display pdf from byte array c# : Rotate all pages in pdf and save application control utility azure web page windows visual studio Chapter%208%20Data%20Converter%20ApplicationsF8-part1440

D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.79 
Figure 8.82: Model for Generating the Composite  
Video Signal from RGB Components 
The native RGB signals from the color camera are first passed through a nonlinear 
gamma unit which compensates for the inherent nonlinearity in the receiving CRT. The 
R'G'B' outputs of the gamma unit then pass through a resistive matrix which generates a 
high-bandwidth luma  signal (often incorrectly called luminance) and two reduced-
bandwidth color difference signals. The luma signal, Y', is formed using the relationship 
Y' = 0.587G' + 0.229R' + 0.114B'. In addition, two color difference signals, designated  
R' – Y' and B' – Y' are formed. The color subcarrier is then used to modulate the color 
difference signals in quadrature, and they are summed to form the chroma signal (often 
incorrectly called chrominance). The color burst and composite sync signals are then 
combined with the luma and chroma signals to form the composite video signal, 
designated CVBS (composite video with burst and sync)—the composite signal is 
ultimately broadcast.  
A reverse process occurs in the television receiver, where the composite signal is 
decomposed into the various components and finally into an RGB signal which 
ultimately drives the three color inputs to the CRT.  
Note that each step in the construction of the composite video signal after the output of 
the resistive matrix has the potential of introducing artifacts in the signal. For this reason, 
engineers working in digital video soon realized that it would be advantageous to keep 
the digital video signal as close to the native R'G'B' format as possible. The first so-called 
component analog video standard developed was designated as Y'PbPr (note that the 
prime notation has been dropped from most modern nomenclature). The corresponding 
GAMMA
G
B
R
MATRIX
G'
B'
R'
ADDER
DELAY
Y'
LPF
R' –Y'
LPF
B' –Y'
ADDER
SYNC
GEN.
90°
BURST
GEN.
COMPOSITE
VIDEO
COMPOSITE SYNC
BURST KEY
COLOR
SUBCARRIER
180°
Y' Pb Pr,
Y' Cb Cr, 
Y' U V
S-VIDEO
OR Y'/C
DIFFERENT
SCALE
FACTORS
RGB
FROM
CAMERA
LUMA
CHROMA
CVBS
Y' = 0.587G' +0.229R' + 0.114B'
f
s
= 13.5MSPS
f
s
= 6.25MSPS
f
s
= 4f
SC
Rotate all pages in pdf and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf and save; pdf expert rotate page
Rotate all pages in pdf and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate a pdf page; pdf reverse page order
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.80 
digital standard is designated Y'CbCr. Digital Y'CbCr component video is specified in 
References 8, 9, and 10.  
Another analog component standard is designated as Y'UV and is similar to Y'PbPr with 
different scaling factors for the color difference signals.  
The final popular analog component standard to be discussed is the so-called S-Video, or 
simply Y'/C. This is a two-component analog system and is often used in high-end VCRs, 
DVDs, and TV receivers and monitors.  
The various analog digital video component standards are summarized in Figure 8.83, 
and the back panel connections for each are shown in Figure 8.84 for a typical high-end 
video receiver.  
Figure 8.83: Analog and Digital Video Component and Composite Standards 
The digital component video standards (References  8, 9, and 10) call for a sampling 
frequency of 13.5 MSPS for the Y' luma signal and 6.25 MSPS for each of the two color 
difference signals, Pb and Pr. This is often referred to as "4:2:2 sampling." The luma 
sampling frequency of 13.5 MSPS was selected to allow an integer number of sample 
periods in the line periods in both NTSC and PAL standards.  
The 13.5-MSPS standard is sufficient for the luma signal whose bandwidth extends to 
5.75 MHz. The color difference signal bandwidths extend to 2.75 MHz, and the  
6.25-MSPS is also adequate.  
It should be noted that if the R'B'G' signals were sampled directly, each would require a 
sampling frequency of 13.5 MSPS, and this is referred to as "4:4:4 sampling."  
‹ Y'PbPr
In component analogvideo,  B' –Y' and B' –Y' scaled to form color 
difference signals Pb and Pr.
‹ Y'CbCr
In component digitalvideo, B' –Y' and B' –Y' scaled to form Cb 
and Cr components.
‹ Y'UV
In NTSC or PAL, B' –Y' and B' –Y' scaled to form U and V analog 
components. U and V are lowpass filtered, and combined into a 
modulated chroma component, C. Luma (Y) is summed with 
chroma to form composite NTSC or PAL signal.
‹ S-Video, or Y'/C
Analogtwo-component system based on luma(Y') and chroma(C) 
signals. 
‹ Composite, or CVBS
Composite video signal with burst and sync.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document Dim detelePageindexes = New Integer() {1, 3, 5, 7, 9} ' Delete pages. All Rights Reserved
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; rotate pages in pdf expert
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific All Rights Reserved
pdf reverse page order preview; how to reverse pages in pdf
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.81 
Figure 8.84: What the Analog Connectors Look Like on a High-End Receiver 
Serial Data Interfaces 
Because of the large number of digital interconnection lines required with parallel 
interfaces, the serial digital interface (SDI) has mostly replaced the early parallel 
interfaces. The current serial interface standard is SMPTE 259M (Reference 10) defines 
10-bit serial interfaces for 4f
SC
NTSC at about 143 Mb/s, 4f
SC 
PAL at about 177 Mb/s, 
ITU-R BT601 4:2:2 component video at 270 Mb/s, ITU-R BT601 4:2:2 component video 
sampled at 18 MSPS (to achieve 16:9 aspect ratio) at 360 Mb/s.  
High definition TV (HDTV) standards with a 16:9 aspect ratio are defined in ITU-R 
BT709 (Reference 12) and SMPTE 292M (Reference 13). A sampling frequency of  
74.25 MSPS  is used with 4:2:2 component sampling, for a serial bit rate of 1.485 Gb/s. 
There are various other HDTV scanning standards which are defined in SMPTE 296M 
and SMPTE 274M.  
The high data rates associated with digital television require the use of data compression 
(such as MPEG) for broadcast transmission, but within the studio the signals are typically 
transmitted in serial uncompressed format on either coaxial or fiber optic cable. 
The field of digital television is somewhat complicated because of the large number of 
acronyms and standards. For further information, the reader should consult References 14 
and 15.  
Digital Video ADCs and DACs: Decoders, and Encoders 
In the world of digital video, a few definitions are in order. The acronym SDTV simply 
refers to standard definition TV (as opposed to HDTV, high definition TV).  
CVBS
Composite Video
with Burst and Sync
2 Outputs
S-Video
Y'/C
2 Outputs
Component Video
Y'PrPb or
Y'CrCb
1 Output
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
1. public void DeletePages(int[] pageIndexes). Description: Delete specified pages from the input PDF file. Parameters: All Rights Reserved.
save pdf rotate pages; rotate pages in pdf permanently
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file All Rights Reserved
change orientation of pdf page; reverse page order pdf online
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.82 
An SDTV decoder converts analog composite video (CVBS), S-Video (Y'/C), Y'UV, or 
Y'PbPr signals into a digital video steam in the form of a Y'CbCr digital stream per ITU-
R BT.656 4:2:2 component video compatible with NTSC, PAL B/D/G/H/I/ PAL M, or 
PAL N. An ADC function is implicit in the definition of the video decoder, but 
traditionally, the term decoder is more generally used to define the DAC function.  
A digital video encoder converters digital component video (ITU-R BT.601 4:2:2, for 
example) into a standard composite analog baseband signal compatible with NTSC, PAL 
B/D/G/H/I, PAL M, or PAL N. In addition to the composite output signal, there is often 
the facility to output S-Video (Y'/C), RGB, Y'PbPr, or Y'UV component analog video.  
In contrast to the digital video terminology, in ADC and DAC terminology, the terms 
encoder and decoder are used to refer to the ADC and the DAC function, respectively, 
and the combination is called a codec (coder-decoder).  
The reason for this is that video engineers consider a composite color signal to have the 
chroma encoded on top of the luma signal. The video decoder (with the ADCs) decodes 
(separates) the chroma and luma signal and is referred to as the decoder. On the other 
hand, the video encoder encodes the chroma and the luma back into the composite signal.  
The first ADCs and DACs used in digital television in the 1970s were modular devices, 
and were typically 8-bits with 4f
SC
sampling, requiring an upper sampling rate of  
17.72 MSPS for PAL. Many of the digital video black boxes of the 1980s ultimately went 
to 9-and even 10-bit resolution when IC ADCs became available. The analog 
conditioning circuitry, such as clamping, dc restoration, and filtering was typically 
separate from the ADC function itself.  
In the 1990s, many low-cost CMOS ADCs and DACs became available with resolutions 
up to 12-bits, and sampling rates of greater than 20 MSPS, thereby solving the basic data 
conversion problem and paving the way for higher levels of mixed-signal integration. 
Modern video decoders and encoders are therefore highly integrated, with on-chip analog 
signal conditioning and digital signal processing. Video decoders and encoders may 
operate at typical sampling frequencies of 4f
SC
, 13.5 MSPS, 27 MSPS, 54 MSPS,  
108 MSPS, 216 MSPS, or 74.25 MSPS.  
The ADV7183A 10-bit video decoder (Reference 16) is a good example of a modern 
highly integrated video signal processor, and a simplified block diagram is shown in 
Figure 8.85.  
The ADV7183A is an integrated video decoder that automatically detects and converts a 
standard definition analog baseband television signal (SDTV) compatible with worldwide 
standards NTSC , PAL, or SECAM into 4:2:2 component video data compatible with  
16-/8-bit ITU-R BT.601/ITU-R BT.656. The advanced and highly flexible digital output 
interface enables high performance video decoding and conversion in both frame-buffer-
based and line-locked clock-based systems. This makes the device ideally suited for a 
broad range of applications with diverse analog video characteristics, including tape-
based sources, broadcast sources, security/surveillance cameras, and professional 
systems. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Description: Copy specified page from the input PDF file pageIndexes, The page indexes of pages that will be copied, 0
rotate individual pdf pages reader; rotate pdf page and save
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate page in pdf and save
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.83 
Figure 8.85: ADV7183A 10-Bit Video Decoder 
The internal 10-bit accurate A/D conversion provides professional quality SNR 
performance. This allows true 8-bit resolution in the 8-bit output mode. The analog input 
channels accept standard composite (CVBS), S-video, and component Y'PrPb video 
signals in an extensive number of combinations. AGC and clamp restore circuitry allow 
an input video signal peak-to-peak range of 0.5 V up to 2 V. Alternatively, these can be 
bypassed for manual settings. 
The fixed 54-MHz (4 × 13.5 MSPS) clocking of the ADCs and data path for all modes 
allows very precise and accurate sampling and digital filtering. The line-locked clock 
output allows the output data rate, timing signals, and output clock signals to be 
synchronous, asynchronous, or line-locked even with ±5% line length variation. The 
output control signals allow glueless interface connection in almost any application. The 
ADV7183A modes are set up over a 2-wire serial bi-directional port (I
2
C-compatible). 
The ADV7183A is fabricated in a +3.3-V CMOS process. Its monolithic CMOS 
construction ensures greater functionality with lower power dissipation. The ADV7183A 
is packaged in a small 80-pin LQFP package. 
The ADV7310 (Reference 17) is a second generation 12-bit video encoder featuring high 
performance DACs using oversampled Noise Shaped Video (NSV™) techniques to 
achieve better levels of performance for mid-range consumer electronics and professional 
video solutions. The maximum sampling rate is 216 MSPS which enables up to 16× 
oversampling. This means better figures for differential gain, phase and signal to noise 
ratio. A simplified block diagram of the ADV7310 is shown in Figure 8.86. 
ADV7183A
54MHz
ADV7183A
54MHz
ANALOG VIDEO
COMPONENT 
OR COMPOSITE
INPUTS
DIGITAL VIDEO
COMPONENT 
OUTPUTS
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page processing source PDF streams into one PDF file and
pdf rotate all pages; pdf rotate single page reader
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and save them into streams. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
rotate pdf pages in reader; how to rotate one pdf page
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.84 
Figure 8.86: ADV7310 Multi-Format 216-MSPS Video Encoder 
The ADV7310 accepts a variety of standard digital video component input formats, 
including HDTV and  SDTV. Outputs are HDTV, SDTV component and composite, S-
Video, etc. Six 12-bit NSV precision video DACs provide multiple video outputs and 
allows 2×, 4×, 8× and 16× oversampling for high definition, progressive scan and 
standard definition video. A DAC adjust feature allows fine tuning of output levels on 
analog interfaces internal to many items of equipment, especially TVs, where EMI 
compliance requirements can be tough to meet.  
The ADV7310 has a standard 2-wire serial I
2
C-compatible interface, and is housed in a 
64-lead LQFP package.  
DIGITAL VIDEO
COMPONENT
INPUTS
ANALOG VIDEO
COMPONENT 
OR COMPOSITE
OUTPUTS
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.85 
Specifications for Video Decoders and Encoders 
Video decoders and encoders are generally specified in terms of video performance, in 
addition to some of the traditional ADC/DAC specifications. Figure 8.87 lists the typical 
video specifications, and their definitions can be found in Reference 7, 14, and 15.  
Figure 8.87: Video Decoder and Encoder Specifications 
Note that the differential gain and differential phase specifications (defined in Chapter 2 
and 5 of this book) apply only to the composite video signal and not the component video 
signals. 
Display Electronics 
Manufacturers of computer graphics displays realized that the resolution provided by 
standard NTSC and PAL video monitors was not sufficient for serious computer users 
because of the close viewing distance required. They also realized that the best 
performance could be obtained by utilizing the native RGB component video rather than 
composite signals.  
For these reasons, a variety of formats for resolution/scanning standards have evolved, 
generally defined by the somewhat obsolete EIA RS-343A standard. Unlike broadcast 
video, the horizontal and vertical resolution as well as the refresh rate in a graphics 
display system can vary widely depending upon the desired performance. The resolution 
in such a system is defined in terms of pixels based on the number of horizontal lines and 
the number of pixels in each line. For instance, a 640 × 480 monitor has 480 horizontal 
lines, and each horizontal line is divided into 640 pixels. So a single frame would contain 
307,200 pixels. In a color system, each pixel requires RGB intensity data. This data is 
generally stored as 8- or 10-bit words in a memory. Refresh rates generally vary from  
‹ Resolution, Sampling Rate, Linearity, Bandwidth
‹ Differential Gain (CVBS)
‹ Differential Phase (CVBS)
‹ SNR
‹ Chroma-Specific (Component Video)
Hue Accuracy
Color Saturation Accuracy
Color Gain Control Range
Analog Color Gain Range
Digital Color Gain Range
ChromaAmplitude Error
ChromaPhase Error
Chroma/LumaIntermodulation
‹ Luma-Specific (Component Video)
LumaBrightness Accuracy
LumaContrast Accuracy
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.86 
60 Hz to 85 Hz. Most modern raster scan computer graphics monitors are "multisync," 
i.e, they will automatically synchronize to a variety of refresh rates and resolutions.  
Figure 8.88 shows some typical resolutions and pixel rates for common display systems, 
assuming a 75-Hz, non-interlaced refresh rate. Standard computer graphics monitors, like 
television monitors, use a display technique known as raster scan. This technique writes 
information to the screen line by line, left to right, top to bottom, as has been previously 
discussed. The monitor must receive a great deal of information to display a complete 
picture. Not only must the intensity information for each pixel be present in the signal but 
information must be provided to determine when a new line needs to start (HSYNC) and 
when a new picture frame should start (VSYNC).  
Figure 8.88: Typical Graphics Resolution and Pixel Rates for 
75-Hz Non-Interlaced Refresh Rate 
The pixel clock frequency gives a good idea of the settling time and bandwidth 
requirements for any analog component, such as the DAC, which is placed in the path of 
the RGB signals. The pixel clock frequency can be estimated by finding the product of 
the horizontal resolution times the vertical resolution times the refresh rate. An additional 
40% should be added, called the retrace factor, to allow for overhead. 
There are several system architectures which may be used to build a graphics display 
system. The most general approach is illustrated in Figure 8.89. It consists of a host 
microprocessor, a graphics controller, a video frame buffer, three color memory banks 
(lookup tables), one for each of the primary colors red, green, and blue, (only one for 
monochrome systems). The microprocessor provides the image information to the 
graphics controller, frame buffer, and to the color lookup tables. This information 
typically includes position and color information. The graphics controller is responsible 
for interpreting this information and adding the required output signals such as sync, 
blanking, and memory management signals. The high speed frame buffer provides pixel 
address information to the lookup tables at the pixel rate.  
RESOLUTION
640 × 480
800 × 600
1024 × 768
1280 × 1024
1600 × 1200
2048 × 1536
PIXEL RATE
30MHz
47MHz
83MHz
138MHz
202MHz
330MHz
Pixel Rate Vertical Resolution × Horizontal Resolution × Refresh Rate × 1.4
Refresh rates can be from 60Hz to 100Hz
NOTATION
VGA
SVGA
XGA
SXGA
UXGA
QXGA
REFRESH RATE
75Hz
75Hz
75Hz
75Hz
75Hz
75Hz
D
ATA 
C
ONVERTER 
A
PPLICATIONS
8.5 D
IGITAL 
V
IDEO AND 
D
ISPLAY 
E
LECTRONICS 
8.87 
Figure 8.89: Simplified Graphics Control System for Generating RGB Signals 
The R, G, and B memories are therefore lookup tables which hold the intensity 
information for each pixel for one frame . The DACs use the words in the memory and 
information from the memory controller to write the pixel information to the monitor. 
This system, when used with 8-bits for each DAC, is known as a 24-bit "true color" 
system. A total of 16.8 million addressable colors can be displayed simultaneously. The 
lookup tables and the DACs are generally integrated into an IC called a video "RAM-
DAC," thereby minimizing the memory requirements of the graphics controller. Once the 
data for a frame is loaded into the RAM-DAC, no more data is required from the graphics 
controller unless there is a change in the pixel content.  
In an effort to reduce system costs while maintaining flexibility, an alternative 
configuration shown in Figure 8.90 was developed,  called a "pseudo-color" 8-bit 
graphics system. In this configuration, only 256 individuals colors out of the total of 16.8 
million can be displayed simultaneously, which is often acceptable in low-end 
applications. Today, most graphics controllers are capable of providing 8-bit ("256 
color"), 16-bit ("high color"), and 24-bit ("true color") outputs.  
CPU
GRAPHICS
CONTROLLER
RED
LOOKUP
TABLE
256 × 8
GREEN
LOOKUP
TABLE
256 × 8
BLUE
LOOKUP
TABLE
256 × 8
DAC
DAC
DAC
RED
GREEN
BLUE
PIXEL CLOCK
SYNC, BLANKING, ETC.
8
8
8
8
8
8
TOTAL NUMBER OF SIMULTANEOUSLY DISPLAYED COLORS 
= 2
8
×2
8
×2
8
=  16.8 MILLION COLORS
VIDEO
FRAME
BUFFER
RAM-DAC
ANALOG-DIGITAL CONVERSION  
8.88 
Figure 8.90: "Pseudo-Color" 8-Bit RGB Graphics System 
Video DACs have some features which distinguish them from traditional high speed 
DACs. Figure 8.91 shows the output waveform and levels for the green output which 
contains the sync information. Notice that the current output video DAC is terminated by 
a 75- resistor to ground (source termination), and the end of the 75- cable is 
terminated with another 75- resistor (load termination). The net dc load on the output of 
the DAC is therefore 37.5 . In order to develop a fullscale 1-V output, a current output 
of 26.67 mA is required for the green output DAC. In a graphics system, 1 IRE unit 
corresponds to approximately 7 mV. Note that all 8-bits (256 levels) of the DAC are 
devoted to the active video region between the blanking level and the white level. The 
300-mV sync level is generated by a separate current switch in the green DAC. A 
separate input is also supplied which generates the blanking level. In some systems, sync 
and blanking is applied to all three color signals, however it is very common practice to 
apply the sync signal to the green only (sync-on-green, or SOG).  
Looking at high-end video DACs, the ADV7125 is a triple 330-MSPS DAC on a single 
monolithic chip (Reference 18). It consists of three high speed, 8-bit video DACs with 
complementary current outputs, a standard TTL input interface, and a high impedance 
analog current output. The ADV7125 has three separate 8-bit-wide input ports. A single 
5-V or 3.3-V power supply and clock are all that are required to make the part functional. 
The ADV7125 has additional video control signals for composite SYNC and BLANK, as 
well as a power-save mode. The ADV7125 is fabricated in a 5-V CMOS process. Its 
monolithic CMOS construction ensures greater functionality with lower power 
dissipation (250 mW @ 3.3 V, 330 MSPS update). The ADV7125 is available in a 48-
lead LQFP package. A simplified functional diagram is shown in Figure 8.92.  
CPU
GRAPHICS
CONTROLLER
COLOR
PALETTE
LOOKUP
TABLE
256 × 24
DAC
DAC
DAC
RED
GREEN
BLUE
PIXEL CLOCK
SYNC, BLANKING, ETC.
8
8
8
TOTAL NUMBER OF SIMULTANEOUSLY DISPLAYED COLORS 
= 2
8
= 256 COLORS
8
VIDEO
FRAME
BUFFER
RAM-DAC
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested