display pdf from byte array c# : Rotate all pages in pdf control software platform web page windows winforms web browser Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF14-part1429

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.139 
and their redundant bits, are interleaved and spread across several windows for 
robustness.  
The Role of ADCs and DACs in Cellular Telephone Handsets 
Doug Grant 
The cell phone handset uses quite a bit of ADC and DAC technology. Starting with the 
audio section, we find a high-performance voiceband codec. Unlike the companded voice 
codecs used in the public switched telephone network, the voice codecs used in cellular 
handsets are linear-coded and higher resolution, typically 16 bits. Linear coding is 
preferred, because all cellular systems use DSP compression algorithms to reduce the bit 
rate to be transmitted, and the math is simpler when linear coding is used. Furthermore, 
less information is lost in the mathematical operations with linear coding, and this SNR is 
better than typical companded voiceband codecs.  
The voiceband ADCs in cell phones are all Σ-∆ types, and include digital filters 
compliant with the bandwidth and stopband-rejection specs dictated by the applicable 
standard. In GSM, these converters provide 16-bit resolution, 8-kSPS sample rates,  and 
60-dB to70-dB signal-to-noise ratio in the voice band. The ADC section also includes 
analog interfaces to accommodate a variety of microphone types, with dc bias for electret 
types, single-ended and differential inputs, programmable gain, switch hook detection, 
etc., as well as other sources such as built in FM radio or MP3 decoders. The DAC 
section includes audio output driver amplifiers suitable for speakers, earpieces, and 
headphones of various types and impedances, as well as provision for mixing multiple 
audio sources to an output device. And of course, they are optimized for low-voltage and 
low-power operation, with efficient power-up and power-down sequencing to save 
battery life. 
Some advanced handsets now include higher-performance DACs to enable playback of 
ringing and game tones, MP3 audio clips, and even full streaming audio content. These 
include all the usual features of multi-standard audio playback converters, such as 
sample-rate conversion, but again with the constraints of low voltage, low current drain, 
and efficient power-up/power-down sequencing. 
Converters also play an important part in the radio and baseband signal chain. Most 
cellular handsets down-convert the modulated RF signal to quadrature (I/Q) baseband 
components. In order to process these signals, dual Σ- A/D converters are generally 
used, with integrated digital channel selection filters matched to the transmitted 
waveform for maximum transfer of signal energy. On the transmit side, most systems 
calculate the quadrature components of the waveform representing the bit stream to be 
transmitted, and load the waveforms in a burst RAM prior to transmission. At the 
appointed time, the RAM contents are clocked into a pair of DACs which modulate an 
intermediate-frequency carrier which is then upconverted to the appropriate RF carrier 
frequency, or in some implementations, the DACs modulate the carrier directly. The 
converter requirements in such a system are dictated by the tradeoff of analog and digital 
filtering used in the system, signal bandwidth, dc offsets in the receive path before the 
ADCs, and the required signal-to-noise ratio to support the bit-error-rate needed for the 
system. In a typical GSM/GPRS/EDGE handset, the ADCs are on the order of 16-bit 
resolution with 65-dB to 75-dB dynamic range and sample rates equal to the symbol rate 
Rotate all pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate page; pdf reverse page order
Rotate all pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page permanently; rotate individual pages in pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.140 
(270.833 kSPS). And of course, these system-specific parameters are in addition to the 
general requirements in a handset for low-voltage, low-current operation, with efficient 
control of power-up and power-down sequencing. 
Cellular handsets also include several additional converters of varying resolutions and 
speeds for the monitoring and control of handset functions. Some of these functions 
include battery status and charge control, battery and power amplifier (PA) temperature 
monitoring, receive-path gain and offset control, transmit burst power ramp-up/down, 
automatic frequency control, and display brightness control. Most of these functions only 
require converters with relatively low bandwidth and low-to-moderate (10- to 14-bit) 
resolution.  
SoftFone and Othello Radio Chipsets from Analog Devices  
(The following descriptions of the Othello Radio chipsets do not reflect the latest 
generation Analog Devices' products.  Details of the latest generation designs are 
available from Analog Devices under non-disclosure agreeement.) 
Analog Devices offers a chipset which comprises the majority of a GSM handset. The 
SoftFone
®
chipset performs the baseband and DSP functions, while the Othello
®
radio 
chipset handles the RF functions as shown in Figure 8.146.  
Figure 8.146: Othello
®
Radio and SoftFone
®
Chipsets Make 
Complete GSM/DCS Handset 
Because of the frequency allocations in GSM countries (other than the U.S.), most GSM 
handsets must be dual-band: capable of handling both GSM and DCS frequencies. The 
SoftFone
®
and Othello
®
chipsets supply the main functions necessary for implementing 
dual- or triple-band radios for GSM cellular phones. The AD20msp430 SoftFone
®
chipset comprises the baseband portion of the GSM handset. The AD20msp430 baseband 
processing chipset uses a combination of GSM system knowledge and advanced analog 
and digital signal processing technology to provide a new benchmark in GSM/GPRS 
DSP
MEMORY
DMA
1 Mbit
SRAM
ADSP-218x
DSP
I/O
ARM7®
CONTROLLER
AUXILIARY
ADC, DAC
BASEBAND I/Q
ADC, DAC
VOICEBAND
CODEC
DIRECT
CONVERSION
RADIO
MULTIBAND
SYNTHESIZER
PA
POWER
CONTROL
AD6522
AD6521
FLASH
MEMORY
ADP33xx
ADP34xx
POWER MANAGEMENT
BATTERY CHARGING
AD20msp430 SOFTFONE® CHIPSET
OTHELLO® RADIO
DISPLAY
SIM
KEYPAD
900MHz/
1.8GHz
MIC
SPEAKER
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document Dim detelePageindexes = New Integer() {1, 3, 5, 7, 9} ' Delete pages. All Rights Reserved
rotate all pages in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file All Rights Reserved
how to rotate just one page in pdf; save pdf after rotating pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.141 
terminal design. The SoftFone architecture is entirely RAM-based. The software is 
loaded from FLASH memory and is executed from the on-chip RAM. This allows fast 
development cycles, since no ROM-code turns are required. Furthermore, the handset 
software can be updated in the field to enable new features. Combined with the Analog 
Devices Othello RF chipset, a complete multiband handset design contains less than 200 
components, fits in a 20 cm
2
single sided PCB layout, and has a total bill-of-materials 
cost 20-30% lower than previous solutions.  
The AD20msp430 chipset is comprised of two chips, the AD6522 DSP-based baseband 
processor and the AD6521 voiceband/baseband mixed-signal codec. Together with the 
Othello radio, the AD20msp430 allows a significant reduction in the component count 
and bill-of-materials (BOM) cost of GSM voice handsets and data terminals. The 
software and hardware foundations of the AD20msp430 chipset enjoy a long history of 
successful integration into GSM handsets. This is Analog Devices' 4th generation of 
GSM chipsets, each of which has passed numerous type- approvals and network operator 
approvals in OEM handsets. In each generation, additional features have been added, 
while cost and power have been reduced. Numerous power-saving features have been 
included in the AD20msp430 chipset to reduce the total power consumption. A 
programmable state machine allows events to be controlled with a resolution of one-
quarter of a bit period. The AD20msp430 chipset uses the SoftFone
®
architecture, where 
all software resides in RAM or FLASH memory. Since ROM is not used, development 
time is reduced and additional features can be field-installed easily.  
There are two processors in the AD20msp430 chipset. The DSP processor is the ADSP-
218x core, proven in previous generations of GSM chipsets, and operated at 65 MIPS in 
the AD20msp430. This DSP performs the voiceband and channel coding functions 
previously discussed. The AD6521 voiceband/baseband codec chip contains all analog 
and mixed-signal functions. These include the I/Q channel ADCs and DACs, high 
performance multichannel voiceband codec, and several auxiliary ADCs and DACs for 
AGC (automatic gain control), AFC (automatic frequency control), and power- amplifier 
ramp control. The microcontroller is an ARM7 TDMI, running at 39 MIPS. The ARM7
®
handles the protocol stack and the man-machine interface functions. Both processors are 
field-proven in digital wireless applications. A simplified block diagram of the AD6521 
baseband/voiceband codec is shown in Figure 8.147. 
The AD20msp430 chipset is fully supported by a suite of development tools and 
software. The development tools allow easy customization of the DSP and/or ARM
®
controller software to allow handset and terminal manufacturers to optimize the feature 
set and user interface of the end equipment. Software is available for all layers, including 
both voice and data applications, and is updated as new features become available. The 
system DMA and interrupt controllers are designed to allow easy upgrades to future 
generations of DSP and controller cores. The display interface can be used with either 
parallel or serial-interface displays. System development can be shortened by the use of 
the debugging features in the AD20msp430. Most critical signals can be routed under 
software control to the Universal System Connector. This allows system debugging to 
take place in the final form factor. In addition, the architecture includes high speed logger 
and address trace functions in the DSP and single-wire trace/debug in the ARM 
controller.  
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific All Rights Reserved
pdf save rotated pages; rotate pdf page by page
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
1. public void DeletePages(int[] pageIndexes). Description: Delete specified pages from the input PDF file. Parameters: All Rights Reserved.
saving rotated pdf pages; rotate pdf pages individually
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.142 
Figure 8.147: AD6521 Baseband/Voiceband Codec Simplified Block Diagram 
The Analog Devices' Othello
®
direct-conversion radio eliminates intermediate-frequency 
(IF) stages, permits the mobile electronics industry to reduce the size and cost of radio 
sections, and enables flexible, multi-standard, multi-mode operation. The radio includes a 
Zero-IF Transceiver and a Multi-Band Synthesizer. 
Othello contains the main functions necessary for both a direct-conversion receiver and a 
direct VCO transmitter, known as the Virtual-IF™ transmitter. It also includes the local-
oscillator generation block and a complete on-chip regulator that supplies power to all 
active circuitry for the radio. Also included is a fractional-N synthesizer that features 
extremely fast lock times to enable advanced data services over cellular telephones-such 
as high-speed circuit-switched data (HSCSD) and general packet radio services (GPRS).  
Most digital cellular phones today include at least one "downconversion" in their signal 
chain. This frequency conversion shifts the desired signal from the allocated RF band for 
the standard (say, at 900 MHz) to some lower intermediate frequency (IF), where channel 
selection is performed with a narrow channel-select filter (usually a surface acoustic-
wave (SAW) or a ceramic type). The now-filtered signal is then further down-converted 
to either a second IF or directly to baseband, where it is digitized and demodulated in a 
digital signal processor (DSP). Figure 8.148 shows the comparison between this 
superheterodyne architecture and the superhomodyne™ architecture of the Othello radio 
receiver.  
BASEBAND
SERIAL
PORT
I TRANSMIT
DAC
Q TRANSMIT
DAC
GMSK
MOD
FILTER
FILTER
POWER
RAMPING RAM
RAMP
DAC
FILTER
FILTER
FILTER
I RECEIVE ADC
Q RECEIVE ADC
AUXILLARY
SERIAL
PORT
CONTROL
REGISTERS
AFC
DAC
I DAC
AUX
ADC
VOLTAGE
REFERENCE
VOICE
BAND
SERIAL
PORT
FILTER
DAC
FILTER
PGA
PGA
ADC
FILTER
BASEBAND CODEC
VOICEBAND CODEC
AUXILIARY SECTION
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages in easy ways box, note, underline, rectangle, polygon and so on are all can be
rotate pdf pages in reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF
pdf rotate one page; reverse page order pdf online
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.143 
Figure 8.148: Direct Conversion Receiver 
Architecture Eliminates Components 
The idea of using direct-conversion for receivers has long been of interest in RF design. 
The reason is obvious: in consumer equipment conversion stages add cost, bulk, and 
weight. Each conversion stage requires a local oscillator, (often including a frequency 
synthesizer to lock the LO onto a given frequency), a mixer, a filter, and (possibly) an 
amplifier. No wonder, then, that direct conversion receivers would be attractive. All 
intermediate stages are eliminated, reducing the cost, volume, and weight of the receiver.  
The Othello
®
radio reduces the component count even more by integrating the front-end 
GSM low-noise amplifier (LNA). This eliminates an RF filter (the "image" filter) that is 
necessary to eliminate the image, or unwanted mixing product of a mixer and the off chip 
LNA. This stage, normally implemented with a discrete transistor, plus biasing and 
matching networks, accounts for a total of about 12 components. Integrating the LNA 
saves a total of about 15 to 17 components, depending on the amount of matching called 
for by the (now-eliminated) filter.  
A simplified functional block diagram of the Othello
®
dual band GSM radio's 
architecture is shown in Figure 8.149. The receive section is at the top of the figure. From 
the antenna connector, the desired signal enters the transmit/receive switch and exits on 
the appropriate path, either 925-960 MHz for the GSM band or 1805-1880 MHz for DCS. 
The signal then passes through an RF band filter (a so-called "roofing filter") that serves 
to pass the entire desired frequency band while attenuating all other out-of-band 
frequencies (blockers-including frequencies in the transmission band) to prevent them 
from saturating the active components in the radio front end. The roofing filter is 
followed by the low-noise amplifier (LNA). This is the first gain element in the system, 
effectively reducing the contribution of all following stages to system noise. After the 
LNA, the direct-conversion mixer translates the desired signal from radio frequency (RF) 
BPF
BPF
VCO
PLL
BPF
VCO
PLL
I
ADC
Q
ADC
sin
cos
CERAMIC
CERAMIC
SAW
BPF
VCO
PLL
I
ADC
Q
ADC
sin
cos
SAW
GSM
900
MHz
DCS
1.8
GHz
BPF
BPF
CERAMIC
CERAMIC
GSM
900
MHz
DCS
1.8
GHz
BPF
SAW
SW
SW
IF
(A) SUPERHETERODYNE
(B) DIRECT CONVERSION (SUPERHOMODYNE™)
LNA
LNA
LNA
LNA
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF
rotate single page in pdf file; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate.tif"); All Rights Reserved
how to change page orientation in pdf document; save pdf rotate pages
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.144 
all the way to baseband by multiplying the desired signal with a local oscillator (LO) 
output at the same frequency.  
Figure 8.149: Superhomodyne™ Direct Conversion  
Dual-Band Transceiver Using Othello 
The output of the mixer stage is then sent in quadrature (I and Q channels) to the 
variable-gain baseband amplifier stage. The VGA also provides some filtering of adjacent 
channels, and attenuation of in-band blockers. These blocking signals are other GSM 
channels that are some distance from the desired channel, say 3 MHz and beyond. The 
baseband amplifiers filter these signals so that they will not saturate the Receive ADCs. 
After the amplifier stage, the desired signal is digitized by the Receive ADCs.  
The Transmit section begins on the right, at the multiplexed I and Q inputs/outputs. 
Because the GSM system is a time division duplex (TDD) system, the transmitter and 
receiver are never on at the same time. The Othello
®
radio architecture takes advantage of 
this fact to save four pins on the transceiver IC's package. The quadrature transmit signals 
enter the transmitter through the multiplexed I/Os. These I and Q signals are then 
modulated onto a carrier at an intermediate frequency greater than 100 MHz. 
The output of the modulator goes to a phase-frequency detector (PFD), where it is 
compared to a reference frequency that is generated from the external channel selecting 
LO. The output of the PFD is a charge pump, operating at above 100 MHz, whose output 
is filtered by a fairly wide (1-MHz) loop filter. The output of the loop filter drives the 
tuning port of a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), with frequency ranges that cover the 
GSM and DCS transmit bands.  
The output of the transmit VCO is sent to two places. The main path is to the transmit 
power amplifier (PA), which amplifies the transmit signal from about +3 dBm to  
+35 dBm, sending it to the transmit/receive switch and low pass filter (which attenuates 
power-amplifier harmonics). The power amplifiers are dual band, with a simple CMOS 
BPF
(SAW)
BPF
(SAW)
LO
GENERATOR
DIV N
PHASE
DETECT
VCO
DIV M
TX/RX
SWITCH
VCO
PLL
I
ADC
Q
ADC
I
DAC
Q
DAC
PA
Σ
GSM/
DCS
SW
BPF
BPF
LNA
VGA
VGA
RX
TX
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.145 
control voltage for the band switch. The VCO output also goes to the transmit feedback 
mixer by means of a coupler, which is either a printed circuit, built with discrete 
inductors and capacitors, or a monolithic (normally ceramic) coupling device. The 
feedback mixer downconverts the transmit signal to the transmit IF, and uses it as the 
local oscillator signal for the transmit modulator. This type of modulator has several 
names, but the most descriptive is probably "translation loop". The translation loop 
modulator takes advantage of one key aspect of the GSM standard: the modulation 
scheme is Gaussian-filtered minimum-shift keying (GMSK). This type of modulation 
does not affect the envelope amplitude, which means that a power amplifier can be 
saturated and still not distort the GMSK signal sent through it.  
GMSK can be generated in several different ways. In another European standard (for 
cordless telephones), GMSK is created by directly modulating a free running-VCO with 
the Gaussian filtered data stream. In GSM, the method of choice has been quadrature 
modulation. Quadrature modulation creates accurate phase GMSK, but imperfections in 
the modulator circuit (or up-conversion stages) can produce envelope fluctuations, which 
can in turn degrade the phase trajectory when amplified by a saturated power amplifier. 
To avoid such degradations, GSM phone makers have been forced to use amplifiers with 
somewhat higher linearity, at the cost of reduced efficiency and talk time per battery 
charge cycle.  
The translation loop modulator combines the advantages of directly modulating the VCO 
and the inherently more accurate quadrature modulation. In effect, the scheme creates a 
phase locked loop (PLL), comprising the modulator, the LO signal, and the VCO output 
and feedback mixer. The result is a directly modulated VCO output with a perfectly 
constant envelope and almost perfect phase trajectory. Phase trajectory errors as low as 
1.5 degrees have been measured in Othello, using a signal generator as the LO signal to 
provide a reference for the loop.  
Because Othello
®
radios can be so compact, they enable GSM radio technology to be 
incorporated in many products from which it has been excluded, such as very compact 
phones or PCMCIA cards. However, the real power of direct conversion will be seen 
when versatile third-generation phones are designed to handle multiple standards. With 
direct-conversion, hardware channel-selection filters will be unnecessary, because 
channel selection is performed in the digital signal-processing section, which can be 
programmed to handle multiple standards. Contrast this with the superheterodyne 
architecture, where multiple radio circuits are required to handle the different standards 
(because each will require different channel-selection filters), and all the circuits will 
have to be crowded into a small space. With direct conversion, the same radio chain 
could in concept be used for several different standards, bandwidths, and modulation 
types. Thus, Web-browsing and voice services could, in concept, occur over the GSM 
network using the same radio in the handset.  
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.146 
Time-Interleaved IF Sampling ADCs with Digital Post-Processors 
Mark Looney 
The material in this section was extracted from Mark Looney's Analog Dialogue article, 
Reference 35. 
Time interleaving of multiple analog-to-digital converters by multiplexing the outputs of 
(for example) a pair of converters at a doubled sampling rate is by now a mature 
concept—first introduced by Black and Hodges in 1980 (Reference 26, 27). While 
designing a 7-bit, 4-MHz ADC, they determined that a time-interleaved solution would 
require less die area than a comparable 2
N
comparator flash converter design. This new 
concept proved of great value in their design, but space-saving was not its only benefit. 
Time interleaving of ADCs offers a conceptually simple method for multiplying the 
sample rate of existing high-performing ADCs, such as the 14-bit, 105-MSPS AD6645 
and the 12-bit, 210-MSPS AD9430. In many different applications, this concept has been 
leveraged to benefit systems that require very high sample rate analog-to-digital 
conversion. 
While the speed and resolution of standard ADC products have advanced well beyond  
4 MSPS and 7 bits, time-interleaved ADC systems (for good reasons) have not advanced 
far beyond 8-bit resolution. Nevertheless, at 8-bit performance levels, this concept has 
been widely adopted in the test and measurement industry, particularly for wideband 
digital oscilloscopes. That it continues to make an impact in this market is evidenced by 
the 20-GSPS, 8-bit ADC that was recently developed by Agilent Labs (Reference 28) and 
adopted by the Agilent Technologies Infiniium™ oscilloscope family (Reference 29). 
Indeed, time-interleaved ADC systems thrive at the 8-bit level, but they continue to fall 
short in applications that require the combination of high resolution, wide bandwidth, and 
wide dynamic range. 
The primary limiting factor in time-interleaved ADC systems at 12- and 14-bit levels is 
the requirement that the channels be matched. An 8-bit system that provides a dynamic 
range of 50 dB can tolerate a gain mismatch of 0.25% and a clock-skew error of 5 ps. 
This level of accuracy can be achieved by traditional methods, such as matching physical 
channel layouts, using common ADC reference voltages, prescreening devices, and 
active analog trimming, but at higher resolutions the requirements are much tighter. Until 
now devices employing more innovative matching techniques have not been 
commercially available. 
This discussion will outline in detail the matching requirements for 12- and 14-bit time-
interleaved ADC systems, discuss the idea of advanced digital post-processing techniques 
as an enabling technology, and introduce a device employing the most promising solution 
to date, Advanced Filter Bank (AFB™), from V Corp Technologies, Inc. (References 31 
and 31). 
Time interleaving ADC systems employ the concept of running M ADCs at a sample rate 
that is 1/M of the overall system sample rate. Each channel is clocked at a phase that 
enables the system as a whole to sample at equally spaced increments of time, creating 
the seamless image of a single ADC sampling at full speed. Figure 8.150 illustrates the 
block- and timing diagrams of a typical four-channel, time-interleaved ADC system. 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.6 S
OFTWARE 
R
ADIO AND 
IF S
AMPLING
8.147 
Each of the four ADC channels runs at one-fourth the system's sample rate, spaced at 90° 
intervals. The final output data stream is created by interleaving all of the individual 
channel data outputs in the proper sequence (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, etc.). In a two-converter 
example, both ADC channels are clocked at one-half of the overall system's sample rate, 
and they are 180° out of phase with one another.  
Figure 8.150: Time-Interleaved ADCs 
For simplicity, this discussion focuses primarily on two-converter systems, but the 
concepts can be extended to four-converter (Reference 35). A two-converter interleaved 
system is shown in Figure 8.151 where two 12-bit, 200-MSPS ADCs  are interleaved to 
produce an effective sampling rate of 400 MSPS. 
As mentioned, channel-to-channel matching has a direct impact on the dynamic range 
performance of a time-interleaved ADC system. Mismatches between the ADC channels 
result in dynamic range degradation that—in an FFT plot—show up as spurious 
frequency components called image spurs and offset spurs. The image spur(s) associated 
with time-interleaved ADC systems are a direct result of gain and phase mismatches 
between the ADC channels. The gain and phase errors produce error functions that are 
orthogonal to one another. Both contribute to the image-spur energy at the same 
frequency location(s). The offset spur is generated by offset differences between the 
ADC channels. Unlike the image spur(s), the offset spurs are not dependent on the input 
signal. For a given offset mismatch, the offset spur(s) will always be at the same level. 
Extensive studies of the behavior of these spurs have resulted in several mathematical 
methods for characterizing the relationship between channel matching errors and 
dynamic range performance (References 32 and 33).  
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.148 
Figure 8.151: Two-Converter Time-Interleaved 12-Bit 400-MSPS ADC 
While these methods are thorough and very useful, the "error voltage" approach used 
here provides a simple method for understanding the relationship without requiring a 
deep study of complex mathematical derivations. This approach is based on the same 
philosophy used in Analog Devices Application Note AN-501 (Reference 34) to establish 
the relationship between aperture jitter and signal-to-noise (SNR) degradation in ADCs. 
The error voltage is defined as the difference between the "expected" sample voltage and 
the "actual" sample voltage. These differences are a result of a large subset of errors that 
fall into three basic categories: gain, phase, and offset mismatches. 
In a two-converter interleaved system, the error voltages generated by gain and phase 
mismatches result in an image spur that is located at Nyquist minus the analog input 
frequency. The offset mismatch generates an error voltage that results in an offset spur 
that is located at Nyquist. Since the offset spur is located at the edge of the Nyquist band, 
designers of two-channel systems can typically plan their system frequency around it, and 
focus their efforts on gain- and phase matching. Figure 8.152 displays a typical FFT plot 
for a two-channel system showing these errors. 
In a four-converter interleaving system, there are three image spurs and two offset spurs. 
The image spurs, generated by gain and phase mismatches between the ADC channels, 
are located at (1) Nyquist minus the analog input frequency and (2) one-half Nyquist plus 
or minus the analog input frequency. The offset spurs are located at Nyquist and at one-
half of Nyquist (middle of the band).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested