display pdf from byte array c# : Rotate pdf page permanently software SDK dll windows wpf asp.net web forms Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF2-part1434

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.19 
As with any IC, the ADT7301 and its associated wiring and circuits must be kept free 
from moisture to prevent leakage and corrosion, particularly in cold conditions where 
condensation is more likely to occur. Water-resistant varnishes and conformal coatings 
can be used for protection. The small size of the ADT7301 package allows it to be 
mounted inside sealed metal probes, which provide a safe environment for the device.  
Microprocessor Substrate Temperature Sensors 
Today's computers require that hardware as well as software operate properly, in spite of 
the many things that can cause a system crash or lockup. The purpose of hardware 
monitoring is to monitor the critical items in a computing system and take corrective 
action should problems occur.  
Microprocessor supply voltage and temperature are two critical parameters. If the supply 
voltage drops below a specified minimum level, further operations should be halted until 
the voltage returns to acceptable levels. In some cases, it is desirable to reset the 
microprocessor under "brownout" conditions. It is also common practice to reset the 
microprocessor on power-up or power-down. Switching to a battery backup may be 
required if the supply voltage is low. 
Under low voltage conditions it is mandatory to inhibit the microprocessor from writing 
to external CMOS memory by inhibiting the Chip Enable signal to the external memory.  
Many microprocessors can be programmed to periodically output a "watchdog" signal. 
Monitoring this signal gives an indication that the processor and its software are 
functioning properly and that the processor is not stuck in an endless loop.  
The need for hardware monitoring has resulted in a number of ICs, traditionally called 
"microprocessor supervisory products," which perform some or all of the above 
functions. These devices range from simple manual reset generators (with debouncing) to 
complete microcontroller-based monitoring sub-systems with on-chip temperature 
sensors and ADCs. Analog Devices' ADM-family of products is specifically to perform 
the various microprocessor supervisory functions required in different systems. 
CPU temperature is critically important in the Pentium microprocessors. For this reason, 
all new Pentium devices have an on-chip substrate PNP transistor which is designed to 
monitor the actual chip temperature. The collector of the substrate PNP is connected to 
the substrate, and the base and emitter are brought out on two separate pins of the 
Pentium.  
The ADM1023 Microprocessor Temperature Monitor is specifically designed to process 
these outputs and convert the voltage into a digital word representing the chip 
temperature. It is optimized for use with the Pentium
®
III microprocessor. The simplified 
analog signal processing portion of the ADM1023 is shown in Figure 8.25. 
Rotate pdf page permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf; rotate one page in pdf
Rotate pdf page permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
change orientation of pdf page; rotate all pages in pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.20 
Figure 8.25: ADM1023 Microprocessor Temperature Monitor Input Conditioning 
Circuits 
The technique used to measure the temperature is identical to the "∆V
BE
" principle 
previously discussed in Chapter 7 of this book. Two different currents (I and N·I) are 
applied to the sensing transistor, and the voltage measured for each. The change in the 
base-emitter voltage, ∆V
BE
, is a PTAT voltage and given by the equation: 
ln(N)
q
kT
V
BE
=
.   
Eq. 8.3 
Figure 8.25 shows the external sensor as a substrate PNP transistor, provided for 
temperature monitoring in the microprocessor, but it could equally well be a discrete 
transistor such as a 2N3904 or 2N3906. If a discrete transistor is used, the collector 
should be connected to the base and not grounded. To prevent ground noise interfering 
with the measurement, the more negative terminal of the sensor is not referenced to 
ground, but is biased above ground by an internal diode. If the sensor is operating in a 
noisy environment, C may be optionally added as a noise filter. Its value is typically 2200 
pF, but should be no more than 3000 pF.  
To measure ∆V
BE
, the sensing transistor is switched between operating currents of I and 
N·I. The resulting waveform is passed through a 65-kHz lowpass filter to remove noise, 
then to a chopper-stabilized amplifier which performs the function of amplification and 
synchronous rectification. The resulting dc voltage is proportional to ∆V
BE
and is 
digitized by the ADC and stored as an 11-bit word. To further reduce the effects of noise, 
digital filtering is performed by averaging the results of 16 measurement cycles.  
65kHz
LOWPASS
FILTER
OSCILLATOR
CHOPPER
AMPLIFIER
AND RECTIFIER
TO ADC
GAIN
=G
I
N × I
V
OUT
V
OUT
= G 
kT
q
ln N
µ
P
REMOTE
SENSING
TRANSISTOR
SPNP
I
BIAS
BIAS
DIODE
C
V
DD
= +3V TO +5.5V
kT
q
ln N
V
BE
=
D+
D–
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document inputFilePath) ' get the 1st page Dim page
rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pages in pdf and save
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
this VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
saving rotated pdf pages; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.21 
In addition, the ADM1023 contains an on-chip temperature sensor, and its signal 
conditioning and measurement is performed in the same manner.  
One LSB of the ADM1023 corresponds to 0.125ºC, and the ADC can theoretically 
measure from 0°C to +127.875ºC. The results of the local and remote temperature 
measurements are stored in the local and remote temperature value registers, and are 
compared with limits programmed into the local and remote high and low limit registers 
as shown in Figure 8.26. An 
ALERT
output signals when the on-chip or remote 
temperature is out of range. This output can be used as an interrupt, or as  
an SMBus alert.  
The limit registers can be programmed, and the device controlled and configured, via the 
serial System Management Bus (SMBus). The contents of any register can also be read 
back by the SMBus. Control and configuration functions consist of: switching the device 
between normal operation and standby mode, masking or enabling the 
ALERT
output, 
and selecting the conversion rate which can be set from 0.0625 Hz to 8 Hz. Key 
specifications for the ADM1023 are given in Figure 8.27. 
Figure 8.26: ADM1023 Simplified Block Diagram 
STATUS
REGISTER
ADDRESS POINTER
REGISTER
ONE-SHOT
REGISTER
CONVERSION RATE
REGISTER
LOCAL TEMPERATURE
LOW LIMIT REGISTER
LOCAL TEMPERATURE
HIGH LIMIT REGISTER
REMOTE TEMPERATURE
LOW LIMIT REGISTER
REMOTE TEMPERATURE
HIGH LIMIT REGISTER
CONFIGURATION
REGISTER
INTERRUPT
MASKING
SMBUS INTERFACE
LOCAL TEMPERATURE
LOW LIMIT COMPARATOR
LOCAL TEMPERATURE
HIGH LIMIT COMPARATOR
REMOTE TEMPERATURE
LOW LIMIT COMPARATOR
REMOTE TEMPERATURE
HIGH LIMIT COMPARATOR
LOCAL TEMPERATURE
VALUE REGISTER
REMOTE TEMPERATURE
VALUE REGISTER
SIGNAL CONDITIONING
AND ANALOG MUX
ADC
ON-CHIP 
TEMPERATURE SENSOR
D+
D
NC     V
DD
NC  GND  GND   NC   NC   NC         SDATA     SCLK     ADD0       ADD1
STBY
ALERT
RUN/STANDBY
BUSY
EXTERNAL DIODE OPEN CIRCUIT
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
commonly used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in display 90 permanently burn drawn annotation on page in web
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; rotate pdf page and save
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document inputFilePath); // get the 1st page PDFPage page
reverse page order pdf; how to rotate one page in pdf document
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.22 
Figure 8.27: ADM1023 Key Specifications 
Applications of ADCs in Power Meters 
While electromechanical energy meters have been popular for over 50 years, a solid-state 
energy meter delivers far more accuracy and flexibility. Just as important, a well 
designed solid-state meter will have a longer useful life. The ADE775x energy metering 
ICs are a family products designed to implement this type of meter (References 9, 10, 
11). 
We must first consider the fundamentals of power measurement (see Figure 8.28). 
Instantaneous AC voltage is given by the expression v(t) = V×cos(ωt), and the current 
(assuming it is in phase with the voltage) by i(t) = I×cos(ωt). The instantaneous power  is 
the product of v(t) and i(t): 
p(t) = V×I×cos
2
(ωt)    
Eq. 8.4 
Using the trigonometric identity, 2cos
2
(ωt) = 1 + cos(2ωt),  
Eq. 8.5 
[
]
cos(2 t)
1
2
V I
p(t)
ω
+
×
=
= Instantaneous Power.   
Eq. 8.6 
The instantaneous real power is simply the average value of p(t). It can be shown that 
computing the instantaneous real power in this manner gives accurate results even if the 
current is not in phase with the voltage (i.e., the power factor is not unity. By definition, 
the power factor is equal to cosθ, where θ is the phase angle between the voltage and the 
current). It also gives the correct real power if the waveforms are non-sinusoidal.  
‹ On-Chip and Remote Microprocessor Sensing
‹ Offset Registers for System Calibration
‹ 1°C Accuracy and Resolution on Local Channel
‹ 0.125°C Resolution/1°C Accuracy on Remote Channel
‹ Programmable Over/Under Temperature Limits
‹ Programmable Conversion Rate
‹ Supports System Management Bus (SMBus) Alert
‹ 2-Wire SMBus Serial Interface
‹ 200µA Max. Operating Current (0.25 Conversions/Second)
‹ 1µA Standby Current
‹ +3V to +5.5V Supply
‹ 16-Lead QSOP Package
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
able to change view orientation by clicking rotate button C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export to HTML file and create multi-page tiff file
rotate all pages in pdf and save; rotate a pdf page
How to C#: Cleanup Images
property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the To identify blank page through the property BlankPageDetected, if there is a blank page
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; permanently rotate pdf pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.23 
Figure 8.28: Basics of Power Measurements 
The ADE7755 implements these calculations, and a block diagram is shown in Figure 
8.29. The two ADCs digitize the voltage signals from the current and voltage transducers. 
These ADCs are 16-bit second order Σ-∆ with an input sampling rate of 900 kSPS. This 
analog input structure greatly simplifies transducer interfacing by providing a wide 
dynamic range for direct connection to the transducer and also by simplifying the 
antialiasing filter design. A programmable gain stage in the current channel further 
facilitates easy transducer interfacing. A high-pass filter in the current channel removes 
any dc component from the current signal. This eliminates any inaccuracies in the real 
power calculation due to offsets in the voltage or current signals.  
Figure 8.29: ADE7755 Energy Metering IC  Signal Processing 
v(t) = V × cos(
ω
t)
(Instantaneous Voltage)
i(t)  = I × cos(
ω
t)
(Instantaneous Current)
p(t) = V × I cos
2
(
ω
t)  
(Instantaneous Power)
V × I
2
=
1 + cos(2
ω
t)
p(t)
Average Value of p(t) = Instantaneous Real Power
Includes Effects of Power Factor and Waveform Distortion
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB 4, false); //only posterize the second page of
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate one page
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.24 
The real power calculation is derived from the instantaneous power signal. The 
instantaneous power signal is generated by a direct multiplication of the current and 
voltage signals. In order to extract the real power component (i.e., the dc component), the 
instantaneous power signal is low-pass filtered. Figure 8.29 illustrates the instantaneous 
real power signal and shows how the real power information can be extracted by low-
pass filtering the instantaneous power signal. This method correctly calculates real power 
for non-sinusoidal current and voltage waveforms at all power factors. All signal 
processing is carried out in the digital domain for superior stability over temperature and 
time.  
The low-frequency output of the ADE7755 is generated by accumulating this real power 
information (see Figure 8.30). This low frequency inherently means a long accumulation 
time between output pulses. The output frequency is therefore proportional to the average 
real power. This average real power information can, in turn, be accumulated (e.g., by a 
counter) to generate real energy information. Because of its high output frequency and 
shorter integration time, the CF output is proportional to the instantaneous real power. 
This is useful for system calibration purposes that would take place under steady load 
conditions. 
Figure 8.30: ADE7755 Energy Metering IC with Pulse Output 
Figure 8.31 shows a typical connection diagram for Channel V1 and V2. A CT (current 
transformer) is the transducer selected for sensing the Channel V1 current. Notice the 
common-mode voltage for Channel 1 is AGND and is derived by center tapping the 
burden resistor to AGND. This provides the complementary analog input signals for V1P 
and V1N. The CT turns ratio and burden resistor Rb are selected to give a peak 
differential voltage of ±470 mV/Gain at maximum load. The Channel 2 voltage sensing is 
accomplished with a PT (potential transformer) to provide complete isolation from the 
power line.  
0 0 0 5 1 4 7
kW-Hr COUNTER
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.1 P
RECISION 
M
EASUREMENT AND 
S
ENSOR 
C
ONDITIONING
8.25 
Figure 8.31: Typical Connections for Channel 1 (Current Sense) 
and Channel 2 (Voltage Sense) 
AGND
PT
CURRENT
SENSE
VOLTAGE
SENSE
ADE7755
AGND
PT
CURRENT
SENSE
VOLTAGE
SENSE
ADE7755
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.26 
REFERENCES: 
8.1 PRECISION MEASUREMENT AND SENSOR 
CONDITIONING 
1.  Walt Kester, Practical Design Techniques for Sensor Signal Conditioning, Analog Devices, 1999, 
Chapter 8. Available for download at http://www.analog.com.  
2.  Data sheet for AD7730/AD7730L Bridge Transducer ADC, http://www.analog.com. 
3.  Walter G. Jung, Op Amp Applications, Analog Devices, 2002, ISBN 0-916550-26-5, Chapter 4. 
4.  Data sheet for AD620 Precision Instrumentation Amplifier, http://www.analog.com. 
5.  Data sheet for AD7793 24-bit Dual Sigma-Delta ADC, http://www.analog.com. 
6.  Data sheet for TMP05/TMP06 ±0.5°C Accurate PWM Temperature Sensor in 5-Lead SC-70, 
http://www.analog.com.  
7.  Data sheet for ADT7301 13-bit, ±0.5°C Accurate, MicroPower Digital Temperature Sensor, 
http://www.analog.com.  
8.  Data sheet for ADM1023 ACPI Compliant High Accuracy Microprocessor System Temperature 
Monitor, http://www.analog.com. 
9.  Data sheet for ADE7755 Energy Metering IC with Pulse Output, http://www.analog.com. 
10.  Paul Daigle, "All-Electronic Power and Energy Meters," Analog Dialogue, Volume 33, Number 2, 
February, 1999, http://www.analog.com. 
11.  John Markow, "Microcontroller-Based Energy Metering using the AD7755," Analog Dialogue, 
Volume 33, Number 9, October, 1999, http://www.analog.com. 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.2 M
ULTICHANNEL 
D
ATA 
A
CQUISITION 
S
YSTEMS
8.27 
SECTION 8.2: MULTICHANNEL DATA 
ACQUISITION SYSTEMS 
Walt Kester 
Data Acquisition System Configurations 
There are many applications for data acquisition systems in measurement and process 
control. All data acquisition applications involve digitizing analog signals for analysis 
using ADCs. In a measurement application, the ADC is followed by a digital processor 
which performs the required data analysis. In a process control application, the process 
controller generates feedback signals which typically must be converted back into analog 
form using a DAC.  
Although a single ADC digitizing a single channel of analog data constitutes a data 
acquisition system, the term data acquisition generally refers to multichannel systems. If 
there is feedback from the digital processor, DACs may be required to convert the digital 
responses into analog. This process is often referred to as data distribution.  
Figure 8.32A shows a data acquisition/distribution process control system where each 
channel has its own dedicated ADC and DAC. An alternative configuration is shown in 
Figure 8.32B, where analog multiplexers and demultiplexers are used with a single ADC 
and DAC. In most cases, especially where there are many channels, this second 
configuration provides an economical alternative.  
Figure 8.32: Two Approaches to a Multichannel 
Data Acquisition System 
PROCESS
CONTROLLER
ADC
ANALOG
MUX
PROCESS
DAC
ANALOG
DEMUX
PROCESS
CONTROLLER
ADC
PROCESS
ADC
DAC
DAC
(A)
(B)
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.28 
There are many tradeoffs involved in designing a data acquisition system. Issues such as 
filtering, amplification, multiplexing, demultiplexing, sampling frequency, and 
partitioning must be resolved.  
Multiplexing 
Multiplexing is a fundamental part of a data acquisition system as shown in Figure 8.32. 
Multiplexers and switches are examined in more detail in Reference 1, but a fundamental 
understanding is required to design a data acquisition system—even if the multiplexer is 
on the same chip as the ADC, which is often the case today.  
A simplified diagram of an analog multiplexer is shown in Figure 8.33. The number of 
input channels typically ranges from 2 to 32, and the devices are generally fabricated on 
CMOS processes. Most multiplexers have internal channel-address decoding logic and 
registers, but in a few, these functions must be performed externally. Unused multiplexer 
inputs must be grounded or severe loss of system accuracy may result. The key 
specifications are switching time, on-resistance, on-resistance modulation, and off-
channel isolation (crosstalk). For a detailed discussion of the details of analog 
multiplexers, refer to Chapter 7 of this book.   
Figure 8.33: Simplified Diagram of a Typical Analog Multiplexer 
Multiplexer on-resistance is generally slightly dependent on the signal level (often called 
R
on
modulation). This will cause signal distortion if the multiplexer must drive a load 
resistance, therefore the multiplexer output should be isolated from the load with a 
suitable buffer amplifier. A separate buffer is not required if the multiplexer drives a high 
input impedance, such as a PGA, SHA or ADC—but beware! Some SHAs and ADCs 
draw high frequency pulse current at their sampling rate and cannot tolerate being driven 
by an unbuffered multiplexer.  
ADDRESS
REGISTER
ADDRESS
DECODER
MUX
ANALOG
INPUTS
BUFFER, SHA,
PGA, ADC
CH.1
CH.M
CLOCK
CH. ADDRESS
R
L
R
ON
R
ON
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested