display pdf in asp.net page : Rotate a pdf page software application cloud windows winforms web page class design_guidelines12-part1740

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
maintenance & oPerations
|
121
irrigaTion managemenT
 BPCPC minimizes water evaporation by using inground drip 
systems wherever possible.
 Compost aids moisture retention in the root zone, playing an 
important role in water conservation.
PlanTing PracTices
 For their numerous installation projects, completed either 
by in-house staff or by consultants, BPCPC staff horticulturists 
carefully select plants at nursery sources.
 The staff also closely supervise planting installations to 
ensure the proper depth (planting too deep can lead to  
premature plant death), correct planting bed soils preparation 
and management, and the proper preparation and handling of 
rootballs as plantings are installed.
Pruning TecHniques
 The staff is trained to ensure that plants are pruned in a way 
that encourages natural growth patterns and maintains correct 
plant structure.
for furTHer informaTion
Association of Natural Bio-Control Producers. http://ANBP.org
Bio-Integrated Resource Center, http://www.keyed.com/birc/index.html
Diver, Steve. Notes on Compost Teas. ATTRA - National Sustainable 
Agriculture Information Service, ATTRA Publication #IP118/103. http://attra.
ncat.org/attra-pub/compost-tea-notes.htmll
Dufour, Rex. Biointensive Integrated Pest Management (IPM). ATTRA - 
National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, ATTRA Publication 
#IP049, 2001. http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/ipm.html
Harris, Richard W. Arboriculture: Integrated Management of Landscape, 
Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. New York: Prentice Hall, 1992
Elements of New York State IPM Cornell University, New York State Agricultural 
Experiment Station. http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/ipmnet/ny/index.html
Integrated Pest Management Institute of North America. http://www.
ipminstitute.org
Levitan, Lois. Best Management Practices and Integrated Pest 
Management Resources and Recommendations Cornell University 
Environmental Risk Analysis Program. http://environmentalrisk.cornell.edu/
PRI/RedRisk-BMP.cfm
McMullen, Marcia and Bruce Seeling. Integrated Pest Management BMPs 
for Groundwater Protection from Pesticides North Dakota State University 
Extension Service. http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/h2oqual/watgrnd/
ae1114w.htm
National Integrated Pest Management Network. http://www.reeusda.gov/nipmn
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Stormwater and 
Nonpoint Source Pollution Control: Best Management Practices Manual, 
December 1994.
Pirone, P.P. Tree Maintenance 6th Edition, Oxford University Press, 1988.
Shigo, A. L. Modern Arboriculture: A Systems Approach to Trees and Their 
Associates. University of North Carolina Press, 1991.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Marketing Landscape 
Integrated Pest Management Services to Customers, 1999. http://www.epa.
gov/oppbppd1/PESP/regional_grants/1999/r2-199.htm
Rotate a pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
Rotate a pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
122
Part IV describes the site systems: soil, water, and vegetation. 
These systems must work together for optimal success. Each best 
practice contains an objective, background information, benefits 
and drawbacks, implementation strategies, examples, references, 
and suggestions for integration with other best practices. 
Together, the practices offer a network of opportunities that can 
be adaptively applied to any park or development opportunity. 
124   Provide comPreHensive soiL testing and anaLysis 
127   minimize soiL disturBance 
134   Prioritize tHe rejuvenation of eXisting soiLs Before imPorting new soiL materiaLs 
138   use comPost 
142   testing, remediation and Permitting for sites witH contaminated soiLs 
149   use engineered soiLs to meet criticaL Programming needs 
152   Provide adequate soiL voLumes and dePtHs 
156   Provide soiL PLacement PLans as Part of contract documents
Part iv: 
Best Practices  
in site systems
soiLs
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
rotate pages in pdf; rotate pages in pdf expert
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate pdf pages individually
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
123
inTroDucTion
Soil is an important but often undervalued component of our 
urban park infrastructure. Healthy soils have an incredible 
capacity to capture and clean water, transform pollutants, 
make nutrients available, and sequester carbon.
Healthy soils are the foundation upon which sustainable 
parks are built. If soils are not prioritized as a critical resource 
worthy of care during design, construction, and maintenance 
cycles, parallel efforts to enhance the vegetative and water 
ecologies will be compromised.
The Sustainable Sites Initiative has developed an outline of 
the critical ecological functions of soil systems.37 
SUPPORT FOR VEGETATION. Soils provide a base to sup-
port vegetation by providing rooting area, water storage, 
and nutrition for growth. Healthy soil also suppresses many 
plant diseases, and reduces the costs of caring for turf and 
landscape plantings. 
REGULATION OF WATER SUPPLY. Healthy soils allow  
rainwater to infiltrate, reducing excess runoff, erosion, 
sedimentation, and flooding. Soils also cleanse and store 
rainwater, recharge groundwater, and moderate the delivery 
of water to plants. 
TREATMENT AND FILTRATION OF WATER POLLUTANTS. 
Water and air pollutants are removed or transformed into 
less harmful materials in the soil. Soil particles and organic 
matter can filter out pollutants by attracting and holding 
chemicals and suspended solids. In addition, soil provides 
habitat for microbes that break down pollutants into more 
benign substances. 
SUPPORT FOR NUTRIENT CYCLING. Soil and its microorgan-
isms play a major role in nutrient cycling, including the carbon 
and nitrogen cycles. Much of the earth’s nitrogen exists in 
rock, sediment, and soils. The nitrogen cycle depends on soil 
biota to convert nitrogen in the atmosphere into usable forms 
in the soil and return nitrogen back to the atmosphere. 
SEqUESTRATION OF CARBON. The pool of organic carbon 
in the soil is approximately twice as large as that of the 
atmosphere. Soils can contain as much or more carbon than 
the vegetation they support. Soil carbon storage can help 
offset release of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas 
that contributes to global climate change. 
PROVISION OF BIOLOGICAL HABITATS. Soils are habitat 
for such organisms as plants, worms, insects, arthropods, 
bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and nematodes. The soil food web 
is responsible for decomposing organic matter, storing and 
cycling nutrients, maintaining soil structure and stability, 
and converting or attenuating pollutants. Soils also support 
healthy vegetation, which supports life above ground.38 
keY PrinciPles
SOILS ARE FRAGILE NATURAL SYSTEMS. Soils are not 
inert; they are a dynamic latticework of sand, silt, clay organic 
matter, air, water, and microorganisms. If handled improp-
erly, a soil’s ability to support life is greatly compromised and 
extremely difficult to restore. Compaction, excessive handling, 
contamination, and erosion all need to be controlled through-
out the construction process in order to ensure a soil environ-
ment that will be able to support water quality and vegetative 
communities over the long term. 
GOOD SOIL PRACTICES REqUIRE COMPREHENSIVE STAND- 
ARDS, VIGILANCE AND ExPERTISE. Ensuring soil quality 
on every project and in every park will be challenging but will 
produce substantial benefits. Soil conditions should be analyti-
cally tested and characterized prior to starting design. During 
design, proposed in situ amendment or new soils practices 
should be carefully controlled by specification and testing to 
ensure that the proper texture, organic matter, pH, soluble 
salts and other parameters are appropriate. 
DESIGN PARAMETERS NEED TO BE ENFORCED DURING 
CONSTRUCTION. Parks staff need to develop a broad range of 
expertise to be able to direct a variety of soil testing proce-
dures, interpret the results, and develop targeted responses to 
individual site needs. Designers can consult with the Natural 
Resources Group, and should also expect to rely on outside 
soil consultants and testing labs until such time the agency 
can fund trained dedicated in-house staff soils expertise. 
Multiple testing laboratory vendors will be required to provide 
an appropriate range of testing and consulting services to 
ensure soil material and installation quality. No project should 
be deemed too small to afford good soil practices. 
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A ONE SIzE FITS ALL SOIL. 
A wide variety of soil types is needed in today’s diverse  
range of parks. Soils must provide the appropriate planting 
medium for the proposed landscape. Soils need to be  
matched to stormwater design objectives and the anticipated 
levels of use and compaction. The soil characteristics required 
by the proposed park programming must be addressed as an 
integral part of the design process. In order to support goals 
for plantings and stormwater management over the long term, 
existing soils must be paired with programming that can  
realistically be accommodated. Otherwise, soils need to be 
modified or replaced to meet the specific needs they are 
intended to support.39 
37 Hanks, Dallas and Lewandowski, Ann “Protecting Urban Soil quality: Examples for Landscape 
Codes and Specifications.” December 2003. p. 1. http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/management/files/
protect_urban_sq.pdf
38 The Sustainable Sites Initiative,™ Standards & Guidelines: Preliminary Report. November 1, 
2007, p. 9.
39 Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape Architects and 
Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006, p. 29.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
rotate all pages in pdf; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages by degrees
124
objecTiVe                                                                  
Ensure a thorough understanding of the soil quality, contami-
nation, percolation, and bearing capacity early in the design 
process. Design soil protection with a high degree of technical 
expertise; monitor construction to ensure proper practices are 
followed and proper soils are installed. Where appropriate, 
make it standard practice to obtain soil testing and analysis 
and the services of a soil scientist.
benefiTs                                                                      
 Provides critical information that can guide the design, 
construction and longterm maintenance of a park project.
J  Provides early warning of site contamination, percolation 
rates, and bearing capacity in order to drive design decisions.
 Ensures success of landscape and minimizes the need  
for future chemical intervention for fertility, pest, and  
disease management.
 Identifies fragile soils prior to the start of the design process 
and enables the design team to set limits on use of heavy 
equipment and soil disturbance areas. 
 Identifies potential design and construction risks includ-
ing slope failure, erosion and sedimentation, and the need to 
protect adjacent water bodies.
 Enables soils to fulfill critical onsite stormwater  
management functions.
 Provides clarity in the permitting process.
 Minimizes environmental impacts and costs associated  
with removing contaminated soils, and introducing imported 
topsoil or fill.
 Informs cost estimation associated with soil remedia-
tion, amendments, importation, excavation, and drainage 
improvements.
 Aids in determining the appropriate plantings for 
revegetation.
Reduces use of unnecessary soil amendments or  
topsoil importing.
 Maximizes the potential for soil reuse onsite.
 Identifies costs and requirements for soil disposal,  
if necessary.
 Quantitatively verifies contractor compliance with  
project requirements.
 Assists maintenance staff with monitoring planting  
and stormwater design features post construction. 
 Improves soil procurement and installation practices by 
providing greater level of specificity.
consiDeraTions                                                         
Budgeting the cost of soil analysis during the design  
phase will be required, as well as the on call services of a  
soil scientist.
 Park’s Capital Projects’ Environmental Control Unit can 
provide assistance for some soil testing and analysis.
 Soil testing for horticultural and stormwater BMP soils  
typically requires specialized consultant and lab expertise. 
This may limit the number of entities that can provide  
qualified services.
inTegraTion                                                             
 S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils before 
Importing New Materials 
 S.5 Testing, Remediation and Permitting for Sites with 
Contaminated Soils 
 S.6 Use Engineered Soils to Meet Critical Programming Needs 
backgrounD                                                             
Geotechnical and analytical soil testing is indispensible to the 
high performance design process. While an educated designer 
can glean a great deal of useful information from looking at 
and touching a soil, it is not possible to determine accurately 
by eye or feel if an existing soil is safe, how it can be manipu-
lated to ensure longterm success, if the soil delivered to a site 
is correct, or if it has been properly installed.
Comprehensive soil testing and analysis forms the funda-
mental basis for the evaluation of existing soil conditions and 
lays the foundations for the proposed soil, vegetation and 
onsite stormwater management strategies, allowing for a holis-
tic, ecologically based approach to site design.
Testing should not be a onetime event at the start of a 
project. It can be used in a variety of ways and at a number of 
different stages during the design and construction process,  
as determined by the needs of the site.
 During the site analysis and assessment phase to: 
Understand existing site conditions and to determine 
appropriate amendment procedures for reuse of soil  
if possible.
Determine if there are any contamination hazards 
within existing soils.
Determine if there are opportunities for onsite storm-
water management.
 During site design phase as required to: 
Source recommended soil component materials if engi-
neered soils are to be used.
Develop mixes and/or amendments for use onsite.
Determine the appropriate plant species for installation 
onsite based on chemical tolerance.
Select compatible planting material.
Locate onsite stormwater management facilities.
s.1  
Provide 
comPreHensive 
soiL testing 
and anaLysis
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
rotate pdf pages on ipad; pdf rotate page and save
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
and Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from
permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate pages separately
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
125
Determine percolation rate.
Determine bearing capacity.
 During construction to: 
Verify acceptable material sources during a contractor’s 
or the agency’s procurement process.
Verify that material delivered to the site is acceptable 
and complies with specifications.
Confirm that the final soil installation complies with the 
construction documents.
 During postconstruction periods to: 
 Verify soils are continuing to perform as designed.
Assist managers in determining the need for supple 
mental soil nutrients to ensure planting vigor.
Monitor soil conditions including compaction levels,  
and infiltration and percolation rates.
PracTices                                                                
Design
ProViDe an allowance for soil TesTing on eacH ProjecT 
seParaTe from anD in aDDiTion To TYPical Design buDgeTs
without accounting for the cost and time required for accurately 
testing and analyzing soils separately and upfront, this additional 
cost may be disregarded and eliminated from a project. 
engage a soil scienTisT
understanding soil quality requires more than collecting soil samples 
and sending them to a lab for analysis. a soil scientist working as 
part of the design team can be useful in several ways beyond the 
interpretation of test results.
 Provide onsite observations: a soil scientist can provide 
invaluable insights about existing soil qualities based onsite 
observations about drainage patterns, condition of existing 
vegetation, or absence of types of vegetation.
 Optimize onsite resources: a soil scientist can direct 
the development of site program and physical design that 
optimizes the use of existing soil resources through careful 
preservation or reuse.
 Develop soil reuse plans for contaminated sites: there are 
significant opportunities during the investigation and reme-
diation planning for maximizing soil reuse, thus minimizing 
importation of soil. Scoping of the remedial investigation 
should include a soil scientist. Once contaminant results 
are obtained that delineate contaminated areas (in three 
dimensions), the soil scientist can optimize the cut and fill 
required for the project. 
 Develop soil specifications: a soil scientist can develop 
soil specifications aimed at rejuvenating existing site soils 
or controlling the quality of new soils imported to the site 
either for mixing with onsite soils or to provide entirely new 
soil profiles.
 Determine cost effectiveness: a soil scientist can  
make a critical early determination if there are sufficient  
soil resources on the site for reuse or if, given the site 
program, it will be more cost effective and time efficient to 
import new soils.
conDucT soil TesTing as DeTermineD bY siTe raTHer THan 
a generic lisT of sTanDarD TesTing ProTocols
 Employ qualified soil professionals as an integral part  
of the project design team to develop a site specific  
testing program. 
 Specific testing protocols should be developed  
on a project by project basis by the design team soil profes-
sionals, based on a site’s unique history and the proposed  
site program. 
 Identify the types of tests, testing locations and labs  
qualified to complete the testing procedures.
 Discuss soil testing needs with the Natural Resources  
Group to help lower costs by identifying local soil experts  
such as those at the Natural Resources Conservation Service  
or the NYC Soil and Water Conservation District.
creaTe a comPreHensiVe soils assessmenT rePorT
 See Part 2: Site Assessment: Soils Assessment Practices 
use THe comPreHensiVe soils assessmenT rePorT
The soils assessment report serves as an aid in the following  
design tasks:
 Determination of suitability of soils for planting
 Selection of plant material
 Selection of soil amendments to produce viable  
growing medium
 Identification of construction protection zones
 Hydrologic and hydraulic analysis
 Design of stormwater management BMPs
 Selection of an in situ soil remediation strategy
 Design of contamination remediation, soil removal,  
and soil cover 
consiDer THe neeD for aDDiTional TesTing
as the design process continues, it may be necessary to provide 
additional testing to more specifically design components such as 
onsite stormwater facilities and building structures.
 Additional tests may include: 
Hazardous contamination percolation or  
infiltration tests
Groundwater depths
Bedrock depths
Soil bearing capacity 
More detailed soil borings
 Additional tests may be required if material is to be  
presourced, or if actual mix designs need to be determined 
in advance of bidding.
use THe soil Professionals on THe Design Team To 
DeVeloP comPreHensiVe soil sPecificaTions
 Once the design is near final, specifications can include 
required testing protocols and frequencies during procurement 
of materials and onsite construction.
 The extent and frequency of testing will vary depending 
upon the size and complexity of the proposed site work.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
rotate one page in pdf; change orientation of pdf page
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
rotate pdf page by page; pdf reverse page order preview
126
consTrucTion
Testing during the construction phase is critical to ensure that 
the proper materials are used and installed correctly.
 Bidding: Requiring contactors to submit proposed soil 
supplier test reports is a good way to evaluate the thorough-
ness of a contractor’s bid.
Too often contractors simply price their work based 
on past experience or current market conditions without 
carefully reading the project specifications.
Contractors can easily underestimate a project and, if 
awarded the contract, can have great difficulty completing 
the work, leading to delays and complications.
The inability of a contractor to demonstrate that they 
have adequately researched the needs of the project should 
be a sign of bigger problems in the quality of their bid.
 Procurement: Procurement testing is a standard  
part of construction contracts and should be included in 
product submittals.
 Delivery: All soil materials should be spot tested upon 
delivery to the construction site before they are installed to 
ensure compliance with the contract documents. 
Note that on sites regulated by the NYSDEC, there are 
testing methods and protocols that should be referenced 
in the project specifications. All imported soils should 
be certified clean and delivered onsite with proper 
documentation.
Testing ensures that problems are revealed before 
materials are placed.
Testing of materials such as compost is critical as 
improperly aged compost can be toxic to plantings.
See further S.4 Use Compost 
The sooner a material is tested when it comes onsite, 
the sooner a contractor can remove and replace non-
conforming materials, minimizing construction delays.
 Installation: Testing during installation ensures that 
problems are revealed and corrected before subsequent 
materials are place over, adjacent to, or in the soil, causing 
further delays and costs associated with the soil removal 
and replacement.
Testing is especially important for stormwater manage-
ment elements; key testing windows during construction 
including after completion of rough grading.
Inspect subsoil and subgrade areas to ensure they are 
free of debris or other contaminants.
Test for proper penetrability, drainage, and especially 
subgrade compaction as required by the specifications.
During topsoil placement:
 Inspect soil placement procedures to ensure  
proper material depths, layering, and transitioning  
as described in the specifications and shown on  
the drawings.
 Test for proper compaction and penetrability.
After topsoil placement: 
(1) Test topsoil before planting.
(2) Amend topsoil as required to correct for organic, 
nutrient and pH deficiencies.
PlanTing anD sTormwaTer managemenT soils
There are a variety of soil tests that provide useful information  
in the design of planting soils and soils for stormwater management. 
The specific types of tests required for planting and stormwater 
management are indicated in Part 2: site assessment Practices.  
at a minimum, new soils should be tested for the following: 
 Texture (particle size distribution)
 Organic content
 Reaction (pH)
 Nutrient content (including nitrate, ammonium, 
phosphorous, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron,  
manganese, zinc and copper)
 Soluble salt content
 In-place bulk density 
 In-place infiltration 
PosTinsTallaTion TesTs
During and after construction the following tests are useful in deter-
mining contractor compliance with the design specifications:
 Infiltration 
 In situ density
 Percolation or permeability
mainTenance
TesT soils on a regular basis To moniTor lanDscaPe 
Performance
once a project is complete, regular testing should be used to ensure 
that soils are healthy and functioning properly. Testing allows main-
tenance crews to apply fertilizers and other amendments at specific 
levels providing a number of important benefits: 
 Provide the nutrients needed for vigorous and health  
plant growth.
 Buffer plant material from disease and insect predation.
 Minimize runoff or leaching of excess fertilizers into adja-
cent water systems.
 Minimize excessive plant growth due to over fertilizing.
 Reduction of costs associated with needless or excessive 
fertilizer and amendment applications
regular testing of stormwater management soils is also critical to 
ensure proper infiltration and percolation, as it can determine: 
 If soils have become compacted, or are becoming clogged 
with silt and debris, requiring cleanout or other rejuvenation
 If soil biology is properly balanced to allow for proper 
nutrient and pollutant absorption and breakdown
The generalized list below identifies some of the more common  
testing that is used in the assessment of soil during park operation. 
 Lawn areas and Planting Beds: Test every two to three 
years to ensure proper pH and nutrients.
 Sports fields: Due to higher use levels, test annually  
for pH, nutrients, compaction, and Gmax (rating of impact 
force for player safety).
 Sand based manufactured soils: Sand based soils,  
due to their low clay content, do not hold nutrients as  
well as loam based soils, therefore they require a higher 
degree of monitoring.
 In the first few years after the completion of construction, 
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
127
test at least twice per year for proper pH and nutrients.
 Once the soil appears to have stabilized, test for pH  
and nutrients annually.
 Recommended ranges for test results can be found  
within the individual BMP descriptions.
see furTHer
f Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
Craul, Phillip. Urban Soils: Applications and Practices. New York: John 
Wiley & Sons, Inc.1999.
objecTiVe                                                                      
To the greatest extent possible, preserve and protect soil 
resources from damage by limiting the zone of site disturbance 
and controlling erosion and compaction during construction. 
benefiTs                                                                    
 Maintains natural soil structure and thus the soil food web, 
beneficial microorganisms and soil organic content.
 Limits soil compaction and reduces runoff, leading to higher 
levels of infiltration and water table recharge.
 Maintains vegetation, reducing the need for replanting.
 Maintains habitat.
 Maintains water quality due to contact with vegetation and 
filtration through soil.
 Prevents future restoration costs.
Reduces risks of invasive species establishment, which 
often occurs after disturbance.
 Protects on and offsite streams, rivers, lakes and ponds from 
sedimentation and turbidity.
 Prevents on and offsite flooding due to poorly controlled 
construction practices.
consiDeraTions                                                             
 Can reduce buildable land area.
 Can increase construction costs and duration due to the fact 
that the contractor may have to work in a more limited site 
area with spatial restrictions for site access, staging, stock-
piles, and work areas.
 Requires frequent onsite supervision of contractor to ensure 
compliance with protection measures.
 Requires costs associated with site protection measures.
 Prevention of compaction requires limiting vehicular traffic 
onsite, limiting contractor site access, storage, and staging area, 
and requires careful sequencing of work during construction.
inTegraTion                                                                
 W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and Flow Paths 
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity and Habitat 
 V.4. Design Water Efficient Landscapes 
backgrounD                                                                           
While there are numerous ways to rejuvenate soil functions lost 
during construction, it is virtually impossible to fully recreate the 
structure and function of natural soil once it has been disturbed. 
s.2 
minimize soiL 
disturBance
128
Retaining natural soil structure, vegetation, and hydrologic 
patterns is the foundation for providing a naturally function-
ing landscape. Disturbing or removing soils and vegetation 
destroys a site’s soil structure and can severely curtail or elimi-
nate its natural capacity for infiltration and evapotranspiration. 
Compaction and disturbance of soils in the upper horizon will 
eliminate macropores and significantly reduce air and water 
movement through soils. Correspondingly, runoff volumes and 
pollutant loads will increase. The health of both vegetation and 
fauna will decrease with reduced water and air flow. 
Disturbance of soils and vegetation also results in habitat 
loss, an increased risk of erosion, and dramatic increases in 
the rate, volume, duration, and frequency of runoff, storm- 
water pollution, and reduced groundwater quantity and quality. 
The risk of invasive species establishment is increased from 
disturbance via seed migration on construction equipment, 
seed that existed in the soil layers and is brought to the sur-
face, or seed finding available soil areas and lack of competi-
tion from existing vegetation.
On all projects, the goal should be to minimize soil distur-
bance using the following hierarchical approach:
 First, disturb the smallest site area possible by careful 
design and site planning. 
 Second, limit the size of equipment to be as small as is 
practicable, or specify the type of equipment (i.e., tracked 
vehicles may be permitted and wheeled vehicles prohibited).
 Third, limit the size of materials and equipment staging 
and storage areas.
 Fourth, on a daily basis enforce soil erosion and sediment 
control specification requirements for construction practices that 
limit soil erosion and compaction and reduce sediment flow.
PracTices                                                                  
Planning
surVeY anD maP exisTing feaTures To iDenTifY criTical 
ProTecTion areas before THe sTarT of Design work
 See Part 2: Soil Assessment Practices 
 On sites where existing soils are to be preserved,  
especially at historic fill sites or areas suspected to have  
been subject to past industrial use, test soils to ensure  
that they are not contaminated.
 Soils should be sampled and analyzed per 6 NYCC 375 
regulations to ensure they are safe.
use siTe Planning sTraTegies To PreserVe anD ProTecT 
exisTing HealTHY VegeTaTion
 Design new facilities around preserved areas maintaining  
as much continuity and connectivity between preserved  
areas as possible.
 Coordinate proposed building or pavement development 
areas (places that will require compacted subgrades anyway) 
with proposed site staging, storage, and stockpiling areas that 
will generate subgrade compaction.
 Plan linear utility runs in compact corridors through healthy 
vegetation areas to minimize site disruption.
 Where possible, group utilities in common trenches  
(maintaining code required separation) to minimize widths  
of excavation.
 Require pavement removals to be completed with the  
smallest equipment sizes possible; require that operation of 
equipment over the base or subbase of pavements removal 
shall be carefully monitored.
 Carefully consider proposed grading to avoid excessive filling 
or cutting within critical root zone areas of existing vegetation.
 Carefully consider proposed drainage patterns so as to main-
tain contributing watersheds to protected root zone areas and 
avoid the need for irrigation.
Design
ProViDe aDequaTe soil ProTecTion Zones arounD exisTing
VegeTaTion
 Protect vegetation in clumps of trees and shrubs rather than 
individual plants, thereby preserving shared soil volumes and 
rooting zones.
 See V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation
DeVeloP a soil PreserVaTion anD ProTecTion Plan
 As part of the early concept and master planning phase, 
develop a soil preservation and protection plan diagram that 
divides the site into five basic zone types: 
Zones of protection where existing soil and vegetation will 
not be disturbed. 
Zones that, based on testing results, will be amended or 
treated in-place with minimal disturbance. 
 In areas that demand less invasive measures, such as 
radial trenching, vegetation is to remain. 
 Rototilling and other more invasive techniques gener-
ally require removal of vegetation prior to amendment.
Zones where construction traffic (both vehicular and 
pedestrian) will be allowed
 To the extent possible, these areas should coincide with 
planned building locations, parking lots, roadways, and walks.
Zones for stockpiling site salvaged topsoil and subsoil 
(in separate piles or areas) and imported soil and soil 
amendments
 These zones should also be limited to areas where planned 
building locations, parking lots, roadways, and walks would occur.
Zones that require specialized soil treatments (such 
as removal and replacement of soils or the installation of 
subdrainage systems) due to existing site degradation, con-
tamination, hardpan layers, or areas that will unavoidably be 
adversely impacted by site construction activities.
 Develop the first two zones as large as possible to protect 
them from construction traffic.
 Locate construction activity zones after establishing soil 
protection zone areas.
 Coordinate with other design consultants, including archi-
tects, site utility engineers, and resident engineers, to ensure 
that protection and preservation zone locations and sizes 
allow sufficient room for the construction of the proposed site 
improvements and not just the improvements themselves.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
129
 Unrealistic preservation and protection zones create undue 
hardship for contractors leading to inflated bids and unen-
forceable site restrictions during construction.
 Be sure to consider the needs for equipment access and 
maneuverability in and around buildings, utility trenches, 
rock outcroppings, stairs, walls, and other new or existing site 
features when establishing protection and preservation zones.
sHare DisTurbance corriDors
 Construction roads should become final roads, and utilities 
should run along path corridors.
DeVeloP incenTiVes anD meTHoDologY for ensuring siTe 
ProTecTion
 Tie contractor payments to continued compliance with site 
protection requirements.
 Site protection specification may be paid out at 25, 50, 75 
and 100% complete, with no payments for lack of compliance.
 Design site protections that are adequate and not easily 
destroyed by general construction activities.
 Maintain basic hydrology of protected areas to ensure  
their longevity.
DeVeloP a siTewiDe graDing anD sTormwaTer managemenT 
sTraTegY
 Base plan on minimal earth moving.
 Consider construction sequence to minimize site disturbance.
erosion conTrol
During construction, erosion and sedimentation pose a serious 
threat to soil and water quality both on and offsite. Erosion 
removes topsoil and exposes subsoil that is less suitable for 
plant growth. It reduces soil organic matter levels, making soil 
more susceptible to compaction and further erosion. Loss of 
organic matter also reduces nutrient levels and nutrient hold-
ing capacity. Erosion disrupts soil structure and soil biological 
communities that contribute to landscape health. Eroded soil 
and runoff carries excess nutrients, pollutants, and sedi-
ments to surrounding water bodies causing eutrophication and 
turbidity. Sedimentation clogs drainpipes, swales, and stream 
channels, oftentimes leading to increased flooding. 
These onsite and offsite damages are often expensive or 
impossible to fix completely, making prevention worthwhile. 
Due to the seriousness of erosion and sedimentation issues, 
the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) 
and NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) 
require projects to obtain approvals and/or permits to specifi-
cally control construction operations and changes to both 
overland and piped stormwater flows. 
Prior To THe sTarT of THe Design Process, DeTermine 
agencY requiremenTs for soil anD erosion conTrol 
incluDing THe neeD for a sTormwaTer PolluTion 
PreVenTion Plan (swPPP), a Plan for conTrolling 
runoff anD PolluTanTs from a siTe During anD afTer 
consTrucTion acTiViTies
 In most cases, soil and erosion control and stormwater 
permits are required from one or more reviewing agencies if a 
project disturbance area exceeds one or more acres.
 Consult the Instruction Manual for Stormwater Construction 
Permit prepared by the NYSDEC.40
 See Figure 1: Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan 
Component Flow Chart below
 The principle objective of a SWPPP is to comply with 
the NYSDEC State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System 
(SPDES) Stormwater Permit for construction activities by plan-
ning and implementing the following practices: 
Reduction or elimination of erosion and sediment loading 
to waterbodies during construction
Control of the impact of stormwater runoff on the water 
quality of the receiving waters
Control of the increased volume and peak rate of runoff 
during and after construction
Maintenance of stormwater controls during and after 
completion of construction
 A well designed SWPPP requires proper selection, sizing, 
and citing of stormwater management practices to protect 
water resources from stormwater impacts; Erosion & Sediment 
Control (ESC), Water Quantity Control, and Water Quality 
Controls are interrelated components of a SWPPP.
if a site is required to have a full swPPP, this plan must be expanded 
to meet all the requirements of the water quality and quantity sizing 
criteria outlined in the new York stormwater management Design 
manual and the new York standards and specifications for erosion 
and sediment controls. 
Figure 1- Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Component Flow Chart
SWPPP and Stormwater Permit Process
START 1
Submit NOI
FINISH
Implement 
SWPPP
Located in a TMDL 
watershed or 
discharging to an 
impaired 303(d) 
listed Water? 2
Condition “A” 
Is disturbance 5 
acres of more?
Condition “B”
Is planned 
construction other 
than single family 
residences or not 
on agricultural 
property?
“Condition C”
Does SWPPP conform to DEC’s recom-
mended Standards?
“Pending”
Submit copy of 
SWPPP upon DEC’s 
request
Is disturbance 
greater than 1 
acre?
Has DEC 
determined 
another need 
for a SPDES 
permit?
Coverage not 
required 1
Develop
Erosion & Sediment Control Plan
E&SC Plan constitutes SWPPP
Develop Full SWPPP 
Water Quality & Quality Control Plan 
Components
SWPPP Certified by a licensed professional
Submit NOI
Develop Full SWPPP 
Water Quality & Quality Control Plan 
Components
NOTES
1. Under any of the above conditions other environmental permits may be required. DEC may require permit 
for construction disturbance <1 acre on a case by case basis.
2. and the following exists: construction and/or stormwater discharges from the construction or post-
construction site contain the pollutant of concern identified in the TMDL or 303(d) listing.
3. After receipt by DEC of completed application.
Permit Coverage 
in 60 Days 3
Permit Coverage 
in 5 Days
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
130
whether or not a formal swPPP is required for a project, consider 
these basic site planning principals to reduce soil erosion and sedi-
mentation potential over the life of the project by fitting the proposed 
design to the existing terrain.
 Avoid the design of excessively steep grading and transi-
tions to existing grade that may become unstable or wear 
away over time.
 Minimize length and steepness of slopes.
 Maintain sufficient breathing room within the site plan to 
provide natural buffer areas or pockets that can reduce the 
velocity of overland flows and provide opportunities for trap-
ping and settlement of debris and sediments.
 Plan for ways to control stormwater velocities within 
swales, gutters, streams, and other open channels.
 Consider the use of vegetative stabilization methods for 
hillsides, swales, and stream banks.
 These vegetative stabilization methods offer long term 
stability and can often be installed as both required erosion 
control methods during construction and as the permanent 
design solution.
 Consider temporary seeding for stabilization.
iDenTifY areas of concenTraTeD flow anD erosion
identify areas where existing storm sewers or concentrated flows 
discharge. often these areas will create or transform a headwater 
flow path into an eroded gully. identify upstream measures to reduce 
the amount and velocity of flow prior to implementing any restoration 
or stabilization measures. caution: stabilizing one area of erosion 
without addressing the source of erosive flows is likely to transfer 
the problem downstream. 
iDenTifY PracTices THaT are conTribuTing To erosiVe 
conDiTions in naTural flow PaTHs anD small sTreams
 Practices such as vehicle parking on lawns, compaction 
along the travel paths of maintenance equipment, or a history 
of compaction by mowing equipment can create flows that will 
damage natural flow paths and small streams.
 Identify areas impacted by these uses, and implement 
techniques to restore soils, provide stormwater management, 
or modify practices.
 See W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and  
Flow Paths
comPacTion ProTecTion anD conTrol
Healthy soil includes not only the physical particles making up the 
soil, but also adequate pore space between the particles for the 
movement and storage of air and water. Pore space in soils is also 
necessary for root penetration and to provide a favorable environ-
ment for soil organisms. compaction occurs when soil particles 
are pressed together under vehicular or pedestrian weight loads, 
destroying a soil’s natural structure of fissures and particle aggrega-
tion, and reducing the amount and size of pore space within a soil 
structure. although desirable under and adjacent to building struc-
tures and pavements, compaction is destructive to soils that support 
vegetation or facilitate stormwater control. 
soil compaction threatens new and existing vegetation due to:
 Restricted root growth
 Reduced plant uptake of water and nutrients
 Reduced air exchange
 Reduced available water capacity
 Reduced soil biological activity
Poor soil quality results in less healthy plants, and higher rates of 
plant disease and mortality, triggering the need for increased irriga-
tion and fertilization to compensate. Trees are especially sensitive 
to compaction and low soil oxygen levels. unfortunately, the impact 
of compaction on trees, whether caused by construction or post 
construction use, may not become obvious until years after the 
compaction occurs.
excessive levels of soil compaction also lead to wider potential 
environmental degradation due to:
 Increased stormwater runoff as a result of low infiltration 
rates of compacted soils
 Increased erosion due to increased stormwater runoff 
volume and velocity
 Increased water pollution potential in local rivers, 
streams, lakes, and ponds
compaction is extremely difficult to ameliorate without drastic and 
expensive remediation procedures. for open surface areas, tradi-
tional agricultural methods of compaction relief can be employed. 
However, on more developed or vegetated sites compaction relief is 
especially challenging around the roots of existing plantings, under-
ground utilities, buildings, pavements and other structures. 
Planning & Process for comPacTion aVoiDance
careful planning during design and before construction can prevent 
many problems associated with compaction during construction:
 Protect existing uncompacted soils.
 Conduct visual inspection and onsite testing to determine 
areas where healthy, noncompacted soils are located. Survey 
these areas and map them for use by the design team in 
critical decision making.
 Protect uncompacted site areas by designing around them 
to the extent possible.
 Maintain uncompacted areas in large, contiguous zones 
rather than as smaller dispersed areas on a site.
 Limit the extent of disturbed area by design.
 Avoid site improvements in areas where there are uncom-
pacted soils.
 Maintain as compact a development footprint as possible 
to minimize soil compaction.
 Locate new site improvements in areas where existing 
soils have already been compromised through compaction.
 Restrict onsite construction activities such as access 
roadways, storage staging, and stockpiling areas to locations 
where the proposed site development will require compacted 
soils, such as proposed roadways, parking lots, paved pla-
zas, and sport courts, or future buildings.
 Design site protection measures, such as mulch blankets 
to prevent soil compaction in areas where heavy equipment 
is anticipated to be operated.
 Coordinate compaction zones adjacent to structures with 
the structural engineer, the goal being to limit zones of 
excessive compaction.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested