display pdf from byte array c# : How to rotate a single page in a pdf document application control utility azure web page windows visual studio Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF7-part1439

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.69 
Figure 8.71: AD1953 SigmaDSP™ 3-Channel, 26-Bit Signal Processing DAC 
High Performance Multichannel Audio Codecs and DACs 
There are many applications in DVD, audio, automotive, home theater, etc., where high 
performance multichannel codecs and DACs are required. The AD1839A (Reference 8) 
is one example of a high-end codec with 2 ADCs and 6 DACs. A simplified block 
diagram is shown in Figure 8.72. 
Figure 8.72: AD1839A, 2 ADC, 6 DAC, 96-kSPS 24-Bit 
Σ
-
Codecs 
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; reverse page order pdf
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate pdf page few degrees
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.70 
The ADCs have 97-dB THD + N and 105-dB SNR/DNR. The DACs have 92-dB THD + 
N and 108-dB SNR/DNR. The devices operate on 5 V with 3.3-V tolerant digital 
interfaces. The maximum sampling rate is 96 kSPS (192 kSPS available on 1 DAC), and 
16-/20-/24-bit word lengths are supported. The Σ- modulators are multibit and utilize 
data directed scrambling. The AD1839A is housed in a 52-lead MQFP package.  
A summary of the multichannel audio family of codecs and DACs is shown in Figure 
8.73. 
Figure 8.73: Multichannel Audio Codecs and DACs 
There are many applications for audio codec products in computer sound cards, and these 
require compatibility with the AC'97 specification. The Analog Devices' AD1985 
SoundMAX
®
Codec (Reference 9) is a good example of a codec which is compliant with 
the latest revision of AC'97. 
Sample Rate Converters 
From an earlier discussion in this section, we saw that there are a variety of standard 
sampling frequencies associated with digital audio signal processing: 8 kSPS, 32 kSPS,  
44.1 kSPS, 48 kSPS, 88.2 kSPS, 96 kSPS, and 192 kSPS, etc. A typical audio studio 
generally has a common mixing console through which all signals must pass—analog 
audio and digital audio. These signals must be synchronized, and the most common 
method is to reference all signals to a 48 kHz master clock as shown in Figure 8.74. It 
should be noted that there are many other sample rate translations which might be 
required, with inputs and outputs ranging from 8 kSPS to 192 kSPS.  
16ch TDM / Daisy-chain Mode
8ch TDM Mode
AD1836AC
102/ 105 dB DNR
4 ADC/ 6 DAC
Differential out
AD1833
110 dB DNR
6 DAC
Diff Out
AD1836A
105/ 108 dB DNR
4 ADC/ 6 DAC
Differential out
AD1833C
108 dB DNR
6 DAC
Diff Out
AD1839A
Single ended out
AD1837A
Single ended out
AD1835A
105/ 110 dB DNR
2 ADC/ 8 DAC
Diff Out
AD1838A
105/110 dB DNR
2 ADC/ 6 DAC
Diff Out
AD1938
102/ 105 dB DNR
4 ADC/ 8 DAC
AD1834
105 dB DNR
8 DAC
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; rotate pages in pdf online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf page order reverse; pdf rotate single page and save
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.71 
Figure 8.74: The Need for Sample Rate Converters (SRCs) 
In order for this to be practical, there must be an easy method for seamlessly translating 
digital signals from one sampling frequency to another. For instance, the 44.1-kSPS CD 
player output must be translated into 48 kSPS to interface with the mixer. This requires 
more than simply changing the sampling frequency—a completely new set of data 
samples must be generated where these translations occur. Figure 8.75 shows one way to 
illustrate the concept of a sample rate converter (SRC).  
Figure 8.75: The Concept of a Sample Rate Converter 
REFERENCE
CLOCK
CD ROM
(44.1 kSPS)
SRC
DAT
PLAYBACK
ANALOG
AUDIO
SOURCES
PRODUCTION
MIXER
DAT
RECORDER
48 kSPS REFERENCE
48kSPS
DISTRIBUTION
Digital Audio Signal
@ Input Sampling Rate
Digital Audio Signal
@ Output Sampling Rate
Input f
s
Output f
s
DAC
ADC
Reconstructed
Audio Signal
• A SRC is a FULLYDIGITAL ENGINE !!!
• However, one way of thinking about it is:
• it reconstructs the signal, just like a DAC would do
• it resamplesthe signal, just like an ADC would do
SRC
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
pdf rotate pages and save; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
rotate all pages in pdf and save; how to rotate one page in pdf document
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.72 
The digital input data is first passed through a DAC updated at the input sampling 
frequency. The analog output of the DAC is resampled by an ADC which operates at the 
output sampling frequency. In practice, however, the SRC is an entirely digital device. 
The process is conceptually one of upsampling the input data followed by zero-stuffing, 
digital interpolation to generate new sampled data, digital filtering, and finally 
downsampling to the desired output sampling frequency. The conversion of a 5-kHz 
sinewave from a sampling frequency of 44.1 kSPS to 48 kSPS using this technique is 
shown graphically in Figure 8.76. 
Figure 8.76: Conversion of a 5-kHz Sinewave from  
44.1-kSPS to 48-kSPS Sample Rate 
The AD1896 (Reference 10) is a 24-bit, high performance, single-chip, second generation 
asynchronous sample rate converter. Based on Analog Devices experience with its first 
asynchronous sample rate converter, the AD1890, the AD1896 offers improved 
performance and additional features. This improved performance includes a THD + N 
range of  117 dB to 133 dB, depending on the sample rate and input frequency, 142 dB 
(A-Weighted) dynamic range, up to 192-kSPS sampling frequencies for both input and 
output sample rates, improved jitter rejection, and 1:8 upsampling and 7.75:1 
downsampling ratios.  
Additional features include more serial formats, a bypass mode, better interfacing to 
digital signal processors, and a matched-phase mode. The AD1896 has a 3-wire interface 
for the serial input and output ports that supports left-justified, I
2
S, and right-justified 
(16-, 18-, 20-, 24-bit) modes. Additionally, the serial output port supports TDM mode for 
daisy-chaining multiple AD1896s to a digital signal processor. The serial output data is 
dithered down to 20, 18, or 16 bits when 20-, 18-, or 16-bit output data is selected. The 
AD1896 sample rate converts the data from the serial input port to the sample rate of the 
serial output port. The sample rate at the serial input port can be asynchronous with 
respect to the output sample rate of the output serial port. The master clock to the 
AD1896, MCLK, can be asynchronous to both the serial input and output ports.  
The AD1896 operates on 3.3-V to 5-V input supplies and 3.3-V core voltages. The part is 
housed in a 28-lead SSOP package. A functional diagram is shown in Figure 8.77. 
5kHz SINEWAVE,
SAMPLED AT 44.1kSPS
5kHz SINEWAVE,
OVERSAMPLED BY SRC
5kHz SINEWAVE,
SAMPLED AT 48kSPS
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; save pdf rotated pages
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.4 D
IGITAL 
A
UDIO 
8.73 
Figure 8.77: AD1896 192-kHz Stereo Asynchronous Sample Rate Converter 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate pdf pages
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.74 
REFERENCES: 
8.4 DIGITAL AUDIO
1.  Alec Harley Reeves, "Electric Signaling System," U.S. Patent 2,272,070, filed November 22, 1939, 
issued February 3, 1942. Also French Patent 852,183 filed 1937, issued 1938, and British Patent 
538,860 issued 1939. 
2.  L. A. Meacham and E. Peterson, "An Experimental Multichannel Pulse Code Modulation System of 
Toll Quality," Bell System Technical Journal, Vol 27, No. 1, January 1948, pp. 1-43. 
3.  Michael Robin and Michel Poulin, Digital Television Fundamentals, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill, 
2000, ISBN 0-07-135581-2, Chapter 6.  
4.  Data sheet for AD74122 16-/20-/24-Bit, 48-kSPS Stereo Voiceband/Audio Codec, 
http://www.analog.com. 
5.  Data sheet for AD1871 Stereo Audio, 24-Bit, 96-kSPS, Multibit Σ- ADC, http://www.analog.com 
6.  Data sheet for AD1955 High Performance Multibit Σ- DAC, http://www.analog.com. 
7.  Data sheet for AD1953 SigmaDSP™ 3-Channel, 26-Bit Signal Processing DAC, 
http://www.analog.com. 
8.  Data sheet for AD1839A  2 ADC, 6 DAC, 96-kSPS 24-Bit Σ- Codecs, http://www.analog.com. 
9.  Data sheet for AD1985 AC'97 SoundMAX
®
Codec, http://www.analog.com. 
10.  Data sheet for AD1896 192-kSPS Stereo Asynchronous Sample Rate Converter, 
http://www.analog.com. 
11.  Ken C. Pohlmann, Principles of Digital Audio, Fourth Edition, McGraw Hill, 2000,  
ISBN 0-07-134819-0. 
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.75 
SECTION 8.5: DIGITAL VIDEO AND DISPLAY 
ELECTRONICS
Walt Kester 
Digital Video 
Introduction 
Before discussing some video applications for data converters, we will review some 
basics regarding video signals and specifications. The standard video format is the 
specification of how the video signal looks from an electrical point of view. Light strikes 
the surface of an image sensing device within the camera, producing a voltage level 
corresponding to the amount of light hitting a particular spatial region of the surface. This 
information is then placed into the standard format and sequenced out of the camera. 
Along with the actual light and color information, synchronization pulses are added to the 
signal to allow the receiving device—a television monitor, for instance—to identify 
where the sequence is in the frame data. 
A standard video format image is read out on a line-by-line basis from left to right, top to 
bottom. A technique called interlacing  refers to the reading of all even numbered lines, 
top to bottom, followed by all odd lines as shown in Figure 8.78. 
Figure 8.78: Standard Broadcast Television Interlace Format 
FIELD 1
FIELD 2
COMBINED FIELDS
(ONE COMPLETE FRAME)
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.76 
The standard television picture frame is thus divided into even and odd fields. Interlacing 
is used to produce an apparent update of the entire frame in half the time that a full 
update actually occurs. This results in a television image with less apparent flicker. 
Typical broadcast television frame update rates are 30 Hz and 25 Hz, depending upon the 
line frequency. It should be noted that interlacing is generally not used in graphics 
display systems where the refresh rate is usually greater (typically 60 Hz). 
The original black and white, or monochrome, television specification in the USA is the 
EIA RS-170 (replaced by SMPTE 170M) specification that prescribes all timing and 
voltage level requirements for standard commercial broadcast video signals. The standard 
American specification for color signals, NTSC, modifies RS-170 to work with color 
signals by adding color information to the signal which otherwise contains only 
brightness information.  
A video signal comprises a series of analog television lines. Each line is separated from 
the next by a synchronization pulse called the horizontal sync. The fields of the picture 
are separated by a longer synchronization pulse, called the vertical sync. In the case of a 
monitor receiving the signal, its electron beam scans the face of the display tube with the 
brightness of the beam controlled by the amplitude of the video signal. A single line of an 
NTSC color video signal is shown in Figure 8.79.  
Figure 8.79: NTSC Composite Color Video Line 
Whenever a horizontal sync pulse is detected, the beam is reset to the left side of the 
screen and moved down to the next line position. A vertical sync pulse, indicated by a 
horizontal sync pulse of longer duration, resets the beam to the top left point of the screen 
to a line centered between the first two lines of the previous scan. This allows the current 
field to be displayed between the previous one.  
–40
0
+7.5
+100
IRE UNITS  (1 IRE UNIT = 7.14mV)
F
R
O
N
T
P
O
R
C
H
BACK
PORCH
COLOR
BURST
H
SYNC
H
SYNC
VIDEO
52.66µs
"ACTIVE" LINE TIME
1.5µs
9.4µs
4.7µs
10.9µs
63.56µs
4.7µs
f
H
= 15.734kHz
Ref. White
Ref. Black
Blanking
Sync
H SYNC INTERVAL
1 NTSC VIDEO LINE
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.77 
In the NTSC system (used in the U.S. and Japan), the color subcarrier frequency is  
3.58 MHz. The PAL system (used in the U.K. and Germany) and SECAM system (used 
in France) use a 4.43-MHz color subcarrier.  
In terms of their key frequency differences, a comparison between the NTSC system and 
the PAL system are given in Figure 8.80. 
Figure 8.80: NTSC and PAL Signal Characteristics 
Digital Video Formats 
Digital video had its beginnings in the early 1970s when 8-bit ADCs with sampling 
frequencies of 15 MSPS to 20 MSPS became available. Subjective tests, such as those 
conducted by A. A. Goldberg (Reference 1) showed that 8-bit resolution was sufficient 
for digitizing the composite video signal at sampling frequencies of 3 or 4 times the 
NTSC color subcarrier frequency (3.58 MHz).  
Digital techniques were first applied to "video black boxes" which replaced functions 
previously implemented using analog techniques. These early digital black boxes had an 
analog video input and an analog video output, and replaced analog-based equipment 
such as time-base correctors, frame stores, standards converters, etc. (Reference 2, 3, 4). 
A typical black box is shown in Figure 8.81.  
As previously mentioned, the required resolution was determined to be 8-bits early in the 
1970s, however, 9-bit and 10-bit resolution eventually became popular as higher 
resolution low-cost ADCs and DACs became available. Some initial black boxes used 
sampling frequencies of 3 times the subcarrier frequency—simply due to the lack of 
faster ADCs, but ultimately 4 times the subcarrier frequency became the industry 
standard. 
Horizontal Lines
Color Subcarrier Frequency
Frame Frequency
Field Frequency
Horizontal Sync Frequency
NTSC
525
3.58MHz
30Hz
60Hz
15.734kHz
PAL
625
4.43MHz
25Hz
50Hz
15.625kHz
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.78 
Figure 8.81: Digital Video "Black Box" 
The early ADCs used in these digital block boxes were modular devices, however in 
1979, the first commercial 8-bit monolithic flash converter was introduced (Reference 5), 
and within a few years was soon followed by many others from a variety of IC 
manufacturers. The availability of low-cost IC ADCs played a large role in the growth of 
digital video.  
Digital videotape recorders (VTRs) emerged in the 1980s, based on CCIR 
recommendations. More digital black boxes proliferated, such as digital effects 
generators, graphic systems, and still stores—these devices operating in a variety of 
noncorrelated and incompatible standards. Digital connections between the black boxes 
were difficult or impossible, and the majority were connected with other equipment using 
analog input and output ports. As a matter of fact, this was one reason why 9-bit and  
10-bit ADCs became popular—the additional resolution reduced the cumulative effects 
of quantization noise in cascaded devices.  
In the 1980s, the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) 
developed a digital standard (SMPTE 244M, Reference 6) which defined the 
characteristics of 4f
SC
sampled NTSC composite digital signals as well as the 
characteristics of a bit-parallel digital interface which allowed up to 10-bit samples. The 
digital interface consisted of 10 differential ECL-compatible data signals, 1 differential 
ECL-compatible clock signal, 2 system grounds, and 1 chassis ground, for a total of 25 
pins. Also in the 1980s, an IEEE standard (Reference 7) was developed which defined 
test methods for measuring the performance of ADCs and DACs used in composite 
digital television applications. Later, digital systems using 4f
SC
NTSC composite digital 
signals adopted a high-speed bit-serial interface, with a data rate of 143 Mb/s (defined in 
SMPTE 259M, Reference 10).  
Even before the finalization of the 4f
SC 
composite digital standard, work was progressing 
on digital component systems, which offer numerous advantages over the composite 
digital systems. To understand the differences and advantages, Figure 8.82 shows a 
generalized block diagram of how the composite broadcast video signal is constructed. 
ANTIALIASING
FILTER
8-BIT
ADC
DIGITAL
PROCESSING
8-BIT
DAC
ANTI-IMAGING
FILTER
ANALOG
VIDEO
INPUT
ANALOG
VIDEO
OUTPUT
f
s
f
s
BANDWIDTH
4.2 MHz
5.0 MHz
SUBCARRIER, f
SC
3.58 MHz
4.43 MHz
f
s
= 4 f
SC
14.32 MSPS
17.72 MSPS
NTSC
PAL
f
s
= 3 f
SC
10.74 MSPS
13.29 MSPS
COMPOSITE VIDEO SIGNAL CHARACTERISTICS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested