Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
10.  Category, Susceptibility and Sensitivity 
10.1  Landscape Category  
10.1.1  The value attached to the landscape is usually based on a consideration  of the  following 
elements: 
ɷ
The importance of the landscape, or the perceived value of the landscape to users or 
consultees, as indicated by, for example, international, national or local designations; 
ɷ
Cultural associations in the arts or in guides to the area, or popular use of the area for 
recreation, where experience of the landscape is important; 
ɷ
Conservation interests: The presence of features of wildlife, earth science or archaeological 
or historical and cultural interest can add to the value of the landscape as well as having 
value in their own right. 
10.1.2  The  categorisation  of  the  landscape  was  based  on  the  evidence  of  designations,  policies 
protective of particular landscape areas, promotion of areas or routes because of their landscape 
or visual qualities,  and identified  or designated cultural  heritage,  biodiversity  or recreation 
interests. Each indicator of landscape category was attributed a weighting of 1 to 5 according to 
its relative importance; a weighting of 5 represents the most important. 
Table 9.1 Indicators of Landscape Category and weightings 
Category 
Indicator 
Weighting 
Landscape 
designation 
National Park 
National Park Variation 
AONB 
Heritage Coast 
Landscape 
policy area 
Limestone Pavement 
Other local policies 
Cultural 
landscape 
designation 
World Heritage Site 
Historic Park & Garden 
Registered Battlefield 
Conservation Area 
Scheduled Monument 
Listed Building 
Biodiversity 
designation 
International designation (SAC, RAMSAR, or SPA) 
National designation (SSSI) 
Recreation 
interest 
CROW Land 
National Trail 
Long distance Footpath 
Page 24 of 64 
Pdf rotate single page reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pdf page and save
Pdf rotate single page reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
Category 
Indicator 
Weighting 
Promoted Walking Route 
National Cycle Route 
Regional Cycle Route 
Local Cycle route 
Country Park 
Canal 
10.1.3  Listed buildings have been included only where there is a concentration of 10 or more listed 
buildings in a 1km x 1km grid square. With regards biodiversity, nationally designated sites have 
been included only where they lie outside internationally designated sites; i.e. a site covered by 
several biodiversity designations (e.g. SPA, SAC and SSSI) is counted once and for the highest 
level of designation present (international or national). 
10.1.4  Each indicator was mapped as a raster layer in GIS and added together with weightings applied 
to produce a landscape category raster with 50m grid resolution. Scores in the resulting raster 
range from 0 (no indicators present) to 20 (several indicators present). Four landscape categories 
were defined (A – D), with corresponding scores as follows: 
Table 9.2 Indicators of Landscape Category and weightings 
Score Range 
Landscape Category 
6 or more 
4 or 5 
2 or3 
0 or 1 
Page 25 of 64 
Version 2
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to change page orientation in pdf document; pdf rotate page and save
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
how to rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pages in pdf online
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
9-1 Landscape Category of the Study Area 
10.1.5  A vector version of the landscape category raster was created in order to allow overlay analysis 
with the landscape areas and visual receptor feature classes. 
10.1.6  For the landscape areas, an average landscape category score for each landscape area was 
calculated by: 
ɷ
Intersecting the landscape area polygons with the landscape category polygons; 
ɷ
For each resultant polygon, multiplying the area in m
2
of the polygon by the category score 
of the polygon 
ɷ
Summing these values for each landscape area 
ɷ
Divide this total by the area in m
2
of the landscape area polygon to give an average 
landscape category score 
ɷ
Round the score to the nearest whole number 
ɷ
Assign the landscape category A-D as per this value 
Page 26 of 64 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
rotate single page in pdf; rotate pdf page few degrees
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
change orientation of pdf page; rotate all pages in pdf preview
10.1.7  The landscape category for the visual receptors was assigned by intersecting the visual receptor 
feature class with the landscape category feature class. For the settlements the same procedure 
was used to calculate an average score for landscape category as for the landscape areas. For 
the  remaining  visual  receptors,  the  landscape  category  is  determined  directly  from  the 
intersected polygons. 
10.2  Susceptibility 
10.2.1  The susceptibility of each landscape area to each of the three-scales of vertical infrastructure was 
determined with reference to the relevant landscape character assessment and graded High, 
Moderate or Slight. This information was included as three fields in the landscape area tables 
which were linked to the landscape area polygons. 
10.2.2  The susceptibility of the visual receptors to changes in views and visual amenity is related to the 
occupation or activity of people experiencing the view and the extent to which their attention or 
interest is focused on the view. A Susceptibility field was created in the attribute table for each 
type of receptor and the following grades assigned: 
ɷ
People in settlements – High susceptibility; 
ɷ
Users of CROW access land – High susceptibility; 
ɷ
Users of long distance footpaths – High susceptibility; 
ɷ
Users of cycle routes – High susceptibility; 
ɷ
Travellers along roads generally – Slight susceptibility; 
ɷ
Travellers along roads – scenic routes – Moderate susceptibility; 
ɷ
Railway travellers – commuter routes- Slight susceptibility;  
ɷ
Railway travellers – commuter routes partly used as scenic routes – Medium susceptibility;  
ɷ
Railways travellers – promoted scenic routes – High susceptibility; and 
ɷ
Visitors to tourist attractions - High susceptibility. 
10.3  Sensitivity 
10.3.1 GLVIA3
10
advises that the sensitivity of landscape receptors combines judgments of their 
susceptibility  to  the type  of  change arising from the development  proposal and the  value 
attached to the landscape. This study uses GIS to assess the sensitivity of both landscape and 
visual receptors based on the spatial interaction of susceptibility and category. 
10
Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment 3
rd
Edition
published by The Landscape 
Institute and the Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment in April 2013  
9-2 Spatial interaction of Landscape Category and 
sceptibility to derive Sensitivity 
Su
Category
Susceptibility
Sensitivity
=
Page 27 of 64 
Version 2
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
saving rotated pdf pages; pdf rotate page
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf rotate all pages; save pdf rotate pages
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
10.3.2  The following matrix was used to determine the sensitivity from the combination of category and 
susceptibility: 
Table 9.3 Matrix for assessing Landscape and Visual Sensitivity 
Landscape category 
Susceptibility 
High 
Great 
High 
High 
High 
Moderate 
High 
High 
Moderate 
Moderate 
Slight 
Moderate 
Moderate 
Slight 
Slight 
10.3.3  A table join was used with a lookup matrix to automatically fill in the sensitivity fields for the 
landscape areas and visual receptors. There are three sensitivity fields for each landscape area, 
one per scale of vertical infrastructure, and one sensitivity field for each visual receptor. 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf rotate page and save; pdf save rotated pages
11.  Assessing magnitude of change 
11.1  Landscape areas 
Magnitude of direct landscape change 
11.1.1  Direct magnitude of change was defined as the magnitude of change resulting from the presence 
of vertical infrastructure within a landscape area. The GIS calculation for direct change is derived 
from: 
1.  the scale of the vertical infrastructure present, defined from the cumulative height of the 
infrastructure within the landscape area, and  
2.  the geographic extent from the density of the infrastructure present in the landscape area.   
11.1.2  For each of the three scales of vertical infrastructure, the point locations of all structures of that 
scale were overlaid on the landscape area polygons. A Spatial Join was used to count the number 
of structures present within each landscape area and to calculate the total height of those 
structures. 
11.1.3  For  each  landscape  area,  density was  calculated  for  each of  the  three  scales  of vertical 
infrastructure by dividing the count of structures within the landscape area by the area in km
of 
the landscape area. 
11.1.4  These two measures were then combined by multiplying the cumulative height by the density, 
and classifying the resultant scores as follows: 
Table 10.1 Magnitude of direct landscape change: small-scale vertical infrastructure 
Cumualtive Height x Density 
Direct Magnitude 
>500 
Large 
>50 and 
500 
Medium 
>0 and 
50 
Small 
None 
Table 10.2 Magnitude of direct landscape change: medium-scale vertical 
infrastructure 
Cumualtive Height x Density 
Direct Magnitude 
>1000 
Large 
>100 and 
1000 
Medium 
>0 and 
100 
Small 
None 
Page 29 of 64 
Version 2
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
Table 10.3 Magnitude of direct landscape change: large-scale vertical infrastructure 
Cumualtive Height x Density 
Direct Magnitude 
>1500 
Large 
>150 and 
1500 
Medium 
>0 and 
150 
Small 
None 
Magnitude of indirect landscape change 
11.1.5  Indirect change was calculated in GIS as the degree of visibility from the cumulative ZTVs (scale) 
and proportion of the area with different degrees of visibility (geographic extent), averaged over 
each landscape area,  
11.1.6  For each scale of vertical infrastructure, the following process was used to calculate an averaged 
visibility score to define the magnitude of indirect landscape change:  
ɷ
Convert the cumulative ZTV from a raster grid to a polygon feature class; 
ɷ
Intersect the landscape area polygons with the cumulative ZTV polygons; 
ɷ
For each resultant polygon, multiply the area in m
2
of the polygon by the visibility score of 
the polygon; 
ɷ
Sum these values for each landscape area; 
ɷ
Divide this total by the area in m
2
of the landscape area polygon to give an average visibility 
score for the landscape area, and; 
ɷ
Assign the magnitude of indirect landscape change using the following classification: 
Table 10.4 Criteria for assessing Magnitude of indirect landscape change 
Magnitude 
Criteria 
Large 
Many (51 or more) structures visible 
Medium 
Some (26 to 50) structures visible 
Small 
Few (1-25) structures visible 
None 
No structures visible 
Overall magnitude of change 
11.1.7  The Magnitude of the direct and indirect landscape change is combined into a measure of overall 
magnitude of change based on the following matrix: 
Page 30 of 64 
Table 10.5 Matrix for assessing Magnitude of Cumulative Landscape Change 
Indirect landscape change 
Direct landscape 
change 
Large 
Medium 
Small 
None 
Large 
Very Large 
Very Large 
Large 
Large 
Medium 
Large 
Large 
Medium 
Medium 
Small 
Medium 
Medium 
Small 
Small 
None 
Medium 
Small 
Small 
None 
11.1.8  A table join was used with a lookup matrix to automatically complete the overall magnitude of 
change fields for the landscape areas. 
10-1 Combination of Direct Magnitude and Indirect magnitude to derive Overall Magnitude 
11.2  Visual Receptors 
Magnitude of Cumulative Visual Change 
11.2.1  The  Magnitude  of  Cumulative  Visual  Change  for  the  visual  receptors  was  determined  by 
intersecting the relevant visual receptor GIS layer with the cumulative ZTV. The same definitions 
of “Many, Some, Few” are used as for indirect landscape change, as per the following table. 
Page 31 of 64 
Version 2
Cumulative Impacts of Vertical Infrastructure 
Appendix 1: GIS Technical Report  
Table 10.6 Criteria for assessing Magnitude of Cumulative Visual Change 
Magnitude 
Criteria 
Large 
Many (51 or more) structures visible 
Medium 
Some (26 to 50) structures visible 
Small 
Few (1-25) structures visible 
None 
No structures visible 
11.2.2  For settlements the same procedure was used to calculate an average score for visibility as for 
the landscape areas. For the remaining visual receptors, the magnitude of cumulative visual 
change for each scale of vertical infrastructure is assigned using the following process: 
ɷ
Reclassify the cumulative ZTV raster into 4 classes of visibility as per Table 10.6 
ɷ
Convert the reclassified cumulative ZTV from a raster grid to a polygon feature class; 
ɷ
Intersect the visual receptor feature class with the cumulative ZTV polygons 
Page 32 of 64 
12.  Significance of cumulative effects 
12.1  Landscape areas 
12.1.1  Final conclusions about significance relate the separate judgements about sensitivity of the 
receptors and magnitude of the changes combined, to judge whether the effect is significant or 
not.  
12.1.2  The following matrix has been used in GIS to determine the significance of the effect of the 
cumulative developments at each scale on the landscape character of each landscape area by 
combining the magnitude of change and sensitivity of the landscape receptor: 
Table 11.1 Matrix for assessing Significance of landscape effects 
Magnitude 
Sensitivity 
Very Large 
Large 
Medium 
Small 
Great 
Great 
significance 
Great  
significance 
Significant 
Intermediate 
High 
Great 
significance 
Significant 
Significant 
Intermediate 
Moderate 
Significant 
Significant 
Intermediate 
Not Significant 
Slight 
Intermediate 
Intermediate 
Not Significant 
Not Significant 
12.1.3  A  table join was used  with  a lookup  matrix to automatically  complete  the significance of 
landscape effects fields for the landscape areas.  
11-1  Spatial  interaction  of  Sensitivity  and  Magnitude  to  derive  Significance  of 
of 
Page 33 of 64 
Version 2
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested