display pdf in asp net c# : Rotate single page in pdf reader SDK Library service wpf .net winforms dnn DataScienceBook1_12-part1687

Remember the list of ages of family members from the last chap-
ter? No? Well, here it is again: 43, 42, 12, 8, 5, for dad, mom, sis, 
bro, and the dog, respectively. The previous chapter mentioned 
that this was a list of items, all of the same mode, namely “integer.” 
Remember that you can tell that they are OK to be integers because 
there are no decimal points and therefore nothing after the decimal 
point. We can create a vector of integers in r using the “c()” com-
mand. Take a look at the next screenshot:
This is just about the last time that the whole screenshot from the R 
console will appear in the book. From here on out we will just look 
at commands and output so we don’t waste so much space on the 
page. The first command line in the screen shot is exactly what ap-
peared in the previous chapter:
c(43, 42, 12, 8, 5)
You may notice that on the following line, R dutifully reports the 
vector that you just typed. After the line number “[1]”, we see the 
list 43, 42, 12, 8, and 5. R “echoes” this list back to us, because we 
didn’t ask it to store the vector anywhere. In contrast, the next com-
mand line (also the same as in the previous chapter), says: 
myFamilyAges <- c(43, 42, 12, 8, 5)
We have typed in the same list of numbers, but this time we have 
assigned it, using the left pointing arrow, into a storage area that 
we have named “myFamilyAges.” This time, R responds just with 
an empty command prompt. That’s why the third command line 
requests a report of what myFamilyAges contains (Look after the 
yellow “>”. The text in blue is what you should type.) This is a sim-
ple but very important tool. Any time you want to know what is in 
a data object in R, just type the name of the object and R will report 
it back to you. In the next command we begin to see the power of 
R:
sum(myFamilyAges)
This command asks R to add together all of the numbers in 
myFamilyAges, which turns out to be 110 (you can check it your-
self with a calculator if you want). This is perhaps a bit of a weird 
thing to do with the ages of family members, but it shows how 
20
Rotate single page in pdf reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf file; rotate pdf pages and save
Rotate single page in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
save pdf rotated pages; how to rotate one pdf page
with a very short and simple command you can unleash quite a bit 
of processing on your data. In the next line we ask for the “mean” 
(what non-data people call the average) of all of the ages and this 
turns out to be 22 years. The command right afterwards, called 
“range,” shows the lowest and highest ages in the list. Finally, just 
for fun, we tried to issue the command “fish(myFamilyAges).” 
Pretty much as you might expect, R does not contain a “fish()” 
function and so we received an error message to that effect. This 
shows another important principle for working with R: You can 
freely try things out at anytime without fear of breaking anything. 
If R can’t understand what you want to accomplish, or you haven’t 
quite figured out how to do something, R will calmly respond with 
an error message and will not make any other changes until you 
give it a new command. The error messages from R are not always 
super helpful, but with some strategies that the book will discuss 
in future chapters you can break down the problem and figure out 
how to get R to do what you want. 
Let’s take stock for a moment. First, you should definitely try all of 
the commands noted above on your own computer. You can read 
about the commands in this book all you want, but you will learn a 
lot more if you actually try things out. Second, if you try a com-
mand that is shown in these pages and it does not work for some 
reason, you should try to figure out why. Begin by checking your 
spelling and punctuation, because R is very persnickety about how 
commands are typed. Remember that capitalization matters in R: 
myFamilyAges is not the same as myfamilyages. If you verify that 
you have typed a command just as you see in the book and it still 
does not work, try to go online and look for some help. There’s lots 
of help at http://stackoverflow.com
, at https://stat.ethz.ch
, and 
also at  http://www.statmethods.net
/. If you can figure out what 
went wrong on your own you will probably learn something very 
valuable about working with R. Third, you should take a moment 
to experiment a bit with each new set of commands that you learn. 
For example, just using the commands shown in the last screen 
shot you could do this totally new thing:
myRange <- range(myFamilyAges)
What would happen if you did that command, and then typed 
“myRange” (without the double quotes) on the next command line 
to report back what is stored there ? What would you see? Then 
think about how that worked and try to imagine some other experi-
ments that you could try. The more you experiment on your own, 
the more you will learn. Some of the best stuff ever invented for 
computers was the result of just experimenting to see what was 
possible. At this point, with just the few commands that you have 
already tried, you already know the following things about R (and 
about data):
How to install R on your computer and run it.
How to type commands on the R console.
The use of the “c()” function. Remember that “c” stands for con-
catenate, which just means to join things together. You can put a 
list of items inside the parentheses, separated by commas.
That a vector is pretty much the most basic form of data storage 
in R, and that it consists of a list of items of the same mode.
That a vector can be stored in a named location using the assign-
ment arrow (a left pointing arrow made of a dash and a less than 
symbol, like this: “<-”).
21
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
rotate pages in pdf expert; rotate pdf pages on ipad
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
rotate a pdf page; reverse page order pdf
That you can get a report of the data object that is in any named 
location just by typing that name at the command line.
That you can “run” a function, such as mean(), on a vector of 
numbers to transform them into something else. (The mean() 
function calculates the average, which is one of the most basic 
numeric summaries there is.)
That sum(), mean(), and range() are all legal functions in R 
whereas fish() is not.
In the next chapter we will move forward a step or two by starting 
to work with text and by combining our list of family ages with the 
names of the family members and some other information about 
them.
Chapter Challenge
Using logic and online resources to get help if you need it, learn 
how to use the c() function to add another family member’s age on 
the end of the myFamilyAges vector.
Sources
http://a-little-book-of-r-for-biomedical-statistics.readthedocs.org/
en/latest/src/installr.html
http://cran.r-project.org
/
http://dssm.unipa.it/R-php/R-php-1/R/
(UNIPA experimental 
web interface to R)
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/R_Programming
https://plus.google.com/u/0/104922476697914343874/posts
(Jer-
emy Taylor’s blog: Stats Make Me Cry)
http://stackoverflow.com
https://stat.ethz.ch
http://www.statmethods.net
/
22
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Single page. View PDF in single page display mode
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to rotate just one page in pdf; pdf reverse page order preview
Test Yourself
R Functions Used in This Chapter 
c()! !
Concatenates data elements together
<- ! !
Assignment arrow
sum()!
Adds data elements
range()! Max value minus min value
mean()! The average
Review 3.1 Getting Started with R
Check Answer
Question 1 of  3
What is the cost of each software license for the R open 
source data analysis program?
A. R is free
B. 99 cents in the iTunes store
C. $10
D. $100
23
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
rotate pages in pdf and save; pdf rotate page and save
An old adage in detective work is to, “follow the money.” In data science, one key to success is to 
“follow the data.” In most cases, a data scientist will not help to design an information system from 
scratch. Instead, there will be several or many legacy systems where data resides; a big part of the 
challenge to the data scientist lies in integrating those systems.
CHAPTER 4
24
Follow the Data
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
permanently rotate pdf pages; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions To be more specific, two or more input PDF documents can then saved and output as a single PDF with user
how to rotate pdf pages and save; pdf rotate pages and save
Hate to nag, but have you had a checkup lately? If you have been 
to the doctor for any reason you may recall that the doctor’s office 
is awash with data. First off, the doctor has loads of digital sensors, 
everything from blood pressure monitors to ultrasound machines, 
and all of these produce mountains of data. Perhaps of greater con-
cern in this era of debate about health insurance, the doctors office 
is one of the big jumping off points for financial and insurance 
data. One of the notable “features” of the U.S. healthcare system is 
our most common method of healthcare delivery: paying by the 
procedure. When you experience a “procedure” at the doctor’s of-
fice, whether it is a consultation, an examination, a test, or some-
thing else, this initiates a chain of data events with far reaching con-
sequences.
If your doctor is typical, the starting point of these events is a pa-
per form. Have you ever looked at one of these in detail? Most of 
the form will be covered by a large matrix of procedures and 
codes. Although some of the better equipped places may use this 
form digitally on a tablet or other computer, paper forms are still 
ubiquitous. Somewhere either in the doctor’s office or at an out-
sourced service company, the data on the paper form are entered 
into a system that begins the insurance reimbursement and/or bill-
ing process.
Where do these procedure data go? What other kinds of data (such 
as patient account information) may get attached to them in a sub-
sequent step? What kinds of networks do these linked data travel 
over, and what kind of security do they have? How many steps are 
there in processing the data before they get to he insurance com-
pany? How does the insurance company process and analyze the 
data before issuing the reimbursement? How is the money “trans-
mitted” once the insurance company’s systems have given ap-
proval to the reimbursement? These questions barely scratch the 
surface: there are dozens or hundreds of processing steps that we 
haven’t yet imagined.
It is easy to see from this example, that the likelihood of being able 
to throw it all out and start designing a better or at least more stan-
dardized system from scratch is nil. But what if you had the job of 
improving the efficiency of the system, or auditing the insurance 
reimbursements to make sure they were compliant with insurance 
records, or using the data to detect and predict outbreaks and epi-
demics, or providing feedback to consumers about how much they 
can expect to pay out of pocket for various procedures? 
The critical starting point for your project would be to follow the 
data. You would need to be like a detective, finding out in a sub-
stantial degree of detail the content, format, senders, receivers, 
transmission methods, repositories, and users of data at each step 
in the process and at each organization where the data are proc-
essed or housed.
Fortunately there is an extensive area of study and practice called 
“data modeling” that provides theories, strategies, and tools to 
help with the data scientist’s goal of following the data. These 
ideas started in earnest in the 1970s with the introduction by com-
puter scientist Ed Yourdon of a methodology called Data Flow Dia-
grams. A more contemporary approach, that is strongly linked 
with the practice of creating relational databases, is called the 
entity-relationship model. Professionals using this model develop 
Entity-Relationship Diagrams (ERDs) that describe the structure 
and movement of data in a system.
25
Entity-relationship modeling occurs at different levels ranging 
from an abstract conceptual level to a physical storage level. At the 
conceptual level an entity is an object or thing, usually something 
in the real world. In the doctor’s office example, one important “ob-
ject” is the patient. Another entity is the doctor. The patient and the 
doctor are linked by a relationship: in modern health care lingo 
this is the “provider” relationship. If the patient is Mr. X and the 
doctor is Dr. Y, the provider relationship provides a bidirectional 
link: 
Dr. Y is the provider for Mr. X
Mr. X’s provider is Dr. Y
Naturally there is a range of data that can represent Mr. X: name 
address, age, etc. Likewise, there are data that represent Dr. Y: 
years of experience as a doctor, specialty areas, certifications, li-
censes. Importantly, there is also a chunk of data that represents 
the linkage between X and Y, and this is the relationship.
Creating an ERD requires investigating and enumerating all of the 
entities, such as patients and doctors, as well as all of the relation-
ships that may exist among them. As the beginning of the chapter 
suggested, this may have to occur across multiple organizations 
(e.g., the doctor’s office and the insurance company) depending 
upon the purpose of the information system that is being designed.  
Eventually, the ERDs must become detailed enough that they can 
serve as a specification for the physical storage in a database.
In an application area like health care, there are so many choices 
for different ways of designing the data that it requires some expe-
rience and possibly some “art” to create a workable system. Part of 
the art lies in understanding the users’ current information needs 
and anticipating how those needs may change in the future. If an 
organization is redesigning a system, adding to a system, or creat-
ing brand new systems, they are doing so in the expectation of a 
future benefit. This benefit may arise from greater efficiency, reduc-
tion of errors/inaccuracies, or the hope of providing a new product 
or service with the enhanced information capabilities. 
Whatever the goal, the data scientist has an important and difficult 
challenge of taking the methods of today - including paper forms 
and manual data entry - and imagining the methods of tomorrow. 
Follow the data!
Sources
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_modeling
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entity-relationship_diagram
26
One of the most basic and widely used methods of representing data is to use rows and columns, 
where each row is a case or instance and each column is a variable and attribute. Most spreadsheets 
arrange their data in rows and columns, although spreadsheets don’t usually refer to these as cases or 
variables. R represents rows and columns in an object called a data frame. 
CHAPTER 5
27
Rows and Columns
Although we live in a three dimensional world, where a box of ce-
real has height, width, and depth, it is a sad fact of modern life that 
pieces of paper, chalkboards, whiteboards, and computer screens 
are still only two dimensional. As a result, most of the statisticians, 
accountants, computer scientists, and engineers who work with 
lots of numbers tend to organize them in rows and columns. 
There’s really no good reason for this other than it makes it easy to 
fill a rectangular piece of paper with numbers. Rows and columns 
can be organized any way that you want, but the most common 
way is to have the rows be “cases” or “instances” and the columns 
be “attributes” or “variables.” Take a look at this nice, two dimen-
sional representation of rows and columns:
Pretty obvious what’s going on, right? The top line, in bold, is not 
really part of the data. Instead, the top line contains the attribute or 
variable names. Note that computer scientists tend to call them at-
tributes while statisticians call them variables. Either term is OK. 
For example, age is an attribute that every living thing has, and 
you could count it in minutes, hours, days, months, years, or other 
units of time. Here we have the Age attribute calibrated in years. 
Technically speaking, the variable names in the top line are “meta-
data” or what you could think of as data about data. Imagine how 
much more difficult it would be to understand what was going on 
in that table without the metadata. There’s lot of different kinds of 
metadata: variable names are just one simple type of metadata.
So if you ignore the top row, which contains the variable names, 
each of the remaining rows is an instance or a case. Again, com-
puter scientists may call them instances, and statisticians may call 
them cases, but either term is fine. The important thing is that each 
row refers to an actual thing. In this case all of our things are living 
creatures in a family. You could think of the Name column as “case 
labels” in that each one of these labels refers to one and only one 
row in our data. Most of the time when you are working with a 
large dataset, there is a number used for the case label, and that 
number is unique for each case (in other words, the same number 
would never appear in more than one row). Computer scientists 
sometimes refer to this column of unique numbers as a “key.” A 
key is very useful particularly for matching things up from differ-
ent data sources, and we will run into this idea again a bit later. For 
now, though, just take note that the “Dad” row can be distin-
guished from the “Bro” row, even though they are both Male. Even 
if we added an “Uncle” row that had the same Age, Gender, and 
Weight as “Dad” we would still be able to tell the two rows apart 
because one would have the name “Dad” and the other would 
have the name “Uncle.”
One other important note: Look how each column contains the 
same kind of data all the way down. For example, the Age column 
is all numbers. There’s nothing in the Age column like “Old” or 
“Young.” This is a really valuable way of keeping things organ-
ized. After all, we could not run the mean() function on the Age col-
28
NAME
AGE
GENDER
WEIGHT
Dad
43
Male
188
Mom
42
Female
136
Sis
12
Female
83
Bro
8
Male
61
Dog
5
Female
44
umn if it contained little piece of text, like “Old” or “Young.” On a 
related note, every cell (that is an intersection of a row and a col-
umn, for example, Sis’s Age) contains just one piece of information. 
Although a spreadsheet or a word processing program might al-
low us to put more than one thing in a cell, a real data handling 
program will not. Finally, see that every column has the same num-
ber of entries, so that the whole forms a nice rectangle. When statis-
ticians and other people who work with databases work with a da-
taset, they expect this rectangular arrangement.
Now let’s figure out how to get these rows and columns into R. 
One thing you will quickly learn about R is that there is almost al-
ways more than one way to accomplish a goal. Sometimes the 
quickest or most efficient way is not the easiest to understand. In 
this case we will build each column one by one and then join them 
together into a single data frame. This is a bit labor intensive, and 
not the usual way that we would work with a data set, but it is 
easy to understand. First, run this command to make the column 
of names:
myFamilyNames <- c(”Dad”,”Mom”,”Sis”,”Bro”,”Dog”)
One thing you might notice is that every name is placed within 
double quotes. This is how you signal to R that you want it to treat 
something as a string of characters rather than the name of a stor-
age location. If we had asked R to use Dad instead of “Dad” it 
would have looked for a storage location (a data object) named 
Dad. Another thing to notice is that the commas separating the dif-
ferent values are outside of the double quotes. If you were writing 
a regular sentence this is not how things would look, but for com-
puter programming the comma can only do its job of separating 
the different values if it is not included inside the quotes. Once you 
have typed the line above, remember that you can check the con-
tents of myFamilyNames by typing it on the next command line:
myFamilyNames
The output should look like this:
[1] "Dad" "Mom" "Sis" "Bro" "Dog"
Next, you can create a vector of the ages of the family members, 
like this:
myFamilyAges <- c(43, 42, 12, 8, 5)
Note that this is exactly the same command we used in the last 
chapter, so if you have kept R running between then and now you 
would not even have to retype this command because 
myFamilyAges would still be there. Actually, if you closed R since 
working the examples from the last chapter you will have been 
prompted to “save the workspace” and if you did so, then R re-
stored all of the data objects you were using in the last session. You 
can always check by typing myFamilyAges on a blank command 
line. The output should look like this:
[1] 43 42 12  8  5
Hey, now you have used the c() function and the assignment arrow 
to make myFamilyNames and myFamilyAges. If you look at the 
data table earlier in the chapter you should be able to figure out the 
commands for creating myFamilyGenders and myFamilyWeights. 
In case you run into trouble, these commands also appear on the 
next page, but you should try to figure them out for yourself before 
you turn the page. In each case after you type the command to cre-
ate the new data object, you should also type the name of the data 
29
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested