one window, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested