display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate all pages in pdf software Library cloud windows .net azure class design_guidelines16-part1744

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
161
inTroDucTion
New York City receives approximately 45 inches of rainfall per 
year, and most of that rainfall (70% of the annual volume) 
occurs in small rainfall events of one inch or less. In a forest, 
nearly all rainfall soaks into the soil and ultimately returns to 
the atmosphere via evapotranspiration from plants and soils; 
some rainfall infiltrates into deeper soil mantle. On an annual 
basis, very little water actually runs off in a natural system. 
In New York City, virtually all the rain that falls on the 
impervious surfaces of roofs, streets, and pavement runs off, 
contributing to flooding, water quality problems, and combined 
sewer overflows. Watersheds with only 10% impervious sur-
faces, streams, and other hydrological features are compro-
mised. At 30% impervious, ecosystem functions are compro-
mised; there is significant loss of aquatic habitat diversity, 
water quality, and species habitat. New York City is generally 
well beyond these ranges of impermeability. 
The city’s parks provide an important opportunity to manage 
water differently: to reduce stormwater runoff and to use soil 
and vegetation to capture water as a resource for the park 
system. High performance landscapes begin by intensively 
managing stormwater. Water from rainfall events should be 
managed at or near the source, returned to soils and vegeta-
tion in a manner that encourages soil absorption and evapo-
transpiration. Water should be allowed to infiltrate, where 
feasible. By designing a landscape that can capture the runoff 
from the small, frequent rainfalls, and allow that runoff to soak 
into the soil or be absorbed by vegetation, many of the vari-
ous urban impacts on water quality (such as nonpoint source 
pollution, combined sewer overflows, flooding, and heat island 
effects) can be mitigated. PlaNYC highlights the importance 
of New York City’s parks and open spaces in capturing and 
retaining stormwater.
Water should not be wasted. Potable water should be treated 
as an especially valuable resource because it is water that 
requires significant energy to clean and deliver that water. 
Opportunities to reduce potable water use through more effi-
cient designs, and to reuse all available water in general, are 
critical components of high performance landscapes. 
keY PrinciPles
RECOGNIzE THAT RAINFALL IS A RESOURCE THAT SUP-
PORTS HEALTHY SOILS AND VEGETATION IN PARKS. Water 
is an important component of a healthy landscape, and healthy 
soils that absorb rainfall will support healthy vegetation, reduc-
ing both stormwater runoff problems and the need for potable 
water. Rather than considering stormwater as a nuisance to be 
managed, parks should be designed to value and capture the 
resource of rainfall, with emphasis on restoring and maintain-
ing healthy soils and vegetation. 
RECOGNIzE THAT SMALL FREqUENT RAINFALLS CAN BE 
CAPTURED BY THE SOILS AND VEGETATION IN NYC PARKS, 
IMPROVING WATER qUALITY FOR THE CITY. Stormwater 
systems have traditionally been designed to address flooding 
concerns during extreme and intense periods of rainfall. The 
more common small rainfall events have traditionally been 
overlooked in the design process, but comprise much of the 
annual volume of rainfall in New York City. Park designs that 
capture these small frequent rainfalls provide a long term and 
sustainable approach to managing the resource of rainfall. 
DESIGN FOR WATER IN WAYS THAT ARE VISIBLE, CRE-
ATIVE, AND THAT RECONNECT PEOPLE TO THE NATURAL 
SYSTEM. By designing systems that come alive with the move-
ment of water during rainfalls, and allowing water to be visible 
and active, park designs can increase awareness of water as 
a resource and its importance to healthy park systems. Water 
management designs provide an opportunity to educate and 
reconnect people to water.
NATURAL LANDSCAPES SHOULD BE PROTECTED AND 
ENHANCED TO IMPROVE THE BENEFITS THEY PROVIDE TO 
THE CITY’S WATER qUALITY. Existing natural systems such 
as woodlands, meadows, stream buffers, and wetlands provide 
many ecological and environmental benefits, including the 
ability to absorb and cleanse runoff. These natural systems 
provide ecological services by slowing, filtering, and captur-
ing water. Infiltration recharges the groundwater for healthy 
streams and wetlands, while vegetation returns water to the 
atmosphere and reduces the urban heat island effect. These 
services are a resource that should be protected and enhanced 
within the park system. 
URBANIzED LANDSCAPES CAN BE DESIGNED TO MAxI-
MIzE THEIR ECOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE. Through careful 
design and consideration, areas such as pavements, roofs, 
athletic fields, and playgrounds can be designed to capture, 
clean, and slow stormwater runoff for infiltration, slow release, 
or reuse. In the urban environment, these park systems can be 
a model for a more sustainable approach throughout the city. 
WATER IS A RESOURCE THAT SHOULD NOT BE WASTED;  
The availability of potable water represents energy usage in the 
collection, treatment, and delivery of that water. Any oppor-
tunity to reduce the use and demand of potable water, or to 
reuse any available water (such as rainfall), should be imple-
mented to reduce the energy impact of water within the parks.
How to rotate all pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; rotate one page in pdf reader
How to rotate all pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate one page in pdf; rotate pdf pages
162
Protect and restore the natural ability of soils, vegetation,  
and associated topography to absorb rainfall, remove pollut-
ants, evapotranspirate, and recharge groundwater. Protect 
natural flow paths and small streams from grading, encase-
ment, or the erosive conditions that are created by piped or 
concentrated flows.
benefiTs                                                                      
 Improves water quality for streams, lakes, and shorelines.
 Provides habitat for fish and other organisms
 Supports natural biological activity.
 Increases base flow for streams, improving ecological  
function of these systems.
 Increases ecosystem services.
Protects soils and vegetation.
 Increases biodiversity and creates healthier ecosystems.
 Prevents future restoration costs.
 Reduces risks of invasive species or contaminants by  
leaving soils and vegetation undisturbed.
 Traps sediments and nutrients.
 Keeps sediment out of streams and sewers.
 Promotes infiltration, reducing runoff volumes; slower  
moving water is more likely to seep into bed and banks.
 Moderates downstream flooding.
 Stores and recycles organic carbon.
 Reduces flow energy, reducing erosion and downstream 
sedimentation.
consiDeraTions                                                          
 Can increase construction costs and duration due to more 
limited site access, staging, stockpile, and work areas.
 May require greater construction administration.
 Requires defined longterm maintenance.
 Requires education of maintenance staff.
inTegraTion                                                               
 D.3 Prepare a Site Preservation and Protection Plan 
J  S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation 
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat 
backgrounD                                                                   
Natural flow paths and small streams provide the largest 
surface area of soil in contact with water. Most biological 
and physical activity takes place in this area where the water 
makes contact with the saturated sediments in the channel 
(the hyporheic zone) or where the water makes contact with 
the edges of the channel (the riparian zone). 
Small headwater streams and natural flow paths are:
 Zero-order streams consisting of swales and hollows that 
lack natural stream banks but serve as important conduits 
of and storage sites for water, sediment, nutrients, and other 
materials during rainfall and snowmelt 
 First-order streams, which are the smallest distinct chan-
nels that may flow perennially (year-round), intermittently 
(several months per year), or ephemerally (periodically after 
a rain or in the spring) 
 Second-order streams formed by first- and zero-order 
streams combining 
Small headwater streams and flow paths make up at least 
80 percent of the nation’s stream network, and in terms of 
gross area, provide more ecosystem services than any other 
water feature. They are critically important to the health of 
larger streams and coastal ecosystems, all of which originate 
in the smaller stream network. However, most zero- and first-
order streams do not appear on maps. 
Small headwater streams are rough and bumpy, slowing the 
passage of water. The friction of gravel, twigs, leaf litter, and 
woody debris reduces flow rates. Slower moving water seeps 
into streambeds and banks, providing soil and groundwater 
recharge and reducing the power of water to cause erosion.
Small headwater streams and natural flow paths are often 
damaged or lost.
 Piped storm sewer discharge increases flow volume and 
velocity to create erosive conditions in small streams and 
natural flow paths, causing the channel to narrow, deepen, 
and release sediment. As the channel deepens, shallow 
groundwater and soil moisture will begin to discharge to 
the channel, ultimately reducing soil moisture conditions 
in the surrounding area and affecting the health of vegeta-
tion, especially woodlands. This is a common problem in 
urban parks where upstream storm sewers often discharge to 
parklands, especially along steep slopes. 
 The creation of large impervious areas that generate flows 
in excess of the capacity of the natural channel, lead to 
erosive conditions. 
 The compaction of pervious areas by mowing, parking, 
and other intense uses collapses the macropore system in 
the soil and creates more runoff and erosive conditions. 
 Grading of pervious areas creates uniform topography, 
eliminating the natural depressions and flow paths that 
previously existed. 
 Piping of swales and wet areas to eliminate wet condi-
tions beyond the minimum necessary to cross roads and 
paths will concentrate the discharge further downstream. 
 Creation and mowing of lawn and turf affects headwa-
ter streams and flow paths. The grass traps sediment and 
w.1 
Protect and 
restore naturaL 
HydroLogy and 
fLow PatHs
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document Dim detelePageindexes = New Integer() {1, 3, 5, 7, 9} ' Delete pages. All Rights Reserved
rotate individual pdf pages reader; rotate single page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file All Rights Reserved
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate pdf page few degrees
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
163
creates sod, narrowing the channel width. The channel 
deepens in response, carrying sediment downstream. As the 
stream narrows, there is less streambed available for micro-
organisms to process nutrients. Nitrogen and phosphorus 
travel downstream five to ten times faster, carrying nutrients 
to streams and coastal waters that can create algal blooms, 
called eutrophication.
PracTices                                                                   
Planning
iDenTifY naTural flow PaTHs anD small sTreams
 Most natural flow paths and small streams are too small to 
appear on maps.
Detailed topographic surveys may indicate approximate 
swale locations, however, visual field confirmation is often 
required to fully identify the location and extent of small 
streams and depressions.
Consult Natural Resources Group (NRG) historic  
maps and flow accumulation models to assess hydrologic 
conditions.
 Conduct field observations during wet periods.
Ephemeral pools are more likely to be observed during the 
wet season of spring.
Ephemeral pools are only seasonally wet and provide criti-
cal habitat to amphibians, plants, and insects.
 Conduct field observations during periods of rainfall.
In the early part of a rainfall, the trickle front can be 
observed as the leading edge of a stream begins, and often 
soaks into the soil.
Rainfall observation will help to identify areas of recharge 
to be protected.
As flow develops, distinct flow paths can be identified and 
areas of erosion noted.
 Incorporate the location of natural flow paths and small 
streams into the site preservation and protection plan. 
iDenTifY naTural lanDscaPe recHarge areas anD 
DePressions
 Within the existing landscape, identify areas where water 
naturally forms small puddles that disappear.
 Consult maintenance staff to help identify these areas. 
 Consult with environmental scientists and ecologists at  
NRG to help identify these areas.
 Incorporate the location of natural landscape recharge areas 
into the site preservation and protection plan.
iDenTifY anD DelineaTe areas of naTural HYDrological 
benefiT or sensiTiViTY
 Maximize preservation of existing undisturbed areas to  
protect existing intact soils and vegetation.
 Areas of focus include: 
Steep slopes 
Mature or valuable vegetation 
Wetland areas
Springs and swales
Stream and shoreline buffer areas 
Areas of natural drainage
 Consult with environmental scientists and ecologists at NRG 
to help identify sensitive hydrologic areas. 
 Incorporate the location of natural hydrological benefit or 
sensitivity into the site preservation and protection plan.
Plan for long Term ProTecTion of exisTing small 
sTreams anD flow PaTHs
 Ensure that protection and preservation zones include small 
streams and flow paths.
 Identify and manage all offsite sources of runoff into 
streams and flow paths.
 Require no new stormwater runoff and no new impervious 
area without complete treatment of those impervious areas for 
water quality and volume.
 Incorporate the location of existing small streams and flow 
paths into the site preservation and protection plan.
 See D.3 Develop a Site Protection and Preservation Plan 
Design
use siTe Design sTraTegies To PreserVe anD ProTecT 
basic siTe HYDrologY
 Design new facilities around preserved areas and  
basic site hydrology, maintaining as much continuity and 
connectivity between preserved areas and original drainage 
patterns as possible.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance.
 Minimize cut and fill beyond original grades as much  
as possible.
 Protect soil structure, especially when relying on infiltration 
for stormwater management.
 Carefully coordinate stormwater management techniques 
with existing soil conditions.
 Develop planting plans in concert with soil conditions  
and stormwater management techniques; plants are a major 
component of the water cycle.
 Consult NRG’s NYC-specific native plant lists and plant 
characteristic data.
 Develop erosion and sedimentation control to protect  
existing water features and hydrologic patterns.
 Prepare site protection and preservation plans.
if comPacTion occurs as ParT of necessarY 
consTrucTion TecHniques, require DecomPacTion Prior 
To final graDing
 The contract documents should include a requirement  
for contractors to pay for decompaction in the case of failure 
to comply with the site protection plan.
 See S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils Before 
Importing New Soil Materials
ProTecT small sTream anD flow PaTHs
 Design buildings, roads, and infrastructure to avoid  
the removal, grading, or compaction of small streams and  
flow paths.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific All Rights Reserved
pdf reverse page order; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
1. public void DeletePages(int[] pageIndexes). Description: Delete specified pages from the input PDF file. Parameters: All Rights Reserved.
pdf reverse page order online; rotate all pages in pdf and save
164
Where crossings are unavoidable, design open bottomed 
culverts of the minimum required length to allow for pas-
sage of aquatic organisms.
Avoid the use of enclosed pipes.
 Revisit all grading plans to identify and reduce unnecessary 
grading.
Pull grading and contours back to the minimum required 
for improvements.
Avoid the unnecessary removal of irregularities in the 
landscape topography that capture water.
See W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes and S.2 Minimize 
Soil Disturbance.
 Design to prevent the discharge of storm sewers directly into 
small streams and natural flow paths.
Use berms, level spreaders, and other measures to  
dissipate water flow upstream of small streams by a distance 
of not less than 50 feet.
 Avoid the concentrated discharge of stormwater onto slopes 
where erosive conditions may develop.
 Situate built elements or areas of intense activity (such as 
playfields) with a buffer area that can absorb and slow runoff 
before it enters small streams and flow paths.
resTore exisTing small sTreams anD flow PaTHs
 Where small streams and flow paths have been damaged by 
existing conditions, implement upstream measures to reduce 
flows and volumes.
 Provide soil stabilization measures as needed.
 See W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes.
 Once the source of the excessive flows and erosive condi-
tions have been addressed, use materials and methods to 
reduce flow velocities and restore sediment deposition, such as 
woodland berms, low porous check dams, and step pools. 
 Contact NRG for assistance in calculating flow volumes and 
shear stress and determining design alternatives.
recreaTe small sTreams anD flow PaTHs
 In previously disturbed areas, small streams and flow paths 
are likely to have been eliminated or encased.
 Any opportunities to remove piping and “daylight”  
small buried streams and flow paths should be evaluated for 
possible restoration.
 Where possible, storm pipes should be replaced with  
vegetated swales.
 In hardscape areas, the use of runnels and surface flow 
paths add movement and can improve aesthetics.
 In dense landscapes, small depressions can be created by 
grading and soil amendments to catch and infiltrate water.
 Multiple depressions can be linked to create connected 
water surfaces during periods of heavy rain.
 Depressions should be limited to no more than four inches 
in depth, and incorporate soil amendments and plantings.
 For areas of infiltration, test for infiltration and  
percolation rates.
See W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes.
consTrucTion
consTrucTion consiDeraTions anD guiDelines
 Install site protection fencing and maintain it throughout 
the entire construction process to protect small streams  
and flow paths.
 Install upstream measures to reduce flows and erosive 
conditions prior to any restoration efforts in small streams and 
flow paths.
 Ensure that erosion and sediment control measures are 
installed and maintained throughout entire construction 
process.
 Ensure that soil testing is completed immediately before 
the installation of stormwater measures and at appropriate 
subgrade and final grade locations to confirm: 
Infiltration rates 
Depth to limiting zones, such as water table and bedrock 
Soil bulk density
 Take measures to decompact subgrade if required.
 See Part 2: Site Assessment for further details.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance.
 See S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils Before 
Importing New Soil Materials.
incorPoraTe Discussion of HYDrologic goals inTo 
conTracTor meeTings
 Review and discuss hydrologic goals of the site and  
the importance of soils and vegetation to the overall  
stormwater philosophy.
 Review and discuss the importance of protecting small 
streams and flow paths.
 Work with contractors early in the process to stress  
the importance of keeping equipment and material out of 
small streams and flow paths.
 Review the importance of uncompacted soils and  
erosion control.
 Review the intent of the construction staging and  
sequencing plan.
 Review the requirements of the site protection and  
construction staging and sequencing plans.
 Emphasize the need for equipment, storage, and disposal  
to avoid small streams and flow paths. 
PreserVe anD ProTecT exisTing soils To allow for 
funcTioning HYDrologY
 See C.3 Create Construction Staging & Sequencing Plans 
make PerioDic insPecTions During consTrucTion PHase 
To ensure comPliance wiTH requiremenTs
mainTenance
PerioDicallY insPecT small sTreams anD naTural 
flow PaTHs
 Identify and address erosive conditions before excessive 
damage occurs.
 Inspect and repair interim restoration measures such as 
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages in easy ways box, note, underline, rectangle, polygon and so on are all can be
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; change orientation of pdf page
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; rotate single page in pdf
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
165
berms and check dams.
 These measures are not intended to last indefinitely,  
but to provide soil stability until vegetation and channel  
stability are established.
 Provide repairs as needed until site stabilization occurs.
 Identify appropriate maintenance measures.
For example, small depressions and flow paths that  
are recreated will require care in mowing to avoid future 
elimination and compaction.
 Develop brief but detailed maintenance sheets specific to 
measures and areas that have been protected or restored.
aVoiD creaTing new Problems
 Avoid repair measures to paths, roads, and culverts that will 
create new problems by channelizing excess water.
Often a culvert will be installed to repair an eroding  
path, causing erosive conditions in small streams and flow 
paths downstream.
 Avoid uncontrolled access of maintenance vehicles.
Such vehicles should be directed to specific routes  
for access needs.
Crossing of small streams and flow paths should  
be avoided.
See W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 Prevent soil compaction and restore compacted areas
See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance
for furTHer informaTion
f Philadelphia Clean and Green Program, which describes where small 
ephemeral pools were created in reclaimed urban lots: http://www.next-
greatcity.com/actions/lots
American Rivers and Sierra Club. Where Rivers are Born: The Scientific 
Imperative for Defending Small Streams and Wetlands, September 2003.
Dunne and Leoplold, Water in Environmental Planning. Macmillan. 1978. 
(Available through Google Docs)
Gomi, T., R.C. Sidle, and J.S. Richardson. Understanding Processes and 
Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems. BioScience 52:905-916. 2002.
Leopold, L.B., A View of the River. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University 
Press. 1994.
http://www.epa.gov/OWOW/NPS/urbanize/report.html
objecTiVe                                                                     
Decrease sewer overflows that contribute to stream  
contamination and flooding. Improve groundwater recharge, 
evapotranspiration, and water availability for plantings.
benefiTs                                                                     
 Reduces runoff, with direct reduction of combined sewer 
overflows in small storms and local flooding in larger events.
 Increases awareness of stormwater by creating a system that 
is visible, not buried.
Reduces irrigation needs if designed to disperse runoff into 
planting beds and across lawns. 
 Increases groundwater recharge.
Reduces cost of piping and inlets.
 Provides easy access for repairs and changes.
 Requires little maintenance and function for many years if 
protected and properly used.
 Reduces local erosion by dispersing, rather than  
concentrating, flows.
consiDeraTions                                                           
 Requires occasional weeding and litter removal.
 Detention structures can increase cost of construction.
 May reduce land available for other uses.
 Amount of overflow must be calibrated to the absorptive 
capacity of the soil.
inTegraTion                                                                 
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and Flow Paths 
J  W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes
backgrounD                                                              
Even in highly urban areas, it is possible to reduce impervious 
cover and thus reduce combined sewer overflow, one of the 
chief culprits of water body degradation. Virtually all rainfall 
that lands on impervious surfaces becomes runoff within 
moments of falling. Additionally, many urban areas of lawn 
or playfield can be so compacted that the area is functionally 
impervious. Even small amounts of rain will create runoff from 
impervious surfaces. This runoff can overload both separate 
and combined-sewer systems in urban areas. Disconnecting 
small impervious areas and downspouts will have a direct and 
immediate benefit.
Parks provide an opportunity to direct runoff from rainfall 
w.2 
reduce fLow to 
storm sewers
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF
rotate pdf pages in reader; rotate a pdf page
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate.tif"); All Rights Reserved
pdf rotate one page; save pdf after rotating pages
166
events and downspouts into the natural landscape and vege-
tated areas which will benefit from improved water availability. 
This will delay the storm flow, thereby reducing the overwhelm-
ing flows to the city’s taxed storm system and minimizes 
combined sewer overflows.
PracTices                                                                                   
Planning
iDenTifY oPPorTuniTies wiTHin THe Design Program
 Identify opportunities for disconnecting roof leaders.
 Identify opportunities to reduce surface flow to  
piped sewers.
DeVeloP a waTer buDgeT
 See Part 2: Site Assessment.
Design
DeVeloP a graDing anD sTormwaTer managemenT Plan
 Carefully consider proposed drainage patterns so as to 
maintain contributing watersheds to protected root zone areas 
so that plants do not need supplemental watering after the 
establishment period.
 Small rainfalls make up the bulk of precipitation. Avoid 
the collection, conveyance, and discharge of small frequent 
rainfalls from hard surfaces into piped sewers.
 Manage stormwater as close to its source as possible. 
Rather than collect and concentrate stormwater and pollut-
ants, provide places for stormwater to flow off paved areas into 
vegetated areas. 
 Balance the absorptive capacity of the natural area and the 
quantity of water expected.
 Runoff from streets, pathways, parking lots, and rooftops 
should be directed to onsite stormwater management BMPs 
whenever possible.
 Methods of conveyance can include grading, curb cuts or 
removal, or through subsurface stormwater pipes.
 Avoid excessive piping of stormwater, which will reduce 
infrastructure costs. 
 For areas where ponding or flooding cannot be tolerated, 
design a piped system that manages larger storms effectively.
 Design piped storm systems to convey runoff from large 
storms to detention areas that delay discharge into municipal 
sewage systems. 
 Avoid the use of one large detention basin for stormwater 
control but rather spread out management strategies through-
out the site.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance
 A grading and stormwater management plan can be a large 
and technical document.
 Consult with Parks engineers and NRG staff for assistance.
DisconnecT DownsPouTs from exisTing builDings
 When disconnecting downspouts from piped sewers,  
consider the size of the roof area.
Generally, buildings with external existing downspouts 
serve less than 1,000 square feet of roof area, which 
includes a vast majority of parks buildings found within park 
space, such as comfort stations and maintenance buildings.
The approximate roof area should be visually confirmed 
to assure discharged flows to vegetative surfaces are not 
unmanageable.
Flow rate estimates should be made for roof areas greater 
than 1,000 square feet in area.
 Sufficient area should be available for water dispersion  
and infiltration.
 While varying by volume, in general, water that is directed to 
flow across lawns requires a flow path of at least 75 feet.
 Downspouts should be far away enough from the nearest 
impervious surfaces to discourage reconnection.
 The proximity and nature of existing structures to the  
disconnection location is important.
The surface topography should grade away from  
the structure.
The disconnection should be made ten feet or more from 
existing basements and drainage should be directed away 
from structures.
 Disconnected downspouts should not discharge across side-
walks or impervious areas due to the potential for creating icy 
conditions during freezing weather.
 Do not disconnect downspouts in areas where ponding or 
basement flooding may occur.
 It may be necessary to extend the downspout to distribute 
Rooftop runoff from the Parks’ Maintenance Facility green roof on Randall’s Island 
is directed to cisterns. The water captured by the cisterns is used to water the 
green roof during periods of drought.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
167
runoff a safe distance from structures.
 Consult maps from the Mayor’s Office of Long Term  
Planning and Sustainability for areas prone to flooding.
 Maintenance staff can also provide information on  
ponding areas.
 Take care to avoid compaction of vegetated and lawn  
areas that receive runoff from downspouts or graded  
impervious areas.
 Longterm compaction of soils by mowing equipment  
will reduce soil infiltration.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 See W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes
aVoiD DownsPouTs in new builDings
 Locate buildings such as comfort stations within  
the landscape so that runoff can be directed to areas of  
high infiltration.
 Plan for runoff to be managed entirely within the landscape.
This is especially important for isolated buildings,  
where the cost of traditional drainage piping would be pro-
hibitively expensive.
 The site designer should work with the architect to reduce 
roof size if possible, and to identify potential downspout 
locations and coordinate drainage, conflicts with path and 
entrance needs, landscape, and other utility issues.
mainTenance
insPecT DisconnecTeD roof leaDers anD imPerVious 
areas regularlY
 Confirm that the flow path is still functional and has not 
been obstructed by mulch, debris, or sediment depositions.
 Restore conditions as necessary for effective runoff 
dispersion.
 Confirm that erosive conditions or localized flooding  
problems have not developed.
If these conditions have developed, identify the cause of 
erosion, such as desire lines, trampling, or clogged drains.
If erosive conditions have developed, consider methods 
to prevent further compaction such as fencing desire lines, 
or implement BMPs such as vegetated swales to direct flow 
and facilitate infiltration.
See W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and  
Flow Paths.
 Confirm that compaction has not occurred due to mowing 
and equipment.
 Refer to W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes for soil 
conditions.
for furTHer informaTion
City of New York, Department of Design and Construction. Sustainable 
Sites Design Manual. 2009.http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/
ddc_sd-sitedesignmanual.pdf
City of New York, Department of Design and Construction. High 
Performance Infrastructure Guidelines. 2009. http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/
downloads/pdf/hpig.pdf
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services. 2006. Fact Sheets: 
Downspout Disconnection. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.
cfm?c=31870
Maryland Stormwater Design Manual, 2000.
New York State Stormwater Management Design Manual (April, 2008); 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/29072.html
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Draft 
Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual. 2005. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.htm
168
objecTiVe                                                                 
Increase the absorbent capacity of a site by maintaining and 
restoring a healthy and porous soil matrix that allows water 
infiltration and by using plants that absorb and evapotrans-
pirate moisture. Remove areas of unnecessary impermeable 
surface and use pervious alternatives, reducing the amount of 
stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces increasing infiltra-
tion and improving water quality.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Applicable at many scales and configurations; ideal for 
small sites in highly urbanized areas such as medians,  
planting strips, traffic islands and other leftover spaces.
Tends to be low maintenance and tolerant of urban  
conditions if well designed.
 Reduces runoff and combined sewer overflows.
 Reduces peak load of runoff to existing infrastructure during 
storm events by infiltrating and slowing water flows.
 Significantly reduces chemical and nutrient loading of 
ground water and surface water bodies.
 Reduces need for expensive hard infrastructure.
 Increases potential for onsite stormwater management 
including filtering stormwater, ground recharge and water  
quality improvement.
 Healthy and absorbent soils will facilitate greater  
evapotranspiration, improving air quality and reducing  
urban heating.
 Encourages healthy plants by returning water to the soil 
mantle and providing natural irrigation to areas than may not 
receive other means of watering.
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Requires periodic maintenance to ensure plant health  
and remove debris.
Requires plant palette to support extensive root  
system development.
 May require the use of soil amendments and restoration 
techniques prior to vegetation installation.
 Not always appropriate for regulated sites such as  
brownfields, however, absorbent landscapes can be created 
above caps.
Requires education and alternative thinking by engineers.
 Can require code changes.
 Soil types may limit infiltration or planting success.
inTegraTion                                                                
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 S.4 Use Compost 
backgrounD                                                              
In urban stormwater management, the simplest approach to 
reducing stormwater runoff and pollutants is to maintain or 
restore the ability of soils to absorb rainfall. Biological macrop-
ores created by vegetation, especially deep rooted vegetation 
and fauna, will improve the absorbent characteristics of a soil, 
thereby reducing runoff, increasing infiltration, and improv-
ing water quality. Soil amendments to improve soil health com-
bined with vegetative plantings intended to create extensive 
root systems, will create, increase, and restore macropores in 
disturbed soil horizons. Improving the opportunity for macrop-
ore development in the upper soil horizon will facilitate deeper 
macropore development and soil absorptive capability. Areas 
of lawn that have become compacted are virtually impervi-
ous and almost as dense as concrete, generating a consider-
able amount of stormwater runoff. Absorbent landscapes can 
control, treat, and gradually release rainfall back into the water 
cycle through infiltration and evapotranspiration.
It should be noted that impermeable caps, required for 
the management of contamination, will preclude infiltration 
to the water table. Such a cap serves to eliminate exposure 
to the contamination, and the infiltration of water that would 
mobilize the contamination to the groundwater. The hydrologic 
holding capacity of the area above the cap is lowered, poten-
tially leading to more runoff. Special attention and engineering 
to account for this must be included.
PracTices                                                                   
Planning
conDucT siTe analYsis To DeTermine anD oPTimiZe 
lanDscaPe absorPTiVe caPabiliTY
 See Part 2: Site Assessment.
 See S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis.
assess exisTing imPerVious surfaces anD DeTermine 
wHere iT is feasible To reDuce or rePlace wiTH a 
PerVious surface
 See Part 2: Site Assessment (Water Analysis, Assess 
Existing Impervious Surfaces) 
eValuaTe PlanneD new imPerVious areas anD reDuce 
THe amounT of PaVemenT wHile accommoDaTing THe 
DesireD neeDs
 Implement pervious surface alternatives in all renovations 
and new development.
DeTermine if THere are imPermeable laYers or 
conTaminaTion below THe surface of THe soil
 Landfill cap 
w.3 
create 
aBsorBent 
LandscaPes
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
169
 Transportation or other structure 
 Rock 
 Contamination 
Design
incorPoraTe siTe ProTecTion Plans
 Keep subgrade from being compacted during construction 
and decompact previously compacted subgrade.
amenD exisTing soils To imProVe PorosiTY
 Ensure that soil testing, especially in areas of infiltration,  
is conducted at appropriate areas.
 Test percolation rates in infiltration areas and at appropriate 
subgrade and final grade locations.
Specify measures to decompact existing top soil  
and subgrade as needed.
 See S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils  
Before Importing New Soil
 Ensure adequate soil depths for healthy vegetation and 
stormwater storage and infiltration.
 Provide a transition layer between soil horizons to  
facilitate drainage.
 Maximize vegetation, that is, increase the quality, density, 
and quantity of vegetation, particularly trees, to increase 
evapotranspiration.
 Use organic mulch to retain moisture, minimize erosion,  
and avoid surface sealing.
 Use vertical staking to restore compacted soils.
Vertical stakes add soil stability. 
Rather than disturbing entire compacted areas,  
which leaves them open to invasive species and erosion,  
use stakes driven vertically to loosen soil, convey water  
and air downward.
Consult Capital Arborist for further information.
 Use vertical mulching to restore compacted soils.
Drill 2” holes 1 foot deep and fill with porous material 
such as sand and mycorrhiza. The depth and spacing  
can be varied depending upon the severity of compaction.
 Add compost to increase porosity.
 See S.4 Use Compost.
uTiliZe sPecifieD soils or subgraDe meTHoDs To
increase PorosiTY
 Where necessary, utilize soils that are specified and manu-
factured to increase infiltration and maintain good porosity.
Specify soils with very low amounts of USDA texture fines.
 For example: less than 10% fine and very fine sands 
and less than 3% silt and clay
Specify gap graded soil materials that have a high  
hydrologic conductivity.
 Examples include CU Structural soil or Stalite  
soil mixes
Specify the use of gap graded gravel subbases (where 
fines have been removed) as is commonly done with porous 
pavement assemblies.
 Consider subgrade remediation to encourage deeper 
subsurface water infiltration.
Ripping of subgrades when space permits, auguring holes 
to more free draining subsurface layers, and backfilling the 
holes with porous soil materials 
PosiTion absorbenT lanDscaPes DeliberaTelY
 Position absorbent landscapes to maximize the  
disconnection of impervious surfaces from the conventional 
stormwater system.
 Optimize infiltration opportunities by connecting absorbent 
landscape areas.
The goal is to give rainwater the longest route overland, 
through the soil strata and past plant leaves and roots before 
connecting it to the conventional stormwater pipe system.
selecT PlanTs THaT will imProVe soil sTrucTure
 Select and manage plants with deep root systems and  
large amounts of surface or root biomass to increase  
organic matter, improve soil structure and moisture through 
better infiltration.
Grasses: Big Bluestem, Canada Wild Rye, Little Bluestem, 
Indian grass, Sideoats Gramma, Canadian Wild Rye, and 
Switchgrass
Forbs: Asters, Indigos, and Coneflowers 
Shrubs: with deep woody root systems for use in wet 
areas, such as Cornus and Salix 
Hardwood trees: oaks and maples are often the pioneers 
of disturbed sites and can be used in groupings with shrubs 
to create microclimate.
 Assess feasibility of plant lists to provide stable  
landscape matrix.
 In large areas of difficult growing condition that will not 
receive much care, choose plants that don’t require very  
specific soil and microclimate conditions.
These plants can tolerate difficult growing conditions 
and will improve soil porosity and enrich the soil until more 
sensitive plants can be added.
 Grass and legume cover crops with deep tap roots can 
reduce existing severe soil compaction and may be needed as 
a first step in soil restoration.
Consider planting noninvasive annual species in conjunc-
tion with the desired permanent species.
DeVeloP meTHoDs To caPTure, TreaT, anD infilTraTe 
sTormwaTer inTo alTernaTiVe bmPs
 Tree trenches 
 Pervious parking aisles 
 Street bump-outs 
 Bioswales (See W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology 
and Flow Paths)
 Rain gardens (See W.5 Use Rain Gardens and Bioretention)
use PerVious surfaces
 Incorporate pervious surface alternatives at the beginning of 
the design process of new development.
See W.7 Use Porous Pavements.
Pervious asphalt 
170
Pervious concrete 
Pervious pavers 
 See D.9 Synthetic Turf.
use PerVious subgraDe
 Use open graded base course such as stone aggregate or 
other recycled aggregates including glass, concrete, or recy-
cled glass reservoirs under conventional pavement to spread 
stormwater over a large surface and allow it to infiltrate slowly.
 This technique requires a method be designed to direct  
the runoff to this bed.
use PerVious curbs anD guTTers
 Pervious curbs can be constructed via slotting at intervals, 
drainage holes, or using a permeable material.
 For areas of higher flows, consider broken stone along  
the edges of the accepting area to allow for infiltration and 
minimize erosion.
 DEP is using the technique of a false catch basin or steep 
top inlet (the curb part of a catch basin).
reDuce PaVing wiTHin Parking loTs
 While they are intended for commercial parking lots,  
comply with the NYC Department of City Planning’s Design 
Standards for a minimum in street tree and landscaping 
allowances http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/parking_lots/park-
ing_lot_present.pdf
 See W.4 Use Infiltration Beds
isolaTe anD TreaT HigH PolluTanT acTiViTies from 
general runoff
 Collect water from maintenance areas and dumpsters and 
provide water quality treatment measures.
 Where complete separation is not possible, use pretreatment 
before runoff areas drain elsewhere.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance.
incorPoraTe eDucaTion elemenTs
 Design to showcase stormwater in rain gardens and other 
absorbent landscapes.
 Use signage to educate park visitors about stormwater and 
water conservation.
consTrucTion
consTrucTion goals
 Ensure that erosion and sediment control measures are 
installed and maintained throughout the construction process. 
 Avoid soil compaction.
 Minimize runoff from construction and construction 
activities.
incorPoraTe Discussion of soil ProTecTion inTo 
conTracTor meeTings
 Prebid meetings: 
Review and discuss hydrologic goals of the site  
and the importance of soils and vegetation to the overall 
stormwater philosophy.
Review the importance of the plantings to stormwater 
management.
 Pre-construction meetings: 
Review the requirements of the site protection and  
construction staging and sequencing plans.
Discuss in detail the importance of soils and vegetation  
to the plans.
Discuss specific procedures for soil protection.
Discuss detailing of sustainable stormwater  
management systems.
ensure comPliance wiTH requiremenTs
 Observe installation of stormwater management elements 
from subgrade preparation to final surface treatment especially 
if unusual stormwater management systems are used.
 Direct corrections to work operations as required to comply 
with the contract documents.
 Ensure that stormwater management elements are installed 
in appropriate weather conditions.
Avoid frozen or saturated soils.
conDucT siTe VisiTs During THe esTablisHmenT PerioD
 Make sure vegetation has established.
mainTenance
 Make sure new plantings are cared for during the  
establishment period, and thereafter.
 Aerate lawns and topdress with compost.
 Confirm standing water soaks into the ground  
within two days.
 Confirm overflow piping is not clogged.
 Remove litter and weeds from rain gardens.
 Mulch planting beds.
 Develop a management plan that leaves organic matter in 
place (leaf litter in particular) or adds organic matter on an 
annual basis to ensure enduring high organic content.
for furTHer informaTion
Abrams, Glen J. “New Thinking in an Old City: Philadelphia’s Movement 
toward Low-Impact Development”, NWQEP Notes: The NCSU Water Quality 
Group Newsletter. ISSN 1062-9149. Number 112. February 2004 North 
Carolina State University Water Quality Group http:/www.bae.ncsu.edu/
The vegetated swale adjacent to this path captures and infiltrates runoff.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested