display pdf in asp.net page : Save pdf rotate pages SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn design_guidelines13-part1741

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
131
Define accePTable leVels of comPacTion in conTracT 
DocumenTs
Different soil textures respond differently to compaction.
 Sandy soils are naturally more resistant to compaction.
 Clay soils are highly sensitive to compaction.
 Acceptable compaction levels need to take into account 
soil type; bulk density is a good proxy measure to under-
stand soil compaction impacts on vegetation.
 By specifying target soil densities and verifying them 
by onsite testing (using ASTM D2937, for example), the 
designer can ensure that planting soils will be conducive to 
plant growth.
 See Figure 2: Bulk Density by Soil Texture (Source: NRCS 
Soil Quality Institute, 1999).
 Define acceptable equipment to complete work.
 Specifications should encourage the contractor to use the 
smallest possible equipment sizes to complete the work.
 Define acceptable equipment that will minimize compac-
tion of soils by naming specific models, weights, and wheel 
or track sizes and tires per axel and wheel loads.
 Create clear levels of accountability for violation.
 Incorporate a system of financial and administrative pen-
alties within the specifications to encourage performance.
 Rate and track contractor performance from contract to 
contract to provide legally defendable means for disquali-
fying contractors from bidding if they fail to comply with 
compaction prevention requirements.
 Require the contractor to remove and replace materials 
that are over compacted, at the contractor’s expense.
consTrucTion
minimiZe siTe DisTurbance During consTrucTion
 Ensure that erosion and sediment control  
measures are installed and maintained throughout  
entire construction process.
 Consolidate construction staging area to  
minimize disturbance.
 Install site protection fencing and maintain throughout 
entire construction process, including trees and groves,  
an also any areas within protection and preservation zones.
 Install site protection fencing; monitor and maintain 
throughout entire construction process.
 Consolidate construction staging area to  
minimize disturbance.
 Ensure that erosion and sediment control measures  
are installed and maintained throughout entire  
construction process.
 Enforce limits of disturbance.
require eDucaTion anD enforcemenT
 Contractors as well as construction management and  
resident engineering staff need to be taught about the  
importance of good soil practices.
 Most construction professionals easily adapt their methods 
once they understand the reasoning behind the requirements. 
However, simply because soil management requirements are 
on the drawings and in the specifications, it does not mean 
that they will be followed. 
 It is the obligation of the project design team to organize 
meetings and make periodic site visits throughout the  
construction phase to ensure that the soil management plan  
is implemented.
 The message of preservation and reuse needs to  
be delivered repeatedly to ensure compliance with the  
stated objectives.
incorPoraTe Discussion of siTe ProTecTion Zones anD 
erosion conTrol anD comPacTion ProTecTion measures 
inTo conTracTor meeTings
 Prebid Meetings: 
Review and discuss site protection and the importance  
of soils and vegetation.
Review the intent of the construction staging and 
sequencing plan.
Review liquidated damages requirements if appropriate.
 Preconstruction Meetings: 
Review the requirements of the site protection and 
soil TexTure
(USDA)
Sands, loamy sands
Sandy loams, loams
Sandy clay loams, loams, clay loams
Silts, silt loams
Silt loams, silty clay loam
Sandy clays, silty clays, some clay loams (35-45% clay)
Clays (>45% clay)
iDeal bulk 
DensiTies
(g/cm3)
<1.60
<1.40
<1.40
<1.30
<1.10
<1.10
<1.10
bulk DensiTies 
THaT maY 
affecT rooT 
growTH
(g/cm3)
1.69
1.63
1.60
1.60
1.55
1.49
1.39
bulk DensiTies 
THaT resTricT 
rooT growTH
(g/cm3)
>1.80 
>1.80 
>1.75
>1.75
>1.65 
>1.58
>1.47
Figure 2: Bulk Density by Soil Texture (Source: NRCS Soil Quality Institute, 1999)
Save pdf rotate pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate all pages in pdf preview; rotate pages in pdf
Save pdf rotate pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to change page orientation in pdf document; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
132
construction staging and sequencing plans.
Discuss in detail the importance of soils and vegetation  
to the plans.
Review the intent of the construction staging and 
sequencing plan.
Review liquidated damages requirements if appropriate.
PHase consTrucTion To limiT soil exPosure
 Minimize the length of time that soil is left bare and 
unprotected.
 Especially avoid bare soil during periods of seasonally high 
precipitation or wind.
 Provide special protection to critical areas such as steep 
slopes and stream borders.
 Clear only those areas where construction will begin soon; 
avoid creating large expanses of cleared areas.
 Land disturbing activities and erosion and sediment control 
practices should be performed in accordance with a planned 
schedule to reduce site erosion and offsite sedimentation.
 Construction scheduling should facilitate installation of ero-
sion and sediment control measures prior to construction start, 
and precede work as construction activities move around the 
site, by breaking soil disturbing activities into phases.
 Grading activities should be limited to the phase/area that is 
immediately under construction to decrease soil exposure and 
its potential for erosion and sedimentation.
 Subsequent phases should begin only when the previous 
phase is nearing completion and its exposed soil has  
been stabilized.
 Additional precautions may need to be taken when manag-
ing contaminated soil, where runoff may need to be collected 
separately and disposed of at a licensed facility. 
 It may be necessary to discuss dewatering when excavation 
reaches groundwater.
sTabiliZe exPoseD soils
 Exposed soils should be stabilized within two weeks of the 
onset of exposure.
 Ideally, permanent vegetation should follow each phase of 
construction; if this is not possible due to seasonal limitations, 
then mulch, seeding, or other measures of soil coverage can 
be used.
 Geotextile fabrics offer effective temporary and permanent 
solutions to erosion and the establishment of permanent 
vegetation.
 Geotextiles are the best solution when disturbed soils will be 
exposed for less than six months or where slopes exceed 30%.
 Geotextiles aid plant growth by holding seeds and  
topsoil in place.
 Some geotextiles are made of biodegradable materials such 
as mulch matting and netting.
 Mulch mattings are jute or wood fibers that have  
been formed into sheets and are more stable than  
normal mulch.
 Netting can be used to hold the mulch and mats to the 
ground but cannot be used alone to stabilize soils.
 Mulch needs to be tested for potential weed seed 
content and its use should be limited to wood or straw 
mulch or other nonseed potential product.
 Nondegradable geotextiles are used to line swales or tempo-
rary runoff diversion channels where moving water is likely to 
wash out either temporary or permanent new plants.
 Seeding is used to control runoff and erosion on disturbed 
areas by establishing annual or perennial vegetative cover  
from seed.
 Seeding is economical, adaptable to different site condi-
tions, and allows selection of a variety of plant materials.
 Temporary seeding with annual grass is appropriate in loca-
tions where earthwork is not complete, but will not begin again 
for six months or more and in the spring or fall when seeds  
can be sown.
 Annual rye grass is the recommended temporary seed
cover type for New York City’s climate.
 Annual rye grass germinates within 7-10 days and pro-
vides reliable soil retention within three weeks.
 Perennial rye grass should be avoided as this is alleopathic 
to native grasses.
 Depending on the size and slope of the disturbed area, 
hydroseeding may be more cost effective than hand seeding.
 Compost blankets, a recent technique, have layers of loosely 
applied compost that typically incorporate seed.
Proven effective in erosion control 
Applied to a depth of 2-3 inches either by hand  
or by machine
 On slopes greater than 2:1, netting should be used in  
conjunction with the blanket.
 The cost of a compost blankets is comparable to straw mat 
and less expensive than a geotextile blanket.
 Permanent vegetative cover requires more care in soil prepa-
ration, finished grading, and maintenance and should be part 
of the site’s overall landscape design.
 Compost berms and blankets can be used to prevent  
soil movement, and silt and sand fences to capture and filter 
overland flow.
 Mulch creates temporary erosion control, and can also be a 
part of the final landscaping plan.
insTall PerimeTer sTormwaTer runoff conTrols
 To control stormwater runoff, silt fences should be properly 
installed around the perimeter of the construction site.
 As an alternative or in addition to silt fences, use compost 
berms, which are particularly appropriate on sites with small 
drainage areas.
 A compost filter berm is trapezoidal in crosssection  
and provides a three dimensional filter that retains sediment 
and other pollutants while allowing cleaned water to flow 
through the berm.
 Catch basin inlets receiving stormwater flows from the con-
struction site must be protected with adequate inlet controls.
 Sediment basins should be created where space is available.
ProTecT sTormwaTer faciliTies unTil ProPerlY 
esTablisHeD
 Temporarily divert water from disturbed areas until 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
saving rotated pdf pages; pdf reverse page order
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
how to rotate one page in pdf document; pdf expert rotate page
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
133
landscaping is fully established, especially lawn areas,  
vegetated swales, rain gardens, and infiltration basins.
 Controlling concentrated flow and runoff to reduce the  
volume and velocity of water from work sites prevents  
formation of rills and gullies.
 Where wind erosion is a concern, install windbreaks.
resTricT Traffic anD oTHer comPacTion generaTing 
acTiViTies
 To the extent possible, limit the operation of vehicular and 
foot traffic, parking and equipment, or material storage to 
predetermined areas where compaction is acceptable or can 
be mitigated.
 Create “no go” areas with protection zone fencing.
 Use 6’ minimum height chain link fencing instead of lower 
plastic barrier fences to prevent workers from easily remov-
ing or damaging fencing and placing material and equipment 
within protection zones.
 Provide clear protection area signage explaining the purpose 
of protection zone.
 Signage should indicate fines or other penalties for violation 
of protection areas.
 Employ ground surface protection measures to minimize  
soil compaction.
 In areas where compaction is undesirable but unavoidable, 
employ protection measures and limit area usage to the least 
damaging activities. 
 Provide mitigation for light weight and heavy weight traffic.
PreVenT comPacTion from equiPmenT During 
consTrucTion
 Do not operate over or handle soil when it is wet.
 Wet or excessively moist soil is significantly more  
susceptible to compaction.
 Allow soils to dry out after storm events before  
resuming construction work.
 Cover stockpiled soils to prevent them from  
becoming saturated enabling them to be used more  
quickly after storm events.
 Use specialized equipment for handling soil  
and grading activities.
 Use the smallest and lightest piece of equipment  
as possible to complete the work, especially in areas where 
topsoil is being stripped and stockpiled or planting soils  
area being installed.
 Use low ground pressure equipment including tracked 
vehicles or vehicles with low inflated (under inflated)  
tires, doubles or high flotation balloon tires.
 Use hand rollers and temporary or permanent  
irrigation systems to settle soil in place at recommended 
compaction levels.
 If irrigation is used, do not overwater and cause  
erosion and runoff.
 Sequence soil installation operations to eliminate  
driving over planting soil during or after installation.
 Stage construction to allow for access roadways  
over the subgrade through planting soil areas.
 Build up planting soil in layers to either side of the  
access roadway.
 Back out of the installation area by installing planting  
soil in layers over the decompacted roadway subgrade.
 Consider the use of conveyors or articulated arm  
equipment to avoid driving over planting soil areas  
during installation install.
 Employ specialized construction methods in  
especially sensitive areas.
 In areas surrounding existing vegetation, complete  
grading and earthmoving work by hand.
 Provide soil protection measures in areas where there  
is concentrated foot and wheelbarrow traffic.
make PerioDic insPecTions During consTrucTion PHase 
To ensure comPliance wiTH requiremenTs
 Observe if protection fencing and other protections  
are in place and properly maintained.
 Observe soil placement and amendment operations  
to ensure sequencing and equipment used is not  
causing compaction.
 Use spot testing to monitor compaction levels at  
subgrade, interstitial, and finish grade elevations.
 Recommend corrections to work operations as required  
to comply with the intent of the contract documents.
see furTHer
f Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
f Jones, Leslie Sauer. The Once and Future Forest: a Guide to Forest 
Restoration Strategies. “Case Study Soil Protection and Restoration During 
Construction.” pg 159-164. Andropogon Associates, Island Press, 1998.
f Thompson, William J. and Sorvig, Kim. Sustainable Landscape 
Construction, A Guide to Green Building Outdoors. Washington, D.C.: Island 
Press, 2000
f Harker, Donald and Libby, Gary and Harker, Kay and Evans, Sherri and 
Evans Marc. Landscape Restoration Handbook, Second Addition. New York, 
New York: Lewis Publishers, 1999.
f Mendler, Sandra and Odell, William and Lazarus Mary Ann. The HOK 
Guidebook to Sustainable Design, Second Edition, Hoboken NJ: John Wiley 
and Sons, Inc.
for furTHer informaTion on soil comPacTion
f Coder, Kim. Soil Compaction Impacts on Tree Roots. University of Georgia 
School of Forest Resources Extension Publication. July 2000. http://www.
forestry.iastate.edu/publications/for00-008.pdf
f Duiker, Sjoerd Avoiding Soil Compaction, Pennsylvania State University 
Cooperative Extension, 2004. http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/freepubs/pdfs/uc186.pdf
f Hanks, Dallas and Lewandowski, Ann. “Protecting Urban Soil Quality: 
Examples for Landscape Codes and Specifications.” USDA-NRCS, December 
2003.http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/management/files/protect_urban_sq.pdf
f “Soil Compaction-Causes and Consequences” http://www.extension.umn.
edu/distribution/cropsystems/components.html
f Managing Soil Compaction http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/
crops/00519.html
f Voorhees, W. B. “Wheel-induced soil physical limitations to Root Growth”, 1992
f United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate single page in pdf file
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; rotate single page in pdf reader
134
Service. Soil Quality — Urban Technical Note No. 2, “Urban Soil 
Compaction”. March, 2000. http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/management/files/
sq_utn_1.pdf
for furTHer informaTion on soil erosion conTrol
f Alexander, Ron. Standard Specification for Compost for Erosion/
Sedimentation Control. Apex, North Carolina: R. Alexander Associates, Inc. 
2003. http://www.compostingcouncil.org/uploads/f5434a42baed1050-
c98b897206b2d16a.pdf
f Barkley, Timothy. Erosion Control with Recycled Materials. Public Roads, 
March/April 2004 Vol. 67, No. 5. 
http://www.tfhrc.gov/pubrds/04mar/03.htm
f Hanks, Dallas and Lewandowski, Ann. “Protecting Urban Soil Quality: 
Examples for Landscape Codes and Specifications.” USDA-NRCS, December 
2003.http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/management/files/protect_urban_sq.pdf
f New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), 
New York State Standards and Specifications for Erosion and Sediment 
Control. August, 2005. http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/29066.html
f New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New York 
State Stormwater Management Design Manual. April 2008. http://www.dec.
ny.gov/chemical/29072.html
f New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New York 
Guideline for Urban Erosion & Sediment Control. 1997.
f United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation 
Service. Soil Quality — Urban Technical Note No. 1, Erosion and 
Sedimentation on Construction Sites. March, 2000. http://soils.usda.gov/
sqi/management/files/sq_utn_1.pdf
f Walter Brown Southface Energy Institute. Sustainable Design, 
Construction, and Land Development, August 2000. Chapter 2 
“Sustainable Site Development” pp 28-30. http://www.southface.org/
web/resources&services/publications/large_pubs/Sustainable_commu-
nity_development.pdf
objecTiVe                                                                 
To the greatest extent possible, reuse existing soils on site 
rather than importing new soil and exporting waste soil.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Increases the soil’s ability to support healthy vegetation.
 Maintains existing soil flora and fauna that can repopulate 
and improve adjacent disturbed areas in the future.
 Maintains existing soil health, reducing the need for  
supplemental irrigation water, fertilizers, and pesticides.
 Increasing macropores will improve the flora and  
fauna, which will in turn increase macropores and maintain 
soil porosity.
 Increased soil organisms will increase ecological services, 
including retaining nutrients in biomass, converting forms of 
nitrogen, increasing the active organic fraction of soil, and 
improving biodiversity.
 Increases soil infiltration capacity during large storm events 
due to conduit flow in macropores.
 Reduces surface runoff and erosion by preserving existing 
healthy soil functions when vegetation is preserved in situ.
 Reduces air pollution resulting from trucking soils to and 
from job site.
 Reduces cost by minimizing importation of topsoil and 
removal of existing soil.
 Reduces potential disruption to existing vegetated areas.
 Reduces risk of importing invasive species or contaminants.
 Reduces stripping of topsoil in other areas by reducing 
demand for imported topsoil.
 Because the soil substrate supports plant life, these  
areas can be aesthetically pleasing and highly beneficial for 
the environment.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Requires testing of onsite soils to determine viability for reuse.
 Rejuvenation of soils onsite can sometimes be costly due to 
s.3 
Prioritize tHe 
rejuvenation of 
eXisting soiLs 
Before imPorting 
new soiL 
materiaLs
40 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Instruction Manual  
for Stormwater Construction Permit. July 2004. http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/water_pdf/instr_
man_1.pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
pdf rotate single page and save; how to rotate just one page in pdf
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB Steps to Rotate image. Save the rotated image to an image file on the disk
how to rotate page in pdf and save; save pdf rotated pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
135
the amount of amendment and other work required.
 Requires knowledge of soil amendments to successfully 
rejuvenate soil to meet programming needs.
 Requires coordination and outreach to other divisions, 
such as the Natural Resources Group, and the Department of 
Environmental Conservation.
inTegraTion                                                             
 S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis 
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 S.4 Use Compost 
backgrounD                                                              
One of the greatest challenges in urban park sites is that  
they often have soil that is compacted, that drains poorly,  
and has an elevated pH. Earthwork can represent a substan-
tial portion of the budget. There are a number of soil modi-
fication strategies that can be used to reduce costs, as well 
as reduce vehicular emissions, fuel consumption, noise, and 
project time.
Existing soils do not always need to be replaced with  
new materials. The most effective tactic is to match the 
proposed site program with the existing soil character. For 
example, highly compactable soils would not be appropriate 
for lawns where you expect high levels of foot traffic, but they 
may be appropriate for planting beds or reforestation areas. 
It is important to match soil conditions and proposed uses. 
Existing soils might also be moved around on the site to clear 
the way for new buildings or parking areas or areas that  
require a different soil matrix.
It is best to leave the soil alone and match the proposed 
plantings to the soil, and to the thriving existing plants.
Understanding the horticultural potential for the existing  
soil makes it possible to match a proposed planting to the  
soil condition. This makes it likely the plantings will thrive 
without amendment or modification. This also avoids damage 
to existing plants due to extensive reworking or replacement  
of the soil. 
It is important to preserve the existing soil structure by 
not compacting or modifying the soil if possible. Macropores 
are formed by soil fauna, plant roots, water movement, and 
freeze/thaw cycles. Macropores are of significant importance 
in water management because the macropores can behave like 
conduits, facilitating the rapid movement of water through the 
macropores, regardless of overall soil saturation and soil type 
(clays or loam). Macropores also facilitate the movement of air 
through soil horizons, supporting a healthy soil organism com-
munity from bacteria and fungi to macro arthropods, such as 
weevils and worms. 
Rejuvenation of onsite soil requires cost benefit analysis to 
determine if it is worthwhile. It does not always pay to reuse 
existing soils if they are of substantially inferior quality or 
if the proposed park programming is not well suited to the 
soil. Substantial modification of existing soil texture is costly. 
Modification of pH is often only temporary.
PracTices
Planning anD Design
Use testing and analysis to identify existing onsite soil 
resources prior to starting design work to determine:
 Soils contamination 
 Horticultural value 
 Stormwater absorption 
 Adequacy of available soil depths and volumes for pro-
posed design 
 See Part 2: Site Assessment.
aDequaTelY Plan for sTockPiling anD reuse of 
HealTHY soils
 Strip and stockpile topsoil from areas where compaction or 
other disturbance is anticipated.
 Develop a plan for separating topsoil according to depth and 
soil type as if there are distinct horizons or distinct soil areas 
that should be preserved.
 Even under the most controlled circumstances, stripping 
degrades the structure and biology of topsoil; this approach 
should be used judiciously.
 Evaluate the volumes of soil materials, both topsoil and 
subsoil, which will be generated from areas to be stripped 
and stockpiled to ensure adequate space has been planned to 
accommodate stockpiling, storage of imported amendments, or 
onsite soil mixing and blending operations.
 Improperly handled topsoil stockpiles can become anaero-
bic, killing their biological content and making the topsoil 
toxic to future plantings.
 Topsoil should be stockpiled for as short a period of time  
as possible.
 Topsoil stockpiles should be limited to six feet in height to 
minimize crush loading, which destroys structure and cooking 
from the inside out due to limited oxygen exchange.
 Topsoil stockpiles should be monitored for ammonium 
buildup and temperature rise. 
 If either of these two indicators is observed, the  
pile should be broken down or turned to halt the  
decomposition process.
 Stockpiled topsoil should be covered several weeks prior to 
reuse to limit additional soil moisture from precipitation.
 If soils become too waterlogged, they will be highly  
susceptible to compaction during installation, rendering 
them useless.
 Covering of stockpiled soils also minimizes stormwater  
runoff and crusting.
 Apply soil erosion and sedimentation control procedures  
to stockpiled soils.
 Even under the best of conditions, stockpiling will  
degrade the structure and biology of healthy topsoil.
 Plan to amend reused soils from stockpiles to  
rejuvenate their health.
 Test soils after placement to determine amendment  
materials and procedures.
 Often the use of compost is an excellent way to rebuild 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
pdf reverse page order online; how to reverse pages in pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; how to rotate all pages in pdf
136
structure and reinvigorate biological functioning.
 See S.4 Use Compost 
graDe subsoil noT ToPsoil
 Strip and stockpile healthy topsoil separately from subsoil, 
which has lower organic content and biological activity and 
often different structure.
 Look for design opportunities to balance cut and fill on site 
through the use of landforms created from excess excavated 
soils from utility and foundation areas.
 Shape rough grades from existing subsoil and excess  
excavated subsoil.
 Install stockpiled topsoil on top of rough subgrade  
to achieve finish grades, reestablishing a natural, healthy  
soil profile.
consiDer susTainable alTernaTiVes To THe 
imPorTaTion of Virgin soil 
Depending on the volumes of soil required, the final intended 
surface uses, and applicable solid waste regulations, consider 
alternatives to importing virgin soil from distant locations.
 Recycled concrete aggregate from construction and  
demolition operations that may otherwise be shipped to a 
landfill may be used as a substitute for beneath structures 
or paved areas.
 Processed dredge material (available from NY/NJ Harbor 
USACE projects) might be considered as fill or as a soil 
amendment in planted areas, dependent upon quality and 
levels of certain contaminants.
 For both cases it is necessary to obtain the appropriate 
Beneficial Use Determination from the NYSDEC. 
for exisTing siTe areas wHere comPacTion is a 
PreexisTing conDiTion, incorPoraTe comPacTion 
alleViaTion sTraTegies inTo THe ProPoseD ProjecT 
Planning Process
 Identify areas of existing soil compaction and test to  
determine opportunities for alleviation.
 Test soils to determine existing soil texture, organic  
content, and bulk density.
 Use penetration tests and test pits to determine  
depths of compaction.
 Use test results to plan compaction remediation work.
 More often than not, soil removal and replacement or, alter-
natively, installation of new soils over compacted soils, includ-
ing subsurface drainage is the most cost effective solution.
 Placement of new soils over compacted soils requires care 
to properly interface soil layers.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance for acceptable  
compaction levels in soil of differing textures 
conTracT DocumenTs
 The contract documents should clearly indicate the  
extents and requirements of soil preservation, protection,  
and reuse in order to allow the contractor to easily identify 
costs and schedule.
 Clear documents allow for ease of enforcement of the 
requirements and, ultimately, lead to better long term results.
PrePare siTe sTaging anD sequencing Plan as ParT of THe
conTracT DocumenTs
 See C.3 Create Construction Staging & Sequencing Plan 
Do noT neeDlesslY enricH exisTing soils
 Existing soils that have been preserved should be tested to 
ensure adequate health.
 Use tests results to determine if amendments would  
be beneficial and specifically identify which amendments  
are required.
 Application of amendments can sometimes degrade existing 
soil conditions through physical damage caused by workers or 
their equipment during installation.
 Excessive fertilization or even subtle pH adjustment can 
destroy existing soil flora and fauna, altering soil chemistry 
and disrupting existing vegetative patterns.
DeVeloP comPreHensiVe sPecificaTions PerTaining To 
soil amenDmenTs anD moniToring
 Specify amendments and procedures associated with the 
improvement of in-place soils.
 Specify procedures for monitoring and maintaining stockpile 
topsoil materials.
 Specify amendments for stockpiled soils to be reused  
on site.
 Specify procedures and standards for onsite soil testing  
and evaluation.
miTigaTe imPacTs of exisTing or consTrucTion creaTeD 
comPacTion
if compaction is encountered on site either as an existing condition 
or as a result of construction operations, the contract documents 
should provide specific provisions for amelioration. it is worth noting 
that after soil structure is destroyed during compaction, simply 
Existing urban soils at the project site were amended to improve soil quality while 
minimizing importation of new soils.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
137
digging up the soil or fluffing it will not fix the problem. rain will 
reconsolidate the soil after a brief time. 
alleviation methods will vary based on site context; a designer 
should employ a hierarchical approach to selecting the most appro-
priate option.
surface comPacTion TreaTmenTs
 Organic Amendment: Blending compost and other amend-
ments into the soil will reduce bulk density, improve drain-
age, and introduce biological activity, which will assist in the 
recovery of soil structure.
 See S.4 Use Compost
 Organics can be added by a variety of methods including 
surface rototilling, air tilling, or core aeration and topdressing.
 Significant amounts of well composted organic matter can 
bring back macroporosity if enough is added.
For clayey soils, 50% by volume must be added.
For sandy soils 33% by volume must be added.
For trees and shrubs somewhere in the range of 18”-24”  
of soil should be amended.
 Spoon, plug, or spike aeration: loosen soils with rotating 
toothed equipment that poke holes in the soil surface; usually 
used to remedy shallow lawn area compaction. 
Avoid below the dripline of existing trees since this 
method would damage surface feeding roots.
 Deep jetting or hydro-injection: High water pressure used to 
bore into the soil at regular intervals to loosen compaction.
Can damage nearby roots if done improperly
 Ripping and chisel plowing: Dragging of vertical shafts or 
plates across the soil surface will breakup and fissure com-
pacted soil.
 Rototilling or disking: Breaks up compaction by churning 
and rotating soil
Can compact the soil just beneath the depth of tillage.
 Soil Replacement: Partial or total replacement of compacted 
soil with a new soil or soil and compost mix. Soil replacement 
can include:
Complete replacement of soil to below the indicated  
limit of compaction (as determined by test pits and other 
testing methods). 
Radial trenching below the drip line of existing trees  
and large shrubs.
Pneumatic (air spade) replacement: using high pressure 
air to excavate soil (while preserving surrounding tree roots) 
which is then replaced by new soil.
subsoil comPacTion TreaTmenTs
 Subsurface ripping: Subgrade treatment before the place-
ment of planting soils involves dragging of vertical shafts or 
plates across a subsoil to break and fissure compacted soil.
Subsoiling can alleviate compaction to depths of  
18” to 20”.
Subsoiling is only effective if done correctly on adequately 
dry soil, and if no subsequent traffic recompacts the soil.
Subsoiling should only be performed with ripping 
equipment.
 Typical agricultural tillage tools such as disks and 
chisel plows should not be allowed because they are  
too shallow or are not built to pull through densely  
compacted layers.
consTrucTion
incorPoraTe Discussion of exisTing soil ProTecTion anD 
reuse inTo conTracTor meeTings
 Prebid meetings: 
Review and discuss protection requirements, off limits 
areas and areas of limited access, as well as penalties  
for violation.
 This may be included within specifications as a  
liquidated damages clause.
Review the intent of the construction staging and 
sequencing plan.
 Preconstruction meetings:
Review the requirements of the site protection and con-
struction staging and sequencing plans.
Discuss in detail the establishment of site protection 
fencing prior to the start of any work.
Discuss specific procedures for soil stripping and stockpil-
ing, and reinstallation of soils.
Review submittals pertaining to soil amendments and 
installation equipment requirements.
make PerioDic insPecTions During consTrucTion PHase 
To ensure comPliance wiTH requiremenTs
 Observe if protection fencing is in place and properly 
maintained.
 Check stockpile sizes and conditions including temperature 
and erosion control measures.
 Observe soil improvement and replacement procedures for 
compliance with requirements.
see furTHer
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
138
objecTiVe                                                                  
Use compost as an amendment for existing soils or as part of 
imported soil mixes to improve soil functioning.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Improves soil structure, porosity, and density, creating a  
better plant root environment.
 Supplies significant quantities of organic matter.
 Increases infiltration and permeability of heavy soils,  
reducing erosion and runoff.
 Improves water holding capacity, reducing water loss and 
leaching in sandy soils.
 Improves cation exchange capacity (CEC) of soils, improving 
their ability to hold nutrients for plant use.
Supplies a variety of macro and micronutrients.
 May control or suppress certain soilborne plant pathogens.
Supplies beneficial microorganisms to soils.
 Improves and stabilizes soil pH.
Can bind and degrade specific pollutants.
 Reuses organic waste.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Compost should be thoroughly tested prior to use on site.
 Testing biological properties of compost takes approximately 
four weeks to complete.
Prior to the use of compost on site, existing soils should be 
tested to determine compost application rates.
 Compost must be sufficiently mature or it can cause damage 
to plants.
inTegraTion                                                              
 S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils  
before Importing New Soil Materials 
 S.6 Use Engineered Soils to Meet Critical  
Programming Needs 
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
backgrounD                                                             
Compost is aerobically decomposed organic waste; it has a 
long history of use as an agricultural soil amendment. Over 
the past two decades, compost has been reassessed as a tool 
for improving the overall soil quality within urban environ-
ments. Compost amended soil has many potential benefits 
when included with the establishment of turf and landscaping, 
including:
 Increased water retention
 Improved soil structure
 Increased nutrient retention
 Reduced need for fertilizer and pesticide use
 Improved stormwater retention 
 Improved turf and landscape performance and aesthetics
 Long term cost savings due to reduced maintenance 
needs 
As a soil amendment, the numerous benefits of compost 
exceed the benefits of numerous other soil amendment prod-
ucts available for use.41 Most importantly, compost is a recycled 
material, contributing to the longterm sustainability of future 
landscape projects. In particular compost should be used in 
place of peat moss, which is not a sustainable product.
PracTices                                                                 
Planning
emPHasiZe siTe assessmenT anD PrePlanning
site assessment and preplanning are critical to the proper use of 
compost as a soil amendment. soils should be amended only to 
achieve specific goals. soil amendment, while usually beneficial, can 
sometimes lead to unintended detrimental consequences.
 Test existing soils prior to the addition of any soil amend-
ments in order to determine application rates and methods 
of installation.
 Identify local compost facilities with appropriate materi-
als as a first source, helping to foster local and/or municipal 
composting systems.
 Consider onsite composting if the project schedule and 
site logistics allow.
 Identify areas where existing soils exhibit poor drainage; 
if the cause of poorly draining soil is not addressed, adding 
compost may exacerbate the compaction problem.
 Avoid onsite amendment on steep slopes (over 3:1) as 
amendment procedures may destabilize existing soils and 
contribute to erosion.
 Identify existing vegetation to determine how close to a 
tree or shrub base, and to what depth, soil amendment can 
be performed without root damage.
 Compost is typically added to existing soils by site mixing 
with a rototiller.
Rototilling typically penetrates the upper 6 to 8 inches 
of the existing soil.
Rototilling should not be done below the drip line of 
existing vegetation.
 For incorporation within the drip line of existing  
vegetation, consider vertical mulching or air tilling to  
protect shallow feeder roots.
DeTermine aPProPriaTe comPosT neeDs anD aPPlicaTion 
meTHoDs
 The quantity of compost to be incorporated is determined  
by the final organic content goal for the various soil types 
desired on site.
 Top dressing is only effective for some aspects of turf man-
agement, but is not adequate for planting bed amendments.
Addresses low volumes of compost added to the surface 
of lawn areas as a method of increasing nitrogen and com-
bating thatch and other disease and insect problems
s.4 
use comPost
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
139
Does not add organic content in sufficient volume to 
significantly increase the percentage within the soil profile
 Annual mulching with compost in planting beds can  
assist in maintaining organic matter, especially in areas  
when maintenance removes leaf litter and other sources of 
organic content.
 For existing soils amended in place, maximize the benefits 
of compost by blending compost into the top 6-8 inches of 
soil; deeper amendment will lead to settlement problems.
 Calculations for the various amendment quantities can be 
kept simple by the following conversion: one inch of material 
spread over 1000 square feet is equivalent to approximately 
three cubic yards.
If this one inch is of typical yard debris compost, with an 
organic content of 50% and bulk density of 1000 pounds 
per cubic yard, it will increase the organic content of the 
soil by approximately 2.5 to 3.5 percent when incorporated 
into the loose eight inch soil depth.
 For onsite blending of stockpiled soils, the organic content 
of all existing subsoils exposed during site construction is 
expected to be less than one percent.
 Compost with a 45-60% organic content is used to supply 
almost all of the organics to the new blended soil profile.
 As a general rule of thumb, a ratio somewhere between 
3:1:2 to 1 of existing low organic (subsoil) soil to compost, by 
loose volume, will achieve the typically desired organics level 
of 8 to 12 percent. 
j  Lower ratios should be used if blending higher organic  
existing topsoil with compost. 
j  Testing should be used to more precisely determine   
specified blending ratios as well as to determine suitability  
of existing soil materials for reuse.
Design
use qualiTY comPosT
 Compost should be a stable, mature, decomposed organic 
solid waste that is the result of accelerated, aerobic biodegra-
dation and stabilization under controlled conditions.
 Properly prepared compost should have a uniform dark,  
soil-like appearance with no visible free water or dust and  
with no foul odors.
 Compost maturity or stability is the point at which the 
aerobic biodegradation of the compost has slowed and oxygen 
consumption and carbon dioxide generation has dropped.
 Poorly aged compost or compost that does not meet mini-
mum federal and state safety standards for heavy metals or 
pathogens can be damaging to the landscape and lead to a 
number of environmental problems including: 
Chemical or biological contamination
Introduction of weed seeds
Plant toxicity due to high ammonium content
Nitrogen leaching from existing soils and plants due to 
improper aging
 The U.S. Compost Council, the US Environmental Protection 
Agency, and the New York State Department of Environmental 
Conservation have developed industry standards and testing 
protocols that can be used to evaluate the suitability of com-
post materials.
 Different tests will produce different test results and levels.
 Specifications for compost should clearly indicate the 
required testing protocol and the testing lab should indicate in 
the test report which protocol was used to determine compost 
levels so that comparisons between specifications and materi-
als are compatible.
 The designer should indicate acceptable local suppliers  
of compost materials, however materials provided by these 
suppliers should still be subject to testing and approval  
prior to use.
 Contractors should be allowed to suggest alternative sup-
pliers, but the designer should require a site visit to observe 
compost production procedures and conditions in addition to 
requiring testing and approval prior to use.
 A site visit to a compost vendor’s site is a critical part of 
determining if the vendor will be able to supply the quantity 
and quality of compost materials required for a project.
comPosT TesTing ProTocols anD recommenDeD minimum 
Performance criTeria
compost testing requires specialized skills and experience. Testing 
required for compost is not the same as testing for soils, though 
there is some overlap in protocols that may be used. while some 
testing labs are experienced in testing both soils and composts, it 
is not unusual that testing labs are unable to complete all of the 
Leaf litter from local residents was added to enrich soils at this stormwater detention basin, helping a diverse range of newly planted vegetation to thrive.
140
necessary testing procedures needed to properly evaluate the suit-
ability of a compost product. since there will be variability between 
composts depending upon the source materials of the composts and 
their maturity, thorough testing is required to determine appropriate 
mixing rates to achieve particular results within soil mixtures.
 Testing for compost should include: 
pH 
Soluble salts 
Organic content 
Moisture content 
Particle size 
Bulk density 
Nutrient content 
Contaminants42
h  Heavy metals 
 Pathogens 
 Solids including plastics, metal, glass, and other 
inert materials 
 Organic chemical compounds including herbicides 
use aPProPriaTe TesTing sTanDarDs
while there are both federal (usePa and usDa) regulations as well 
as new York state (nYsDec and nYsDam) regulations that pertain to 
compost, there are nationally or state mandated requirements for 
testing composts. The us composting council (uscc) has published 
a standardized set of methods for compost testing. The program is 
called Test methods for the examination of composting and compost 
(Tmecc). The uscc also has a laboratory certification program as 
part of their seal of Testing assurance (sTa) Program. not all quali-
fied labs are enrolled, but these labs may be a good option, since 
oversight is provided. consult the uscc website for an updated list of 
sTa certified labs at www.compostingcouncil.org. if you choose not 
to use an sTa certified lab, contact the lab to discuss which testing 
protocols they typically use.
43
There are other protocols for compost 
testing that are commonly used by area extension service testing 
labs including rutgers university, Penn state university, cornell 
university, and the university of massachusetts. These testing proto-
cols include test methods from:
 ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials 
Standards
 Northeastern Regional Publication No. 493: 
Recommended Soil Testing Procedures for the Northeastern 
United States, 2nd Edition.. Agricultural Experiment 
Stations of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, 
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia; 
Revised,—December 15, 1995. 
 ASA: American Society of Agronomy, Methods of Soil 
Analysis Part 1, 1986. 
 AOAC: Analyses by Association of Official Agricultural 
Chemists, Official Methods of Analysis 
 Solvita Procedure, Woods End Laboratories 
regardless of the testing protocols used, provided that the testing 
lab is qualified and experienced in working with compost, the target 
ranges indicated in the chart at the end of this bmP section would 
still apply.
consTrucTion
use PreconsTrucTion TesTing
 If testing has not taken place as part of the design process, 
the existing soil must be tested prior to soil amendment.
 After testing, the soil scientist can use the soil analyses to 
determine amendment quantities required, plan the amending 
process, and proper material volumes can be ordered.
ensure ProcuremenT of comPosT comPlies wiTH 
sPecificaTions bY clearlY laYing ouT TesTing anD 
VerificaTion ProceDures in consTrucTion sPecificaTions
To simplify procedures, the contractor should be responsible for 
identifying proposed compost sources and that the sources can 
provide adequate volumes for the project, including providing test 
data indicating that the compost meets the specification require-
ments. The contractor should then obtain samples of the material 
for testing to demonstrate the actual proposed material meets the 
specifications. Testing for compliance of compost materials should 
be completed at the source location on a sample of the actual 
compost to be used prior to delivery to the site. Do not rely on sup-
plier testing data that may be out of date or not representative of the 
actual material supplied.
 Compost may need to be ordered weeks in advance to 
ensure availability, especially during the spring season.
 Sufficient quantities of compost are generally available in 
the fall, but they are frequently delivered before the product 
has completely decomposed.
 If space is available at the site, having the compost 
delivered up to eight weeks in advance of use allows the 
composting process to be completed onsite.
 Testing before use: 
Require contractor to identify compost source and 
available volumes before start of any site construction 
operations.
 Identification of the compost supplier should be a 
required part of the bid form, requiring the contractor  
to demonstrate compliance with the work requirements  
prior to award of the job.
ensure comPosT qualiTY bY requiring TesTing uPon 
DeliVerY To THe siTe
once the compost product is delivered to the site, it is critical to test 
the material before use to ensure the material is well decomposed.
 If the delivered product is determined not to be suffi-
ciently mature, adjustments to the installation process and 
schedule will be required.
 Site aging of the compost typically delays subsequent 
landscape installation operations.
coorDinaTe comPosT TesTing neeDs wiTH consTrucTion 
scHeDule
soil and soil amendment testing, especially compost testing, is often 
poorly understood and inadequately planned for within construc-
tion schedules. Poor planning leads to needless compromises on 
longterm quality. 
 Require the contractor to include testing and approval 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested