HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
151
Sports fields and other intensive pedestrian use areas
Emergency access vehicle routes
Seasonal and infrequent parking lot areas
Sand based soils are used for a variety of reasons — 
sustainability, compaction resistance, and stormwater 
quality improvement.
DeVeloP a VarieTY of oTHer HigH Performance soils 
for sPecialTY uses
There are a number of other engineered soil mixes that are fre-
quently needed to solve specific urban design problems including:
 Steep slope soils with high internal friction to  
resist sloughing
 Engineered soils often include geofibers 
 Teardrop Park in Battery Park City makes extensive  
use of geofiber reinforced soil.
 Sand based biofiltration soils for use in stormwater  
quality areas, including rain gardens and infiltration basins
 Note that not all biofiltration soils need to be 
manufactured 
 See further W.5 Use Rain Gardens & Biofiltration
 Wetland soils
 Manufactured wetlands
 Waste water treatment facilities
 Lightweight soils for green roof applications 
 See further W.8 Create Green and Blue Roofs
manufacTureD soils neeD To be clearlY inDicaTeD anD 
quanTifieD on soil PlacemenT Plans, wiTH aPProPriaTe 
DeTails anD sPecificaTions
 The use of manufactured soils requires detailed drawings 
and specifications to ensure contractors fully understand soil 
placement requirements.
 See S.8 Provide Soil Placement Plans as Part of Contract 
Documents for further discussion of soil placement plan 
requirements.
consTrucTion
DeVeloP a DeTaileD consTrucTion scHeDule for use 
bY biDDers
 Allow lead time for procurement, testing, and mixing.
 Construction schedule should specifically include time for 
procurement of acceptable manufactured soil components, 
testing, and development of acceptable final mix designs.
faciliTaTe THe use anD ProcuremenT of manufacTureD soils
 Manufactured soil specifications require the contractor to 
source component materials, confirm the material compliance 
through testing, and develop final mix designs that are also 
confirmed through testing.
 This process can be lengthy particularly if a contractor is 
unfamiliar with the use of manufactured soils and where the 
various component materials can be sourced and tested.
 The procurement and final mix design process can be 
significantly shortened by providing the contractor with the 
name and address of testing labs and source material locations 
within the specifications.
 In some cases, premixed manufactured soils that are gener-
ally known to be compliant with the project needs can be 
sourced and their locations included within the specifications.
The use of manufactured soils also requires careful over-
sight during installation to ensure that the proper material 
has been delivered, field mixed (if required), and that it has 
been properly installed.
aVoiD TransPorTaTion of manufacTureD soils oVer 
long DisTances
 Manufactured soils should not be transported over  
long distances as the component materials may segregate  
during transport.
 If transport distances are a concern, the project require-
ments may be modified to allow for onsite mixing of soils, 
assuming there is sufficient space available.
ProTecT manufacTureD soils onsiTe
 Manufactured soil materials, such as natural soil materials, 
should be protected from wind and precipitation, which can 
cause segregation or depletion of component materials, alter-
ing the design and performance of the soil mix.
 Manufactured soil materials should also be protected from 
onsite contamination, which could affect performance.
ProViDe onsiTe suPerVision of manufacTureD soil 
TesTing anD insTallaTion
 Manufactured soils should be tested upon delivery to the 
site prior to installation to ensure component materials and 
mixes are correct.
Engineered soil fiber amendments were added to the topsoil throughout Brooklyn 
Bridge Park to prevent erosion over the steep slopes. Also visible in this photo is the 
drip irrigation system, which was later covered with mulch.
Pdf rotate single page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate page in pdf and save; pdf rotate pages separately
Pdf rotate single page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page reader; save pdf rotated pages
152
 Manufactured soils are often designed to fully replicate 
natural soil horizons so there are often varying soil mix types 
and compaction rates installed in successive layers.
 Confirm manufactured soil performance at the comple-
tion of installation through testing to ensure compliance with 
specifications.
mainTenance
obTain PosT-insTallaTion moniToring
 Manufactured soils often have very low actual soil content, 
specifically low silt and clay content.
 Since they are so narrowly controlled from a soil texture 
standpoint, manufactured soils require closer nutrient monitor-
ing than loam based soil mixes.
 Manufactured soils have a tendency to drain much more rap-
idly and to have significantly less nutrient buffering capacity.
 Manufactured soils supporting plant material should be 
monitored closely for watering needs.
 Manufactured soils supporting vegetation should also be 
tested annually for nutrient needs to ensure longterm sustain-
ability of the plants.
for furTHer informaTion
Case Studies:
Battery Park City and Hudson River Park are the two largest projects built 
to date in New York City using entirely engineered soils. 
Other Sources of Information:
Bassuk, N., Grabowsky, J., Trowbridge, P., Urban, J. Structural Soil: 
An Innovative Medium Under Pavement that Improves Street Tree Vigor. 
1998 ASLA (American Society of Landscape Architects) Annual Meeting 
Proceedings, pp. 183-185. http://www.hort.cornell.edu/uhi/outreach/csc/
article.pdf
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
Ferguson, Bruce. Porous Pavements. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2005.
Grabowsky, Jason and Nina Bassuk. 2008. Sixth- and Tenth-Year Growth 
Measurements for Three Tree Species in a Load-Bearing Stone—Soil Blend 
Under Pavement and a Tree Lawn in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. Arboriculture 
& Urban Forestry 2008. 34(4):265—266.http://www.hort.cornell.edu/uhi/
research/articles/auf34(4).pdf
Smiley, E. Thomas, Calfee, Lisa, Fraedrich, Bruce R., and Smiley, Emma 
J. Comparison of Structural and Noncompacted Soils for Trees Surrounded 
by Pavement. Arboriculture & Urban Forestry 32(4): July 2006. http://joa.
isa-arbor.com/request.asp?JournalID=1&ArticleID=2952&Type=1
Thompson, J. William, Sorvig, Kim and Farnsworth, Craig D. Sustainable 
Landscape Construction: A Guide to Green Building Outdoors. Washington, 
D.C.: Timber Press, 2007.
Urban, James “Growing the Urban Forest” City of Toronto, Tree 
Symposium: Healthy Trees for a Beautiful City, September 27, 2004. http://
www.toronto.ca/environment/pdf/james_urban.pdf
Urban, James. Up By Roots: Healthy Soils and Trees in the Built 
Environment. Champagne, IL: International Arboriculture Society, 2008.
47 Craul, Philip. Urban Soils: Applications and Practices. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 
Inc.1999, p. 107.
48 Ferguson, Bruce. Porous Pavements. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2005.
s.7 
Provide adequate 
soiL voLumes  
and dePtHs
objecTiVe                                                                   
Provide adequate soil volumes and depths necessary to  
support vigorous growth to maturity.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Allows trees, shrubs, and plants to achieve mature size.
 Improves opportunities for structural support for trees, 
reducing incidence of wind overturn.
 Reduces the frequency of watering by increasing available 
soil water storage capacity.
 Reduces need for fertilization by providing increased  
nutrient availability.
 Optimizes soil needs and eliminates unnecessary  
soil volumes.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Requires increased coordination with the location of  
adjacent utilities and structures, if present.
 Potentially requires greater excavation and soil volumes  
and costs.
inTegraTion                                                                
 S.8 Provide Soil Placement Plans as Part of Contract 
Documents 
backgrounD                                                            
While the quality of soils is critical to the success of plant-
ings, it is no less important to provide sufficient depths and 
volumes of quality horticultural soil. Soil depth is critical to 
the development of adequate rooting structures which support 
vegetative growth above ground. Soil volume is critical in that 
it provides sufficient water storage and nutrient availability for 
plants. Soil volume is also directly related to the size and area 
of root mass for plants, ensuring proper structural support and 
surface area needed to support critical air exchange and water 
uptake. Adequate soil volumes and depths are also important 
to stormwater management. Sufficient volumes and depths 
are required to provide sufficient infiltration, filtration, deten-
tion, and retention. Research over the past two decades has 
revealed that industrywide, the provision of soil volumes has 
been poorly understood and greatly underestimated.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
how to rotate all pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages on ipad
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
How to delete a single page from a PDF document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(filepath); // Detele page 2 (actually the third page).
pdf rotate just one page; permanently rotate pdf pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
153
PracTices                                                                  
Design
ProViDe sufficienT soil DePTHs To susTain longTerm 
growTH anD maTuriTY
as soil depths increase, air exchange below these depths is reduced 
and, as a result, biological activity decreases and the environment is 
less conducive to feeder roots.
 The vast majority of plant roots exist in the top 8 to 12” 
depth of soil, especially for most trees.
 Soil depths greater than 12 to 14” are vital to the  
development of structural roots, water storage, and  
nutrient uptake.
 Soil depths beyond 36” — especially for trees — are 
generally a waste of money unless there are extraordinary 
mitigating circumstances.
 Minimum soil depth by plant type:
Turf: 8-12”
Annual Flowers and Groundcovers: 10-12”
Perennials and Grasses: 12-18”
Shrubs: 18” minimum, 24” recommended; larger  
may be required depending upon plant container or 
rootball size
Trees: 24” minimum, 36” recommended; deeper as 
required for larger rootballs
For green roof plantings, soil depths can be classified 
three ways:
 Extensive: 2-6” generally limited to sedums, herbs, 
and alpines
 Shallow or Semi-intensive: 6-12” including annuals, 
perennials, grasses, small woody plants
 Intensive 12”+ including perennials, grasses,  
and shrubs 
For turf grass, large shrubs, and trees and shrubs on 
green roofs, use volumes listed above.
ProViDe sufficienT soil Volumes To susTain long Term 
growTH anD maTuriTY
There are a variety of ways to calculate required soil volumes for 
trees including anticipated mature canopy size or anticipated mature 
trunk caliper. as a minimum, provide individual shades trees with 
at least 800 cubic feet, 3 feet deep, and cluster trees in a common 
rooting volume at least 600 cubic feet of soil volume, 3 feet deep. 
This is the absolute minimum in area, and more total volume is 
always better.
49
Perhaps a better way to consider soil volume, based 
on an actual mature tree size basis, is to provide between 1.6 and 2.0 
cubic feet of soil for every square foot of mature crown projection.
50 
This approach can also be used to better inform soil volume require-
ments for large shrubs and small trees. again, more soil volume pro-
vides a better rooting environment and structural support, especially 
for trees. while minimum soil volume has been well studied for trees, 
it remains poorly studied for shrubs, perennials and groundcovers. 
 Landscape architect James Urban has developed a  
useful chart to quickly calculate anticipated minimum  
soil volumes: 
If you have other plantings combined with tree soils, 
a good rule of thumb is to provide sufficient soil for the 
trees (closer to 2 cubic feet of soil for the mature crown 
projection rather than the lower 1.6 cubic foot estimate) 
and allow the shrubs, perennials, groundcovers or turf 
grass to inhabit the same soil volume.
samPle calculaTions for a maTure Tree 
wiTH a 30’ crown ProjecTion  
(30’ DiameTer canoPY siZe):
 Assumption: Provide 2 cubic feet of soil available for root-
ing for each square foot of mature crown projection.
 Calculate crown projection by taking the mature crown 
spread of the tree in feet, squaring it, and multiplying by 
0.7854.
j Crown projection (30 feet)2 = 900 x .7854 = 707 and 
will thus require 707 square foot
 Crown projection x 2 cubic feet of soil per square foot of 
crown projection = 1,414 cubic feet of soil volume for root 
growth.
 To calculate the dimensional volume of the soil, divide the 
total cubic feet of planting soil by an average depth of 3 feet 
(recommended depth).
j 1,414 cubic feet ÷ 3’ depth = 471 square feet of pro-
jected surface area to achieve the necessary
soil Volume for Trees
1200/24
900/20
640/16
480/12
320/8
140/4
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
ULTIMATE TREE SIzE*
2Crown (ft)/diameter (in)
SOIL VOLUME REqUIRED (FT3)
*The ultimate tree size is defined by the projected size of the crown and the diameter 
of the tree at breast height.
NOTE: For example, a 16-in. diameter tree requires 1000 cu ft of soil.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
rotate pdf page; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
rotate pdf pages by degrees; how to rotate pdf pages and save
154
Street trees planted in adequate soil volumes are more likely to survive and cause 
fewer pavement breaks. This tree was not given enough soil, harming both the tree 
and the surrounding sidewalk. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
file to the end of another and save to a Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions and then saved and output as a single PDF with user
reverse page order pdf; pdf save rotated pages
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Office 2003 and 2007, PDF. 4. -. 8. rotate page. In the mode of single page view, click to rotate file page 90 degrees in clockwise.
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pages in pdf and save
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
155
The numerous benefits of contiguous volumes of soil 
for multiple trees allow for slight reduction in total soil 
volume for trees, perhaps as much as 25%.51 Reduction 
of provided soil volume should be applied judiciously, 
especially in areas where trees may be under microcli-
matic stress.
 When using manufactured soils, and in particular skeletal 
soils, structural soils, green roof soils, or sand based soils 
that are naturally lean on loam content, soil volumes should 
be increased to compensate for poor soil quality
For example, with structural soils the actual available 
soil volume (excluding the stone aggregate matrix) can be 
as low as 20 to 30% on a volume basis.
esTablisH a siTe soil buDgeT earlY in THe Design Process 
To aiD in criTical Design Decision making
 Understanding and identifying basic soil volumes and 
depths allows designer, cost estimator, and construction man-
ager to quickly estimate soil budgets for site. 
 Soil budgeting also identifies if adequate resources  
are available onsite or if horticultural quality material will  
need to be imported. It is critical to project scheduling and 
budgeting, as well as to the ultimate project budget, to 
understand the time required and costs associated with soil 
operations to accommodate sufficient quantities of horticul-
tural quality soil. 
 Diagramming of soil for budgeting purposes requires 
designers to consider how soil volumes are aggregated on site, 
leading to better coordination with utility corridors, pavement 
(which may require structural soils) or building structures. 
 Soil budgeting allows designer to develop a plant  
palate and planting locations that are appropriate to available 
soil resources. This is especially important when planning 
projects where there are limited budgets or weight limitations 
over structures. 
 The preparation of the soil budget will need to include:
Finish grades and subgrades 
Drainage 
Earthwork calculations 
Cost estimating
coorDinaTe soil DePTHs anD Volumes wiTH exisTing anD 
ProPoseD siTe sTormwaTer managemenT anD exisTing 
grounD waTer conDiTions
 Soil volumes and depths are only of benefit to plantings 
if the water properly cycles into and out of the soil. Poor 
subsurface drainage, high ground water (either permanent 
or seasonal) leads to anaerobic conditions that lead to plant 
disease, decline and death. 
 Site design strategies should encourage the diversion of 
surface stormwater runoff to areas that are proposed for plant-
ings to both benefit the health of the plantings and to provide 
increased storm water quality.
PrePare a soil PlacemenT Plan as ParT of scHemaTic 
anD Design DeVeloPmenT leVel Design milesTone efforTs 
for coorDinaTion wiTH oTHer members of THe Design 
Team incluDing engineers, consTrucTion managers,
anD cosT esTimaTors
 A soil placement plan is a scaled diagrammatic plan that 
indicates where each type of soil system is installed on the 
site. Areas of different soil types are indicated by unique hatch 
patterns and are cross referenced to soil installation details. 
 Soil placement plans show the surface areas requirement of 
specific soil types (such as lawn areas, planting beds, struc-
tural soil, etc.).
 Provide graphic or text descriptions of the typical soil 
profiles and interfaces or transitions required to achieve the 
desired soil depth. 
 See S.8 Provide Soil Placement Plans as Part of Contract 
Documents for further discussions of soil placement plan 
requirements.
laYer soils To mimic naTural soil HoriZons
 Planting soils should mimic soil structures found in  
nature to the extent possible to encourage good soil biological 
functioning and accommodate normal root growth. 
 Horticultural soils should have a high organic layer  
located at the top 6 to 12” to accommodate soil organisms 
and surface root feeding, which require frequent air and  
water exchange. 
 Lower layers within soil horizons serve to store water and 
nutrients and provide structural support for rooting. High 
organic content in lower layers is wasted and can lead to set-
tling problems as the organic content breaks down.
creaTe conTiguous soil Volumes To encourage 
HealTHY rooTing
 Plan soil areas to be as contiguous as possible to allow 
plantings to share rooting space.
 Large areas of uninterrupted soil areas are preferable to 
numerous smaller soil areas.
 Develop clear utility corridors to minimize disruption  
of soil areas.
 Consider running utility corridors deeper to allow horticul-
tural soil volumes to span over the tops of the compacted 
utility backfill areas.
 If utilities are backfilled with soils that are compacted  
to 95% density with densely graded materials, roots will not 
be able to penetrate the utility corridors, thus protecting the 
utility lines.
 Where critical volumes are not achievable, create linkages to 
adjacent areas of soil volume.
 Consider one of the following methods to allow roots to seek 
out increased quality soil volumes in other areas: 
Geocomposite root paths 
Structural soil root paths 
Pavement bridging
be sure To unDersTanD How waTer will geT inTo anD
ouT of soil areas
 The use of larger uninterrupted soil areas makes the direc-
tion and disbursement of site stormwater more efficient.
 Be sure to understand the contributing runoff volumes, 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
toolkit, designed particularly for manipulating and managing single-page and multi delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc.
pdf page order reverse; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to change page orientation in pdf document
156
objecTiVe                                                                    
Prepare a soil placement plan, details, and coordinated  
specifications as part of the project contract documents.
benefiTs                                                                      
Compels the design team to thoroughly document planting 
soil requirements and associated material interfaces,  
improving the quality of the planting soil environment.
 Elevates the importance of soil installation requirements to 
the contractors working on the project.
 Allows the contractors to accurately estimate scope of work, 
material quantities, and costs associated with project.
 Allows for more accurate sequencing and scheduling of  
soil installation.
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Requires increased design effort and time to produce  
contract documents.
inTegraTion                                                               
 S.7 Provide Adequate Soil Volumes and Depths 
backgrounD                                                            
The design and quality of planting soil is at least as impor-
tant to the success of a project as the planting or stormwater 
design, yet the detail and level of care with which planting soil 
is given in typical construction document packages is often 
limited. It is not unusual that the soil requirements are only 
vaguely shown on the drawings and are poorly coordinated with 
the specifications. As a result, contractors are often left to 
infer the intent of the designer as to how soils are to be used 
and placed across a project site.
A coordinated soil placement plan elevates the importance 
of planting soils within the contract documents and provides a 
much higher degree of integration with adjacent materials. The 
development of soil placement plans during the design process 
also allows for the development of more accurate earthwork 
s.8 
Provide soiL 
PLacement 
PLans as Part 
of contract 
documents
infiltration rate of the proposed soil volumes, and underlying 
subgrade to ensure that the proposed soil volumes will not be 
saturated for long periods of time, which may lead to plant 
decline or death.
 It may be necessary provide: 
 Subsurface drainage for areas that cannot infiltrate 
quickly enough to support vigorous plant growth 
High flow bypass to limit inflow to sensitive or  
confined soil areas 
Erosion protection at inflow areas during large  
storm events 
for furTHer informaTion
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
Craul, Phillip. Urban Soils: Applications and Practices. New York: John 
Wiley & Sons, Inc.1999.
Grabowsky, J. and Gilman, E. Measurement and Prediction of Tree Growth 
Reduction from Tree Planting Space Design in Parking Lots. Journal of 
Arboriculture 30, (3) 2004.
DeGaetano, A. Specification of Soil Volume and Irrigation Frequency 
for Urban Tree Containers Using Climate Data. Journal of Arboriculture 
26(3)2000.
Lindsey, P. and Bassuk, N. 1991. Specifying Soil Volumes to Meet the 
Water Needs of Mature Urban Street Trees and Trees in Containers. Journal of 
Arboriculture. 17(6) 141-149.
Lindsey, P. and N. L. Bassuk. Redesigning the Urban Forest from the 
Ground Below: A New Approach to Specifying Adequate Soil Volumes for 
Street Trees. Journal of Arboriculture 24 (3) 1992. 
Trowbridge, P. and Bassuk, N. Trees in the Urban Landscape: Site 
Assessment, Design and Installation. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, 2004.
Urban, J. Bringing Order to the Technical Dysfunction within the Urban 
Forest. Journal of Arboriculture 18(2) 1992.
Urban, James. Up By Roots: Healthy Soils and Trees in the Built 
Environment. Champagne, IL: International Arboriculture Society, 2008.
49 Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape Architects and 
Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
50 Lindsey, P. and Bassuk, N. 1991. Specifying Soil Volumes to Meet the Water Needs of Mature 
Urban Street Trees and Trees in Containers. Journal of Arboriculture. 17(6) 141-149. and 
51 Craul and Craul
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
157
cost estimates, more rapidly revealing project opportunities 
and constraints. Finally, the development of soil placement 
plans and supporting details and specifications allows the 
planting soils to be more fully conceived as an integrated 
system rather than as the filler between other site elements.
PracTices                                                               
Design
DeTermine siTe Programming neeDs in orDer To 
accuraTelY Define soil qualiTY ParameTers
 In order to determine if existing or imported soil will  
be of sufficient quality for a project, it is important to clearly 
define the site programming needs before making a final 
determination of the quality and suitability of existing or new 
site soils including: 
Existing or proposed landscape strategies including  
planting palette
Proposed levels of maintenance including whether or not 
automatic irrigation will be proposed
Levels of site use and whether or not compaction  
resistance would be needed for athletic fields or other high 
use lawn areas
 Use a zone based approach to soil design.
 It is more than likely that one soil type will not sufficiently 
address the long term needs of the site’s various planting and 
stormwater site needs. By categorizing soil programming needs 
onsite into similar programmatic zones, soil quality can more 
easily be defined, constructed, and maintained. Typical soil 
zones include:
Turf areas with low traffic 
Turf areas with high traffic (areas subject to large  
crowds, athletic fields, stabilized vehicle lanes that  
require compaction resistance, and other special needs) 
Annual and perennial lawn beds 
Shrub beds 
Mixed shrub and tree beds 
Trees in open lawn areas 
Trees in paved areas (requiring structural soil or  
other special needs) 
Planting areas over subterranean structures 
Planting areas over roofs including extensive green roof 
areas, roof planters, and traditional planted roofs 
DeVeloP Zone baseD DiagrammaTic soil PlacemenT Plans
 Develop zone based diagrams indicating various soil  
types and their associated depths. 
 Develop plans early in the design process to establish  
realistic soil needs and associated costs, and to identify  
coordination issues.
 Coordinate soil placement plans with soil preservation  
and protection plan diagrams.
 Use diagrammatic plan areas to calculate required plant-
ing soil volumes and associated excavation to achieve the 
proposed soil depths. These volumes can be compared to 
existing soil volumes available on site to determine if there are 
adequate soil resources or if additional materials will  
have to be imported.
 Zone based diagrams: 
Allow the designer to understand excavation depths that 
are required for rootballs of various plant materials.
Enable a designer to begin to make inferences about sub-
surface drainage needs within compacted soils or potential 
conflicts with adjacent and crossing utilities.
Are especially important when designers are trying to 
achieve minimum soil volumes for tree plantings in struc-
tural soil areas.
Are also important in areas where planting soils are 
entirely imported as necessary on certain brownfield sites, 
sites with limited infiltration due to past uses, rooftops  
or pier structures with weight restrictions, or sports field 
projects where manufactured compaction resistant soils  
are required.
DeVeloP TYPical cross secTions of PlanTing soil areas 
To unDersTanD soil DePTHs, laYering requiremenTs anD 
maTerial inTerface neeDs
 Develop typical planting soil cross sections for each  
type of planting soil need including lawn areas, perennial 
display beds, tree and shrub beds, constructed wetlands and 
infiltration basins.
 Use typical cross sections to more accurately estimate soil 
material and amendment needs on a plan basis.
 Develop cross sections through the site to understand  
how the various soil profiles interface with one another  
and adjacent site improvements such as pavements, walls, 
buildings, and waterbodies.
 Coordinate differing compaction requirements and angles 
of influence between horticultural areas and areas serving as 
structural foundations.
 Overlay utility crossings and coordinate anticipated elevation 
and compaction needs.
 Coordinate the location of surface drainage systems  
and underdrainage systems for both landscape areas and 
building areas.
 Develop planting soil termination and interface details 
based on review of site cross sections, which helps ensure that 
soils abut each other without creating interface problems that 
can lead to drainage problems.
use Zone baseD soil Diagrams To DeVeloP subgraDe 
graDing Plans
 Develop subgrade grading plans to allow the contractor to 
accurately estimate earthwork calculations (i.e., the difference 
between the grade of existing soils and the finish grade of 
proposed planting soils).
 Use subgrade grading plans to locate subdrainage piping 
systems and to ensure that all planting soils are adequately 
drained.
 Subgrade grading plans and subdrainage plans are  
critical for:
 Any project that makes use of layered or manufactured 
soil installations requiring coordination of soil depths, 
158
shaping of the subgrade prior to soil placement, and locat-
ing underdrainage piping systems 
Waterfront development projects where there may be 
concerns about storm surges, tidal fluctuation, and saltwater 
contamination of planting soil areas
Brownfield sites in order to coordinate with the elevation 
of capping layers
PrePare a soil PlacemenT Plan
 A soil placement plan is a scaled diagrammatic plan  
that indicates where each type of soil system is installed  
on the site.
 Areas of different soil types are indicated by unique hatch 
patterns, which are cross referenced to soil installation details.
 Soil placement plans show areas of specific soil types, such 
as lawn areas, planting beds, structural soil, etc.).
 Detail sheets show protection details and typical soil profiles 
and interfaces or transitions.
 Soil placement notes include specialized equipment 
requirements, methods of installation, compaction and settle-
ment, as well as protection after installation prior to the start 
of landscaping operations.
Alternatively, soil placement notes can be assembled  
into a single specification section specifically dedicated to 
planting soil.
 Prepare written specifications as necessary.
 Clearly outline material requirements, performance require-
ments, and penalties for the contractor for failure to comply 
with the soil management plan requirements.
 Create a single specification for all soil management require-
ments, greatly simplifying enforcement of the requirements by 
resident engineers.
Numerous references to soil management throughout a 
specification book can make it difficult for the contractor to 
immediately grasp the full range of requirements, and make 
it difficult for a designer to locate and properly coordinate 
soil management needs across multiple specification sec-
tions during construction.
 Coordinate the soil management plan with the requirements 
of the soil and erosion control plan, soil protection plan, and 
the site staging and sequencing plan.
 The entire design team should review and assist with the 
preparation of the soil placement plan, especially on large 
projects or projects with significant natural features to be 
preserved or where available site area is limited.
 It is also very helpful to have the plan reviewed by the resi-
dent engineer or construction supervisors prior to bidding to 
ensure that the requirements laid out are reasonable given the 
total scope of work, budget, and schedule.
DeVeloP a soil PlacemenT Plan THaT is commensuraTe 
wiTH scale of THe ProjecT
 For less complex projects a soil placement plan, at a 
minimum, may consist of a single drawing with detailed notes 
outlining contractor requirements.
 For more complex projects, a soil management plan can 
consist of a number of drawings including: 
Soil placement notes, soil placement plans, planting soil 
details and interface details, and subgrading plans
mainTain sTanDarDs of qualiTY THrougHouT consTrucTion 
Process bY combining boTH DeTail sPecificaTions anD 
onsiTe insPecTions
it is not enough to draw plans and specify the proper soil materials 
for a site; a good deal can go wrong during procurement, delivery, 
and installation that can compromise the long term success of a 
project. soil placement specifications need to specifically detail how 
soils should be placed, especially with subsoil preparation and plant-
ing soil installation and layering.
sPecificaTions for TesTing During consTrucTion neeD To 
be couPleD wiTH DiligenT insPecTion of THe work
 Prior to start of work: 
Verify the proper location and installation of soil and  
vegetation protection fencing as described in the soil man-
agement plan.
Verify that erosion and sedimentation controls have been 
properly installed.
Review with general contractor that topsoil stockpiling 
and other specified measures are incorporated into the  
work plan.
Review procedures for soil material delivery, collection of 
delivery tickets, and frequency of spot testing for imported 
soil materials and amendments.
Review procedures for onsite testing and inspections  
during installation.
 During grading and earthwork operations: 
Verify that proper erosion and sedimentation control 
methods are being employed.
Verify proper excavation and stockpiling of topsoil and 
subsoil materials.
 After completion of rough grading: 
Inspect subsoil and subgrade areas to ensure they are free 
of debris or other contaminants.
Test for proper penetrability, drainage, and compaction as 
required by the specifications.
Check that the subgrade is excavated to the proper depth 
and shaped to provide sufficient slopes to subsurface drains.
Check that all subsurface drains and irrigation lines, if 
required, have been properly installed and tested.
 During topsoil placement: 
Inspect soil placement procedures to ensure proper mate-
rial depths, layering, and transitioning as described in the 
specifications and shown on the drawings.
Test for proper compaction and penetrability.
 After topsoil placement: 
Test topsoil before planting and amend topsoil as required 
to correct for organic, nutrient, and pH deficiencies.
 After completion of planting: 
Verify placement of mulch as described in specifications 
and as shown on drawings.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
159
sPecifY THaT soils are insTalleD in laYers THaT are 
ProPerlY TransiTioneD 
 Proper soil installation is critical to ensuring soil 
functioning.
 Soil failures due to poor workmanship are possible even 
when using the correct soil types.
 Soil placement needs to be detailed and sufficiently speci-
fied so that the soils are installed in such a way that they are 
transitioned or zipped together with the underlying soil so 
water can flow freely from one layer to the other.
 Soils with abrupt changes in texture, structure, and/or den-
sity can significantly reduce the flow of soil water. The abrupt 
change can result in perched water leading to prolonged satu-
ration of root zones and anaerobic conditions, both of which 
lead to plant mortality.
 Poor interface of soils can also lead to destabilization and 
slumping in areas where soil is installed on slopes.
 Transitioning between layers can be accomplished by apply-
ing two to three inches of soil, tilling it into the underlying 
soil, and then applying the remaining soil on top.
 When layering soils, even soils of the same type, it is 
important to scarify the surface of the soil to be layered on 
top to break up any crusting or compaction, again minimizing 
interface problems.
 Prior to placing soils on prepared subgrades, the subgrade 
soils should be scarified by deep raking or with the teeth of a 
backhoe rather than by the use of rotary tilling or disc plows 
to avoid the creation of a compaction layer immediately below 
the worked surface of the subsoil.
sPecifY ProTecTion of soil maTerials from 
conTaminaTion During consTrucTion
specifying protection of soil materials from contamination during 
construction is another important way to ensure soil quality and long 
term performance.
 Frequently construction activities unrelated to earthwork 
and planting soil operations create conditions that significantly 
degrade the horticultural qualities of soils.
 Improper handling or disposal of materials frequently used 
during construction can contaminate soil.
 Vehicle and generator fuels, asphaltic materials, aggregates, 
gypsum, plaster, hydraulic fluids, paints, adhesives, clean-
ing products, acid washes, and waste water produced during 
construction all have the potential to change soil chemistry or 
damage the physical properties of soil.
 Cementitious products are among the most common and 
destructive soil contaminants, clogging soil structure and 
significantly raise pH.
 Cementitious materials including dry grout and mortar 
mixes, and washout water from concrete trucks, pumps, and 
chutes should be carefully handled around soils.
 Prefabricated or onsite fabricated concrete washouts can be 
used to contain concrete and washout liquids.
The washout facilities consolidate solids for easier  
disposal and prevent runoff of liquids
 Prefabricated concrete washout containers are delivered  
to the site, and some companies offer maintenance and 
disposal services.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance for further discussion of 
soil erosion and soil compaction, two critical aspects of main-
taining soil quality during the construction phase.
for furTHer informaTion
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
160
162   Protect and restore naturaL HydroLogy and fLow PatHs 
165   reduce fLow to storm sewers 
168   create aBsorBent LandscaPes 
172   use infiLtration Beds 
175   use rain gardens & Bioretention 
179   use stormwater PLanter BoXes 
180   use Porous Pavements 
184   create green and BLue roofs 
188   manage rooftoP runoff
Part iv: 
Best Practices  
in site systems
water
Part IV describes the site systems: soil, water, and vegetation. 
These systems must work together for optimal success. Each best 
practice contains an objective, background information, benefits 
and drawbacks, implementation strategies, examples, references, 
and suggestions for integration with other best practices. 
Together, the practices offer a network of opportunities that can 
be adaptively applied to any park or development opportunity. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested