Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
ɷ
Determining magnitude of change for landscape and visual receptors 
2.3.3 
AutoCAD Map3D has been used for data conversion and the digitising of some features. Microsoft 
Excel  has  been  employed  extensively  for  formatting  data  received  in  tabular  format,  the 
preparation of the Landscape Character Tables, the creation of lookup tables to facilitate analyses 
and for various calculations.  
2.3.4 
All maps have been exported to PDF from ArcGIS and optimized for viewing and printing using 
Adobe Acrobat Professional. 
Page 4 of 64 
Pdf rotate single page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
reverse pdf page order online; rotate one page in pdf reader
Pdf rotate single page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages; how to rotate one pdf page
3.  Data collection 
3.1  Acknowledgements 
3.1.1 
We wish to thank the following key data providers for their help with the study:  
ɷ
Cumbria County Council 
ɷ
Lancashire County Council 
ɷ
Lake District National Park Authority 
ɷ
Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority 
ɷ
Allerdale District Council 
ɷ
Carlisle District Council 
ɷ
Copeland District Council 
ɷ
Eden District Council 
ɷ
Lancaster District Council 
ɷ
Wyre District Council 
3.1.2 
A complete list of data providers is included as Appendix A.  
3.2  Data Sources 
3.2.1 
The study uses base mapping and GIS data, publicly available and from Cumbria County Council 
(CCC) and other local authorities in the study area and buffer zones, and OS MasterMap data to 
identify vertical infrastructure features shown on maps.  This is supplemented by data from 
National Grid, OFCOM, developers, and others as listed in Appendix A. The district and county 
local  authorities  have  provided  data  relating  to  existing  infrastructure  and  proposed 
developments currently within the planning system. 
Landscape Character Assessments 
3.2.2 
The baseline for the assessment used existing landscape character assessments as detailed 
below: 
ɷ
Natural England, National Landscape Character Areas 
(http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/ourwork/landscape/englands/character/areas/northwest.
aspx
)
3
ɷ
Cumbria County Council (2007) Cumbria Wind Energy Supplementary Planning Document: 
Part 1 (including addendum January and October 2008) 
(http://www.cumbria.gov.uk/planning-environment/renewable-energy/windEnergy.asp
); 
3
Links to assessments valid at 29/08/14 
Page 5 of 64 
Version 2
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
reverse page order pdf online; rotate pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate all pages in pdf file
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
ɷ
Coates Associates (2007) Cumbria Wind Energy Supplementary Planning Document: Part 2 
Landscape and Visual Considerations 
(http://www.cumbria.gov.uk/planning-environment/renewable-energy/windEnergy.asp
); 
ɷ
Cumbria County Council (2003) Technical Paper 5: Landscape Character, Cumbria and Lake 
District Joint Structure Plan 2001-2016 
(http://www.planningcumbria.org/eLibrary/Content/Internet/538/755/1599/2318/2323/38520
131637.pdf
); 
ɷ
Cumbria County Council and AXIS (2003) Technical Paper 6: Planning for Renewable Energy 
Development in Cumbria, Cumbria and Lake District Joint Structure Plan 2001-2016 
(http://www.planningcumbria.org/eLibrary/Content/Internet/538/755/1599/2318/2323/38520
131750.pdf
);  
ɷ
Cumbria County Council (2011) Cumbria Landscape Character Guidance and Toolkit: Part 1 
Landscape Character Guidance 
(http://www.cumbria.gov.uk/planning-environment/countryside/countryside-
landscape/land/landcharacter.asp
); 
ɷ
Cumbria County Council (2011) Cumbria Landscape Character Guidance and Toolkit: Part 2 
Landscape Character Toolkit  
(http://www.cumbria.gov.uk/planning-environment/countryside/countryside-
landscape/land/landcharacter.asp
ɷ
Chris Blandford Associates (2008) Lake District National Park: Landscape Character 
Assessment and Guidelines (part of the Lake District National Park Landscape Character 
Supplementary Planning Document, adopted 19th October 2011)  
http://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk/caringfor/policies/lca
); 
ɷ
Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority (2001) Yorkshire Dales National Park Landscape 
Character Assessment  
(http://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/specialplace/specialquality-
landscape/characteroflandscape
); 
ɷ
Land Use Consultants (2010) The Solway Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty 
Landscape and Seascape Character Assessment  
(http://www.allerdale.gov.uk/downloads/Solway_Coast_AONB_-
_Landscape_Character_Assessment.pdf
); 
ɷ
Lovejoy (2005) Landscape Sensitivity to Wind Energy Developments in Lancashire 
(http://new.lancashire.gov.uk/media/152752/Wind-Energy-Development.pdf
); 
ɷ
Environmental Resources Management (2000) A Landscape Strategy for Lancashire: 
Landscape Character Assessment  
(http://new.lancashire.gov.uk/media/152746/characterassesment.pdf
); 
ɷ
Environmental Resources Management (2000) A Landscape Strategy for Lancashire: 
Landscape Strategy 
(http://new.lancashire.gov.uk/media/152743/strategy.pdf
); 
ɷ
Chris Blandford Associates (2009) Forest of Bowland Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: 
Landscape Character Assessment 
(http://new.lancashire.gov.uk/media/152746/characterassesment.pdf
3.2.3 
Landscape Character Assessments are in preparation for the Arnside and Silverdale AONB and 
the North Pennines AONB. These were not available at the time of carrying out the Study. 
Page 6 of 64 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pdf page permanently
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
how to rotate all pages in pdf; how to rotate page in pdf and save
3.2.4 
National and Regional and, where relevant, local landscape designations have been considered 
within the study. These have been collated from information supplied by the Local Authorities, 
Natural England, English Heritage, SUSTRANS and others as detailed in Appendix A. 
3.3  Datasets used in the study 
3.3.1 
Datasets were collected relevant to the following themes: 
ɷ
Ordnance Survey Base mapping 
ɷ
Landscape Character 
ɷ
Landscape Designations and Policies 
ɷ
Cultural Landscape Designations 
ɷ
Biodiversity Designations 
ɷ
Access and Recreation 
ɷ
Visual Receptors 
ɷ
Vertical Infrastructure 
3.3.2 
A schedule of all datasets received was maintained in Microsoft Excel and updated upon receipt 
of any data to include details of the supplier, version date and other appropriate information. A 
compact version of the schedule of datasets used is included as Appendix B. 
Page 7 of 64 
Version 2
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
rotate single page in pdf file; reverse page order pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
4.  Data standards 
4.1  Data format and conversion 
4.1.1 
Data for the study has been provided and collected in a number of formats including: 
ɷ
ESRI Geodatabase 
ɷ
ESRI Shapefile 
ɷ
MapInfo TAB 
ɷ
MapInfo MID/MIF 
ɷ
AutoCAD DWG 
ɷ
Geographic Markup Language – GML, GZ 
ɷ
Raster datasets – ESRI GRID and Raster Catalogs 
ɷ
Raster imagery – TIFF, JPEG 
ɷ
Web Feature Service 
ɷ
Google Earth - KML, KMZ 
ɷ
Microsoft Access - MDB 
ɷ
Microsoft Excel – XLS, XLSX 
ɷ
Text formats including ASCII and CSV 
4.1.2 
Each of the datasets provided was subject to a brief check for issues relating to georeferencing, 
missing attribute data, and incomplete coverage across the study area. A series of thematic 
ArcGIS map documents (mxd files) was created in order to map and review the many datasets 
received.  
4.1.3 
In order to use the data in the study it has been necessary to convert and process the collected 
datasets as follows: 
ɷ
All vector datasets were converted to Geodatabase Feature Classes  
ɷ
Feature Datasets (a collection of Feature Classes) were created for related data, e.g. onshore 
wind developments, telecommunication masts and transmitters 
ɷ
Tabular data was formatted to ArcGIS conventions (field names without spaces or special 
characters, cell formats as numeric or string) and saved as tables within a Geodatabase 
ɷ
Raster image tiles were checked for correct georeferencing 
ɷ
Spatial and attribute indices were added to large datasets to facilitate use 
4.1.4 
All raster outputs from the analyses have been stored in ESRI GRID format with a 50m grid 
resolution. 
4.2  Coordinate system 
4.2.1 
All spatial datasets used or created during the course of the study have been stored in a 
Transverse Mercator projection in Ordnance Survey 1936 British National Grid coordinates .Data 
Page 8 of 64 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate one page in pdf; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate pdf page by page
received in WGS 1984 projection has been re-projected to British National Grid coordinates using 
the 7 parameter “OSGB_1936_To_WGS_1984_NGA_7PAR” transformation. 
4.3  Spatial resolution 
4.3.1 
The Study uses numerous datasets which have been captured at a range of scales; from 6 figure 
grid references for turbine locations and telecommunication masts locations identified from OS 
MasterMap, to 50 metre gridded DTM data and designations and policy data captured against 
1:50,000 base maps. 
4.3.2 
Data capture specifically undertaken for the Study includes: 
ɷ
Digitising Long Distance Footpaths from OS 1:50,000 raster maps 
ɷ
Digitising  a  limited  number  of  point  locations  for  vertical  infrastructure  from  aerial 
photography 
ɷ
Digitising point locations for tourist attractions from OS MasterMap and raster maps 
4.3.3 
The spatial resolution of the study is defined as 50m (equivalent to the resolution of the DTM) 
and it is recommended that the Study outputs are not analysed at a scale greater than 1:50,000. 
4.4  Metadata 
4.4.1 
Datasets provided with the report are complete with metadata to the latest UK Gemini 2.2 
standard, to facilitate the future use of the datasets and satisfy the requirements of the 2007 
INSPIRE
4
directive. 
4
Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE) Directive
Page 9 of 64 
Version 2
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
Page 10 of 64 
5.  Defining the Study Area 
5.1.1 
The extent of the Study Area is defined by the combined area of: 
ɷ
Cumbria County Council  including  the Districts  of  Allerdale, Barrow-in-Furness,  Carlisle, 
Copeland, Eden, and South Lakeland. 
ɷ
The area of the Lake District National Park Authority within a 12km buffer from its boundary 
ɷ
The area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority within Cumbria County 
ɷ
The Lancashire districts of Lancaster and Wyre 
OS Boundary-Line and Natural England’s National Parks datasets were combined to create the 
GIS polygon representing the Study Area as shown on Map SA.01. 
5.1.2 
Buffer zones from the study area were generated at 15km, 25km and 35km intervals (Map 
SA.02). These represented the area of search for vertical infrastructure according to the height 
criteria included in Table 6.1.  
5.1.3 
A further 29 LPAs are located within or partly within the buffer zones and for which vertical 
infrastructure data was collected: 
ɷ
Dumfries and Galloway 
ɷ
Scottish Borders 
ɷ
Northumberland 
ɷ
Northumberland National Park 
ɷ
Gateshead District 
ɷ
County Durham 
ɷ
Darlington 
ɷ
Richmondshire District 
ɷ
Harrogate District 
ɷ
Craven District 
ɷ
Bradford District 
ɷ
Ribble Valley District 
ɷ
Pendle District 
ɷ
Calderdale District 
ɷ
Burnley District 
ɷ
Rossendale District 
ɷ
Hyndburn District 
ɷ
Blackburn with Darwen 
ɷ
Bury District 
ɷ
Preston District 
ɷ
South Ribble District 
ɷ
Chorley District 
ɷ
Bolton District 
ɷ
Wigan District 
ɷ
St. Helens District 
ɷ
West Lancashire District 
ɷ
Sefton District 
ɷ
Fylde District 
ɷ
Blackpool 
6.  Mapping Vertical Infrastructure 
6.1  Developments considered 
6.1.1 
Developments considered within the study include both existing and proposed developments. 
Proposed developments included in the detailed analyses and assessment were limited to those 
that had already received planning permission (consentedat the time of writing the study. 
6.1.2 
Data has been collected for the following types of vertical infrastructure and shown on Maps 
VI.01 to VI.15: 
ɷ
Onshore wind turbines;  
ɷ
Offshore wind turbines; 
ɷ
Electricity transmission towers (pylons); and 
ɷ
Mobile phone, radio and television transmitters, or other communications masts. 
6.1.3 
The study defines three scales of vertical infrastructure based upon height; large-scale, medium-
scale, and small-scale. Small-scale structures are considered as from 15m up to 50m in height; 
medium-scale structures as 51m-100m; and large-scale structures as over 100m. 
6.1.4 
The minimum height structure to be included within the study was 15m, in order to eliminate 
elements in the urban and urban fringe areas e.g. highway and street lighting columns or 
telecommunication poles.  Low voltage electricity transmission lines (11kV and 33kV) on wooden 
poles have been excluded from the study as these structures are generally below the 15m height 
threshold. 
6.1.5 
Stacks  and  chimneys  associated  with  power  generation  and  distribution  were  originally 
considered to be included within the assessment. However, due to lack of available data these 
elements have had to be excluded from this study. These types of structures are not identified 
consistently on OS Mastermap and height data is not readily available. 
6.1.6 
Developments in the planning system but not yet consented are not included in the main 
analyses and assessment; however, they are discussed and analysed to some extent in the Main 
Report and include the following: 
ɷ
Onshore wind turbine developments - submitted applications in the study area and buffer 
zones; 
ɷ
Walney Extension offshore wind farm;  
ɷ
the Moorside Nuclear Power Station; and 
ɷ
The North West Coast Connections reinforcement works and route corridors. 
6.1.7 
Developments which are at the scoping or screening stage of the planning process have also 
been excluded, due to the limited level of information available with regards the proposed layout 
and structure heights. 
Page 11 of 64 
Version 2
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
6.2  Vertical infrastructure database 
6.2.1 
Data for the developments (proposed and existing) was collated as point feature classes in a 
vertical infrastructure geodatabase in GIS, including 6-figure OS grid references for the location 
of each structure and the height of the structure in metres above ground level.  
6.2.2 
For onshore and offshore wind developments the following information was also collated as 
attribute data in the database: 
ɷ
Development name or address 
ɷ
Current  status:  Operational,  Under-Construction,  Consented  or  Submitted  Planning 
Application 
ɷ
Relevant Local Planning Authority 
ɷ
Planning application reference 
ɷ
Year of application 
ɷ
Year of planning consent 
ɷ
Year the development commenced operating 
ɷ
Hub and blade-tip height, and rotor diameter of wind turbines  
5-1 Extract from database of onshore wind developments 
6.2.3 
For electrical transmission towers the pylon model and voltage of the associated powerline was 
also collated as attributes. 
6.2.4 
Once the database had been assembled, a preliminary sift was carried out to exclude structures 
that did not meet the height/distance thresholds as set out in Table 5.1.  
Table 5.1 Scale and Distance Criteria for Vertical Elements 
Height of vertical 
element (m) 
Scale of 
infrastructure 
Maximum distance 
(km) from study area 
boundary 
15 to 50 
Small-scale 
15 
Page 12 of 64 
Height of vertical 
Scale of 
Maximum distance 
(km) from study area 
boundary 
element (m) 
infrastructure 
51-100 
Medium-scale 
25 
Over 100 
Large-scale 
35 
Structures which did not satisfy the inclusion criteria were identified by overlaying the study area 
and buffer zone polygons on the vertical infrastructure point datasets and running a combination 
of location and SQL (Structured Query Language) queries to filter out structures which were too 
small or too distant. 
6.2.5 
With regards the data collated for telecommunications masts, it was evident that there were 
several  incidences  of  structures  that  were  geographically  coincident,  i.e.  a  number  of 
telecommunications  transmitters  which  are  located  at  different  heights  on  a  larger 
telecommunications mast and share the same OS 6 figure grid reference. In these instances, only 
the largest structure height (i.e. the main mast) was used in the calculation of the ZTVs. 
6.3  Limitations and Assumptions 
6.3.1 
For developments where location coordinates for the proposed structures are not stated explicitly 
in the planning application, grid references have been derived from development layout plans 
and, in a small number of cases (mostly domestic scale wind turbines), the structure location has 
been assumed to be at the centroid of the development boundary. In those instances where 
location coordinates for developments have been provided by a LPA, it has been assumed that 
these are correct. 
6.3.2 
Given the extent of the study area and the number of vertical structures considered, it has not 
been possible to validate the location of all features or the attribute data associated with the 
features. Where possible, checks have been made against OS base mapping and recent aerial 
photography but it is possible that errors are present. Additionally, discrepancies for the location 
of structures were found between datasets received from different sources. Further, the micro-
siting of onshore wind turbines (generally within 50m of the permitted location) introduces a 
potential  error  of  ±50m  for  the  location  of  turbines.  Consequently,  data  validation  is 
recommended as an important element in the ongoing maintenance of the vertical infrastructure 
database.  
6.3.3 
For some of the smaller domestic wind turbines, the planning application does not explicitly state 
the dimensions of the proposed turbine. In these instances the dimensions have been assumed 
based on the generating capacity stated in the application. 
6.3.4 
For all National Grid pylons, the model of the pylon (but not the height of the structure) is stated 
in the National Grid dataset. The study assumes the pylon height is the nominal standard height 
for the model and does not take into account the use of height extensions or reductions for 
particular pylons. With regards pylons on the local distributor network, the pylon height has been 
assumed as a standard height for the operating voltage (mostly 132kV) of the associated line. 
Page 13 of 64 
Version 2
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested