display pdf in asp net c# : Rotate a pdf page Library control component .net azure wpf mvc DataScienceBook1_14-part1689

count up how many of each number there are and then pick the 
category that has the most. 
The variance, a measure of dispersion. Like the range, the vari-
ance describes how spread out a sample of numbers is. Unlike 
the range, though, which just uses two numbers to calculate dis-
persion, the variance is obtained from all of the numbers 
through a simple calculation that compares each number to the 
mean. If you remember the ages of the family members from the 
previous chapter and the mean age of 22, you will be able to 
make sense out of the following table:
This table shows the calculation of the variance, which begins by 
obtaining the “deviations” from the mean and then “squares” 
them (multiply each times itself) to take care of the negative devia-
tions (for example, -14 from the mean for Bro). We add up all of the 
squared deviations and then divide by the number of observations 
to get a kind of “average squared deviation.” Note that it was not a 
mistake to divide by 4 instead of 5 - the reasons for this will be-
come clear later in the book when we examine the concept of de-
grees of freedom. This result is the variance, a very useful mathe-
matical concept that appears all over the place in statistics. While it 
is mathematically useful, it is not too nice too look at. For instance, 
in this example we are looking at the 356.5 squared-years of devia-
tion from the mean. Who measures anything in squared years? 
Squared feet maybe, but that’s a different discussion. So, to address 
this weirdness, statisticians have also provided us with:
The standard deviation, another measure of dispersion, and a 
cousin to the variance. The standard deviation is simply the 
square root of the variance, which puts us back in regular units 
like “years.” In the example above, the standard deviation 
would be about 18.88 years (rounding to two decimal places, 
which is plenty in this case).
Now let’s have R calculate some statistics for us:
> var(myFamily$myFamilyAges)
[1] 356.5 
> sd(myFamily$myFamilyAges)
[1] 18.88121
Note that these commands carry on using the data used in the pre-
vious chapter, including the use of the $ to address variables 
within a dataframe. If you do not have the data from the previous 
chapter you can also do this:
> var(c(43,42,12,8,5))
[1] 356.5
40
WHO
AGE
AGE - 
MEAN
(AGE-
MEAN)
2
Dad
43
43-22 = 21
21*21=441
Mom
42
42-22=20
20*20=400
Sis
12
12-22=-10
-10*-10=100
Bro
8
8-22=-14
-14*-14=196
Dog
5
5-22=-17
-17*-17=289
Total:
1426
Total/4:
356.5
Rotate a pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate page in pdf and save; pdf rotate all pages
Rotate a pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order online; pdf rotate just one page
> sd(c(43,42,12,8,5))
[1] 18.88121 
This is a pretty boring example, though, and not very useful for the 
rest of the chapter, so here’s the next step up in looking at data. We 
will use the Windows or Mac clipboard to cut and paste a larger 
data set into R. Go to the U.S. Census website where they have 
stored population data:
http://www.census.gov/popest/data/national/totals/2011/inde
x.html
Assuming you have a spreadsheet program available, click on the 
XLS link for “Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for the 
United States.” When the spreadsheet is open, select the popula-
tion estimates for the fifty states. The first few looked like this in 
the 2011 data:
.Alabama
4,779,736
.Alaska
710,231
.Arizona
6,392,017
.Arkansas
2,915,918
To make use of the next R command, make sure to choose just the 
numbers and not the text. Before you copy the numbers, take out 
the commas by switching the cell type to “General.” This can usu-
ally be accomplished under the Format menu, but you might also 
have a toolbar button to do the job. Copy the numbers to the clip-
board with ctrl+C (Windows) or command+C (Mac). On a Win-
dows machine use the following command:
read.DIF("clipboard",transpose=TRUE)
On a Mac, this command does the same thing:
read.table(pipe("pbpaste"))
It is very annoying that there are two different commands for the 
two types of computers, but this is an inevitable side effect of the 
different ways that the designers at Microsoft and Apple set up the 
clipboard, plus the fact that R was designed to work across many 
platforms. Anyway, you should have found that the long string of 
population numbers appeared on the R output. The numbers are 
not much use to us just streamed to the output, so let’s assign the 
numbers to a new vector.
Windows, using read.DIF:
> USstatePops <- + 
read.DIF("clipboard",transpose=TRUE)
> USstatePops
V1
1   4779736
2    710231
3   6392017
...
Or Mac, using read.table:
> USstatePops <- read.table(pipe("pbpaste"))
> USstatePops
41
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
pdf expert rotate page; how to rotate all pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
rotate all pages in pdf and save; rotate pdf page by page
V1
1   4779736
2    710231
3   6392017
...
Only the first three observations are shown in order to save space 
on the page. Your output R should show the whole list. Note that 
the only thing new here over and above what we have done with R 
in previous chapters is the use of the read.DIF() or read.table() func-
tions to get a bigger set of data that we don’t have to type our-
selves. Functions like read.table() are quite important as we move 
forward with using R because they provide the usual way of get-
ting data stored in external files into R’s storage areas for use in 
data analysis. If you had trouble getting this to work, you can cut 
and paste the commands at the end of the chapter under “If All 
Else Fails” to get the same data going in your copy of R.
Note that we have used the left pointing assignment arrow (“<-”) 
to take the results of the read.DIF() or read.table() function and 
place it in a data object. This would be a great moment to practice 
your skills from the previous chapter by using the str() and sum-
mary() functions on our new data object called USstatePops. Did 
you notice anything interesting from the results of these functions? 
One thing you might have noticed is that there are 51 observations 
instead of 50. Can you guess why? If not, go back and look at your 
original data from the spreadsheet or the U.S. Census site. The 
other thing you may have noticed is that USstatePops is a data-
frame, and not a plain vector of numbers. You can actually see this 
in the output above: In the second command line where we request 
that R reveal what is stored in USstatePops, it responds with a col-
umn topped by the designation “V1”. Because we did not give R 
any information about the numbers it read in from the clipboard, it 
called them “V1”, short for Variable One, by default. So anytime 
we want to refer to our list of population numbers we actually 
have to use the name USstatePops$V1. If this sounds unfamiliar, 
take another look at the previous “Rows and Columns” chapter for 
more information on addressing the columns in a dataframe. 
Now we’re ready to have some fun with a good sized list of num-
bers. Here are the basic descriptive statistics on the population of 
the states:
> mean(USstatePops$V1)
[1] 6053834
> median(USstatePops$V1)
[1] 4339367
> mode(USstatePops$V1)
[1] "numeric"
> var(USstatePops$V1)
[1] 4.656676e+13
> sd(USstatePops$V1)
[1] 6823984
Some great summary information there, but wait, a couple things 
have gone awry:
42
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
reverse page order pdf online; rotate all pages in pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
rotate pdf page few degrees; how to reverse pages in pdf
The mode() function has returned the data type of our vector of 
numbers instead of the statistical mode. This is weird but true: 
the basic R package does not have a statistical mode function! 
This is partly due to the fact that the mode is only useful in a 
very limited set of situations, but we will find out in later pack-
ages how add-on packages can be used to get new functions in R 
including one that calculates the statistical mode.
The variance is reported as 4.656676e+13. This is the first time 
that we have seen the use of scientific notation in R. If you 
haven’t seen this notation before, the way you interpret it is to 
imagine 4.656676 multiplied by 10,000,000,000,000 (also known 
as 10 raised to the 13th power). You can see that this is ten tril-
lion, a huge and unwieldy number, and that is why scientific no-
tation is used. If you would prefer not to type all of that into a 
calculator, another trick to see what number you are dealing 
with is just to move the decimal point 13 digits to the right.
Other than these two issues, we now know that the average popula-
tion of a U.S. state is 6,053,834 with a standard deviation of 
6,823,984. You may be wondering, though, what does it mean to 
have a standard deviation of almost seven million?  The mean and 
standard deviation are OK, and they certainly are mighty precise, 
but for most of us, it would make much more sense to have a pic-
ture that shows the central tendency and the dispersion of a large 
set of numbers. So here we go. Run this command:
hist(USstatePops$V1)
Here’s the output you should get: 
A histogram is a specialized type of bar graph designed to show 
“frequencies.” Frequencies means how often a particular value or 
range of values occurs in a dataset. This histogram shows a very 
interesting picture. There are nearly 30 states with populations un-
der five million, another 10 states with populations under 10 mil-
lion, and then a very small number of states with populations 
greater than 10 million. Having said all that, how do we glean this 
kind of information from the graph? First, look along the Y-axis 
(the vertical axis on the left) for an indication of how often the data 
43
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
rotate all pages in pdf preview; rotate pdf pages in reader
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
and Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate pages in pdf permanently
occur. The tallest bar is just to the right of this and it is nearly up to 
the 30 mark. To know what this tall bar represents, look along the 
X-axis (the horizontal axis at the bottom) and see that there is a tick 
mark for every two bars. We see scientific notation under each tick 
mark. The first tick mark is 1e+07, which translates to 10,000,000. 
So each new bar (or an empty space where a bar would go) goes 
up by five million in population. With these points in mind it 
should now be easy to see that there are nearly 30 states with popu-
lations under five million.
If you think about presidential elections, or the locations of schools 
and businesses, or how a single U.S. state might compare with 
other countries in the world, it is interesting to know that there are 
two really giant states and then lots of much smaller states. Once 
you have some practice reading histograms, all of the knowledge is 
available at a glance. 
On the other hand there is something unsatisfying about this dia-
gram. With over forty of the states clustered into the first couple of 
bars, there might be some more details hiding in there that we 
would like to know about. This concern translates into the number 
of bars shown in the histogram. There are eight shown here, so 
why did R pick eight? 
The answer is that the hist() function has an algorithm or recipe for 
deciding on the number of categories/bars to use by default. The 
number of observations and the spread of the data and the amount 
of empty space there would be are all taken into account. Fortu-
nately it is possible and easy to ask R to use more or fewer 
categories/bars with the “breaks” parameter, like this:
hist(USstatePops$V1, breaks=20)
This gives us five bars per tick mark or about two million for each 
bar. So the new histogram above shows very much the same pat-
tern as before: 15 states with populations under two million. The 
pattern that you see here is referred to as a distribution. This is a 
distribution that starts off tall on the left and swoops downward 
quickly as it moves to the right. You might call this a “reverse-J” 
distribution because it looks a little like the shape a J makes, al-
though flipped around vertically. More technically this could be re-
ferred to as a geometric distribution. We don’t have to worry about 
44
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
save pdf rotate pages; pdf rotate single page
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
change orientation of pdf page; rotate all pages in pdf preview
why it is called that at this stage, but we can speculate on why the 
distribution looks the way it does. First, you can’t have a state with 
no people in it, or worse yet negative population. It just doesn’t 
make any sense. So a state has to have at least a few people in it, 
and if you look through U.S. history every state began as a colony 
or a territory that had at least a few people in it. On the other hand, 
what does it take to grow really large in population? You need a lot 
of land, first of all, and then a good reason for lots of people to 
move there or lots of people to be born there. So there are lots of 
limits to growth: Rhode Island is too small too have a bazillion peo-
ple in it and Alaska, although it has tons of land, is too cold for lots 
of people to want to move there. So all states probably started 
small and grew, but it is really difficult to grow really huge. As a 
result we have a distribution where most of the cases are clustered 
near the bottom of the scale and just a few push up higher and 
higher. But as you go higher, there are fewer and fewer states that 
can get that big, and by the time you are out at the end, just shy of 
40 million people, there’s only one state that has managed to get 
that big. By the way, do you know or can you guess what that hu-
mongous state is? 
There are lots of other distribution shapes. The most common one 
that almost everyone has heard of is sometimes called the “bell” 
curve because it is shaped like a bell. The technical name for this is 
the normal distribution. The term “normal” was first introduced 
by Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855), who supposedly called it that 
in a belief that it was the most typical distribution of data that one 
might find in natural phenomena. The following histogram depicts 
the typical bell shape of the normal distribution. 
If you are curious, you might be wondering how R generated the 
histogram above, and, if you are alert, you might notice that the his-
togram that appears above has the word “rnorm” in a couple of 
places. Here’s another of the cool features in R: it is incredibly easy 
to generate “fake” data to work with when solving problems or giv-
ing demonstrations. The data in this histogram were generated by 
R’s rnorm() function, which generates a random data set that fits 
45
the normal distribution (more closely if you generate a lot of data, 
less closely if you only have a little. Some further explanation of 
the rnorm() command will make sense if you remember that the 
state population data we were using had a mean of 6,053,834 and a 
standard deviation of 6,823,984. The command used to generate 
this histogram was:
hist(rnorm(51, 6043834, 6823984))
There are two very important new concepts introduced here. The 
first is a nested function call: The hist() function that generates the 
graph “surrounds” the rnorm() function that generates the new 
fake data. (Pay close attention to the parentheses!) The inside func-
tion, rnorm(), is run by R first, with the results of that sent directly 
and immediately into the hist() function.
The other important thing is the “arguments that” were “passed” 
to the rnorm() function. We actually already ran into arguments a 
little while ago with the read.DIF() and read.table() functions but 
we did not talk about them then. “Argument” is a term used by 
computer scientists to refer to some extra information that is sent 
to a function to help it know how to do its job. In this case we 
passed three arguments to rnorm() that it was expecting in this or-
der: the number of observations to generate in the fake dataset, the 
mean of the distribution, and the standard deviation of the distribu-
tion. The rnorm() function used these three numbers to generate 51 
random data points that, roughly speaking, fit the normal distribu-
tion. So the data shown in the histogram above are an approxima-
tion of what the distribution of state populations might look like if, 
instead of being reverse-J-shaped (geometric distribution), they 
were normally distributed.
The normal distribution is used extensively through applied statis-
tics as a tool for making comparisons. For example, look at the 
rightmost bar in the previous histogram. The label just to the right 
of that bar is 3e+07, or 30,000,000. We already know from our real 
state population data that there is only one actual state with a 
population in excess of 30 million (if you didn’t look it up, it is Cali-
fornia). So if all of a sudden, someone mentioned to you that he or 
she lived in a state, other than California, that had 30 million peo-
ple, you would automatically think to yourself, “Wow, that’s un-
usual and I’m not sure I believe it.” And the reason that you found 
it hard to believe was that you had a distribution to compare it to. 
Not only did that distribution have a characteristic shape (for exam-
ple, J-shaped, or bell shaped, or some other shape), it also had a 
center point, which was the mean, and a “spread,” which in this 
was case the standard deviation.  Armed with those three pieces of 
information - the type/shape of distribution, an anchoring point, 
and a spread (also known as the amount of variability), you have a 
powerful tool for making comparisons. 
In the next chapter we will conduct some of these comparisons to 
see what we can infer about the ways things are in general, based 
on just a subset of available data, or what statisticians call a sam-
ple.
Chapter Challenge
In this chapter, we used rnorm() to generate random numbers that 
closely fit a normal distribution. We also learned that the state 
population data was a “geometric” distribution. Do some research 
to find out what R function generates random numbers using the 
geometric distribution. Then run that function with the correct pa-
46
rameters to generate 51 random numbers (hint: experiment with 
different probability values). Create a histogram of these random 
numbers and describe the shape of the distribution.
Sources
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Friedrich_Gauss
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Galton
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Pearson
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Fisher
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Sealy_Gosset
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal_distribution
http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/utils/html/read.t
able.html
http://www.census.gov/popest/data/national/totals/2011/inde
x.html
http://www.r-tutor.com/elementary-statistics/numerical-measur
es/standard-deviation
47
Review 6.1 Beer, Farms, and Peas
Check Answer
A bar graph that displays the frequencies of occurrence for a 
numeric variable is called a
A. Histogram
B. Pictogram
C. Bar Graph
D. Bar Chart
R Functions Used in This Chapter 
read.DIF()!!
Reads data in interchange format
read.table()!
Reads data table from external source
mean()! !
Calculate arithmetic mean
median()! !
Locate the median
mode()! !
Tells the data type/mode of a data object

!
!
!
Note: This is NOT the statistical mode
var()!!
!
Calculate the sample variance
sd()! !
!
Calculate the sample standard deviation
hist()!!
!
Produces a histogram graphic
Test Yourself
If All Else Fails
In case you have difficulty with the read.DIF() or read.table() func-
tions, the code shown below can be copied and pasted (or, in the 
worst case scenario, typed) into the R console to create the data set 
used in this chapter.
V1 <- c(4779736,710231,6392017,2915918,37253956,

5029196,3574097,897934,601723,18801310,9687653,

1360301,1567582,12830632,6483802,3046355,2853118,
4339367,4533372,1328361,5773552,6547629,9883640,

5303925,2967297,5988927,989415,1826341,2700551,

1316470,8791894,2059179,19378102,9535483,672591,

11536504,3751351,3831074,12702379,1052567,

4625364,814180,6346105,25145561,2763885,625741,

8001024,6724540,1852994,5686986,563626)
USstatePops <- data.frame(V1)
48
Sampling distributions are the conceptual key to statistical inference. Many approaches to 
understanding sampling distributions use examples of drawing marbles or gumballs from a large jar 
to illustrate the influences of randomness on sampling. Using the list of U.S. states illustrates how a 
non-normal distribution nonetheless has a normal sampling distribution of means.
CHAPTER 7
49
Sample in a Jar
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested