display pdf from byte array c# : How to rotate a single page in a pdf document Library application component asp.net html .net mvc Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF6-part1438

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.59 
SECTION 8.4: DIGITAL AUDIO 
Walt Kester 
Introduction 
Voiceband digital audio had its beginnings back in the early days of the PCM system 
development initiated by the 1937 patent filing of A. H. Reeves of the International 
Telephone and Telegraph Corporation (Reference 1). During the early 1940s, Bell 
Telephone Laboratories continued PCM work relating to speech encryption systems, and 
after the war, turned their attention to commercial PCM transmission. An experimental 
24-channel PCM system was developed, and the results summarized in 1948 in 
Reference 2 by L. A. Meacham and E. Peterson. Some of the significant developments of 
this work were the successive approximation ADC, Shannon-Rack decoder (DAC), and 
the logarithmic companding/expanding of voiceband signals. 
In order to minimize the number of bits per second and still maintain the required 
dynamic range for voiceband, the early system utilized 7-bit ADCs and DACs with a 
logarithmic compressor ahead of the ADC and a logarithmic expander after the DAC.  
With the solid state devices available in the mid 1950s, Bell Labs developed the T-1 
carrier system which was prototyped in the late 1950s and put into service in the 1960s. 
The standard sampling rate for voiceband signals was established at 8 kSPS, and the 
initial system used 7-bit logarithmically encoded ADCs and DACs. Later systems used  
8-bit "segmented" ADCs and DACs (see Chapter 3 of this book for a description of the 
architecture).  
Modern wireless systems, such as cellular telephone, use higher resolution linear Σ- 
ADCs and DACs, rather than the logarithmic ones used in the early systems. A simplified 
comparison between the standard 8-bit companded system and the modern cell phone 
handset is shown in Figure 8.62. Modern cellular transmission systems make use of 
sophisticated DSP-based speech compression algorithms in order to reduce the overall 
data rate to acceptable levels, rather than limiting the resolution of the converters. In most 
cases the ADC and DAC (codec) are integrated into a chip which performs many other 
digital functions in a handset. It should be noted that if needed, the modern linear codecs 
can be made backward compatible with the logarithmically encoded 8-bit systems by 
simply using on-chip lookup tables to convert the high resolution linear data into the 8-bit 
logarithmic data.  
In the 1970s and 1980s, the field of digital audio rapidly expanded to include much more 
than voiceband for PCM systems. A driving force behind this expansion was the 
increased availability of low-cost high resolution ADCs and DACs with sufficient 
dynamic range and sampling rates.  
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf reverse page order online; rotate one page in pdf
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; rotate single page in pdf
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.60 
Figure 8.62: Voiceband Telcom Digital Audio Simplified 
In the consumer electronics industry, the compact disk (CD) player has proliferated into 
nearly every household. Today, high-end DVD audio players give increased levels of 
performance in home theater systems. 
Since the beginning of the 1980s, digital audio equipment has steadily been replacing 
analog equipment in broadcast and production systems. Some of this digital equipment 
has analog inputs and outputs and is designed to replace an analog device and operate in 
an analog environment (i.e., a digital "black box"). However, the trend in broadcast and 
production is toward the all-digital studio, in which all aspects of recording, processing, 
and transmission take place in the digital domain. To this end, the AES (Audio 
Engineering Society) and EBU (European Broadcast Union) have developed standards to 
facilitate this future transition.  
Sampling Rate and THD + N Requirements for Digital Audio 
The key audio specifications are total harmonic distortion plus noise (THD + N), 
dynamic range (DNR), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). THD + N is more correctly 
expressed as (THD + N)/S the ratio of the rms sum of all spectral components in the 
passband (20 Hz to 20 kHz), excluding the fundamental, to the rms value of the 
fundamental input signal. The ratio can be expressed in % or dB. THD + N is a negative 
number when expressed in dB, but often simply expressed as a positive number, with the 
minus sign assumed. 
Dynamic range (DNR) is the ratio of a fullscale input signal to the integrated noise in the 
passband (20 Hz to 20 kHz), expressed in dB. It is measured with a –60-dB input signal 
ADC
8-BIT
COMPANDING
VOICE
PUBLIC SWITCHED
TELEPHONE NETWORK
(PSTN), T-CARRIER
LPF
DAC
8-BIT
EXPANDING
LPF
VOICE
f
s
= 8kSPS
f
s
= 8kSPS
ADC
16-BIT
LINEAR Σ-∆
VOICE
DIGITAL CELLULAR
PHONE SYSTEM
LPF
DAC
16-BIT
LINEAR Σ-∆
LPF
VOICE
f
s
= 8kSPS
K
1
f
s
K
2
f
s
TELCOM VOICEBAND CODEC INTEGRATED INTO HANDSET
SNR, THD + N  ~  60-70dB
f
s
= 8kSPS
(A) T-CARRIER
PCM
(B) DIGITAL
CELLULAR
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
IN
OUT
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf rotate page and save; saving rotated pdf pages
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf save rotated pages; rotate pdf pages on ipad
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.61 
and is equal to [S/(THD+N)] + 60dB. The noise level therefore basically establishes the 
dynamic range. It is specified with and without an A-Weight filter applied.  
Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the ratio of the fullscale input signal level to the integrated 
noise in the passband (20 Hz to 20 kHz) with no input signal applied, expressed in dB (a 
positive number). In many cases, the SNR and DNR specifications are approximately 
equal. Note that this definition of SNR for audio is slightly different than the SNR for 
standard ADCs and DACs defined in Chapter 2, where it is defined as the ratio of the rms 
signal to rms value of all other components excluding the harmonics of the fundamental. 
These definitions are summarized in Figure 8.63. 
Figure 8.63: Key Audio Specifications 
Figure 8.64 lists a few of the popular applications of digital audio and some typical  
THD + N and sample rate requirements. For the purposes of this discussion, THD + N 
numbers are given as positive numbers in dB below the signal level. In actuality, when a 
small percentage, for example 0.001% is converted into dB, it is a negative number as 
previously mentioned above.  
In most cases, the sampling frequency is chosen to be slightly above twice the highest 
frequency of interest, however, the actual numbers deserve some further discussion.  
The early requirement for the standard PCM T-carrier sampling rate of 8 kSPS has 
already been discussed. Voiceband audio occupies an approximate bandwidth of 3.5 kHz, 
and requires an SNR of only 60 dB to 70 dB. Although 16-bit Σ- codecs are used today 
for the convenience of DSPs, only approximately 11-bits of actual dynamic range is 
required.  
‹ Total Harmonic Distortion Plus Noise (THD + N):
More correctly: S/(THD + N), the ratio of the rms value of the 
fundamental input signal to the rms sum of all other spectral 
components in the passband (20Hz to 20kHz), expressed in % or dB. 
This is a negative number in dB, but often simply expressed as a
positive number, with the minus sign assumed. 
‹ Dynamic Range (DNR):
The ratio of a fullscale input signal to the integrated noise inthe 
passband (20Hz to 20kHz), expressed in dB. It is measured with a –60dB 
input signal and is equal to [S/(THD+N)] + 60dB, so the noise level 
establishes the dynamic range. It is specified with and without an A-
Weight filter applied.
‹ Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR):
The ratio of the fullscale input signal level to the integrated noise in the 
passband (20Hz to 20kHz) with no input signal applied, expressed in 
dB. (Approximately equal to DNR in many cases)
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
rotate all pages in pdf; how to reverse page order in pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
pdf rotate page; rotate pdf pages and save
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.62 
FM stereo has a higher bandwidth (typically 15 kHz), and a sampling rate of 32 kSPS 
was therefore chosen for digital transmission over land lines connecting the studio to FM 
transmitter. A minimum THD + N of 60 dB to 70 dB is sufficient for these applications.  
Figure 8.64: Digital Audio THD + N and Sample Rate Requirements 
Speech analysis and speech processing systems require a THD + N of at least 70 dB to  
80 dB, and sampling rates up to 48 kSPS are used, depending upon the application.  
The professional audio bandwidth extends from 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Therefore, a minimum 
sampling frequency of 40 kSPS is required—in practice, 44.1 kSPS (audio CD standard) 
is the lowest used.  
High quality computer audio sound cards need 80 dB to 90 dB THD + N, and 48 kSPS 
has been adopted as the standard sampling frequency.  
High-end stereo CD players, DVD audio players, and studio recording systems require 
greater than 100 dB of THD + N and DNR, and therefore place the most critical 
requirements on the ADC and DAC. Regarding sampling frequency, 44.1 kSPS was 
chosen as the compact standard sampling frequency. It was selected to allow the use of 
NTSC or PAL "U-Matic" videotape recorders (VTRs) fitted with a PCM adapter to 
record and play back digital audio signals transformed into "pseudo-video" waveforms. 
Later, these VTRs were used to master compact disks (CDs), and 44.1 kSPS became a 
defacto standard that is also used in some digital audio tape (DAT) play-back-only 
applications. 
For studio and broadcast applications, 48-kSPS sampling has become the industry 
standard for digital audio recording. This frequency was adopted for the following 
reason. In a digital television environment, the digital audio reference signal must be 
locked to the video reference signal to avoid drift in the relationship between audio and 
video signals and allow click-free audio and video switching. A sampling rate of 48 kSPS 
was chosen for both NTSC and PAL to facilitate the conversion between the two 
standards and maintain the proper phase relationship between video and audio in both 
systems (the details of this are explained in Reference 1). In these applications, THD + N 
requirements are generally greater than 100 dB. 
Telcom
FM Stereo
Speech Analysis, etc.
Computer Audio
Stereo CD, DAT, etc.
DVD Audio
Standard Sample Rates (kSPS)
8
32
8 - 48
48
44.1, 48, 88.2, 96
48, 96, 192
THD + N (dB)
60 - 70
60 - 70
70 - 80
80 - 90
> 100
> 100
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi
rotate pdf page permanently; how to rotate pdf pages and save
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
pdf rotate one page; rotate pdf page by page
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.63 
Audio for digital video disk (DVD) utilizes sampling frequencies of 48 kSPS when video 
and audio are both present. Although most humans cannot hear frequencies above  
20 kHz, tests have shown that harmonics and the effects of room acoustics enable some 
audio above 20 kHz to be heard, or at least felt. Therefore, for high-end DVD audio-only 
applications, sampling rates of 96 kSPS and 192 kSPS can be used. Higher DVD 
sampling frequencies and resolution enhance the audio quality over CDs in stereo 
playback (i.e., 96-kSPS/24-bit vs. 44.1 kSPS/16-bit for CDs). THD + N and DNR 
requirements for DVD audio are typically greater than 100 dB.  
Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) is the basic form of digital audio used on most CDs as 
well as to master virtually all digital recording. PCM encoding on DVD-video products 
can use up to a 96-kSPS sampling frequency and a 24-bit sample word. Producers of 
DVD products rely heavily on audio and video compression to fit their source material 
within the space and bandwidth of the DVD medium. By slightly compressing the audio, 
DVD producers can make space available for video and other added features without 
sacrificing perceptible audio performance and quality. The audio compression formats 
are used only to remove redundant data. The end user does not detect the difference, 
because the removed data is masked by other sounds. Since the incoming audio stream is 
altered by the compression, all of the original PCM data cannot be recovered on 
playback—these formats are referred to as lossy compression. This can result in audio 
tracks as small as 1/15th the size of the uncompressed PCM master for Dolby Digital 
compression.  
Overall Trends in Digital Audio ADCs and DACs 
Digital audio systems place high performance demands on ADCs and DACs because of 
the wide dynamic range requirements. Early ADCs for digital audio in the 1970s 
typically utilized either the successive approximation or subranging architectures (see 
Chapter 3 for architecture descriptions). The resolution was generally 16-bits, and the 
maximum sampling frequency about 50 kSPS. The ADCs were modules or hybrids, and 
the DACs were ICs with an input serial-to-parallel converter followed by a traditional 
parallel binarily-weighted DAC. The DACs generally used thin-film laser trimmed 
resistors to achieve the required accuracy. The ADCs were relatively costly and primarily 
used in the recording studios, while the DACs were used in high volume in consumer CD 
players.  
Early CD players used techniques similar to the simplified diagram in Figure 8.65A. The 
output anti-imaging filter presents a fundamental problem with this approach, especially 
when audio requirements are considered. Theoretically, a 16-bit parallel DAC updated at 
44.1 kSPS could be used at the output, however, because the audio bandwidth extends to 
20 kHz, the transition region of the filter is narrow. For example, with a 44.1 kSPS 
update rate, the transition region is from 20 kHz to 24 kHz, which is log
2
(24 ÷ 20) = 
log
2
(1.2) = 0.263 octaves. For 60-dB stopband attenuation in 0.263 octaves, the required 
slope of the filter in the transition region is 60 ÷ 0.263 = 228 dB/octave. Assuming  
6-dB/octave per pole, a 38-pole filter would be required! This is obviously a difficult and 
expensive filter, especially if linear phase is desired (as is the case in audio applications). 
Another problem is the "sin(x)/x" rolloff caused by the DAC reconstruction process. 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate single page in pdf file; pdf rotate single page
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
rotate all pages in pdf preview; rotate single page in pdf reader
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.64 
With no compensation, the output is attenuated by approximately 4 dB at the Nyquist 
frequency of 22.05 MHz (see Chapter 2 of this book for details).  
Figure 8.65: Stereo CD Digital Audio Simplified  (One Channel Shown) 
Therefore, in order to simplify the anti-imaging filter requirement, oversampling 
techniques are used as shown. The 16-bit, 44.1-kSPS data is passed through a digital 
interpolation filter which creates extra data points, and produces output data at a multiple 
K times the original sampling rate of 44.1 kSPS. A side benefit from oversampling is the 
3-dB increase in SNR that occurs each time the output sample rate is doubled. 
Oversampling rates of 4, 8, and 16 were popular in early CD players. With K = 16, for 
example, the effective output update rate is now 16 × 44.1 = 705.6 kSPS. The transition 
region of the filter now extends from 20 kHz to 685.6 kHz, which is equal to  
log
2
(685.6 ÷ 20) = log
2
(34.3) = 5.1 octaves. The required slope of the filter in the 
transition region is now 60 ÷ 5.1 = 12 dB/octave, and a 2 or 3-pole filter is sufficient. The 
high oversampling rate also minimizes the signal attenuation due to the sin(x)/x rolloff 
previously mentioned.  
The Σ- ADC uses a highly oversampled input analog modulator followed by a digital 
filter and decimator, as described in detail in Chapter 3 of this book. The Σ- DAC uses a 
digital modulator to produce a single (or multibit) analog output  at a highly oversampled 
rate. The oversampling feature greatly eases the requirements on both the ADC input 
antialiasing filter and the DAC output anti-imaging filter. There are many other 
advantages of the Σ- architecture which make it the ideal choice for audio ADCs and 
DACs. Figure 8.65B shows a modern CD player using a Σ- DAC, where oversampling 
rates of 64, 128, and 256 are quite commonly used.  
Today, Σ- ADCs and DACs dominate the digital audio market because of their high 
dynamic range, oversampling architecture, low power, and relatively low cost. Because 
DAC
16, 18, 
20-BIT
PARALLEL
LPF
f
s
= 44.1kSPS
Kf
s
Kf
s
DIGITAL
INTERPOLATION
FILTER
K = 4, 8, 16
PARALLEL
18, 20-BIT
DATA @ Kf
s
DAC
24-BIT
Σ-
f
s
= 44.1kSPS
Kf
s
LPF
SINGLE OR
MULTIBIT ANALOG
DATA @ Kf
s
K = 64, 128, 256
AUDIO
(A) EARLY SYSTEMS
(B) MODERN SYSTEMS
AUDIO
READ
HEAD
DIGITAL
PROCESSING
4.3218Mb/s
16-BITS
READ
HEAD
DIGITAL
PROCESSING
4.3218Mb/s
16-BITS
44.1kSPS
44.1kSPS
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.65 
they are typically produced on CMOS processes, the addition of many audio-specific 
digital features is relatively easy. The following sections examine a few of the many 
digital audio offerings available from Analog Devices.  
Voiceband Codecs 
There are many applications where both an ADC and a compatible DAC are required, 
such as in voice and audio processors, digital video camcorders, cell phone handsets, PC 
sound cards, etc. When the ADC and DAC are both on the same chip, they are called a 
coder-decoder (or codec). The AD74122 (Reference 4) is a typical example of a low cost, 
low power general purpose stereo voice and audio bandwidth codec. A simplified block 
diagram is shown in Figure 8.66. 
Figure 8.66: AD74122 16-/20-/24-Bit, 48-kSPS Stereo Voiceband Codec 
The AD74122 is a 2.5-V Σ- stereo audio codec with 3.3-V tolerant digital interface. It 
supports sampling rates from 8 kSPS to 48 kSPS and provides 16-/20-/24-bit word 
lengths. The architecture uses multibit modulators and data directed scrambling DACs for 
reduced idle tones and noise floor (see Chapter 3 of this book). 
The ADC THD + N in the 20 Hz to 20 kHz bandwidth is 67 dB and the dynamic range 
(DNR) is 85 dB. The DAC THD + N is 88 dB (measured with a sampling rate of  
48 kSPS), and the dynamic range is 93 dB. The device has digitally programmable 
input/output gain, on-chip volume controls per output channel, software controllable 
clickless mute, and contains an on-chip reference.  The serial interface is compatible with 
popular DSPs. The AD74122 is packaged in a 20-lead TSSOP package.  
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.66 
High Performance Audio ADCs and DACs in Separate Packages 
For studio quality digital audio recording, the THD + N and SNR of an ADC should be 
greater than 100 dB. Early ADCs for digital audio were expensive modules or hybrids, 
now of course, they are ICs based on the Σ- architecture. The AD1871 stereo 24-bit,  
96-kSPS Σ- ADC is an excellent example of an ADC suitable for the exacting 
requirements of professional audio recording (Reference 5). It uses multibit modulators 
and data scrambling techniques to yield 103-dB THD + N, and 105-dB SNR/DNR.  The 
device operates at an input oversampling frequency of 6.144 MSPS for an output 
sampling rate of 48 kSPS (K = 128). It has an SPI-compatible serial port, on-chip 
reference, and is housed in a 28-lead SSOP package. A functional diagram is shown in 
Figure 8.67. 
Figure 8.67: AD1871 Stereo Audio, 24-Bit, 96-kSPS Multibit 
Σ
-
ADC 
Looking at DACs, the AD1955 (Reference 6) represents the high-end of digital audio 
performance. It operates on  a 5-V power supply and 16-/18-/20-/24-bit data at up to a 
192-kSPS sample rate. It supports the SACD (super audio compact disk, a Phillips 
standard) DSD (direct stream digital) bit stream, and supports a wide range of PCM 
sample rates including 32 kSPS, 44.1 kSPS, 48 kSPS, 88.2 kSPS, 96 kSPS, and  
192 kSPS.  The AD1955 uses a multibit Σ- modulator with "Perfect Differential 
Linearity Restoration" and data directed scrambling for reduced idle tones and noise 
floor. The output is a differential current of 8.64-mA p-p.  
The AD1955 has 120-dB SNR/DNR at a 48-kSPS sample rate (A-Weighted stereo) and 
110-dB THD + N. The digital filter has 110-dB stopband attenuation with ±0.0002-dB 
passband ripple. The device has hardware and software controllable clickless mute, serial 
(SPI) interface, and is housed in a 28-lead SSOP plastic package. A functional diagram is 
shown in Figure 8.68.  
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.67 
Figure 8.68: AD1955 High Performance Multibit 
Σ
-
DAC 
Figure 8.69 summarizes the current (2004) Analog Devices portfolio of high-end stereo 
audio DACs in individual packages.  
Figure 8.69: Audio DAC Family 
Performance
117 dB SNR/ DNR
107 dB THD+N
Current Out
Pin Compatible
Pin Compatible
AD1854J
AD1853
AD1855
AD1854K
•High End 
DVD-Audio Players
•Professional Audio
••DVD Players 
•A/V Amps
•High End TV’s
AD1852
108 dB SNR/ DNR
• 97 dB THD+N
113 dB SNR/ DNR
• 97/ 101 dB THD+N
115 dB SNR/ DNR
104 dB THD+N
•SACD Players
•High End 
DVD-Audio Players
•Professional Audio
AD1955
123 dB SNR/ 
DNR – Mono
120 dB SNR/ 
DNR – Stereo
110 dB THD+N
Current Out
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.68 
The CMOS processes used to fabricate Σ- ADCs and DACs lend themselves to 
additional digital functionality with only moderate increases in chip real estate and 
power. The SigmaDSP™ family of audio DACs incorporate DSPs which allow speaker 
equalization, dual-band compression/limiting, delay compensation, and image 
enhancement. These algorithms can be used to compensate for real-world limitations of 
speakers, amplifiers, and listening environments, resulting in a dramatic improvement in 
perceived audio quality.  
The AD1953 SigmaDSP 3-channel, 26-bit signal processing DAC (Reference 7) accepts 
data at sample rates up to 48 kSPS. The signal processing used in the AD1953 is 
comparable to that found in high-end studio equipment. Most of the processing is done in 
full 48-bit double-precision mode, resulting in very good low level signal performance 
and the absence of limit cycles or idle tones. The compressor/limiter uses a sophisticated 
two-band algorithm often found in high-end broadcast compressors. A simplified block 
diagram is shown in Figure 8.70.  
Figure 8.70: AD1953 SigmaDSP™ 3-Channel, 26-Bit Signal Processing DAC 
The AD1953 has a dynamic range of 112 dB and a THD + N of 100 dB. Note that the 
DAC has left and right channels as well as a subwoofer output channel. The part operates 
from a single 5-V supply and is housed in a 48-lead LQFP package. A graphical user 
interface (GUI) is available for evaluation of the AD1953 as shown in Figure 8.71. This 
GUI controls all of the functions of the chip in a very straightforward and user-friendly 
interface. No code needs to be written to use the GUI to control the device. Software 
development tools are also available.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested