display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate a pdf page in reader software application dll winforms html azure web forms design_guidelines19-part1747

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
water
|
191
ProPerlY siTe sTorage sTrucTure aboVe graDe
 Place aboveground rain barrels and cisterns close to the 
building that is providing the catchment area. 
 Place aboveground storage systems on a sturdy foundation, 
such as compacted earth or a concrete pad.
 Consider disconnecting aboveground rain barrel and cistern 
systems during the winter to prevent freezing. 
ProPerlY siTe sTorage sTrucTure below graDe
 Place underground storage systems below the frost line. 
 Line storage systems and account for building foundations.
 Place underground storage systems away from areas expe-
riencing vehicular traffic, unless designed to be covered with 
structurally suitable materials. 
 Consider the use of prefabricated polyethylene or concrete 
vault structures with access manholes for below grade storage. 
 Alternatively, design pipe field systems if a shallower storage 
strategy is needed due to subsurface conditions such as bed 
rock or high ground water. 
 Install all storage systems per the manufacturer’s 
instructions. 
consTrucTion
ProTecT DrYwell siTe During consTrucTion
 Prevent compaction of soils with heavy equipment in the  
dry well area. 
Incorporate dry well off limits area into construction 
sequencing and site management plan.
 If possible, install dry wells in the final stages of site con-
struction to prevent compaction from equipment, clogging with 
sediment, or other types of damage. 
If earlier installation is necessary, undertake erosion and 
sedimentation control measures.
mainTenance 
Perform PerioDic mainTenance of infilTraTion sYsTems
 Check the system, especially seams, for leaks.
Clean storage tank to remove sediment and debris.
Check the distribution system for clogging to and  
from the storage tank.
unDerTake PerioDic insPecTion anD mainTenance of 
DrY wells
 Periodically inspect dry well to ensure drainage within  
48 hours of a storm event. 
In case of a longer drainage period, check the  
system for clogging.
 Periodically clean screens, filters, and the seepage pit  
to ensure proper functioning.
for furTHer informaTion
City of Portland. Stormwater Management Manual, Revision 4. 2008. 
http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=35117
City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services. Fact Sheets: Cisterns. 
2006. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=31870
City of Portland, Portland Bureau of Environmental Services. Fact Sheets: 
Drywells. 2006. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=31870
City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services. Fact Sheets: Rain 
Barrels. 2006. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=31870
City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services. Fact Sheets: How to 
Build Your Own Rain Barrel. 2006. http://www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.
cfm?c=31870
Council on the Environment of NYC. Rainwater Harvesting 101. http://
www.cenyc.org/files/osg/RWH.how.to.pdf
Kinkade-Levario, H. Forgotten Rain: Rediscovering Rainwater Harvesting. 
Granite Canyon Publications. 2004.
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Draft 
Pennsylvania Stormwater Management Manual. 2005. http://www.dep.state.
pa.us/dep/subject/advcoun/stormwater/stormwatercomm.html
How to rotate a pdf page in reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
reverse pdf page order online; rotate single page in pdf file
How to rotate a pdf page in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
192
194   Protect eXisting vegetation 
198   manage invasive sPecies 
200  Protect and enHance ecoLogicaL connectivity and HaBitat 
202  design water efficient LandscaPes 
204  design Low imPact irrigation systems 
206  use an ecoLogicaL aPProacH to PLanting 
21 1   increase quantity, density and diversity of PLantings
214  avoid utiLity confLicts witH PLanting areas 
21 5  reduce turfgrass 
218  imProve street tree HeaLtH
Part iv: 
Best Practices  
in site systems
vegetation
Part IV describes the site systems: soil, water, and vegetation. 
These systems must work together for optimal success. Each best 
practice contains an objective, background information, benefits 
and drawbacks, implementation strategies, examples, references, 
and suggestions for integration with other best practices. 
Together, the practices offer a network of opportunities that can 
be adaptively applied to any park or development opportunity. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to rotate just one page in pdf; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate pages in pdf online
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
193
inTroDucTion
New York City is an amalgam of plant communities that have 
evolved for millennia in response to specific geology, soils, 
climate, and other environmental influences particular to our 
geographic location. Even with centuries of urbanization and 
industrialization, and despite of severe fragmentation of the 
natural landscape, 23 distinct plant communities can still be 
found within the five boroughs, mostly on parkland.
Vegetation is critical to the users’ experience of a park and a 
park’s ecological and climatological value. Vegetation absorbs 
and transpires rainwater, prevents soil erosion, creates habitat 
from the ground to the treetops, and is integral to healthy air 
and a stable climate.
For every project, the fundamental questions to ask are: 
what are the existing plant communities on and around the 
site, and what plant communities are currently thriving. All 
By analyzing and assessing these variables, Parks staff will be 
able to nurture existing plant communities, coax the highest 
level of biological function from a given site, and design plant-
ings that will have the best chance to thrive far into the future. 
This focus on plant survival helps provide the proper  
context for one other critical issue: the use of native or non-
native plants. Although park advocates and experts continue 
to debate this issue vigorously, many urban sites — with 
their altered microclimate, compacted soils, high intensity 
uses, and numerous environmental stresses including climate 
change — are difficult for native species to thrive in. At the 
same time, some nonnative species can become invasive, 
overwhelming other species and ultimately eradicating  
plant diversity. 
keY PrinciPles
CONTROL INVASIVE VEGETATION: Tame or eradicate existing 
invasive vegetation. Invasive vegetation is not the same as 
nonnative vegetation. Invasive vegetation dominates an area 
or habitat. Although there is vigorous discussion within many 
segments of the design and environmental professions about 
the value of native vs. nonnative vegetation, the first principle 
of designing with vegetation is to do no harm. When introduc-
ing nonnative plants, do not introduce any species that may 
dominate native species, create a monoculture, or reduce 
plant biodiversity.
SUSTAIN NATIVE VEGETATION COMMUNITIES: Often native 
plants are among the existing plant communities on a given 
site. In these cases, Parks should conserve, manage, and 
enhance their sustainability, and plant native species commu-
nities where it has been determined they can thrive.
CONSIDER VEGETATION, SOIL, AND WATER AS AN INTE-
GRATED SYSTEM: Vegetation needs living soil and appropriate 
amounts of water to survive. Designers and Parks staff must 
understand the existing and anticipated soil and water condi-
tions and develop plant palettes that will respond favorably 
to available or newly engineered conditions. Designers must 
understand what soils are needed to sustain a desired plant 
community.
CREATE MULTITIERED VEGETATION COMMUNITIES: Plant 
communities should include a balance of upper, middle, and 
lower story vegetation. Woodland and forest plant communi-
ties, for example, provide greater habitat value, diversity, 
aesthetics, resiliency, erosion control, and water resources pro-
tection if they include multiple tiers of trees, shrubs, grasses, 
and herbs. In contrast, other vegetation communities such as 
grasslands provide specific habitat and ecological functions 
with a more homogeneous vegetation structure. 
VEGETATION TIMELINES ARE LONG: Always consider 
maturity when making decisions about plant selection. After 
determining what a given site will support, designers and Parks 
staff must also consider what the long term goals of a mature 
park are. For example, a timeframe could be decades long. 
Planting must be designed to support overall programmatic, 
scenic, and habitat goals. Careful consideration should be 
given to the sun needs of vegetation and activity, and scenic 
views, as well as the need for vegetation buffers.
ENCOURAGE A BROAD RANGE OF AESTHETIC CHOICES IN 
VEGETATION DESIGN: Successful parks can contain a variety 
of formal and informal landscapes. Aesthetic choices have 
ramifications for ecological diversity and overall sustainabil-
ity. The general public and the Parks Department should be 
encouraged to imagine, create, and embrace many different 
kinds of landscapes that have high ecological values and can 
be sustained over time. The traditional park landscape of lawn 
and trees is of relatively low ecological value, providing little 
habitat for insects, birds, and other creatures. There are many 
examples of ways to increase sustainability, such as featuring 
meadows instead of lawns, and planting multiple species of 
trees to avoid the plight of monocultural disease vulnerability.
PRIORITIzE PLANT COMMUNITY ExPANSION AND HABITAT 
ENHANCEMENT: Efforts should be made restore existing  
plant communities and connect to surrounding plant commu-
nities. If restoration is not feasible, efforts should be made to 
maximize biological functionality and connectivity to neighbor-
ing sites.
CONSIDER ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF 
PLANTINGS: It is critical to design plantings for the level of 
maintenance that can be expected at a site, and to provide a 
source of water for the establishment period. Without this level 
of foresight, plantings likely will not survive. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
pdf page order reverse; how to rotate one pdf page
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
pdf reverse page order; reverse page order pdf online
194
objecTiVe                                                                 
Identify, assess, and protect existing vegetation of aesthetic, 
historic, and ecological value. Preserve existing onsite  
vegetation and its stormwater management, air quality, and 
microclimate benefits. 
benefiTs                                                                    
 Reduces overall site disturbance including soil compaction 
and erosion.
 Maintains ability of the site to manage stormwater flows  
and treat stormwater.
 Minimizes costs by reducing need for soil amendments  
and new plantings.
 Reduces long term maintenance needs and costs.
 Protects desirable plants from becoming crowded or  
shaded out.
 Improves biodiversity and animal habitat.
 Preserves mature ecosystems and habitat.
Provides insight into site-appropriate ecosystems that can 
inform landscape design.
 Reduces urban heat island effect.
 Reduces energy use by minimizing new plantings  
and transport.
consiDeraTions                                                       
J  Protection zones may limit contractor maneuverability onsite
May add cost if protection fence needs to be relocated and 
reinstalled during construction to provide temporary access.
inTegraTion                                                             
 V.2 Manage Invasive Species
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat
 V.7 Increase Quantity, Density and Diversity of Plantings 
backgrounD                                                              
Preservation of healthy and appropriate site vegetation 
promotes the ecological viability of a site. Existing trees and 
shrubs provide important stormwater management functions 
such as absorption and cleansing. Vegetation improves air 
quality and microclimate. Mature vegetation provides habitat 
and aesthetic value. Mature trees improve environmental qual-
ity by decreasing air pollution, reducing and treating stormwa-
ter runoff, and reducing urban heat island effect.
PracTices                                                                  
Design
unDersTanD exisTing PlanT communiTies on anD off siTe
 Include native, nonnative, and noninvasive plants  
in analysis.
 Engage a botanist or ecologist as part of the planting design 
team to review context and make recommendations.
 Identify a reference plant community for comparison to past 
and future site conditions.
Compare soils from the reference community to site con-
ditions and amend if necessary.
Whether the desired plant community is native or horti-
cultural and noninvasive, choosing a successful reference 
community will boost the success rate of the installation.
Set goals for the plant community such as growth rate, 
species diversity, maximum tolerated invasive plant cover, 
indicator plants or animals desired.
Set a desired timeline for goals and supply to  
site manager.
 Review site with Parks Natural Resources Group (NRG) if 
adjacent to any Forever Wild sites or forested or wetland areas.
 NRG can provide a site assessment and background data on 
native plants and invasive plants of concern in these areas.
 Consult with Parks’ Native Plant Center (NPC) to determine 
if there are opportunities for utilizing NPC nursery stock in 
construction, or engaging NPC expertise in native plant preser-
vation or proliferation onsite.
 Early notification of plant needs helps the nursery to  
plan ahead.
engage a cerTifieD arborisT as ParT of THe Design Team
 Engage a certified arborist or registered consulting arborist 
to prepare an existing vegetation report.
 The arborist should assist the design team with:
Determining long term site goals so that plant palettes 
can be designed to build on and enhance existing vegetative 
ecosystems and respond to desired performance of plants  
on site 
Recommendations about vegetation preservation, trans-
planting and removals, and recommended pruning or sup-
port system installations required during construction
Reviewing the soil tests and soil scientist recommenda-
tions completed beforehand and offering additional com-
ments or recommendations as required, including fertilizing 
or other compensatory actions required during construction 
Determining critical root zones based on tree species’ 
tolerance to construction impacts, condition, age class and 
growing conditions
Developing existing vegetation protection measures
Developing an invasive species management program
Developing an existing vegetation maintenance program 
to be used by the contractor during the construction phase
Monitoring existing and new vegetation during the con-
struction and establishment period phases 
v.1 
Protect eXisting 
vegetation
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Tiff Annotation. Rotate a Tiff Page. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Rotate Tiff Page. PDF in C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#
rotate individual pages in pdf; pdf rotate all pages
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF.
change orientation of pdf page; rotate pdf page permanently
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
195
use siTe Planning sTraTegies To PreserVe anD ProTecT 
exisTing HealTHY VegeTaTion
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
 Number the trees in accordance with the vegetation report.
 Where possible, protect vegetation as clumps of trees and 
shrubs rather than individual plants, thereby preserving shared 
soil volumes and rooting zones.
 Ideally, protection zones should be as large as possible to 
preserve adequate critical rooting zone areas.
Protection zones should be as symmetrical as possible 
around large plant material, especially trees, so as to not 
create structural instability.
The critical root zone (CRZ) is calculated by the DBH, 
species, tolerance to construction impacts, and age class, 
where tree species known to be tolerant of typical con-
struction stress and young (less than 20% of their life 
expectancy) have a CRZ radius of ½ foot per inch DBH and 
tree species known to be sensitive to construction stress, 
overmature (greater than 80% of their life expectancy) have 
a CRZ radius of 1 ½ foot per inch DBH.
Reference the Tree Protection Zones of Healthy, 
Structurally Sound Trees52 tables for more species and 
condition-specific standards.
 Illustrate the CRZ for each tree on all design plans that 
include excavation and grading.
 Carefully consider proposed grading to avoid excessive filling 
or cutting within critical root zone areas of existing vegetation.
When construction activity is to take place around a group 
of trees or other vegetation, the cumulative critical root 
zones of the massing should be determined to reduce or 
eliminate any impacts to those areas.
 Consider removing trees that have sustained CRZ loss in 
excess of 30%.
Tree species, health, structural integrity, soil type, 
vegetation competition, structure proximity, future planned 
impacts, and planned maintenance and management 
regimes contribute to the determination of which trees 
should be removed.
 Carefully consider areas adjacent to project site but not 
within contract limit lines to protect important vegetation.
 Carefully consider proposed drainage patterns so as to main-
tain contributing watersheds to protected root zone areas.
Grade changes, cuts and fills can alter the hydrology of 
the site and the water and nutrients available to the tree 
impacting root system vitality.
Develop specifications that clearly identify requirements  
pertaining to work adjacent to and below the dripline of 
existing trees and vegetation.
DeVeloP Tree anD VegeTaTion ProTecTion Plans
 Prepare a tree protection plan and necessary  
details showing: 
A summary of the tree inventory (tree protection  
schedule) prepared by an arborist, including: 
 Tree number keyed to plans 
 Tree species 
 DBH 
CRZ measurements 
 Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA)  
condition rating at time of design 
 Means of tree protection throughout project, i.e.,  
tree fencing, root protection 
 ANSI 300 pruning needs 
 Indication of tree removal/transplant 
 Special comments/notes 
Clear and concise notes outlining standards of tree 
protection and contractual responsibilities of protecting and 
preserving existing vegetation
Protection of critical root zone areas, including fencing 
and reference fencing or other protection details
Fencing that can withstand vehicular impact 
Special means of excavation to minimize impacts to trees
 Coordinate tree and vegetation protection plan with other 
contract documents including: 
Soil protection plans 
Construction staging and sequencing plans 
Soil placement plans 
Soil erosion and sedimentation control plans 
Grading and drainage plans 
Site utility plans 
Planting plans
 Include designated stockpile location(s) and truck  
access route(s).
 Indicate on plans and in specifications that protection  
barriers may have to be relocated and reinstalled during  
construction to provide temporary access.
 Require contractor to maintain protection barrier in good 
condition throughout the life of the contract.
DeVeloP a Plan for Tree anD VegeTaTion remoVal anD 
TransPlanTaTion
 Identify individual trees and shrubs for removal.
All trees greater than 6 inches in DBH to be removed 
must be approved by the Borough Forestry Office and miti-
gated based on the NYC tree valuation formula.
All trees less than 6 inches in DBH to be removed under 
Protecting groves rather 
than individual trees leaves 
larger areas of soil within the 
critical root zone undisturbed 
during construction.
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# a specific image from PDF document page in VB PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages in reader
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Rotate270: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 90 degrees BurnAnnotation: Burn all annotations to PDF page. for you to create and add a PDF document viewer
pdf rotate pages and save; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
196
the clear and grub specification must be approved by the 
Borough Forestry Office.
 Select species for removal based on their structural integrity, 
relative invasiveness (as defined by NYSDEC or local experi-
ence), state of health/viability for survival, and conflict with 
proposed construction. 
 Specify top down tree cutting rather than felling to protect 
surrounding viable trees/vegetation.
 Avoid tree cutting during migration and nesting periods.
 Identify species for transplant and show new locations; 
identify root pruning and transplant procedures and advance 
timing in specifications.
 Require two year guarantee on transplants.
 If appropriate, develop a plan for invasive species removal 
or in place control to minimize disturbance, and consult with 
NRG to identify appropriate techniques.
Plan for VegeTaTion in consTrucTion sTaging anD 
sequencing Plans
 See C.3 Create Construction Staging & Access Plans.
DeVeloP sPecificaTions THaT carefullY inDicaTe work 
requiremenTs anD resTricTions
 Indicate specific scheduling and coordination requirements 
associated with plant material transplanting, including pro-
curement root pruning, protections, and aftercare.
 For large quantities or specific sizes of native plants,  
contract growing may be required to ensure healthy plants  
for installation.
 Indicate seasonal limitations associated with vegetation 
work.
 Require that work adjacent to and within critical root zone 
areas be supervised full time by a certified arborist.
 Require all work within the critical root zone to be com-
pleted by hand or with pneumatic (air spade) equipment.
Clearly indicate if trenching is to be required and what 
methods the contractor must employ.
Show approximate trenching requirements on the plans so 
that the contractor can readily quantify costs.
 Require pavement removals to be completed with the  
smallest equipment sizes possible; operation of equipment 
over the base or subbase of pavements removed shall be  
carefully monitored.
 Clearly indicate who shall be responsible for directing and 
approving work operations in and around protected vegetation 
to remain.
 Clearly specify that work and corrective actions shall be 
directed by the design team’s consulting arborist or another 
dedicated noncontractor party.
Assign a realistic construction allowance within the con-
tract documents when it is anticipated that there may need 
to be adjustments to work operations based on unforeseen 
site conditions such as buried tree roots or the necessary 
removal of trees that are structurally compromised by con-
struction operations through no malice of the contractor.
The use of the allowance avoids lengthy disagreements 
and delays to the work.
Clearly indicate vegetation assessment and replacement 
formulas such as the NYC tree valuation process that shall 
be used to determine the value of replacement plant materi-
als damaged by construction operations, as outlined in 
Article 14 of all Parks capital contracts.
Tree inventories and tree impact mitigation plans are 
required as part of any infrastructure project that may 
adversely impact existing vegetation.
imProVe enforcemenT of conTracTor comPliance 
THrougH THe DeVeloPmenT of a sYsTem To imPose 
liquiDaTeD Damages on conTracTors wHo fail To 
follow HigH Performance guiDelines
 Many contractors will build the cost of liquidated damages 
and replacement vegetation into their bid pricing reasoning 
that it is far cheaper and quicker to simply remove and replace 
existing vegetation rather than to work around it.
Liquidated damages for existing vegetation destruction  
should be realistic in their value as determined within 
industry standard vegetation appraisal guidelines.
In order to be truly effective, the incurrence of liquidated  
damages on a project should also have consequences 
regarding the ability of the contractor to bid future work  
with the agency.
consTrucTion
creaTe a scHeDule
 Review scheduling requirements for installation of  
vegetation protections, transplants, and other related work at 
the preconstruction meeting.
moniTor mainTenance anD HanDling
 Maintain vegetation protections throughout the duration  
of construction.
 Inspect vegetation protection areas daily and promptly cor-
rect deviations from the requirements.
 Use the design team’s consulting arborist to monitor existing 
vegetation health throughout construction
 For large and/or specialized installations, consider requiring 
a restoration ecologist or other specialist to oversee soil place-
ment and planting, paid for as a contract item.
 Require the contractor to take corrective actions immedi-
ately as determined by the consulting arborist.
Mulch areas where existing vegetation has been protected 
to provide additional moisture retention.
Maintain water to areas of protected vegetation. 
Contributing water may have to be temporarily interrupted 
during construction operations.
Wash plantings to minimize build up of dust.
In areas where excavation may expose roots of existing 
plants to be preserved, minimize damage to roots, properly 
prune roots, and ensure that they are covered with sufficient 
soil and/or moisture maintaining mats to prevent the roots 
from drying out.
Monitor and enforce vegetation protection requirements 
by immediately giving a warning when the contractor 
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
197
violates the protection zones and then imposing  
damages at next occurrence.
Training
 Provide additional training for construction staff about the 
use of liquidated damages and appraising and evaluating 
tree and plant damage according to International Society for 
Arboriculture standards.
for furTHer informaTion
f The Natural Resources Group of the Parks Department has a number of 
applicable publications available on their website. They include resource 
guides to habitat locations and plant selection, forest restoration, and 
assessments of individual parks: http://www.nycgovparks.org/sub_about/
parks_divisions/nrg/nrg_stats.html
Ecological Management Plan for the Bronx River http://www.bronxriver.
org/puma/images/usersubmitted/greenway_plan/
Gargiullo, Margaret B. Native Plants of New York City and Vicinity for 
Natural Habitat Restorations. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New 
Jersey and London. 2008.
The New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse. New York Invasive Species. 
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. 
USDA National Invasive Species Information Center http://www.inva-
sivespeciesinfo.gov/
USDA National Plant Materials Center http://plant-materials.nrcs. 
usda.gov/
City of Bellevue, WA Parks and Community Services Department. 
Environmental Best Management Practices and Design Standards Manual, 
2006. http://www.ci.bellevue.wa.us/Parks_Env_Best_Mgmt_Practices.htm
Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers, Guide for Plant Appraisal, 9th 
Edition. 2000.
International Society of Arboriculture.ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Tree Pruning. 2002.
International Society of Arboriculture.ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Tree Planting. 2005.
International Society of Arboriculture. ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Tree & Shrub. 2007.
International Society of Arboriculture.ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Fertilization. 2007.
International Society of Arboriculture.ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Tree Inventories. 2006.
International Society of Arboriculture.ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Tree Support Systems. 2007.
International Society of Arboriculture. ISA Best Management Practices 
Series: Managing Trees During Construction. 2008.
Johnson, Gary. Protecting Trees from Construction Damage: A 
Homeowner’s Guide. University of Minnesota Extension Service, 1999.http://
www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/housingandclothing/DK6135.html
King County Parks and Recreation Division, Best Management Practices 
Manual, Seattle, WA, 2004. http://www.metrokc.gov/parks/bmp/
Matheny, Nelda and Clark, James. A Photographic Guide to the Evaluation 
of Hazard Trees in Urban Areas, 1994.
Matheny, Nelda and Clark, James. Trees & Development: A Technical 
Guide to Preservation of Trees During Land Development. 1998.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Chapter 4: BMPs to Protect 
Trees at the Lot Level: New Construction, Remodeling & Redevelopment in 
Conserving Wooded Areas in Developing Communities: Best Management 
Practices in Minnesota. 2008. http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/forestry/urban/
bmps_chapter4.pdf
Siewert, Alan, Siewert, Anne, Rao, Bal and Marion, Daniel ed. Tree and 
Shrub Fertilization: Proceedings from an International Conference on Tree 
and Shrub Fertilization, Society for Ecological Restoration International, 
Tucson, AZ.2003.www.ser.org
Watson, Gary and Himelick, E.B. Principles & Practice of Planting Trees & 
Shrubs, 1997.
inDusTrY associaTions
American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Washington, DC. (202) 
293-8020. www.ansi.org
International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), P.O. Box 3129, Champaign, IL 
61826 (217) 355-9411. http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.aspx
American Society of Consulting Arborists (ASCA), 9707 Key West Avenue 
Suite 100, Rockville, MD, 20850 (301) 947 — 0483. http:/www.asca-
consultants.org
sTanDarDs
American National Standards Institute, ANSI A300 (Part 1) Pruning 
Standards.
American National Standards Institute, ANSI A300 (Part 2) Fertilization 
Standards. 
American National Standards Institute, ANSI A300 (Part 3) Support 
Systems Standards — Cabling, Bracing & Guying Established Trees.
American National Standards Institute, ANSI A300 (Part 5) — 2005 
Management - Tree, Shrub and Other Woody Plant Maintenance — Std. 
Practices for Management of Trees and Shrubs During Site Planning, Site 
Development and Construction. 
American National Standards Institute, ANSI A300 (Part 6) — 2005 
Transplanting — Tree, Shrub and Other Woody Plant Maintenance — Std. 
Practices for Transplanting. 
American National Standards Institute, ANSI Z60.1 — 2004 American 
Standards for Nursery Stock.
American National Standards Institute, ANSI ZI33.1 2000 - Tree Care 
Operation Standards for Pruning, Repairing, Maintaining & Removing Trees 
and Cutting Brush — Safety Requirements.
52 Matheny, N., and Clark, J., Trees and Development: A Technical Guide to Preservation of 
Trees During Land Development, International Society of Arboriculture, Champaign, IL, 1998.
198
objecTiVe                                                                   
 Prevent the introduction of invasive species and control 
existing invasive species to allow desired vegetation to  
regain an ecological majority. Effectively prepare sites for 
successful reintroduction of complex ecosystems that are 
horticulturally sustainable.
benefiTs                                                                 
 Restores habitat conditions that have been altered by  
the presence of invasive species.
 Benefits native species and increases the likelihood 
of establishing a more diverse, self sustaining vegetation 
community.
 Allows the redevelopment of complex ecological 
relationships.
 Begins the process of restoring long term ecosystem resiliency.
 Improves potential habitat value for local fauna through 
increased biodiversity.
consiDeraTions                                                          
 Invasive species control often takes extended periods of time. 
 It may require the use of herbicides, which require  
certified applicators.
inTegraTion                                                              
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat 
Performance goal                                                  
For new construction projects within sites exhibiting invasive 
vegetation, NYCDPR has developed standard specifications 
for invasive species eradication. However, the field of inva-
sive management is rapidly evolving and research on latest 
best management practices should be conducted on highly 
invaded sites. Consult with NRG on the best options to develop 
management practices for invasive management. The practices 
should start with Parks standard specifications for invasive 
species eradication, but should also include the research 
of local universities, plant societies, and plant conserva-
tion organizations to develop the database. These include 
Society for Ecological Restoration International, New York 
Invasive Species Information, the New York Invasive Species 
Clearinghouse, Cornell University Cooperative Extension, and 
the USDA. Finally,research on latest best management prac-
tices should be conducted on sites, and documented to add to 
the database.
PracTices                                                                 
Design
PreVenT THe inTroDucTion of inVasiVe sPecies
 Do not use any plants listed on state and federal lists  
of invasive species, many of which are still available in the 
nursery trade, except in highly isolated urban areas where 
spread of these plants is not possible.
 Review sourcing of site materials to prevent accidental  
introduction of invasive species.
This can be coordinated with USDA screening methods.
 If the use of hay is required onsite, salt hay bales may  
be used to prevent the introduction of unwanted species.
 If invasive species are present on nearby properties, plant-
ings that crowd out seed establishment should be incorporated 
into the planting design.
 Limit fertilizer usage; many invasive plants will outcompete 
native plants in a high nutrient environment.
focus on inVasiVe sPecies THaT are Harmful raTHer
THan nonnaTiVe sPecies
 Identify and target top invaders that are displacing diverse 
ecosystems, altering ecosystem processes or impeding the 
establishment of goal ecosystems.
DeVeloP a conTrol anD managemenT Plan baseD on 
laTesT besT managemenT PracTices
 Identify species to be eradicated.
 Understand invasive species’ growth habits and identify opti-
mal season(s) for eradication by mechanical or chemical means.
 Research local, state, and federal control methods for individual 
species as not one control method works for all invasive plants.
 Control measures should provide an advantage for desired 
species to establish and compete with invasive species; control 
measures can include: 
Herbicide 
Hand removal 
Mowing 
Cutting, which is usually associated with an herbicide 
treatment; roots can be removed or left in place depending 
upon the allowable amount of soil disturbance 
Fire management if allowable
Shading out invasive species with larger tree plantings 
Covering soil with weed barrier during construction phase 
Using a black tarp to bake out weed seeds over a summer 
during construction 
 Cover soil with filter fabric and plant in strips between  
filter fabric or in holes cut in filter fabric.
 Identify if permanent root barriers are required for long  
term protection of site.
For complicated projects that utilize unconventional 
construction practices, consider specifying a contractor with 
experience through prequalification requirements in the con-
tract and fulltime supervisory personnel as contract items.
 Specify appropriate soil sterilant or nonresidual systemic her-
bicide as applicable to the particular species to be eradicated 
v.2 
manage 
invasive sPecies
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
199
Large areas of Randall’s Island that had been overrun with invasive species 
underwent extensive restoration, creating freshwater and saltwater marshes.
200
objecTiVe                                                                  
Maintain and enhance landscape biodiversity and ecological  
connectivity within the site, neighborhood, and region. 
Increase areas of multitiered vegetation and ecological value.
benefiTs                                                                    
Protects and enhances existing plant and animal  
communities, prevents species extinction, and helps maintain 
genetic diversity.
 Protects riparian ecosystems and potable water supply from 
contamination by herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers.
 Protects site soils.
 Encourages biodiversity.
 Protects nutrients held in the biomass of native vegetation.
 Absorbs and cleanses stormwater runoff.
 Stable vegetative systems that are linked to surrounding  
systems require less maintenance, fertilizer, water, and  
herbicides than stand alone islands.
 Stable vegetative systems are far less susceptible to invasive 
species, pests, and disease.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Multitiered landscapes and the preservation of vegetation 
remnants necessary to build connectivity may not meet  
community expectations of manicured appearance. 
inTegraTion                                                              
 D.2 Plan for Connectivity and Synergy 
 V.7 Increase Quantity, Density and Diversity of Plantings 
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance 
PracTices                                                                 
Planning
 Analyze soil characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and local 
flora and fauna species prior to design to understand the site 
and its neighborhood context as an integrated ecosystem.
 Identify critical or unique habitats based on topography, 
water, or vegetation.
 Link land use mapping and development plans to the 
v.3 
Protect and 
enHance ecoLogicaL 
connectivity  
and HaBitat
and the surrounding vegetation and hydrologic conditions.
 Require a certified applicator for all chemical  
applications and review regulatory requirements of  
DEC and other governing agencies.
 Request material safety data sheet on chemical  
treatment, if used.
 Specify that surrounding areas are to be protected  
from migration of chemical applications.
 Exercise caution when using chemical treatment adjacent  
to aquifer, high quality water, or high water table.
 Protect water sources during construction.
 Specify that all parts of invasive plants are to be removed 
from the site and disposed of legally, and in a manner that 
prevents spread to other sites.
seT goals for ecosYsTem recoVerY anD assessmenT
 Set goals for restoration of site including restoration at 
multiple scales, for example, after removal of invasive species 
replace non-vegetated areas with native plants consistent  
with surrounding species.
 See V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat.
consTrucTion
clean consTrucTion equiPmenT Tires wHen enTering THe 
siTe To aVoiD imPorTaTion of inVasiVe sPecies
 Earthmoving equipment brought to the site from other areas 
can bring unwanted invasive plants and seeds on to the site 
with unpredictable consequences.
 Require contractors to clean equipment prior to entering site.
mainTenance
DeVeloP meTHoDs for earlY DeTecTion anD raPiD 
managemenT
 Provide training for site managers to recognize invasive 
plants as they emerge as removal is much easier when  
plants are few, young, and vulnerable.
 Maintain a schedule for monitoring and removal of  
invasive species.
for furTHer informaTion
For new construction projects within sites exhibiting invasive vegetation, 
NYCDPR has developed standard specifications for invasive species eradication.
Roesch, R.G. Instructional Manual for the Removal of Invasive Species 
Along the Bronx River.NYSDOT May 18, 2005.
National Invasive Species Management Plan. http://www.invasivespe-
ciesinfo.gov/council/nmp.shtml
Society for Ecological Restoration International. www.ser.org
New York Invasive Species Information. http://nyis.info/
The New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse. http://nyis.info/
Cornell University Cooperative Extension. www.cce.cornell.edu/  
USDA National Invasive Species Information Center. http://www.inva-
sivespeciesinfo.gov/
USDA National Plant Materials Center. http://plant-materials.nrcs.usda.gov/
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested