display pdf in asp.net page : Rotate single page in pdf control application platform web page html azure web browser design_guidelines17-part1745

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
171
programs/extension/wqg/issues/notes112.pdf
Advances in Porous Pavement from Stormwater March-April 2005. http://
www.stormh2o.com/march-april-2005/pavement-materials-watershed.aspx
Blevin, Keith and Peter Germann, Macropores and Water Flow in Soils. 
University of Virginia Department of Environmental Science, Charlottesville, 
VA. 1982.
Capital Regional District. Reducing Impervious Surfaces. http://www.crd.
bc.ca/watersheds/protection/howtohelp/reduceimpervious.htm
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
City of New York, Department of Design and Construction. Sustainable 
Sites Design Manual. 2009. http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/
ddc_sd-sitedesignmanual.pdf
City of New York, Department of Design and Construction. High 
Performance Infrastructure Guidelines. 2009. http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/
downloads/pdf/hpig.pdf
CDOT. The Chicago Green Alley Handbook, http://www.resourcesaver.org/
file/toolmanager/CustomO16C45F95080.pdf
Florida Concrete & Products Association (FC&PA). http://www.fcpa.org/
Greater Vancouver Regional District. Stormwater Source Controls 
Preliminary Design Guidelines Vancouver: GVRD, 2004. http://www.grvd.
bc.ca/sewerage/stormwater_reports.htm
WA Public Works Department. Impervious Surface Reduction. Olympia: 
360-753-8454
Ferguson, Bruce K. Introduction to Stormwater: Concept, Purpose, 
Design., New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1999.
Jay, Jane H., Asphalt Nation: How the Automobile Took Over America and 
How We Can Take it Back. Crown/Random House: 1997.
National Stone, Sand and Gravel Association http://www.nssga.org/
Frazer L. Paving Paradise: The Peril of Impervious Surfaces. 
Environmental Health Perspectives 113:A456-A462. doi:10.1289/ehp.113-
a456. 2005
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Draft 
Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual.2005. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.htm
Pitt, Robert, et al. Infiltration Through Disturbed Urban Soils and 
Compost-Amended Soil Effects on Runoff Quality and Quantity. U.S. EPA 
Office of Research and Development, 1999.
Pitt, Robert, et al. Compacted Urban Soils Effects on Infiltration and 
Bioretention Stormwater Control Designs. Department of Civil Engineering, 
University of Alabama, 2002.
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, City of Portland. 2006. 
Fact Sheets: Vegetated Swales. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.
cfm?c=31870
Reliant Stadium Houston, Texas. http://64.207.55.2/project_profile/
browserecord.php?-lay=Form%20View&-action=browse&-recid=140
Soil and Water Conservation Society. Soil Biology Primer. USDA Natural 
Resources Conservation Service, 2000.
Government of British Columbia. Soil Rehabilitation Guidebook.. March, 
1997. http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/tasb/LEGSREGS/FPC/FPCGUIDE/soilreha/
rehabtoc.html
Stephens, Kim A., Patrick Graham and David Reid. The Stormwater 
Center: The Stormwater Manager’s Resource Center.
http://www.stormwatercenter.net/monitoring%20and%20assessment/
imp%20cover/impercovr%20model.htm
Province of British Columbia. Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook 
for British Columbia, 2002. http://wlawww.gov.bc.ca/epd/epdpa/mpp/
stormwater/stormwater.html
Thompson, J. William and Kim Sorvig. Sustainable Landscape 
Construction Island Press, 2000
University of Nevada, Cooperative Extension Your Landscape Can Be 
Beautiful, Water Efficient and Easy On the Environment. http://www.unce.
unr.edu/publication/EB9502/ChapterTwelve.html
Tuller, M and D. Orr, Hydraulic Functions for Macroporous Soils. Utah 
State University, 2001.
Rotate single page in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf expert rotate page; reverse pdf page order online
Rotate single page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate page; rotate pages in pdf online
172
objecTiVe                                                                   
Retain and infiltrate stormwater in a subsurface layer to reduce 
the volume of runoff entering storm sewers and increase 
groundwater recharge.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Reduces runoff and combined sewer overflows. 
 Improves water quality.
 Uses space efficiently by layering stormwater services  
below other park uses.
 Reduces need for stormwater conveyance structures  
such as pipes and inlets.
 Provides a measure to reduce stormwater volume in  
areas of high erosion or downstream damage.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Design must be considered early in the design phase  
to account for needs of system in conjunction with surface 
land use.
 Requires an uncompacted subsurface with well drained  
soils for infiltration.
 Use may be limited by regulations in landfills or areas  
of soil contamination.
inTegraTion                                                                
 W.2 Reduce Flow to Storm Sewer 
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
backgrounD                                                             
Subsurface infiltration beds are used for the temporary  
storage and infiltration of stormwater runoff. They consist of 
a pervious soil layer or porous pavement layer placed above a 
uniformly graded aggregate bed. Subsurface infiltration  
beds can be used in a variety of areas to reduce stormwater 
runoff and improve water quality, but are especially suited 
for under porous asphalt, porous concrete, tree trenches, and 
infiltrating synthetic turf.
Subsurface infiltration beds can be used on a slope if  
the beds are terraced or stepped. Infiltration beds can also  
be used.
A dry well is a small, subsurface vertical infiltration bed and 
is especially suitable for roof runoff from the downspouts of 
buildings. Dry wells can reduce the volume of runoff entering 
the stormwater infrastructure system by disconnecting roof 
drainage from the sewer system. The infiltration of this runoff 
also recharges groundwater. Dry wells are effective in urban 
parks because they are space efficient and can be located 
under planting areas, under paths or walkways, or incorporated 
in other ways into the footprint of project disturbance.
PracTices                                                             
Design
eValuaTe siTes for infilTraTion beD locaTion earlY in THe 
siTe Planning Process
 Avoid areas of excessive cut if the soil mantle is removed.
 Avoid areas of fill, which require compaction and will not be 
suitable for infiltration.
 Undertake an integrated design process, with input from 
different disciplines early in the schematic design phase, to 
assist in identifying potential areas for subsurface infiltration.
conDucT soil inVesTigaTion anD infilTraTion TesTing
 Determine the infiltration rate and verify subsurface condi-
tions suitable for infiltration.
 See Part 2: Site Assessment.
DeTermine wHere infilTraTion beDs woulD be useful
 Direct connection of roof leaders 
Roof leaders and area inlets may be connected to convey 
runoff water to the bed.
Water quality inserts or sump inlets should be used to 
prevent the conveyance of sediment and debris into the bed.
See W.9 Manage Rooftop Runoff.
 Direct connection of inlets 
Catch basins, inlets, and area drains may be directly  
connected to subsurface infiltration beds.
Sediment and debris removal must be provided.
Storm structures must include sediment trap areas  
below the inverts of discharge pipes to trap solids and 
debris, and screens or snouts to prevent debris and trash 
from entering beds.
In areas of high traffic or excessive generation of sedi-
ment, litter, and other similar materials, a sump or a water 
quality insert may be required (inserts designed to work 
inside curbs and grates to keep sediment, hydrocarbons, 
and litter out of the storm water system).
 Under recreational fields 
Subsurface infiltration is very well suited below playfields 
and other recreational areas.
Work with the specifications department to determine 
which types of synthetic turf would be appropriate for 
infiltration.
Special consideration should be given to the engineered 
soil mix in these cases.
Additionally, beds can be designed to provide water cap-
ture for reuse in irrigation needs.
 Under planting beds and landscaped areas 
Beds can be constructed with a top layer of 8 to 12 inches 
of topsoil, allowing for the establishment of vegetation.
 Under parking and pavement areas 
In areas where porous pavement is not feasible, 
w.4 
use infiLtration 
Beds
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
rotate all pages in pdf preview; rotate pages in pdf expert
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
rotate pdf pages and save; save pdf rotate pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
173
subsurface infiltration beds can be placed beneath standard 
pavement provided a mechanism is installed to convey the 
runoff to the bed.
Problems to consider: 
 Areas where runoff must receive water quality treat-
ment prior to infiltration 
 Areas where spills or contamination of runoff may occur 
and a mechanism for spill containment is needed
meeT THe following criTeria for infilTraTion sYsTems
 Design to capture a 1” storm event as a minimum.
 Size infiltration beds as large as possible considering cost, 
area available, and site constraints to optimize water capture 
beyond the minimum.
 Spread the water out rather than concentrating it in a  
small area.
 Avoid a loading ratio of impervious area to infiltration  
bed area of more than 5 to 1.
 The loading ratio of total drainage area to infiltration  
area should not be greater than 8 to1.
 Ensure underlying soils have an infiltration rate of  
0.5 inches per hour at the minimum. 
 Size the stormwater storage to absorb at least a 1” storm 
event from the contributing rain fall area.
 Locate infiltration systems so that they pose no threat to 
subsurface structures.
 Evaluate each situation based on geology, soils, and  
amount of stormwater.
 Limit the designed depth of water capacity to no more  
than two feet to reduce compaction and overloading of an 
infiltration system.
 It is crucial that the base of the bed remains level  
in all situations to prevent the water from sitting in the  
low lying area and causing settlement.
 Infiltration beds may be placed on a slope by benching  
or terracing parking bays.
 Do not compact the bed bottom.
Place the stone subbase in lifts and lightly roll for  
minimum required compaction.
 Grading 
Subsurface infiltration beds can be stepped or terraced 
down sloping terrain provided that the bottom of the bed 
remains level.
Stormwater runoff from nearby impervious areas (includ-
ing rooftops, parking lots, roads, and walkways) can be 
directly conveyed to the subsurface storage media, where  
it is then distributed through the bed via a network of  
perforated piping.
It is crucial that subsurface infiltration beds not be placed 
on area of recent or compacted fill and that the bed bottom 
has a slope no greater than 1%.
DeTermine infilTraTion area anD Volume
 Infiltration area: The infiltration area is the bottom area  
of the bed, defined as: 
Length of bed x width of bed = infiltration area  
(if rectangular) 
This is the area to be considered when evaluating the 
loading rate to the Infiltration bed.
 Volume: The storage volume of the infiltration bed is defined 
as the area beneath the discharge invert. This is equal to:
Length x width x depth below invert/drain x void ratio  
in medium
The void ratio in AASHTO No. 3 stone is 40%.
Soil mechanic and physics references are available that 
provide estimates of pore/void percent associated with dif-
ferent rock/soil grades/textures. Consult NYC engineering 
department for assistance.
 All infiltration beds should be designed to infiltrate or empty 
within 48 hours.
consiDer siZe anD DePTH of infilTraTion beD
 The depth of the bed is a function of stormwater storage 
requirements, grading, and frost depth considerations.
 Infiltration beds may be large in size when located in  
areas such as beneath athletic fields and pipe fields below 
pavement areas, or small, such as an area beneath a path or 
planting bed.
 General rules are to locate systems no closer than 20 feet 
down gradient or 100 feet up gradient of buildings, but site 
conditions should be evaluated for each application.
 Maintain at least 2 feet separation between seasonal  
high water table and the bed bottom.
 Maintain at least 2 feet separation between bedrock  
and the bed bottom.
 Existing path systems frequently overlap with tree  
root zones.
 Tree root zones must be avoided when designing  
infiltration beds.
maTcH infilTraTion maTerials To THe inTenDeD enD use
 The infiltration bed generally consists of an open  
graded, clean washed stone aggregate, usually 12 to 36  
inches in depth.
 The storage media for subsurface infiltration beds typically 
consists of clean washed, open graded aggregate. Open graded 
refers a gradation of stone with only a small percentage of 
aggregate particles in the small range. This results in more 
voids because there are not enough small particles to fill in the 
voids between the larger particles. 
 Storage alternatives are available, generally variations on 
plastic cells that can significantly increase the storage capac-
ity of aggregate beds, but often at an increased cost.
 The bed is wrapped in nonwoven geotextile to prevent the 
movement of soil into the storage bed and clogging of pores.
 Stormwater storage elements may also be used, however, 
the use of solid pipes for storage is discouraged, as the intent 
is to promote infiltration and not simply water storage.
 The bed may be covered with: 
A layer of 12-18 inches of permeable soil (see W.5 Use 
Rain Gardens & Bioretention)
Suitable backfill material for the construction of a natural 
or artificial athletic field
Porous pavement (see W.7 Use Porous Pavements)
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf rotate all pages; pdf rotate page and save
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Single page. View PDF in single page display mode
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; saving rotated pdf pages
174
Standard impervious pavement.
 Inlets and Outlets 
All infiltration beds must be designed with an overflow 
outlet so that as the water level rises in large storms, water 
is safely conveyed to storm sewers or overflows without 
creating saturated conditions.
An outlet control structure is commonly used to provide 
control in the beds, usually in the form of an inlet box with 
an internal concrete weir or a low flow orifice.
If the design of an infiltration bed is subject to DEP 
review, an outlet control structure can be required.
Cleanouts or inlets should be installed at a few locations 
within the bed (depending on bed size) and at appropriate 
intervals to allow access to the perforated piping network.
In areas with poorly draining soils, subsurface Infiltration 
beds may be designed to overflow to adjacent wetlands or 
bioretention areas.
consiDer THe following requiremenTs
 Stone for infiltration beds should be 2 inch to 1 inch 
uniformly graded coarse aggregate, with a wash loss of no 
more than 0.5%, AASHTO size number 3 per AASHTO 
Specifications and should have voids ≥ 35% as measured  
by ASTM-C29.
 Nonwoven permeable geotextile should consist of  
needled nonwoven polypropylene fibers and meets the  
following properties: 
Grab tensile strength (ASTM-D4632) ≥ 120 lbs 
Mullen burst strength (ASTM-D3786) ≥ 225 psi 
Flow rate (ASTM-D4491) ≥ 95 gal/min/ft2
UV resistance after 500 hrs (ASTM-D4355) ≥ 70% 
Heat-set or heat-calendared fabrics are not permitted.
Acceptable types include Mirafi 140N, Amoco 4547,  
and Geotex 451.
 To provide an even surface for paving, install a 1 inch layer 
of choker base course of single size, 1/2” crushed stone that 
stabilizes the open graded asphalt (often AASHTO #57 stone) 
over the bed aggregate.
 If a vegetated surface layer is planned, then place an 
approved soil mix over infiltration bed in maximum 6 inch lifts, 
then stabilize topsoil and conduct seeding or planting.
 If a porous pavement or concrete surface layer is desired, 
lay it directly over the stone bed course.
 See W.7 Use Porous Pavement.
consTrucTion
be aware of consTrucTion sequence
 If possible, install subsurface infiltration systems toward the 
end of the construction period.
 Avoid compacting the existing subgrade or exposing it to 
construction equipment traffic prior to stone bed placement.
 Remove accumulation of fine materials and/or surface pond-
ing caused by erosion of subgrade using light equipment, and 
level all bed bottoms.
 Leave earthen berms in place during excavation.
 Immediately place geotextile and bed aggregate after the 
approval of subgrade preparation.
 Install all necessary upstream and downstream control 
structures, cleanouts, and perforated piping.
 Keep construction equipment off the bottom of the bed 
as much as possible while clean (washed) uniformly graded 
aggregate is placed in the bed in maximum 8 inch lifts.
mainTenance
 Inspect and clean all catch basins and inlets that convey 
collected runoff to the beds on an annual basis. 
 Ensure that upstream measures prevent sediment from 
entering the bed, or the life of the bed will be reduced and will 
require frequent maintenance.
 Inspect, clean, and repair water quality measures that treat 
the runoff before it enters the bed, including catch basins, or 
vegetative elements such as swales.
for furTHer informaTion
New York City Department of Design and Construction. Sustainable Sites 
Design Manual. 2009. http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/ddc_sd-
sitedesignmanual.pdf
New York City Department of Design and Construction. High Performance 
Infrastructure Guidelines. 2009
http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/hpig.pdf
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Draft 
Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual.2005. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.htm
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
rotate pages in pdf permanently; pdf rotate pages and save
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
175
objecTiVe                                                                  
Reduce runoff volume, improve water quality, infiltrate runoff 
and, where appropriate, provide water for plantings through 
the use of depressed landscaped areas.
benefiTs                                                                           
 Landscaping can be more resilient and maintenance free 
due to water capture than traditional planting beds requiring 
frequent watering.
 Reduces runoff and combined sewer overflows.
 Removes pollutants via settling, vegetation, and soils.
 Bioretention can reduce total suspended solids (TSS) by up to 
85% and total nitrogen and total phosphorus at ratios of 20:1.
 Landscaping design can be visually appealing as well  
as functional.
 Landscape provides ecosystem services such as air quality 
improvement, habitat, and evaporative cooling.
Offers cost effective detention and treatment.
consiDeraTions                                                                  
 Poor infiltration rates or clogged overflow pipes lead to 
standing water and mosquito breeding.
 High velocity flow entering the rain garden could  
cause erosion.
 Requires education to dispel fears about standing water and 
insect borne disease.
 Plantings should be appropriate to the function, and can be 
very naturalized or more formal.
 During rain events, litter will be washed into the rain garden. 
If it is not intercepted by a screen it will need to be removed 
from the garden.
inTegraTion                                                               
 S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis 
 S.2 Minimize Site Disturbance 
 W.4 Use Infiltration Beds 
 W.9 Manage Rooftop Runoff 
 V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes 
backgrounD                                                             
Rain gardens are shallow planted areas that retain small 
amounts of stormwater for 12 - 48 hours. Rain gardens typi-
cally manage small storm events through both infiltration and 
evapotranspiration from plants within the garden, but rain gar-
dens can also be designed for temporary storage, known as biore-
tention. Rain gardens typically consist of the following elements:
 Inflow area(s) 
 Shallow planted ponding areas over welldrained,  
permeable soil media 
 A mulch layer, preferably leaf compost 
 An optional gravel filter bed and underdrain system 
 An overflow mechanism to take larger rainfall events to 
the stormwater system or other BMPs 
 Vegetation 
Rain gardens are highly versatile and can be shaped and 
adapted to fit into a number of constrained surroundings, includ-
ing playgrounds and court sports, lawn areas, traffic islands 
and roadway swales. In large parks, they are typically designed 
as part of a larger stormwater management system. If placed in 
areas that would be landscaped under a conventional stormwater 
plan, the additional cost of constructing rain gardens is minimal.
PracTices                                                                   
Design
rain garDen Design consiDeraTions
 Distribute rain gardens throughout a site near sources of 
runoff, if possible, to mimic natural drainage patterns and 
manage water close to the source.
 Place rain gardens on areas of the site with well draining 
soils if infiltration is a goal.
 Soils should have an infiltration rate of at least 0.5 inches 
per hour or more to ensure adequate drainage of the system.
 Underdrains or other structures can also be used to manage 
excess runoff.
 Design to drain all standing water within 48 hours.
 Place rain gardens at natural low points if possible.
 Keep rain gardens 10’ from foundations or provide a method 
to waterproof foundations.
 Stormwater can be conveyed to a rain garden through sheet 
flow, an inlet with a flared end section, curb cuts, downspouts, 
trench drains, swales, or other surface structure.
w.5 
use rain 
gardens & 
Bioretention
At Mullaly Park in the Bronx, breaks along the curb direct runoff into a 
planting bed whose engineered soil layers and water-tolerant plants 
are designed to retain water.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
how to rotate one pdf page; reverse page order pdf online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate single page in pdf file; pdf rotate single page
176
Design rain garDen area
 Determine design storm volumes and model stormwater flows 
based on final catchment areas to determine rain garden sizes.
 An ideal drainage area to bioretention area ratio is 5:1.
The ratio depends on the underlying soil and the design 
of the system, particularly the overflow and high flow man-
agement system.
 The dimensions (area and depth) of the rain garden should 
be designed based on the drainage area, desired water depth, 
soils, and capacity of the overflow structure or underdrain 
system.
 Avoid side slopes of greater than 3:1.
 Side slopes of 2:1 may be used with a fence or retaining 
wall in constrained situations.
 Ensure that ponded water drains from the rain garden  
within 48 hours.
 Provide a soil base for the planting area of at least 2 feet,  
or more for areas incorporating trees and larger vegetation.
Deeper soil can lead to settlement over time and should 
be accounted for in installed soil volumes.
 Cover with several inches of mulch or compost.
Wood mulch that can float is discouraged.
 See S.7 Provide Adequate Soil Volumes and Depths  
for additional information.
ProViDe for oVerflow
 Even if rain gardens are not tied directly into the storm sys-
tem, provide a means of overflow for large storm events, such 
as a broad weir to disperse flow over a lawn or wooded area.
Overflow points can include, but are not limited to, riser 
pipes or spillways.
Domed riser pipes are recommended to prevent surface 
clogging from debris and vegetation.
 Ensure that soil pH, void space, and organic matter promote 
vegetation growth and stormwater absorption and drainage.
 Provide a prepared soil mix if onsite soil is not appropriate.
Specify 50% sand, 20-30% topsoil with less than 5% 
clay, and 20-30% leaf compost.
Minimize the use of clays.
Depth should accommodate the largest rootball as well as 
the stormwater storage requirements.
Provide an underlying 6-10” layer of clean open graded 
gravel to increase storage and infiltration if necessary.
It is essential to wrap stone using nonwoven geotextile 
fabric to prevent clogging.
 Consider use of an underdrain system in the event of com-
pacted and clay soils to augment drainage.
Perform siZing baseD on waTer qualiTY Volumes
 For sizing, refer to the table compiled from the  
New York State Stormwater Manual on page 177, and  
at http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/29072.html.
 See also Simple Chart for Rain Garden Sizing on  
page 178 for sample calculations.
Design aPProPriaTe PlanTings
J  Use plant designs that include a mix of upland and wetland plants.
 Choose plants with well developed roots.
 Space plantings to facilitate rapid establishment of thick 
cover and soil stability through dense rooting structure.
 Vary bottom elevations of plant bed to avoid monocultures, 
as different species thrive in different soil moistures, and to 
avoid reliance on the survival of one plant type.
 For areas capturing runoff from pavements and sidewalks, 
do not use for food production without proper filtering precau-
tion to avoid chemical deposition.
consTrucTion
consTrucT rain garDens wiTH care
 Construct rain gardens in the last construction phases to 
prevent damage, compaction and sediment deposition.
 Protect areas planned to become bioretention throughout 
construction if possible with effective erosion and sediment 
control measures.
Compost socks are highly effective. 
 Excavate rain gardens with care to prevent compaction of 
the bed bottom.
 Slightly overfill the excavated area with the modified soils if 
the soils are expected to settle somewhat.
 If employing infiltration, follow the guidelines provided in 
W.4 Use Infiltration Beds.
mainTenance
conDucT PerioDic mainTenance anD moniToring
 Maintain periodically, especially during the first 1 to 2 years 
of establishment.
 Proper maintenance includes: 
Weeding 
Removing litter and excess detritus 
Replacing mulch or compost 
Occasional replacement of plants may be required if the 
rain garden develops gaps in planting.
 Monitor rain gardens, particularly after rainstorms during the 
establishment period as mulch and smaller plantings can wash 
out and will need to be replaced
rain garDen siZing anD Design guiDance              
The following is derived from NYS Stormwater Management 
Design Manual.
Stormwater quantity reduction in rain gardens occurs via 
evaporation, transpiration, and infiltration, though only the 
infiltration capacity of the soil and drainage system is con-
sidered for water quality sizing. The storage volume of a rain 
garden is achieved within the gravel bed, soil medium and 
ponding area above the bed. The size should be determined 
using the water quality volume (WQv), where the site area is 
the area draining to the rain garden. The following sizing crite-
ria should be followed to arrive at the surface area of the rain 
garden, based on the required WQv.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
177
CALCULATION EqUATIONS
WQv = water quality volume, cubic feet of volume of water storage to be filtered
V
SM 
 volume of soil media
A
RG
= proposed area of the rain garden surface
D
SM
= depth of soil media, typically 1.0’ to 1.5’
P
SM
= porosity of soil media (assumed to be 0.20)
V
DL
 = volume of drainage layer
D
DL
= depth of drainage layer, typically 0.5’ to 1.0’
P
DL
 = porosity of drainage later (assumed to be 0.40)
D
P
 =  allowable ponding depth about surface, maximum 0.5’ 
WQv            
= ARG 
(DS
M
x PSM + DDL x PDL + DP)
This equation can be reworked to determine the flexible variables based on a fixed quantity. For instance, if you have a set area for 
the runoff source and know how deep you want your soil and drainage layers to be, you can determine WQv (volume of storage to 
filter runoff) first. Adjust the equation to isolate the unknown variable, the necessary size of the rain garden.
STEP 1—CALCULATE WATER qUALITY VOLUME USING
WQv =  (P) (Rv) (A) 
  12
Where: 
WQv = water quality volume [ft3], as defined in Chapter 4 of the New York Stormwater Management Design Manual 
P = 90% rainfall capture = 0.9 in
I = percentage of runoff from impervious area draining to rain garden 
Rv = runoff coefficient
0.05 + 0.009 x (I) where 100% is assumed for paved or rooftop, so 0.05 + 0.009 x 100 = .95
A = area draining into rain garden
STEP 2—SOLVE FOR DRAINAGE LAYER AND SOIL MEDIA STORAGE VOLUME
Determine the volume of soil media required in the rain garden: V
SM
= A
RG
x D
SM
x P
SM
or Determine area of rain garden: V
SM
/ (D
SM
x P
SM
) = A
RG
Determine the volume of the drainage layer: V
DL
= A
RG
x D
DL
x P
DL
Determine the volume of water the rain garden can handle: WQv ≤ V
SM
+ V
DL
+ (D
P
x A
RG
)
ExAMPLE
Assumptions:  
  =  1,000 sq. ft. impervious drainage area
  = 90% rainfall capture of a 1” storm = 0.9 in
Rv  =  runoff coefficient
0.05 + 0.009 x (I) where 100% is assumed for paved or rooftop, so 0.05 + 0.009 x 100 = .95
A
RG
 rain garden size of 200 sq. ft.
D
SM
 soil depth of 1’
P
SM
 porosity of soil media (assumed to be 0.20)
D
DL
 drainage layer (below soil) of 0.5’
P
DL 
= porosity of drainage later (assumed to be 0.40)
D
P
= allowable ponding depth of 0.25’ 
Note: For the equation at left, all units should be in feet, not inches.  
Be sure to convert inches to feet (i.e., 6” = 0.5’) for correct calculations
Note: see Figure 4.1 in Ch. 4 in the NY Stormwater Management Design 
Manual for more detailed numbers.
Where measuring “I” is impractical 
refer to Table 4.2 in the NY Stormwater 
Management Design Manual.
Note: This does not need to be converted to feet from inches; 
the division of 12 in the equation accounts for this
Note: This depth would also be the height that a catch basin is raised above the surface.
new York sTaTe sTormwaTer siZing criTeria
178
for furTHer informaTion
Dunnett, Nigel and Clayden, Andy. Rain Gardens: Managing Water 
Sustainably in the Garden and Designed Landscape Portland, Oregon: 
Timber Press Inc., 2007
New York State Stormwater Management Design Manual, Chapter 9, April 
2008. http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/29072.html
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Draft 
Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual. 2005. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.htm
Center for Watershed Protection. Watershed Protection Techniques: A 
Periodic Journal on Urban Watershed Restoration and Protection Tools, Silver 
Spring, MD 20910, 301-589-1890. www.cwp.com
Low Impact Development Center, Inc. and National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation. Rain Garden Design Templates. http://www.lowimpactdevelop-
ment.org/raingarden_design/
Native Plant Society of NJ. Rain Garden Manual. http://www.npsnj.org/
rain_garden_home.htm
The Rain Garden Network Chicago, Illinois. http://www.raingardennet-
work.com/raingardens.htm
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Rain Gardens Infiltrating. 
http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/wm/nps/rg/index.htm
Step 1:
WQv = (P) (Rv) (A) 
  12
WQv = (0.9”) (0.95) (1000 ft  ) = 71.25 ft3 
12
Step 2:
V
SM
 A
RG
x D
SM
x P
SM
V
DL
 =  A
RG
x D
DL
x P
DL
WQv ≤  V
SM
+ V
DL
+ (D
p
x A
RG
)
V
SM
 (200 ft2) (1 ft) (0.20) = 40 ft3
V
DL
 =  (200 ft2) (0.5 ft) (0.40) = 40 ft3
WQv ≤  40 ft3 + 40 ft3 + (0.25 ft)*(200 ft2) = 130 ft3
Because WQv (the volume of storage area needed to achieve water quality) is less (71.25 ft3) than the water storage volume in the 
rain garden (130 ft3), the rain garden is large enough.
simPle cHarT for rain garDen siZing
assumes a depth of 2’ for soil and 6” for drainage layer, allowable ponding of 2”, and that the entire drainage area is impervious.
Table W.2
2
Drainage area 
minimum area of rain garDen 
Volume of waTer sTorage 
(sq. fT.) 
(sq. fT.) 
(cu. fT.)
100 
7.1 
5.4
200 
14.3 
10.8
300 
21.4 
16.2
400 
28.5 
21.7
500 
35.6 
27.1
1000 
71.3 
54.2
1500 
106.9 
81.2
2000 
142.5 
108.3
3000 
213.8 
162.5
4000 
285.0 
216.6
5000 
356.3 
270.8
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
179
objecTiVe                                                                  
Capture runoff from small storm events, providing water  
quality treatment, while slowing and reducing discharge. 
benefiTs                                                                     
 Temporarily stores and reduces runoff.
 Reduces combined sewer discharges.
 Improves water quality through pollutant removal uptake by 
vegetation, and absorption into soils.
 Provides ideal pretreatment before an infiltration BMP 
 Creates visually appealing elements.
 Applicable to small, impervious and constrained sites in 
urban environments.
 Appropriate for the smaller volumes of runoff from  
comfort stations.
 Practical in high water tables, such as portions of Queens, 
Brooklyn and Staten Island.
consiDeraTions                                                     
 Applicable only to small drainage areas.
 Must be designed to avoid conflicts with utilities,  
which could increase costs.
This approach comes at a relatively high cost compared  
to other stormwater management practices.
inTegraTion                                                                  
 S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis 
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 W.4 Use Infiltration Beds 
 W.9 Manage Roof Runoff 
 V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes
backgrounD                                                             
A planter box is a structure, usually formed from concrete or 
brick, that is filled with absorbent soils and plants in order 
to store runoff temporarily and provide treatment. Planter 
boxes capture runoff from small storm events, usually from 
roof areas, and are especially useful in the limited spaces of 
urban areas. They provide some water quality treatment in the 
process of slowing and reducing the peak discharge of small 
rainfall events.
Planter boxes may be underdrained for slow discharge to a 
storm sewer, or open bottomed to serve as infiltration systems 
depending on location and site conditions.
PracTices                                                               
Design
PlacemenT
 Consider placing planter boxes against buildings, along 
walkways and roadways, and in other areas with small, narrow 
open space available.
 Consider placing planter boxes of various shapes and  
sizes on top of the existing surface (elevated) or at surface 
grade (depressed).
 Consider placing planter boxes adjacent to the external 
downspouts of a building to receive rooftop runoff.
 Roof leaders can be directed to planter boxes.
maTerials
 Form planter box structure out of concrete, wood, brick, 
stone, or other appropriate materials.
 Fill structure with a base layer of gravel covered by soil 
media and vegetation.
The designer should determine proper soil textures to 
avoid the migration of planting soil into the gravel layer.
 In flowthrough planter boxes, which do not allow infiltra-
tion, provide a gravel base that contains waterproofing and an 
underdrain to allow runoff to flow out of the planter box after it 
seeps through the vegetation and soil.
 Consider designing planter boxes with open bottoms  
for infiltration, when there are uncompacted, welldrained  
soils beneath. 
 If roof leaders discharge into planter boxes, design a splash 
w.6 
use stormwater 
PLanter BoXes
Runoff from this building is directed to a planter box to allow absorption 
by plants and soil, helping to reduce stormwater overflow events.
180
area to prevent erosion and disperse water through the box.
 Select vegetation for planter boxes based on the plants’  
ability to tolerate being periodically inundated with water.
Give preference to plants that readily assimilate  
water and pollutants.
 Ensure that the soil media used for planting drains  
adequately within 48 hours.
inflow anD ouTflow
 Convey runoff to planter box from roof leaders, storm pipes, 
or through sheet flow if at grade.
 In elevated planter boxes, allow for a gap up to 12 inches 
between the soil surface and the top of the box for additional 
water storage.
 In depressed planter boxes, consider filling the gap  
above soil surface with gravel or cobbles to avoid creating a 
tripping hazard.
 Always use an overflow outlet to convey excess runoff from 
the planter box.
Consider conveying overflow to an infiltration BMP if 
applicable at the site, or to the storm sewer system 
A domed and perforated cap on the riser will reduce  
the likelihood that the inlet will become clogged with  
vegetation and soil.
consTrucTion
 Build planter boxes in the final phase of construction,  
after adjacent buildings if applicable, to prevent damage.
mainTenance
 Inspect plants periodically for survival and health.
 Regularly inspect and clean all structures and pipes  
to prevent clogging.
 Regularly remove sediment from planter boxes.
for furTHer informaTion
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services. 2006. Fact 
Sheets: Flow-through Planters. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.
cfm?c=31870
City of Sandy Public Works. Stormwater Management Incentive 
Program: Planter Boxes. http://www.ci.sandy.or.us/index.
asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={A9D3CDDE-3BA0-42DE-BE30-4E321A155AA8}
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). 2005. 
Draft Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.htm
objecTiVe                                                                 
Create pervious hardscape surfaces that allow rainfall to  
drain directly through pavement into a subsurface stormwater 
storage or infiltration bed. 
benefiTs                                                                    
 Reduces runoff and combined sewer overflows.
 Applicable to most roads, parking areas, walks, and other 
paved surfaces. 
 Porous asphalt and concrete surfaces provide better traction 
for walking paths in rain or snow conditions. 
Increases longevity of pavement because freeze-thaw cycles 
do not adversely affect the structural integrity of the pavement. 
 Reduces contaminants such as total suspended solids, if the 
right base materials are used to act as filters before water gets 
to the aggregate reservoir, 
consiDeraTions                                                         
 Porous pavements should never be placed directly on sub-
grade, and should only be used with an underlying stormwater 
bed to receive the water.
 Requires periodic vacuuming twice per year for optimal 
performance.
 Not applicable to surfaces with steep grades; 5% maximum 
grades is a good standard.
Requires uncompacted subsurface with fairly well- 
drained soils.
 Cost of installation is higher than traditional pavement.
Use may be limited by existing regulations in brownfield 
areas or areas of soil contamination.
 Not appropriate in areas prone to spills or contamination, 
such as refueling stations.
 Salt and sand cannot be used on porous concrete. 
Sand cannot be used on porous asphalt. 
 Reinforced grass grids have not worked well in New York 
City parks in the past.
inTegraTion                                                                
 S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance
 W.4 Use Infiltration Beds 
 W.9 Manage Roof Runoff 
backgrounD                                                             
Porous pavement consists of a porous (permeable) surface of 
asphalt, concrete, or pavers overlaying an open graded stone 
w.7 
use Porous 
Pavements
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested