display pdf in asp.net page : Rotate single page in pdf Library software component asp.net winforms azure mvc design_guidelines14-part1742

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
141
ParameTers
pH 
Soluble Salt Concentration 
Nutrient Content  
(dry weight basis)   
Carbon-to-Nitrogen Ratio
Moisture Content
Water Holding Capacity (dry 
weight basis)
Organic Matter Content44 
Particle Size 
Debris Content 
Bulk Density
Maturity45
Stability 
Maturity   
Physical Contaminants 
Biological Contaminants 
uniTs of measure
dS/m (mmhos/cm) 
Content %, wet weight basis
% (dry mass) 
% Passing a selected mesh 
size dry weight basis 
Carbon Dioxide 
Evolution Rate mg CO
2
-C per 
g OM per day
Seed Emergence and %, 
relative to positive control  
and 
Seedling Vigor %, relative to 
positive control
mg/kg (ppm) 
Fecal Coliform Bacteria, or 
MPN per gram per dry weight
TesTing ProTocol
TMECC 04.11-A, 
“Electrometric pH 
Determinations for Compost”
TMECC 04.10-A, “Electrical 
Conductivity for Compost”
TMECC 05.07-A, “Loss 
on Ignition Organic Matter 
Method”
TMECC 02.02-B, “Sample 
Sieving for Aggregate Size 
Classification” 
Solvita Test
TMECC 05.08-B, 
“Respirometry” 
TMECC 05.05-A, “Biological 
Assays” 
TMECC 04.06, “Heavy 
Metals and Hazardous 
Elements” 
TMECC 04.13-B, 
“Atomic Absorption 
Spectrophotometry”
TMECC 07.01-B, “Fecal  
Coliforms”
recommenDeD range
5.5-7.5
≤2 
N: 1-2.5% 
P: 1-2% 
K: 0.5-1.5%
12:1-25:1
40-50%
>100% 
20-60% 
<3/8” for soil amendment 
>1/2” for mulch or 
topdressing lawn areas
Debris such as metal, glass, 
plastic, wood (other than 
residual chips), asphalt, or 
masonry shall not be visible 
and shall not exceed one 
percent (1%) dry weight.
800-1,000 lbs/yd3
≥6 (mature)
< 8 
Minimum 80% 
Meet or exceed US EPA Class 
A standard, 
40 CFR § 503.13, Tables 1 
and 3 levels 
Meet or exceed US EPA Class 
A standard, 
40 CFR § 503.13, Tables 1 
and 3 levels
Rotate single page in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf pages in reader; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
Rotate single page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf permanently; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
142
objecTiVe                                                                    
Improve sites by cleaning up contaminated soils and making 
them usable as parks.
benefiTs                                                                                                 
 Cleaning up contaminated sites provides new land for park 
development, and improves the quality of the environment for 
city residents.
 Remediating contaminated sites reduces health risks.
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Sites with contaminated soils require extensive testing,  
permitting, and remediation due to health concerns and  
regulatory controls.
 Testing must be conducted early in the process, before or 
parallel with park design. 
 Soil testing and analysis, as well as remediation design, 
must be budgeted in addition to the normal design costs.
 Considerable experience and expertise is required to  
properly examine a site for contaminants before the site  
can be used as parkland.
 Site remediation and soil cover can easily double the  
cost of a park project.
backgrounD                                                             
In New York City vacant land is likely to be contaminated to 
some degree for many reasons, including leaking oil tanks, or 
unlawful dumping of batteries, oil and building debris, even 
hazardous materials. Contamination due to illegal dumping is 
highly likely adjacent to roads in isolated areas or near bridges, 
railways, waterways, and land filling operations. Some areas 
were filled with soil and materials regarded as safe when they 
were installed, but now exceed acceptable limits of contamina-
tion. Any site that has a history of manufacturing, industrial, or 
service establishments such as dry cleaners, printing or photo 
s.5 
testing, 
remediation, 
and Permitting 
for sites witH 
contaminated 
soiLs
of compost as a specific line item within the construction 
schedule since testing of compost takes approximately four 
weeks to complete.
 Plan for at least two complete compost test cycles within 
the proposed schedule to ensure sufficient time to obtain 
acceptable compost material.
 The minimum time that should be allotted to compost 
testing and approvals is two months.
 Three to five months is the preferred schedule allotment 
to allow for adequate time for disqualification of source 
materials and the location of acceptable materials verified 
by testing.
for furTHer informaTion
Chollak, T. and Rosenfeld, R. Guidelines for Landscaping with Compost-
amended Soils. Prepared for City of Redmond Public Works, Redmond, WA. 
1998. http://www.ci.redmond.wa.us/insidecityhall/publicworks/environment/
pdfs/compostamendedsoils.pdf
Compost Fact Sheet #2: Regulation and Certification of Composts,  
Cornell Waste Management Institute, 2005. http://cwmi.css.cornell.edu/
compostfs2.pdf
Guidelines and Resources for Implementing Soil Quality and Depth BMP 
T5.13 2007 Edition. http://www.soilsforsalmon.org/pdf/SoilBMP_Manual-
2007.pdf
E&A Environmental Consultants, Inc. Development of Landscape Architect 
Specification for Compost Utilization, Seattle, Washington, December 1997. 
http://www.cwc.org/organics/org972rpt.pdf
U.S Composting Council (USCC), Test Methods for the Examination of 
Composting and Compost (TMECC), Holbrook, NY 11741. www.composting-
council.org
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Compost Specification 
for Soil Incorporation http://epa.gov/osw/conserve/rrr/composting/highway/
highwy4.pdf
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Code of Federal 
Regulations (USEPA, CFR), Title 40, Part 503 Standards for Class A biosolids.
41 E&A Environmental Consultants, Inc. Development of Landscape Architect Specification for 
Compost Utilization, Seattle, Washington, December, 1997.
42 Testing of contaminants is regulated by both the federal and state government, depending 
upon the type of compost products being used. Organic chemical contaminant and herbicidal 
testing can be both expensive and time consuming. Typically these tests are done by bioassays. 
See further Maurice E. Watson, Testing Compost, Ohio State Extension Service Bulletin ANR-15-
023. http://ohioline.osu.edu/anr-fact/0015.html
43 Cornell Waste Management Institute, Compost quality Fact Sheet #4, Ithaca, NY: Cornell 
University, 2004, p.3.
44 Compost generated from yard waste and leaf mold is generally lower in organic than compost 
generated from biosolids. Understanding organic content is critical to determining how much 
compost to use to alter overall soil mix organic content.
45 Compost stability and maturity are critical issues to understand when using compost, The 
TMCC does have a protocol for testing maturity, and the Solvita test method is perhaps a better 
measure and generally takes less time. Increasingly, labs are now using this protocol in place 
of the TMCC 05.08-B, “Respirometry” and TMECC 05.05-A, “Biological Assays” test protocols. 
For further information see: http://solvita.com/compost_info.html and http://solvita.com/pdf-files/
quick_guideV5.pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
rotate pdf page permanently; rotate one page in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
rotate all pages in pdf file; rotate pages in pdf and save
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
143
processing shops are suspect. 
One of the great challenges with working on sites within 
New York City is that there are relatively few areas where there 
are undisturbed soils, so it is difficult to know for sure what 
sorts of potentially hazardous conditions may exist below 
grade. As a matter of course, all sites, including ones assumed 
to be clean, should be screened for potential contamination. 
Sites with contaminated or even suspected contaminated soils 
must be tested early in the design process, as contamination 
will have a major impact on site planning and the construction 
budget. If chemical contamination is suspected at a site, the 
Capital Projects’ Environmental Control Unit (ECU) should be 
consulted.
There are four types of soils that designers may encounter: 
 Clean, nonimpacted soils (unclassified soil / fill) 
 Historic fill soils, often referred to as urban fill sites  
(typically nonhazardous, contaminated soil) 
 Former municipal landfill waste and cover soil
 Hazardous waste/fuel or chemical spill 
Historic fill should be assumed to be contaminated and the 
soil should be tested even if no environmental permits are 
anticipated. Historic fill or urban fill material is nonindigenous 
material historically placed on site in order to raise the topo-
graphic elevation and typically contains construction debris. 
Urban fill typically contains coal ash, PCBs, and heavy metals 
and should be analyzed/tested accordingly. Urban fills usu-
ally require a soil rejuvenation program or soil cover, however 
sometimes the contamination is sufficient to require disposal 
or special handling.
A future park’s location is a significant factor in the number 
of permits or approvals needed. The first step is compliance 
with the City Environmental Quality Review (CEQR) process, 
where 20 criteria are used to assess whether park development 
may create impacts to the area. The process could end with 
a finding of no impact, or it could result in a memorandum of 
understanding among agencies and Parks on ways to mitigate 
potential impacts. Other steps in the approval process involve 
acquiring permits that address soil erosion, tidal wetlands, 
coastal erosion, and freshwater wetlands.
 If soil is contaminated but not hazardous it may be left 
in place depending on the anticipated final land use. A 
geotextile, impermeable cap such as pavement or cement, 
or clean soil/fill material may be required to be placed over 
the contaminated soil to provide a barrier against human 
exposure. A demarcation material or substance (e.g., plastic 
construction fencing) should be placed on the existing soil 
before the clean fill in order to delineate the clean fill/soil 
from contaminated soil and ensure proper handling and dis-
posal procedures. The recommended depth of clean fill/soil 
should always be maintained to prevent human exposure. 
This is recommended in those instances where Parks follows 
New York State regulations most applicable to historic fill 
sites at 6 NYCRR Part 375-6.8(b).
Former municipal landfill waste, landfill cover soil, and 
hazardous waste sites are subject to New York State regula-
tions applicable to solid and hazardous waste sites are 6 
NYCRR Part 360 and Part 370, respectively. These are likely 
to require extensive testing, soil removal and soil cover. 
Despite the challenges of determining the extent of contami-
nation and subsequent remediation requirements, chemically 
contaminated sites represent substantial opportunities for 
increasing parklands and, as a result, improving urban ecologi-
cal functioning and outdoor public access.
PracTices                                                                  
PermiTTing anD TesTing
The primary concern for any contaminated site development is 
the health and safety of workers and the public. The challenge 
of accomplishing this is much greater for brownfields and 
recovered sites. The strategy for success involves a number of 
steps, including: 
 Phase 1 environmental site assessment 
 Phase 2 environmental site assessment, which includes 
soil testing and analysis
 Park design
 Permits and approvals
 Waste disposal
 Fill material importation 
It is important that park design, soil testing and analysis, 
and permits proceed in parallel and not sequentially. Each 
step is discussed below.
PHase 1 enVironmenTal siTe assessmenT
This initial survey of site conditions involves a visual inspection of 
the site and a review of documents, maps, reports, and other avail-
able information that may shed light on potential contamination at a 
site. The assessment should follow asTm e1527-05. 
 Look for visual cues that the site could be contaminated: 
Was the site previously used for industrial purposes or 
waste operations? 
Is there exposed waste? Are there signs of illegal 
dumping? 
The Pennsylvania and Fountain Avenue landfills in Queens, operated as  
waste disposal sites in the 1950s and 60s, were capped with an impermeable 
membrane and covered by millions of tons of sand and topsoil brought in by  
barge. Analysis of regional soils and plant communities provided the blueprint  
for soil specifications on site. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
rotate pdf pages and save; pdf rotate single page reader
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Single page. View PDF in single page display mode
pdf rotate one page; reverse pdf page order online
144
Are there monitoring wells for landfill gas or groundwa-
ter on the site? 
Is the area covered with invasive plants indicative of 
site disturbance? 
 Perform a document search 
Maps could show land uses that would have been likely 
sources of contamination.
Was it used by a business that employed hazardous 
chemicals, such as dry cleaning fluid, paint thinners, 
pesticides? 
Was there a gas station or building that would have 
used underground tanks for oil? 
 Perform regulatory database search and records review for 
petroleum spills, institutional/engineering controls, etc. 
PHase 2 enVironmenTal siTe assessmenT
This investigation involves soil and groundwater sampling, based on 
the outcome of the Phase 1 investigation. The assessment should 
follow asTm e 1903-97 (2002). work with the Parks environmental 
remediation unit to determine a proper protocol for testing.
 If the Phase 1 investigation identifies a below ground fuel 
storage tank, for example, the Phase 2 investigation would 
include test pits or even technologies, such as ground pene-
trating radar, to locate buried metal objects, wells to identify 
contaminated groundwater and/or groundwater flow direc-
tion, and soil samples to define the extent of contamination.
 Soil testing locations should be evenly distributed across 
the entire site with additional focus on locations of sus-
pected contamination. Sample spacing is dependent on the 
potential contaminant sources and the anticipated use area 
of the park.
 If buildings are planned, the site should be assessed for 
soil gas vapors. If present, the building(s) may need to be 
monitored for the presence of these vapors, and if signifi-
cant vent them. 
PermiTs anD aPProVals
New park projects usually require one or more permits or 
special approvals. 
City Environmental quality Review (CEqR) 
The first step in the environmental review arena is compliance 
with the City Environmental Quality Review (CEQR) process 
that is administered by the NYCDEP. It is New York City 
policy to limit activities that would have negative impacts on 
the environment. Park development requires completion of a 
seven page Environmental Assessment Statement (EAS) that 
requires information on 20 technical areas, including urban 
design/visual resources, historic resources, hazardous materi-
als, waterfront revitalization program, and public health. Parks 
planning office usually leads this process.
The CEQR identifies any potential adverse effects of pro-
posed actions, assesses their significance, and proposes mea-
sures to eliminate or mitigate significant impacts. Only certain 
minor actions (known as Type II actions, see Appendix A below 
for commentary) are exempt from environmental review. 
If the action is judged not significant (see Appendix B below 
for commentary), a negative declaration is issued, signaling 
completion of the CEQR process. These notices are sent to all 
involved or interested agencies, affected community boards, 
and elected officials. A typical end result of this process is a 
memorandum of understanding between Parks and other city 
agencies to address areas of concern that are not covered in 
specific regulatory programs such as those discussed below. 
If the proposed actions are judged to have significant 
impact, NYCDPR files a positive declaration, requiring the 
completion of a draft environmental impact statement (EIS). 
This is a major undertaking, which will not be described here. 
Once the EIS is complete a notice of completion is filed, a 
public hearing is held, and a final EIS is filed. 
When New York State regulations apply to an action, a regu-
latory official may request submittals in compliance with State 
Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) requirements, which is 
equivalent to the CEQR process. SEQR is not applicable within 
New York City, as NYCDEP has been authorized to run the 
CEQR program in lieu of SEQR. In this circumstance, NYCDPR 
should request NYCDEP guidance on how to proceed. 
Examples of permits that may be needed for the develop-
ment of a park are listed.
 The most common permit requirement is the State 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES) that 
requires the preparation of a Storm Water Pollution 
Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for sites greater than one acre, 
and for smaller sites under specific conditions. 
The SWPPP commits Parks to take precautions to 
prevent soil erosion. 
 Another common permit (issued separately by the 
NYSDEC and the US Army Corps of Engineers) is the tidal 
wetlands permit, as many of the city’s parks are located 
along the 577 miles of coastal lands. Many times this per-
mit is issued concurrently with a navigable waters (excava-
tion and fill) permit and a 401 water quality certification.
 Other permits include ones for freshwater wetlands, solid 
and hazardous waste management, air pollution control, and 
coastal erosion hazard areas. 
 Projects in coastal areas and some designated inland 
waterways (where local waterfront revitalization programs 
have been developed) require a NYS Department of State 
(NYSDOS) Coastal Consistency Certification.
 In addition to these permits, city agency permits and 
approvals are needed, including those from the NYC 
Department of Buildings (NYCDOB), and NYCDEP.
work wiTH in-House exPerTs, THen regulaTors, in
ParTicular nYsDec, To DeTermine THe neeD for anD
meTHoDs of remeDiaTion
when working on sites with suspected or confirmed contamination, 
it is essential to work with the regulating agencies from the start 
of a project—even prior to the start of soil testing and analysis. 
Project designers and managers should confer with capital Projects’ 
environmental remediation staff, who may request assistance from 
the nYc office of environmental remediation that assists city agen-
cies in addressing contaminated site issues.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; rotate individual pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pages in pdf online
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
145
 Cooperatively develop clear project goals and objectives 
including specific planned uses of the site and anticipated 
sampling, testing, remediation, and construction. 
This allows all parties involved to better understand the 
project objectives and testing protocols.
 After the sampling and analysis is complete, identify 
acceptable remediation alternatives.
 Clearly identify the interfaces between remediation work 
and proposed park construction and maintenance.
 Identify which design elements will need to be coordi-
nated and approved for use with remediation activities. 
 Identify protocols for park construction and maintenance 
subsequent to the completion of remediation, including 
hazardous material handling, testing, and inspection.
It is likely this will require the use of consulting envi-
ronmental remediation experts and soil scientists to assist 
with regulating agency coordination, developing remedia-
tion plans, and the evaluation of alternative remediation 
approaches including budgets and schedules. 
 Use consulting soil scientists to assist with the  
evaluation of: 
Site conditions and opportunities for soil reuse 
Analysis of proposed soil capping materials  
and methods 
 Regulators and environmental engineers can be focused 
solely on isolating contaminants from human contact. As a 
result, soil caps are generically specified without consider-
ing the ability to support future plantings. 
 Improperly specified capping soils can result in poor 
drainage and are susceptible to excessive compaction  
during construction, resulting in limited rooting opportuni-
ties not just for trees but for shrubs and grasses. The soil 
composition must consider the needs of native species  
as appropriate. 
 If impermeable caps are required to prevent the surface 
infiltration into contaminated soils, a soil scientist can assist 
with proper specification of cap placement, slopes, and 
cover materials that will allow for viable plantings above the 
capping layer.
conDucT soil TesTing anD analYsis
before soils or historic fill are excavated, a chemical analysis of 
contaminants must be made of the material for four reasons. first, 
construction workers and site personnel have a right to know the 
nature of soils with which they are working so that they may wear 
appropriate clothing and protective equipment. second, the disposal 
sites require the analysis before the material will be accepted. Third, 
the analysis will determine whether soils should be excavated and 
stockpiled, or loaded directly onto trucks for disposal. if contami-
nated, the soils should not be stockpiled. fourth, the soil may be 
clean enough to reuse onsite. 
 Work with the Capital Projects’ Environmental 
Remediation staff and the regulator to develop a soil testing 
grid and protocol based on the examination of the site and 
its historic uses.
 DEC prefers soil analysis to include hazardous waste 
characteristics (i.e., TCLP analysis), and chemical analysis 
for volatiles, semivolatiles, PCBs, pesticides, and metals.
 All activities such as sample collection, transportation, 
and sample delivery to the analytical laboratory must be 
performed by a New York State qualified environmental 
professional, using approved chains of custody.
 The laboratory must be certified by the NYS Department 
of Health (NYSDOH) under their Environmental Laboratory 
Approval Program (ELAP).
 NYSDEC prefers a 50 foot by 50 foot grid of tests two 
feet deep. For large areas, the sampling grid distances may 
have to be enlarged and the degree of compositing samples 
may have to be expanded for budgetary purposes.
 A cost benefit analysis should be conducted in terms of 
grid distances. Additional sampling costs that result in bet-
ter contaminant delineation and in decreases in soil removal 
and import may lead to significant cost savings. 
 Sampling is not generally required in areas where existing 
soils will not be excavated and where clean soil cover or an 
engineered cover (such as buildings, pavement, or impervi-
ous synthetic turf) will be placed.
 See Part 2: Site Assessment.
 See the Calvert Vaux soil sampling protocol, dated 
January 27, 2009 (in Part 6: Case Studies) for directions on 
how the first phase of that project is planned to be sampled 
and the samples analyzed.
DisPose of wasTe anD conTaminaTeD soil aPProPriaTelY
The following points provide further guidance on managing  
waste soils.
 When excess soil must be managed, NYSDEC prefers 
representative samples be collected, using a 50 foot by 50 
foot grid, compositing a single sample from four locations 
within each grid space, to a depth of two feet below the final 
design grade.
 In the case where several feet of excavation are required, 
sampling should be similarly conducted at every two feet  
of depth.
 Depending on the results, waste soil would be directed 
for disposal to a hazardous, nonhazardous, or unclassified 
(i.e., construction and demolition or municipal solid waste) 
disposal site.
 For a nonhazardous or hazardous waste site, a waste pro-
file form must be completed, certified by a NYCDPR official, 
and submitted to a representative of the disposal site.
 For hazardous wastes, a special RCRA Subtitle C Site 
Identification Form (US EPA Form 8700-12 found at http://
www.epa.gov/osw/inforesources/data/form8700/8700-12.
pdf) must be filled out and sent to the US EPA Region 2 
office so that a hazardous waste generator ID number can  
be assigned.
The ID number must be entered on waste profile forms 
and waste manifests that are carried to hazardous waste 
disposal sites by waste transporters.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf rotate just one page; save pdf after rotating pages
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate pdf page and save; rotate pdf pages individually
146
Design
Areas of contamination will control the location of new uses, 
the soil removal and fill, as well as site access and uses.
inVolVe THe remeDiaTion Design Team in THe Design of 
THe Park
 Remediation and park development should not be treated as 
two separate and unrelated activities.
 Close collaboration between the remediation design team 
and the park design team or, better yet, integration of the 
remediation and park design as a single project can lead to 
project efficiencies that are mutually beneficial.
 There are significant opportunities during the investiga-
tion and remediation planning for maximizing soil reuse, thus 
minimizing import of soil.
 Once contaminant results are obtained that sufficiently 
delineate contaminated areas (in three dimensions), the envi-
ronmental remediation professional involved in the remedia-
tion project can work with the design team to optimize the cut 
and fill required for the project.
oPTimiZe use of conTaminaTeD siTes
based on the results of soil sampling and analysis, park programming 
and facility construction should be matched to levels of contami-
nants found.
 For soils areas with elevated contaminant concentra-
tions, features such as artificial turf, pavement, or buildings 
should be considered to serve as appropriate barriers to 
contamination.
 When placing buildings on contained areas, consider-
ation must be given to the potential for vapor intrusion (i.e., 
fumes from the subsurface entering built structures through 
the slab, thus contaminating the indoor air or presenting an 
explosion hazard).
 The NYSDOH provides guidance on this issue, and often 
special mitigation measures and engineer controls must be 
taken to eliminate vapor migration from the subsurface to 
the indoor air.
 Areas that exceed the restricted residential Soil Cleanup 
Objectives (SCOs) of NYSDEC but meet commercial SCOs 
should be selected for passive recreational uses.
These areas may require one foot of compliant  
cover soil.
 Passive recreation areas should be areas “which have 
public uses with limited potential for soil contact,” as per 
NYS DEC46 
 Special exemptions for areas with mature trees should  
be considered regarding the placement of cover soil over 
critical roots zones, which will kill trees.
 Areas that exceed the commercial SCOs, upon additional 
assessment, may be reserved for wilderness areas or nature 
based uses that have restricted human intrusion.
The designer should be careful to locate only those 
activities which meet this definition such as forested 
areas with restricted access, wetlands, or other forever 
wild areas.
 Areas meeting the restricted residential SCOs are  
appropriate for active recreational uses.
These areas also include ballfields and soccer fields.
 Traditional open lawn areas, seating areas, and planting 
bed areas, which are typically considered passive recreation, 
are considered as active recreation because they have a 
greater potential for soil contact.
These areas may require two feet of compliant  
cover soils.
consiDer PreserVaTion of exisTing PlanT colonies 
esTablisHeD onsiTe
This is extremely difficult because if the site is contaminated, use of 
vegetated areas will be restricted. 
 Existing plant life on a contaminated site serves  
numerous ecological functions.
 Since many contaminated sites are also located in  
otherwise industrial or built out areas, existing plant life 
represents important green space within a neighborhood.
consiDer PHYToremeDiaTion anD bioremeDiaTion for 
conTaminaTeD siTe cleanuP
Phytoremediation and bioremediation are sciences that show great 
potential for use in the remediation of contaminated urban soils. it 
should be noted that the appropriateness of phyto- and bioremedia-
tion is highly contaminant specific. metals and recalcitrant organic 
compounds are not biodegraded, and often are simply redistributed 
by the biological activity of plants or bacteria. in some cases this can 
mean that the compounds are concentrated in high levels that could 
become dangerous. when compounds are taken up by the plants, 
the plant material could cause wildlife and human exposures to the 
contaminants. such accumulation scenarios require harvesting and 
proper disposal, and can be highly labor intensive and costly. Plants 
have been found to volatilize contaminants in the root zone and leaf 
stoma, thus creating localized air contamination. experts in envi-
ronmental biotechnology, environmental engineering, environmental 
chemistry, botany, as well as landscape architects should be con-
sulted prior to considering such a strategy. The Parks environmental 
remediation staff can assist you in finding more information.
Phyto- and bioremediation should be judiciously used and the 
results carefully monitored to determine their efficacy as they are 
potentially cost effective methods of remediation.
 A number of projects throughout the United States  
and the world have successfully used these techniques to 
remediate contaminated soils.
 It may take longer than more conventional approaches, 
but often at significantly lower cost.
 Careful study is required to determine if this is an  
option within the project scheduling parameters and  
regulatory oversight.
sPecial consiDeraTions for Parks on former lanDfills
special regulations will apply to a former landfill as its landfill  
designation never expires. it is difficult to get nYsDec approval 
for introducing trees and other plants within the engineered cap, 
which has permit specifications to be met now and in the future. it is 
likely that certain allowable tree species can be planted, but other 
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
147
volunteer species must be removed. methane exposures will  
always be an issue.
consiDer seParaTe conTracTs for siTe remeDiaTion 
work anD Park consTrucTion work
Remediation work and park construction are two very different types 
of projects that require divergent contractor skill sets. while some 
contractors are sufficiently experienced to do both types of work, the 
pool of potential contractors and, therefore, competitive bidders, is 
larger if the work is broken into two separate contracts. 
landscaping contractors should be made aware of and follow any 
site management plans associated with remediation in order to pre-
vent compromising the remedial efforts and unnecessarily exposing 
workers to potential hazardous materials (i.e., co-mingling of con-
taminated and clean fill, preserving the integrity of any geotextiles or 
demarcation barriers) This also applies to future maintenance work. 
There are a number of other benefits to separating the contracts.
 Remediation work requires significantly higher bonding 
requirements, the cost of which would have to be borne over 
the duration of the park construction if it were issued as a 
single contract.
 If a site has been successfully remediated, subsequent 
contract work has a reduced liability and risk, translating 
into lower bid pricing.
 Separate contracts limit contractor exposure to site con-
taminants once remediation is complete.
 Isolating traditional site construction from more special-
ized soil remediation construction work acknowledges that a 
remediation contractor is not a landscaping subcontractor.
consiDer sTageD resToraTion anD occuPaTion of 
conTaminaTeD siTes
 Complete the identifiable, noncontaminated, nonwetland 
portions of the project first; these areas may require fewer or 
no permits. Subsequently complete other, specific projects 
that are more likely to require regulatory permits.
 For projects where complete restoration of the site and 
construction of a park program may exceed available funding, 
consider a staged restoration of the site.
 It may be possible to clean up or contain selected areas to 
allow limited access or to introduce phyto- or bioremediation 
installations that may begin the restoration of the site to a 
more usable state.
 There may be ways to implement significant habitat 
improvements with staged restoration and occupation of the 
site of benefit to the surrounding neighborhood.
consTrucTion
fill maTerial imPorTaTion
a typical nYsDec, nYcDeP, and nYcoer requirement for park 
development is the importation of soil to fill in areas where waste 
had been excavated and disposed offsite, to grade a site for new fea-
tures, and to cover in-place contaminated soils. all agencies require 
precautions be taken to assure that only approved materials are 
brought to a project site. all agencies also require that representa-
tive samples of the fill be analyzed for the list of parameters listed in 
nYsDec’s technical and administrative guidance #4046 (Tagm 4046, 
found at http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/2612.html) and require 
assurance that the fill does not exceed the clean up concentra-
tions listed therein (see appendix c below for commentary). Parks’ 
challenge is to establish a sampling regime that any agency would 
approve. such a regime should include these features: 
 Representative samples should be collected and analyzed 
under the supervision of Parks or its contractors and not by 
the suppliers of the fill.
 Use of a fill source that is plentiful enough for the entire 
need of the project, if possible.
 Sampling and analysis at a rate of one per 250 to 1,000 
cubic yards of delivered fill, the rate being determined by 
DEC based on site specifics.
 Both agencies will require more frequent sampling when 
more than one fill source is required for the project or if the 
appearance (e.g., light vs. dark colored, sand vs. rock, moist 
vs. dry) of the fill is variable.
 See Appendix D below for additional details.
aPPenDices
APPENDIx A—TYPE II CEqR ACTIONS
Type II CEQR actions exempt from CEQR (note: these are 
abridged descriptions) include:
 Maintenance or repair that involve no substantial  
changes to a structure or facility
 Minor temporary uses of land with negligible or no  
permanent effect on the environment
 Construction or expansion of single- to three-family  
residences or nonresidential structures of less than  
4,000 square feet
 Replacement or rehabilitation of a structure  
on the site where it originated 
 Maintenance of existing landscaping or native growth
 Expansions of existing educational institutional  
structures by less than 10,000 square feet of floor area
APPENDIx B — PARK DEVELOPMENT AS POSITIVE 
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
Nonsignificant environmental impacts should be expected  
at Park development sites. Park development includes  
the removal and remediation of contamination, so this  
can only be considered positive. 
APPENDIx C— TAGM #4046
It is questionable whether TAGM #4046 standards (estab-
lished in 1994) legally apply to historic fill sites (the predomi-
nant type of material found at NYC parks sites), given that 
NYSDEC states the standards apply to Federal Superfund, 
State Superfund, 1986 EQBA Title 3 and Responsible Party 
(RP) sites, and when NYSDEC determines that cleanup of 
such a site to predisposal conditions is not possible or fea-
sible. It is believed that the generally less restrictive standards 
of 6 NYCRR Part 375-6(b) (established in 2006 and found 
at http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/15507.html#15513) actu-
ally apply, but until the authority of TAGM #4046 limits are 
148
successfully challenged, both Part 375 and TAGM #4046 are 
to be used.
APPENDIx D — FILL MATERIAL IMPORTATION — 
ADDITIONAL DETAILS
Fill material quality is a concern that must be addressed in 
order to provide a safe and healthy soil for the development of 
a park. The soil must be appropriate for the types of plantings 
proposed. It should also not be destructive of the place it is 
removed from. In most instances top soils are removed from 
construction sites. However, due diligence should be exercised 
to prevent stripping of green field sites.
Some materials, such as excavated metamorphic rock from 
subway line extensions, may require reduced testing due to 
the lack of potential exposure to contaminants only found 
from human exposure. Other materials, such as excavated 
soils from beneath paved airport runways, can be uniform and 
consistently clean and could qualify for reduced testing. This 
is not the case for fueling or maintenance areas at airports. 
A common source of material is from a large development 
project, such as the construction of the parking lots for Yankee 
Stadium in the Bronx. In these or similar sites, an investiga-
tion into the origin and boundary of a targeted material must 
be completed, using historical maps and other documentation. 
The current condition and condition at the time of the importa-
tion must be known to avoid inadvertent contamination. 
Typically, the soil owner collects a representative sample 
or set of samples in the presence of an independent environ-
mental monitor (IEM), and the samples are then taken, under 
chain of custody, by the approved laboratory. The IEM may 
use appropriate field testing equipment such as a photoioniza-
tion detector (PID) for volatile organics, or x-ray fluorescence 
(XRF) analyzers for metals in soil. Another control that may be 
required to prevent noncompliant fill material being imported 
to a project site involves continuous communication between a 
NYCDPR contractor at the fill excavation site and a coworker at 
the receiving park site. Tracking the license numbers of trucks 
leaving and arriving prevents noncompliant trucks from  
slipping in.
for furTHer informaTion
Calvert Vaux Soil Sampling Protocol — Historic Fill Site Summary, Marty 
Rowland, et al — January 12, 2009
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
Flint Futures, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University 
of Michigan Partners: Genesee County Land Bank & Genesse Institute 
“Reimagining Chevy in the Hole”, October, 2007. http://www.thelandbank.
org/Landuseconf/Reimagining_Chevy_in_the_Hole.pdf
Ford, Kristen. “Re-Imagining the Land: Planning for Brownscape 
Redevelopment in the Delaware River Corridor”. Dangermond Fellowship 
Project 2007/2008. www.lafoundation.org/documents/ford_analysis.pdf
Indiana Department of Environmental Management, “The Environmental 
Side of the Business of Brownfields.”Brownfields Bulletin: Breaking Down 
Barriers to Using Brownfields, Issue 27, 2005. http://www.inchgov/ifa/
brownfields/bulletin/27/issues.html
Kirkwood, Niall, Ed. “Manufactured Sites: Rethinking the Post-Industrial 
Landscape”, New York: Taylor & Francis, 2001. 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and New York 
State Department of Health New York State Brownfield Cleanup Program 
Development of Soil Cleanup Objectives Technical Support Document, 2006. 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/15507.html
NYS Department of Health, Final Soil Vapor Intrusion Guidance, October 
2006. http://www.health.state.ny.us/environmental/investigations/soil_gas/
svi_guidance/
United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation 
Service. “Urban Technical Note No. 3 “Heavy Metal Soil Contamination,” 
September, 2000. http://soils.usda.gov/sqi/management/files/sq_utn_3.pdf
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Green Remediation: 
Incorporating Sustainable Environmental Practices into Remediation of 
Contaminated Sites document # EPA 542-r-08-002. April 2008. http://www.
brownfieldstsc.org/pdfs/green-remediation-primer1.pdf
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Road Map to 
Understanding Innovative Technology Options for Brownfields Investigation 
and Cleanup, Fourth Edition. Document #EPA-542-B-05-001.September 
2005. http://www.brownfieldstsc.org/pdfs/Roadmap.pdf
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Brownfields Technology 
Primer: Selecting and Using Phytoremediation for Site Cleanup (EPA 542-R-
01-006), July 2001. http://www.brownfieldstsc.org/pdfs/phytoremprimer.pdf
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Phytoremediation 
Resource Guide (EPA 542-B-99-003), June 1999. http://www.clu-inchorg/
download/remed/phytoresgude.pdf
Westphal, Lynn and Isebrands, J.G. “Phytoremediation of Chicago’s 
Brownfields: Consideration of Ecological Approaches and Social 
Issues.” http://www.urbanecologycollaborative.org/UEC/upload/90/
uecadmin2/2001%20Westphal%20and%20Isebrands.pdf
Willey, Neil. “Phytoremediation: Methods and Reviews.” New York: 
Humana Press, 2007.
6 NYCRR Part 375 — see http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/remediation_hud-
son_pdf/part375.pdf and http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/15507.html
TAGM#4046 — see http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/2612.html
CEQR — see http://www.nyc.gov/html/oec/html/ceqr/ceqrpub.shtml
46 Sourcebook for Landscape Analysis of High Conservation Value Forests. http://www.proforest.
net/objects/publications/HCVF/hcvf-landscape-sourcebook-final-version.pdf
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
149
objecTiVe                                                                  
Use engineered soils when needed to withstand urban  
stresses and conditions where naturally occurring soils are 
unable to function.
benefiTs                                                                     
The performance of engineered soil is highly predictable 
due to the inclusion of installation as part of a complete soil 
system from finished surface down to subgrade.
 Key soil performance criteria can be easily controlled with 
manufactured soils including compaction resistance, organic 
content, drainage and infiltration rates, soil weight, bulk  
density, and filtration of pollutants.
Engineered soils generally make use of derelict materials, 
such as sand or stone aggregate and recycled products,  
making them highly sustainable products.
 Engineered soils may provide a greater range of design and 
construction opportunities than naturally occurring soils.
The long term maintenance of landscapes that rely on  
engineered soils is often less costly than that of naturally 
occurring soils that may not be well suited to the  
programmatic use of the site.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Use of manufactured soils requires a specifically designed 
soil material and implementation oversight by experienced 
designers or soils scientists to ensure proper installation.
 Manufactured soil procurement costs may be more than 
natural topsoil due to controlled mixing.
 The procurement of engineered soils is lengthier than 
procurement of naturally occurring soils due to the need for 
sourcing and testing of component materials and the develop-
ment of final mix proportions.
 Manufactured soils may require specialized testing and 
installation procedures.
inTegraTion                                                              
 S.7 Provide Adequate Soil Volumes and Depths 
 S.8 Provide Soil Placement Plans as Part of  
Contract Documents 
 W.5 Use Rain Gardens & Bioretention 
 W.6 Use Stormwater Planter Boxes 
 W.8 Create Green and Blue Roofs 
backgrounD                                                                
New York City’s parks are unusual in that they are subjected 
to a wide variety of programming uses at extremely high levels 
of use and require materials that can function under extreme 
construction circumstances. Naturally occurring, loam based 
soils are often too limited in their carrying capacity (due to 
textural classification, drainage rates, filtration capacity or 
structural performance) to meet some of the more extreme soil 
conditions that often needed in the city’s parks. Examples of 
these situations include high use lawns and sports fields, light-
weight green roofs, stormwater quality basins and rain gardens, 
and compactable planting soils located below pavement areas 
along streets, in plazas and in parking lots.
Engineered soils should be considered as part of a varied 
soil design palette available to park designers to meet the 
city’s broad open space needs. Because they are designed 
and manufactured soil systems, engineered soils are highly 
consistent and predictable in the performance, allowing them 
to serve long term needs in parks.
Engineered soils have been used for decades around the 
world on golf courses and green roofs. They have been used 
extensively on New York City parks including such locations 
at the Great Lawn in Central Park, Battery Park City, Hudson 
River Park, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Metrotec Center, on sports 
fields, for bioretention and stormwater filtration basins, and on 
numerous street tree applications.
Today, manufactured soils have been recognized as espe-
cially useful on highly disturbed urban sites or in locations 
where basic soil functions cannot be accommodated without 
wholesale replacement of the soil including:
 Areas of extensive urban fill exhibiting a variety of horti-
cultural challenges such as poor structure, high pH, poor 
drainage, or heavy compaction
 Areas that have or will become heavily compacted due 
to construction staging or will be subjected to unavoidable, 
irreparable compaction due to exposure to repeated heavy 
vehicle traffic
 Landfill or contaminated sites that require capping or 
isolation of toxic materials from human contact
Manufactured soils are also commonly used in areas 
where specialized site programmatic needs cannot be met 
through the use of naturally occurring, loam based soil mixes 
including:
 Rooftop or other landscapes over structures that have 
significant weight restrictions
 Biofiltration and constructed wetland areas for stormwater 
treatments where soils perform specialized filtration, drain-
age or detention functions
 Constructed wetlands for sanitary treatment
 Compaction resistant lawn areas that are subjected to 
s.6  
use engineered 
soiLs to meet 
criticaL 
Programming 
needs
150
especially high use or are intended for organized sports
 Stabilized vegetated road beds and parking areas for 
emergency vehicles or infrequent parking needs
 Steep slope areas where the soils need to exceed their 
natural angle of repose
 Below pavement areas where soils need to be compacted 
to support structural loading while still allowing for plant 
growth and rooting volume
One of the greatest benefits of manufactured soil use, in 
addition to its responsiveness to specific design requirements, 
is that it significantly reduces reliance on topsoil that is often 
stripped from offsite sources to the detriment of other healthy 
landscape areas and then transported to new sites for reuse. 
Manufactured soils are largely made up of derelict soil materi-
als such as sands, gravels, expanded clay and shale, and other 
aggregates as well as recycled materials such as compost. They 
typically only contain a very small amount of naturally occurring 
topsoil and, in some cases no soil materials at all. Manufactured 
soils therefore are generally considered a sustainable product.47 
PracTices                                                                 
Design
be aware of wHaT migHT Trigger use of manufacTureD soils
 Lack of onsite resources or soils that cannot  
support vegetation 
 Programmatic needs such as stormwater management 
requiring high infiltration and storage rates 
 Anticipated high levels of use
 Subsurface constraints such as compaction or lack of  
percolation are very common on urban sites.
consiDer imPorTanT earlY Planning anD Process 
requiremenTs
 Testing of existing onsite soils 
 Depths and volume requirements 
 Subsurface drainage 
 Methods of transport and installation 
 Staging approaches 
engage THe serVices of an exPerienceD soil scienTisT
 Use a soil scientist to develop standard specifications  
for production of engineered soils and to assist with oversight 
during the construction phase.
consiDer a VarieTY of engineereD soil TYPes
There is no one type of engineered soil that meets all high perfor-
mance needs.
 Develop a range of standard specifications to allow 
designers to have a variety of options.
It should be noted that engineered soils should be used 
judiciously in city parks as they are often more expensive 
than traditional loam based soils.
 Use engineered soils only when other design solutions 
are not possible or appropriate to programming or  
levels of use.
 Consider opportunities for recycled materials to be used.
NYSDOT has specified recycled crushed glass as 
underdrain material in bioretention systems.
consiDer sTrucTural soil for imProVing urban Tree 
enVironmenTs
one of the most pressing needs for engineered soil in parks is the 
need for planting soils below pavements. These soils, known as 
structural soils, allow trees to be planted and to survive in paved 
areas, providing much needed shade and other ecosystem benefits 
along streets and in parking lots, urban plazas, playgrounds, and 
other gathering areas. The term structural soil was coined by cornell 
university (cu) urban Horticulture institute (uHi) to describe their 
stone-soil mixed product.
 Structural soil creates a supportive environment for  
trees within compacted soils by designing soil mixes that 
allow a particle to particle contact (either aggregate or sand 
grain) that allows for compaction while maintaining suf-
ficient pore space for root penetration, organic matter, and 
water and air movement.
 The term has become widely used to describe similar 
systems using a variety of materials.
 Structural soils can be classified into four different types 
including:48 
Stone and soil mixes (CU Soil is one type of this kind 
of structural soil)
Lightweight mixes based on internally porous  
aggregates (expanded shale or slate) 
Sand based mixes
Naturally occurring compaction resistant, sandy loams 
It should be noted that some sand based and 
naturally occurring sandy loam mixes often achieve 
compaction rates less than 95% sometimes ranging 
from 88-95%, making them less suitable for support of 
vehicular or rigid pavements.
 Each type of structural soil behaves slightly differently 
and is constructed in somewhat different ways, providing 
designers a variety of ways in which to solve tree and  
pavement conflict.
 Work with a soil scientist to determine which type of soil 
is most applicable.
 It should be noted that structural soils are inherently 
inferior to loam based soils and should only be used in  
situations that cannot be accommodated by strategic  
design methods including planting beds, planters, and  
other design devices.
DeVeloP a VarieTY of comPacTion resisTanT soils 
To accommoDaTe HigH leVels of wear anD surface 
comPacTion
compaction resistant soils can accommodate heavy foot or vehicular 
traffic without losing critical structure that allows for plant growth. 
These soils are generally intended for turfgrass areas and will 
deform below vehicular traffic, which is why they are not considered 
structural soils. 
 Compaction resistant soils are generally sand or sandy 
loam based soils used for program needs such as:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested