display pdf in asp net c# : Change orientation of pdf page Library SDK component .net asp.net html mvc CurveFittinginExcel0-part1668

ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 1 of 12 
Plots, Curve-Fitting, and Data Modeling in Microsoft Excel 
This handout offers some tips on making nice plots of data collected in your lab experiments, 
as well as instruction on how to use the built-in curve-fitting routines in Microsoft Excel. 
Excel is a good utility program for data recording and plotting, and is actually used a lot by 
practicing  engineers  in  industry.    The  main  reason  for  its  popularity  is  simply  cost  and 
convenience (most people have it on their computers) making information sharing very easy.  
It  is  also  easy  to  learn  and  use.    With  a  little  extra  effort  you  can  write  your  own 
computational routines using the built-in VBA (Visual Basic) compiler.   
If you already know how to create a basic X-Y plot on Excel, then skip ahead to page 3 
and the section called “Changing the Plot Appearance”.  
Simple X-Y Plots 
Table  1  includes  measured  data  on  the  current-
voltage relationship of a diode that we can use for 
demonstration  of  the  plotting  and  curve-fitting 
features of Excel.  Enter the data in two columns as 
shown in the figure below,  select the two columns 
and then choose “Chart…” from the “Insert” menu 
(or just click on the Chart icon in a toolbar if it is 
visible).   You will  then see  a  dialog  box like  that 
shown in the figure below.  Select the “XY (Scatter)” 
chart  type  as  shown.    In  this  case  there  are  some 
options  (sub-types)  that  control  whether  each  data 
point is highlighted by a marker of some kind, and 
whether  a  straight-  or  smoothed  line  is  shown 
connecting  the  data  points.    That  isn’t  really 
important  at  this  stage  because  you  can  always 
change  the  appearance  later,  but  let’s  start  by 
choosing the smoothed-lines with data markers (highlighted selection in the figure).  
Step 1:  Enter 
data, then 
select the 
columns you 
want to plot
Step 2:  Select 
“Chart”from 
the Insert menu 
or toolbar
Table 1 –  Sample Diode I-V Data 
[mA] 
[Volts] 
0.001  0.24 
0.005  0.34 
0.01 
0.36 
0.02 
0.39 
0.05 
0.43 
0.1 
0.46 
0.2 
0.49 
0.5 
0.53 
1.0 
0.57 
2.0 
0.60 
0.65 
10 
0.68 
14 
0.69 
(Note: this is 
actual data 
recorded by Prof. 
York on a certain 
diode. In this 
experiment I 
expected an 
exponential 
dependence so I 
made a list of 
diode currents that 
would yield a nice 
plot, and then 
recorded the diode 
voltage that 
produced those 
currents. )
Change orientation of pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate one pdf page; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
Change orientation of pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate page; rotate individual pages in pdf
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 2 of 12 
Now select “Next” and you will see the “Source Data” dialog box.  Click on the “Series” 
Tab and you will see something like the following: 
This gives a snapshot of what the graph will look like so far, and the source of data.   It 
looks a little strange for a diode characteristic because Excel has assumed the first column 
represents the horizontal coordinate, so we need to switch the X and Y data range around.  
This is easy, just interchange the data ranges for the X and Y values.  It is also useful to give 
the data series a  name (like “Data” or “Measurements”) which will appear in the legend.  
Now select “Next” and you will see the “Chart Options” dialog box below.  Here you can add 
labels for the x- and y-axes as I have already done: 
VB Imaging - Micro QR Code Generation Guide
settings, like image size, rotation/orientation, data mode You can change the location by setting X and PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\\Sample.pdf") Dim page
rotate pages in pdf and save; rotate pdf page and save
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Read and Scan Linear & 2D Barcodes
barcode from a certain image and document page area 1D and 2D barcodes from VB project PDF & MS Detect and report barcodes at any orientation and rotation angle
rotate pdf pages in reader; rotate pdf pages
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 3 of 12 
At this point you can just select “Finish”, and you will see the finished plot appear in the 
worksheet as shown below. 
Changing the Plot Appearance 
The plot above is the default Excel format for plots, which looks okay on a computer screen 
but not great in a printed document or presentation.  If you right-click anywhere within the x-
y axis, you will see a list of options for changing the plot appearance.  First let’s change the 
plot  background  from  gray  to  white;  just  right-click  in  the  plot  and  select “Format  plot 
area…” to change  this.   Now  right-click  again and select “Chart Options”  to  add  major 
gridlines on the x-axis.  I also like to reformat the gridlines to be dashed lines as follows: 
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Select "Orientation" to set barcode rotation angle; Select "Width" and RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files
rotate pages in pdf expert; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
C# Word - Document Pages Processing in C#.NET
Set Page Orientation in Word Document. You can set page orientations of all pages in document. We provide two type for pages orientation
rotate a pdf page; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 4 of 12 
In the above I also moved the legend inside the chart (just drag it in there), resized the plot, 
and eliminated the border around the chart area.   
This is starting to look like a nicely formatted plot, but there is still one change I would 
strongly recommend, and that is increasing the size of the markers and the weight of the 
connecting line, and the fonts.  Do this by double-clicking on one of the data points to launch 
the appropriate dialog box.  You can increase the font size of the axis labels and legend by 
double-clicking on those labels and making the appropriate change. After doing this I get the 
following: 
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
This is a suitably formatted plot for a lab report or power-point presentation.   
Log Scales 
Since many of the diode data points involve small currents, they appear close to zero on the 
linear scale shown above.  A logarithmic scale is sometimes used to effectively expand the 
scale for small currents.  This is done in Excel by double-clicking on the appropriate axis (y-
axis in this case) and then selecting the “Series” tab in the “Format Axis” dialog as shown.  
At the bottom you see a check box labeled “Logarithmic Scale”; click this and press “Okay” 
C# Imaging - Micro QR Code Generation Guide
settings, like image size, rotation/orientation, data mode You can change the location by setting new PDFDocument(inputDirectory + "Sample.pdf"); BasePage page
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
C# Imaging - Read PDF 417 Barcode in C#.NET
Read PDF 417 in entire PDF, Word, Excel or PPTX page region with C# code. C# code to scan multiple PDF 417 barcodes in any orientation.
permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate pages separately
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 5 of 12 
Now your plot should look something like this 
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
The data seems  to  fall on a  straight line, which  is what  we’d expect for an  exponential 
dependence.  A couple of minor formatting issues can be addressed here; first note that the x-
axis intersects the y-axis at 1 mA; on a log plot like this we’d prefer to have the x-axis and 
labels lie along the bottom of the chart.  You can do this by going back to the “Format axis” 
dialog box (by double-clicking on the y-axis) and typing in  the appropriate intercept value 
for the x-axis ins the “Value (X) axis crosses at:” box.  In this case the appropriate value is 
0.001.  Note that you could also adjust the limits of the vertical scale if desired, but in this 
example Excel has automatically chosen appropriate values. So we now have something that 
looks like this: 
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
Here I have also removed the line connecting the data points in preparation for the next step, 
which is to add a second “Model” curve to compare the data against our diode model.  Just 
double-click on one of the data points and click the “Line: None” box in the Patterns tab of 
the “Format Data Series” dialog.  
Curve-Fitting, or “Trendlines” 
As you know, diodes are usually modeled by a relationship of the form 
/
1
s
qV nkT
I I e
(0.1) 
where 
n
is the ideality factor, 
s
I
is the reverse saturation current, and 
/
26 mV
kT q
at 
room temperature.  How can we use the measured data to determine appropriate parameters 
for the saturation current and ideality factor for this diode?  There is an easy way to do this 
VB.NET Image: How to Create Visual Basic .NET Windows Image Viewer
different image and document formats, including png, jpeg, gif, tiff, bmp, PDF, and Word Apart from that, you are entitled to change the orientation of an
save pdf after rotating pages; save pdf rotated pages
VB.NET Image: Read and Scan Codabar on Image and Document within
Read and scan Codabar barcode from PDF document within on scanned Codabar, including location, orientation, and even format, you only need to change the sample
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; rotate all pages in pdf
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 6 of 12 
using the “Trendline” feature in Microsoft Excel.    Just right-click on one of the data points 
in the chart and select “Add Trendline…”; you will then see a new dialog box appear as 
shown below:   
Grab this corner 
with the cursor 
and drag it down 
one row to 
remove the I=0 
data point
You  can  see  that  there  are  a  few  different  options  for  curve-fitting  the data,  but  the 
important one (“Exponential”) is grayed out.  Why?  The reason is that our data set includes 
an  (0) 0
I
   data point,  which  you  can  never  theoretically have  on a  simple  exponential 
model!  So the trick here is to remove that data point from the plot; the easiest way to do this 
is to just grab one of the top corners of the boxes enclosing the data and adjust the range to 
exclude this point.  Do that for both the current and voltage columns, and now you should see 
all of the available curve-fitting options when you select “Add Trendline…” again: 
Now select the exponential model and hit “Okay”.  Excel will find the best fit of the data 
to a model of the form 
V
I Ae
and plot this on the chart as shown below: 
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 7 of 12 
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
Expon. (Data)
A pretty good fit in this case.  But we’d really like to know what the curve-fit parameters are, 
right?  Double-click on the trendline and select the “options tab to get the following: 
Here we want to select “Display equation on chart”.  You can also change the name of the 
trendline to “Model”.  Now with a few additional but minor formatting changes we have: 
y = 5.48E-06e
2.13E+01x
0.0001
0.001
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Diode Voltage V, Volts
Current I, mA
Data
Model
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 8 of 12 
The last step is to simply compute the parameters we want from the information Excel has 
provided.  In this case Excel has told us that  
V
I Ae
is a pretty good fit to the data when 
6
5.48 10
A
and 
21.28
.  Note that our vertical scale is in milliamps, so the fitting 
parameter 
A
also has these units; in other words, 
5.5 nA
A
.  Now, going back to our diode 
model in (0.1), we see that for 
s
I
I
the model reduces to 
/
s
qV nkT
I I e
, so we must have 
5.5 nA
21.28
s
I
A
q
nkT
 
 
(0.2) 
You can use Excel to compute the ideality factor from the last equation.  Assuming the data 
was taken at room temperature I get  
1.8
n
, which is comfortably in the range we’d expect 
for real devices. 
Plotting Multiple Data Series 
As an example of plotting multiple curves, let’s make a plot showing how the diode would 
behave at other temperatures using the model parameters just provided by our curve-fitting 
exercise.  Note that the saturation current 
s
I
is temperature dependent, approximately given 
by the relation 
3
/
( )
s
g
E kT
T
I T
T e
(0.3) 
where 
g
E
is the bandgap energy of the semiconductor (1.13 eV for Silicon). If we know the 
saturation current at some reference temperature 
0
T
, then we can write 
3
0
0
0
1
1
( )
( )
exp
g
s
s
qE
T
I T
I T
T
k
T T
 
 
 
(0.4) 
Below I’ve made some room in the original spreadsheet so that columns F-G-H will describe 
the predicted currents at the three different temperatures entered into boxes F9, G9, and H9.   
Enter the first 
two points and 
drag down to 
fill in the rest
Constants found 
from data-fitting at 
room temperature
Temperatures (in 
Kelvin) at which we will 
compute the diode 
current in columns F-H
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 9 of 12 
The fitting constants for the diode saturation current and ideality factor and the measurement 
temperature 
0
T
are included  in F4:F6  as shown.    To  define  the  voltages at  which we’ll 
compute  the  currents, enter the  first two  points  (which  define the  starting  value  and  the 
increment) and then drag downward to fill in the rest as shown.  The range of 0.0 to 0.75 
Volts should be fine. 
Now we can enter the equation for the diode current in the appropriate boxes. There is a 
simple way to do this in Excel such that we only need to enter the formula once. Start with 
the  temperature-dependent  saturation  current.    First  click  on  the  F10  cell  and  enter  the 
formula from (0.4) as shown below (formulas are always preceded by an “=” sign).  Note that 
the temperature is referenced as F$9; this tells Excel that no matter which cell this formula 
ends up in when we drag it around, we always want to keep the “9” row reference constant.  
Similarly,  the measured  diode  saturation  current  at 
0
T
is referenced  as $F$5, which  tells 
Excel to keep both the column and row reference constant when the formula moves.  Without 
the dollar sign in front of a row or column reference, the reference will change according to 
the relative movement of the cell content.   
Equation in box F10 for 
computing the saturation 
current at 280K
Last step: grab the corner 
of box around F10 and 
drag across to H10
Once the formula is entered you can grab the corner of the box around F10 and drag it to 
H10 to fill in the saturation current for the other temperatures. 
Now enter the equation for the full diode current from (0.1) in box F11 as shown below. 
Note that this time we reference the voltage as $E11, because we want the voltage to change 
as we drag the formula 
down
, but we don’t want it to change when we drag it 
sideways
. Now 
grab the corner of the box surrounding F11 and drag it down to F26, the last cell in that 
column; you should now see the following  
ECE 2                                                 Circuits and Systems 
Spring 2009 
Page 10 of 12 
Equation in box F11 
for computing the I-V 
curve at 280K
Saturation currents at 
each temperature
Last step: grab 
the corner of box 
around F11 and 
drag down to F26 
to fill in the cells in 
this column, then 
drag to H26
Finally, grab the box and drag to H26 to fill in the other columns. Now, each cell should 
compute the diode current for the voltage in the particular row, and for the temperature at the 
top of the particular column that the cell appears in.  If you then click in any of these boxes, 
you can see how the references to the voltage and temperature change as you move from cell 
to cell. 
To plot all three of these curves together we could use the same procedure as before and 
select the range of data to plot (E11 through H26) and then insert a new chart.  However, 
doing  it that  way  means  we’d  have  to  go  through  all  of  the  formatting  stuff  again.   A 
somewhat easier alternative is to copy and paste a previously formatted graph (like the one 
we made for our measured data) and then just change the source data for the plot.  To do this, 
right click somewhere in the new chart and select “Source Data…”.  Click on the “Series” tab 
in the dialog box; to add a new data series, then click the “Add” button.  For example, after 
doing this and entering a new name “Model at T=290K” I get the following: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested