display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate just one page in pdf application software tool html azure wpf online design_guidelines20-part1749

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
201
preservation and enhancement of environmentally  
sensitive areas.
 Engage local stakeholders to learn about historic  
knowledge, nesting, and unusual sightings, including  
them in the planning process.
researcH inDigenous PlanT communiTies To unDersTanD 
THe ecological DeVeloPmenT of THe region
 Analyze the site to understand current climate and micro-
climate constraints, including soils, contaminants, adjacent 
uses, sun and shade, and hydrology.
 Historical plant communities can provide insight and  
guidance to define target ecological restoration goals
 See Part 2: Site Analysis: Water Analysis. 
 See S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis.
 See V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation.
.
maP exisTing VegeTaTion TYPes anD communiTies 
PresenT on siTe
 Consult with Parks’ Natural Resources Group to assess  
existing vegetation communities and develop vegetation plans.
 Assess vegetative health and complexity to begin to develop 
a sense of realistic future plant palettes that preserve and add 
to the richness of site.
 On highly disturbed sites, a vegetation map will serve  
as a base map for future comparison rather than reveal  
historic patterns.
This should include canopy, shrub and ground layers.
Design
eValuaTe sensiTiVe aDjacenT PlanT communiTies To aVoiD 
acciDenTal inTroDucTion of sPecies DeTrimenTal To 
THose communiTies
 Consult with NRG and the NPC to avoid plantings that  
foster globally homogeneous plant communities.
 Reinforce local and regional plant communities. 
 Refer to New York City Parks Forestry Department’s survey  
of street trees:
Top species are listed by borough district.
Avoid those species most common in park’s district  
to increase diversity.
 Design for species diversity at all scales, within a site  
as well as within a region.
 Planting homogenous communities jeopardizes the integrity 
of the site to disease or infestation.
 If desired, select plants with similar forms but different 
taxonomy for visual uniformity but genetic diversity.
creaTe conTiguous neTworks of naTural sYsTems
 Develop overarching goals for reconnection of fragmented 
landscapes.
May include consideration of desired wildlife or indicator 
species representing overall ecosystem health.
 Design landscaped areas to reconnect fragmented vegetation 
and establish contiguous networks with other natural systems 
both within the site and beyond its boundaries.
 Where space permits, design redundancy of multiple  
habitat movement corridors to adapt to the dynamic nature  
of landscape processes.
 Design habitat corridors of sufficient width to allow for good 
vegetation layering and a diversity of species that comprise 
both interior and edge conditions.
minimiZe siTe DisTurbance
 Minimize edge conditions that degrade habitat, encourage 
invasive species, and alter ecological communities.
 Avoid major alterations to sensitive topography, vegetation, 
and wildlife habitat.
 See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance.
 See V.8 Avoid Utility Conflicts with Planting Areas
creaTe anD PreserVe HabiTaT
 Preserve ecologically significant and/or sensitive vegetation, 
wildlife habitat, and topography.
 Use a diversity of ecotypes to repair or restore existing  
site systems.
 Use plant associations found locally that will enhance  
biodiversity and habitat.
 Use plants to help stabilize slopes, shores, and stream banks 
to prevent erosion and increase sites for refuge and cover.
PreserVe anD ProTecT THe geneTics of THe local 
lanDscaPe bY using local sPecies
 Develop methods for procuring plant material that go beyond 
the usual specification from a plant catalog.
This allows for careful consideration of local ecotypes, 
plant availability, and alternative procurement methods.
 Consult with the Native Plant Center for advice and 
availability.
maTcH PlanT selecTions To ProTecTion anD PreserVaTion goals
 Woodland preservation 
 Canopy development
 Wildlife protection and attraction 
Design for waTer qualiTY
 Design riparian corridors with adequate dimension to offer 
optimal protection of waterways by filtering contaminants.
 Integrate stormwater management BMPs to manage and 
treat runoff and to minimize water pollution.
As part of a larger restoration effort along the Bronx River, Spartina species were 
planted at the salt marsh at Concrete Plant Park. Nearby stands of Spartina were 
referenced in order to place them in their appropriate habitat.
How to rotate just one page in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate pages in pdf permanently
How to rotate just one page in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pdf page by page
202
objecTiVe                                                                      
Promote plant survival through plant selection and placement, 
associating plant needs with available water resources, using 
zones, appropriate soils, and mulch. Use stormwater as a 
resource by directing stormwater runoff from impervious areas 
to plant beds where infiltration, limited ponding, detention, 
evapotranspiration, and pollutant filtering can occur.
benefiTs                                                                     
 Promotes planting success.
 Conserves local water supply.
 Reduces construction costs.
 Protects downstream water bodies by reducing impervious 
surfaces and the stormwater runoff they create. 
 Reduces combined sewer overflows.
 Protects water resources from contaminants associated with 
landscape maintenance.
consiDeraTions                                                         
 Requires monitoring to ensure optimal water efficiency, 
minimal plant loss, and performance quantification.
May raise operations and maintenance concerns, depending 
on source and quantity of the stormwater runoff.
inTegraTion                                                                 
 W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and Flow Paths
 W.9 Manage Rooftop Runoff 
 V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation 
 V.5 Design Low Impact Irrigation Systems 
Performance goal                                                  
 After establishment, apply no more than 1 inch of irrigation 
water per week, including rainwater, to turfgrass areas.
 Set a goal of no irrigation of plants except during initial 
installation and establishment period.
PracTices                                                                  
Design
DeVeloP waTer buDgeT goals
 See Part 2: Water Assessment Practices.
 Identify water capture opportunities onsite.
v.4  
design 
water efficient 
LandscaPes
Design for PlanT success
 Consider the likely vegetation evolution at the site given the 
longevity and form of the plants in the design and adjacent 
plants, and likely maintenance and management scenarios at 
the site.
 Set 5, 10, 15, 25 and 50 year landscape goals in order to 
create rich habitats that can evolve and adapt to time rather 
than maintain a look indefinitely.
mainTenance
moniTor THe siTe wiTHin iTs larger conTexT
 Consult with NRG about other forest and natural areas  
management in the vicinity of a site.
 Ecological systems rarely relate to property boundaries; 
working on a site by site basis can make it difficult to see the 
larger landscape and ecological patterns within the landscape.
Use GIS mapping and link records to other land use  
mapping and decision systems.
Maintain records of plant and animal species to monitor 
changes over time.
 Perform annual assessment of landscape conditions and 
ecological features to inform landscape management.
While this may currently be a long term goal, Parks must 
begin to build a database of information on plant perfor-
mance to successfully assess the quality of installations and 
learn for future work.
for furTHer informaTion
Benson, John F. and Maggie H. Roe, Ed. Landscape and Sustainability. 
New York: Spoon Press. 2000
Daily, Gretchen C, Susan Alexander, Paul R. Ehrlich, Larry Goulder, Jane 
Lubchenco, Pamela A. Matson, Harold A. Mooney, Sandra Postel, Stephen 
H. Schneider, David Tilman, and George M. Woodwell. Ecosystem Services: 
Benefits Supplied to Human Societies by Natural Ecosystems Washington 
D.C.: Ecological Society of America. http://www.ecology.org/biod/value/
EcosystemServices.html
Edinger, G.J., D.J. Evans, S. Gebauer, T.G. Howard, D.M. Hunt, and A.M. 
Olivero (editors). Ecological Communities of New York State. Second Edition. 
A revised and expanded edition of Carol Reschke’s Ecological Communities 
of New York State. (Draft for review). New York Natural Heritage Program, 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY. 
2002.http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/29384.html
Geay, Gene W. The Urban Forest. New York:John Wiley & Sons, 1996
Hellmund, Paul C. and Daniel S. Smith, eds. Ecology of Greenways.
University of Minnesota Press, 1993.
Labaree, Jonathan M. How Greenways Work: A Handbook on 
EcologyAmerican Trails, Redding, California.1992. http://www.american-
trails.org/resources/greenways/NPS5Grnwy.htm
Marsh, William Landscape Planning: Environmental Applications. 
Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1983
McKinney, Michael. Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Conservation. 
BioScience, Vol.52, No. 10 October, 2002.
National Park Service. http://www.nps.gov/dsc
United States Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District.Best 
Management Practices, December 2000. 
http://www.lrc.usace.army.mil/co-r/best_management_practices.htm
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
PDF page processing functions by just following attached for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pdf page and save
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PDF document pages, or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate all pages in pdf
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
203
 Develop goals.
 Consult with Parks Greenstreets Division to learn from their 
stormwater capture experience.
 Look for opportunities to contribute to NYC BMP database 
for stormwater capture.
grouP PlanTs accorDing To THeir waTer neeDs
 Establish landscapes with full vegetation cover to create 
microclimates and reduce watering needs, as opposed to large 
mulch beds with few plants.
 Use a hydrozone approach to the landscape design where 
plantings are grouped in beds with similar water requirements.
 Establish zones based on: 
High use (regular supplemental watering)
Medium use (occasional supplemental watering) 
Low use (natural rainfall only, no supplemental watering) 
 Coordinate zones with the site’s aesthetic and programming 
requirements.
Concentrate high use areas in the most visually prominent 
locations or where highest levels of site uses will occur.
Try to maximize low use areas not only to conserve water 
but to also to minimize the need for irrigation systems.
 Determine if the proposed grading and drainage design 
could be adjusted such that any high or medium use areas 
could be designed to accept stormwater runoff.
 This is often the case for planting areas near buildings with 
large roof areas or adjacent to large paved areas.
use DrougHT ToleranT naTiVe anD low waTer-use
PlanTs
 Select plants to minimize watering needs.
 In rain garden and infiltration areas, be careful to  
select plants that can tolerate both inundation and  
droughty conditions.
 Review soil mix designs in planting beds to  
determine if soil types can further minimize the need  
for supplemental watering.
limiT Turf areas To THose neeDeD for PracTical
PurPoses 
 See V.9 Reduce Turfgrass
ProViDe HealTHY soil
 Engage a soils scientist to evaluate the water capacity of 
soils as well as water movement within soils.
 Improve soil conditions to maximize water efficiency.
 The use of compost and other amendments greatly improves 
water infiltration and plant holding water capacities.
 See S.4 Use Compost.
mulcH oVer soil anD arounD PlanTs To reDuce
eVaPoraTion
 Provide between 2 and 4 inches of organic mulch to  
prevent evaporation of soil moisture
Inorganic mulches such as rocks, gravel, marble or glass 
are good soil insulators, but they are not typically good 
choices for urban landscapes and especially landscapes 
surrounded by large areas of paving or buildings because 
inorganic mulches absorb and re-radiate heat in the planting 
bed, increasing water loss from plants. 
 Determine a plan for mulch reduction as plants establish. 
use efficienT irrigaTion sYsTems
 See V.5 Design Low Impact Irrigation Systems. 
consTrucTion
waTer PlanTs regularlY During esTablisHmenT
 Develop incentives and penalties to ensure compliance.
 Use tree gator bags or similar to reduce labor cost and  
frequency of watering.
mainTenance
waTer wiselY
 Plant water requirements will vary by season and weather 
conditions; watering, whether manual or automatic, should be 
adjusted according to plant needs.
 If an irrigation system is used, operate the system at times 
of low evaporation; watering in the early morning hours from 
12AM to 7AM is generally best because evaporation rates are 
low and the public is generally not onsite.
Drip or subsurface irrigation systems, due to their very low 
volume flows, often operate outside of this schedule.
Monitor and repair irrigation system leaks or malfunction-
ing components immediately to prevent water loss and  
plant injury.
 Avoid overwatering trees to conserve water and  
prevent root rot.
 Maintain mulch cover to recommended depths;  
replenish annually.
 Do not shear shrubs; shearing promotes water  
demanding new growth.
 Consider hand watering for medium zones during low  
rainfall/drought periods after establishment.
 Remove competitive weeds regularly.
for furTHer informaTion
American Water Works Association. http://www.awwa.org
Brede, Doug. Turfgrass Maintenance Reduction Handbook. Ann Arbor, MI: 
Ann Arbor Press, 2000.
Capital Regional District, British Columbia, Best Management Practices: 
Guide to Water Conservation in the Public Sector. http://crdinfo.crd.bc.ca/
report_files/DMP340.pdf
Coder, Kim. Using Gray Water on the Landscape. University of Georgia 
College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences
http://interests.caes.uga.edu/drought/articles/gwlands.htm
Duble, Richard, Douglas Welsh, and William Welsh. Xeriscape: Landscape 
Water Conservation. Texas AgriLife Extension Service. http://aggie-horticul-
ture.tamu.edu/extension/eriscape/xeriscape.html
Irrigation Association, 6540 Arlington Boulevard, Falls Church, VA 22042-
6638 (703) 536-7080. http://www.irrigation.org
Mecham, Brent. Best Management Practices for Landscape Irrigation. 
Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District. http://www.ncwcd.org
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Easy to rotate the current picture or file page through just a button You can also process a multi-page document by deleting one or more page(s) from it
rotate pdf pages on ipad; pdf rotate pages separately
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
can be easily integrated into many MS Visual Studio .NET applications to create PDF with just a few VB.NET: Create a New PDF Document with One Blank Page.
save pdf rotate pages; rotate individual pdf pages reader
204
objecTiVe                                                                     
Reduce irrigation to the minimum, for establishment periods 
and high use turf areas. Prioritize use of systems that reuse 
stormwater and greywater.
benefiTs                                                   
 Conserves local water supply.
 Keeps stormwater onsite.
 Can reuse available greywater to reduce loads to the  
combined sewer system.
consiDeraTions                                                        
May require monitoring to ensure optimal water efficiency.
 Existing regulations require treatment of stormwater before 
it can be used in an irrigation system.
 Greywater will require treatment before reuse.
 May require outside agency coordination including the 
health department.
Cost, maintenance, and regulations are often cited as rea-
sons for reverting to conventional designs over stormwater or 
greywater systems.
inTegraTion                                                                 
 W.1 Protect and Restore Natural Hydrology and Flow Paths 
 W.9 Manage Rooftop Runoff 
PracTices                                                                     
Planning
creaTe a siTe waTer buDgeT
 See Part 2: Water Assessment Practices.
use efficienT irrigaTion sYsTems
 Harvest, store, and reuse stormwater for irrigation  
where possible.
Coordinate greywater harvesting and reuse with  
associated design professionals including civil  
engineers, architects, plumbing engineers, and  
irrigation consultants.
Consider greywater harvested from other sources  
v.5 
design 
Low imPact 
irrigation
systems
National Xeriscape Council. http://www.national_xeriscape_council.php
Smith, Stephen W. Landscape Irrigation: Design and Management. John 
Wiley & Sons, 1997.
Rainwater Harvesting. http://www.rainwaterharvesting.com
Sustainable Engineering Solutions, Subsurface Capillary Irrigation 
Brochure, for Kapillary Irrigation Sub Surface Systems (Kisssusa) (800) 
376-7161. http://www.kisssusa.com/Libraryandmedia/media/KISSS%20
product%20offering%20(Ebook).pdf
Wade, Gary, and James Midcap A Guide to Developing a Water-Wise 
Landscape University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental 
Sciences. http://www.ces.uga.edu/pubcd/B1073.htm
Water Strategies Minnesota Sustainable Design Guide, 2001. http://www.
sustainabledesignguide.umn.edu/MSDG/water_pi.htm
Xeriscape and Sustainable Landscape Design. http://www.commonsense-
care.com/xeriscape.html
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
functions, including extracting one or more page(s) from PDF document. To utilize the PDF page(s) extraction function in VB.NET application, you just need to
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate single page in pdf
VB Imaging - VB MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
barcode.Resolution = 96 'set rotation barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 barcode It allows you to select one page from a Below is just an example of generating an
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages individually
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
soiLs
|
205
including sinks and showers, which necessitates coordina-
tion with health department, but should be examined in 
overall water budget balance.
Research past greywater systems that have been  
installed in parks to determine which systems have been 
more successful.
 If an irrigation system is to be used, engage an independent 
Irrigation Association certified irrigation designer (CID) as part 
of the project design team to design the system. 
Design an irrigation system to maximize water efficiency 
and uniformity of distribution; design in accordance with 
soils, slope, plant species, microclimate, water source, and 
local weather conditions.
Consult with maintenance staff when designing a durable 
system that avoids past failures in popup sprinkler heads 
and PVC piping.
 Keep irrigation systems simple.
 Use low volume drip systems in planting beds and  
around trees.
 Continue to research durable systems within Parks and 
beyond to ensure success.
 Consider the use of a subsurface capillary irrigation system 
for rooftop and lawn area applications. 
 Assess whether temporary or permanent irrigation systems 
are more appropriate.
 Develop an irrigation system that will be abandoned after 
the plants’ establishment. 
This could be an inexpensive underground system or 
soaker hoses.
This would probably be less costly than providing  
temporary water such as hand watering from a truck, 
hydrants or hose bibs.
 Design irrigation systems or efficient spray systems  
(turfgrass areas only) to reduce evaporation loss and to avoid 
applying unnecessary water on pavements.
 Specify water conserving irrigation management methods 
such as check valves, pressure regulators, and a weather-based 
irrigation controller (WBIC) that can monitor soil moisture 
levels, rain events, and wind velocities; also, specify a system 
that can be timed to irrigate at appropriate times.
 Determine available onsite water pressure and volume and 
provide a booster pump, if necessary.
 Carefully consider irrigation system water sources.
Test water supplies to ensure water will not cause long 
term injury to plantings.
If grey water is used, it is likely that code requirements 
will require a decontamination system.
Consider installation of a filtration system if water  
supply is known to be frequently dirty.
Refer to existing water reduction programs such as  
EPA’s Water Sense program to develop sites that remain 
within the specified water budget.
 EPA approved low flow irrigation fixtures are listed on the 
agency’s website.
consTrucTion
irrigaTion sYsTem insTallaTion
 Use an Irrigation Association certified irrigation contractor 
or equivalent to install irrigation system in accordance with 
specifications, system design criteria, and water supply source 
(harvested rainwater, cistern, filtered greywater, or potable 
water supply).
 Prior to beginning installation, verify that the point of  
connection, flow rate, and static and dynamic pressures meet 
design criteria.
 Install the irrigation system according to the design  
drawings and specifications and manufacturer’s published 
performance standards.
 Review planting plans prior to installation to minimize  
conflicts between larger plants and irrigation equipment.
Review construction plans for conflicts between  
hardscape and irrigation system elements.
Install sleeves for irrigation piping and wiring, including 
spare sleeves for future renovations, below pavements and 
through foundations and building walls as required.
 Document the actual installation and prepare an as built 
record set of drawings.
 Within the record set of drawings, describe the system  
layout and components including all changes from the  
original design.
irrigaTion sYsTem sTarTuP anD TesTing
 Test the irrigation system to verify that it meets the  
design criteria.
 After installation, perform an irrigation audit using a  
procedure approved by the Irrigation Association.
 Program the weather based irrigation controller (WBIC)  
as required.
mainTenance
irrigaTion sYsTem Training
 Explain to the maintenance staff the location and operation 
of all components of the system.
 Provide the staff with recommendations for operation  
of the system for maximum water conservation and the  
importance of maintaining system components according to 
the original design.
 Provide the staff with keys, tools, warranties, and  
operating instructions for all equipment.
 At the end of the growing season, require that the  
installation contractor return to the site to review system  
winterization and shutdown procedures with the staff  
as the system is actually shut down.
 Require that the installation contractor to return to the site 
to review the system startup procedures with the staff as the 
system is turned back on.
waTer PlanTs regularlY During esTablisHmenT
 Use soaker hoses to reduce labor costs of watering.
 Use tree gator bags or similar to reduce labor cost.
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
VB.NET methods for you to locate the target TIFF page(s) accurately and quickly; Rotate single or multiple TIFF page(s) at one time just as you wish;
how to rotate page in pdf and save; pdf rotate just one page
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Resolution = 96;// set resolution barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0;// set It allows you to select one page from a PDF Below is just an example of generating an
how to change page orientation in pdf document; rotate all pages in pdf file
206
objecTiVe                                                                       
Preserve local plants and plant communities, specify plants 
that are appropriate to site conditions, recreate multitiered 
plant communities that are noninvasive. Choose plants appro-
priate for the soil, climate, and level of care.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Increases probability of plant success.
 Helps preserve and increase genetic diversity.
 Helps preserve local pollinators, insects, birds,  
and mammals.
 Preserves a sense of place.
Reduces maintenance needs including weeding, fertilizing, 
watering, and insect and disease management.
 Increases soil health.
 Protects water quality by reducing need for fertilizers,  
herbicides, and pesticides.
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Designers will have to adjust standard plant palettes to 
comply, and become more aware of local conditions to specify 
correct planting procedures.
 Finding suppliers for native species or local sources of  
species can be difficult and may increase costs.
 Plant availability may be different at time of purchase than 
at time of design.
 Establishment period maintenance and budgeting is  
typically poorly understood and therefore not provided for on 
most projects, however, without establishment care there will 
be greater plant mortality.
 Public expectation of planting area appearance may not be 
congruent with certain plant communities; outreach may be 
necessary for acceptance.
 Current maintenance methods and Park Inspection Program 
may not appropriately address this method of planting or these 
plant types; outreach, training and education may be neces-
sary, as well as reevaluating how park vegetation is rated.
inTegraTion                                                              
 S.1 Provide Comprehensive Soil Testing and Analysis 
v.6 
use an 
ecoLogicaL 
aPProacH to 
PLanting
waTer wiselY
 See V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
American Water Works Association. http://www.awwa.org
Brede, Doug. Turfgrass Maintenance Reduction Handbook. .Ann Arbor, MI: 
Ann Arbor Press, 2000.
Coder, Kim. Using Gray Water on the Landscape. University of Georgia 
College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences
http://interests.caes.uga.edu/drought/articles/gwlands.htm
Irrigation Association, 6540 Arlington Boulevard, Falls Church, VA 22042-
6638 (703) 536-7080. http://www.irrigation.org
Mecham, Brent. Best Management Practices for Landscape Irrigation. 
Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District. http://www.ncwcd.org
Smith, Stephen W. Landscape Irrigation: Design and Management, John 
Wiley & Sons, 1997.
Rainwater Harvesting. http://www.rainwaterharvesting.com
Sustainable Engineering Solutions, Subsurface Capillary Irrigation 
Brochure, for Kapillary Irrigation Sub Surface Systems (Kisssusa) (800) 
376-7161. http://www.kisssusa.com/Libraryandmedia/media/KISSS%20
product%20offering%20(Ebook).pdf
Wade, Gary, and James Midcap A Guide to Developing a Water-Wise 
Landscape University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental 
Sciences. http://www.ces.uga.edu/pubcd/B1073.htm
Water Strategies Minnesota Sustainable Design Guide, 2001. http://www.
sustainabledesignguide.umn.edu/MSDG/water_pi.htm
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
How to Rotate, Merge Word Documents Within VB.NET Imaging the length of the web page, here we just describe each single or multiple Word pages at one time with
rotate a pdf page; rotate pages in pdf and save
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
The last one is for rendering PowerPoint file to raster image Gif. This demo code just converts PowerPoint first page to Gif image.
rotate all pages in pdf and save; save pdf rotated pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
207
backgrounD                                                                  
Healthy plants are essential to the functional, ecological, 
and aesthetic success of a high performance landscape. 
Plantings that are properly selected for their location and 
nurtured during their establishment period are more suc-
cessful and have significantly reduced long term mainte-
nance and replacement costs.
Multitiered plantings have enormous environmental benefits 
and significantly reduced long term costs due to microclimate 
creation and total plant cover. These landscapes are not recon-
structions of a false place in time, but rather are put back on 
an appropriate ecological trajectory and succeed over time. 
They do not remain static. Each level of succession relies on 
certain conditions to develop before they can succeed to the 
next stage. For instance, meadows succeed to shrublands if 
there is little disturbance; organic matter will accumulate, and 
insects, birds, and animals will move seeds from nearby ecolo-
gies onto the site. 
PracTices                                                               
Design
sTuDY soil To DeTermine wHaT communiTies will 
surViVe or wHaT amenDmenTs are necessarY To fosTer 
aPProPriaTe PlanT communiTies
 Avoid soil amendments that require long term applications; 
aim for soils replenished by the vegetation.
 Soil microbes are integral to the success of herbaceous 
plant layers and are especially important in areas of created  
or heavily disturbed soils.
 Consult with NRG about the soils and to assess the  
need to conduct soil faunal tests.
 Engage a soil microbiologist to help assess soil fauna 
development.
recogniZe anD Plan for climaTe cHange anD PlanT 
sPecies migraTion
 See D.7 Mitigate and Adapt to Climate Change 
 Plan for warmer temperatures.
 Plan for higher sea levels, especially for waterfront parks.
DeVeloP goals of PlanT maTerial for sTormwaTer 
managemenT anD microclimaTe miTigaTion 
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 W.4 Use Infiltration Beds 
 W.5 Use Rain Gardens and Bioretention
 W.6 Use Stormwater Planter Boxes 
 W.8 Create Green and Blue Roofs
DeVeloP PlanT PaleTTes baseD on Doing no Harm
even frederick law olmsted, the great american landscape  
architect, made plant choices based solely on aesthetic desires and 
thus introduced one of the most invasive trees on the east coast 
(Ailanthius altissima, Tree of Heaven). it is imperative that we learn 
from mistakes like these.
 When using nonnative plants, conduct sufficient research 
to ensure that invasive plants are not released into the 
ecosystem.
 See V.2 Manage Invasive Species 
selecT PlanTs aPProPriaTe for local ecologY anD 
siTe conDiTions
 It is important to select plants adapted to and appropriate 
for the ecology at the installed location.
 Native plants are best suited to undisturbed local condi-
tions, yet in urban applications, especially where radically 
altered soils and climate situations exist, success is contingent 
upon selecting the proper plant palette for the site and its 
unique conditions rather than simply using native or nonnative 
provenance as a selection criterion.
 Evaluate environmental conditions to determine proper 
selection such as: 
Soil 
Water
Anticipated precipitation or irrigation 
Anticipated climate change, which can include a warmer 
and wetter New York 
Migrating pests and known pest problems; consult with 
NRG and Forestry on pest policies.
Elevation, especially relative to stormwater management 
areas, rivers, streams or marine coasts where stormwater 
surges with flooding, both brackish and fresh, can be rea-
sonably expected.
Deicing areas
Solar orientation
Wind exposure 
Air pollution
Sun/shade resulting from adjacent habitats or structures
 Consider both installed and future plant material size and 
locations in relation to design requirements.
 Apply hierarchical approach to species selection striving 
to protect, maintain, and restore local ecosystem types and 
their associated plant palettes first and then moving to more 
horticultural responses: 
Native 
Locally adapted (naturalized), noninvasive 
Nonnative, noninvasive 
 Select plants as part of ecosystem groupings to encourage 
multiple types of landscape cover and canopy cover each well 
suited to specific program and ecological needs, including 
but not limited to wetlands, grasslands, old fields, managed 
forests, and unmanaged forests.
learn from oTHer siTes
 Plant in patterns observed onsite or in analogous habitats.
 Research local ecotypes and develop methods to preserve 
these species.
 Research past restoration efforts in parks and visit  
those sites.
 Contact designers and learn from past successes to  
replicate and failures to avoid repeating.
208
At Pugsley Creek Park in the Bronx, retaining walls incorporate willow braches that 
will continue to grow, providing greater soil stabilization and habitat.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
209
cHoose PlanTs To resPonD To exPecTeD siTe conDiTions 
anD surrounDings
 Avoid species that require extensive site remediation and 
long term care such as watering and fertilizing.
 Weigh the environmental cost of plant selections.
 Weigh the maintenance costs of plant selections.
 Weigh the codependency need of individual plants.
For example, trillium needs a very specific set of climatic, 
soil, and moisture conditions to grow; can the site sustain 
those conditions? 
 Select salt tolerant species for plants located in areas sus-
ceptible to deicing salt runoff, tidal surges, or sea level rise.
 Selects plants according to their ability to accommodate the 
following challenges as necessary: 
Flooding 
Compaction resistance due to soil conditions, existing or 
proposed site uses or adjacent traffic vibration
Pollution resistance 
Resistance to extreme climatic conditions such as wind, 
reflected heat or shade due to adjacent building conditions 
Sun/shade resulting from maturity of adjacent plantings
 Select plant species that are resistant to local pest or  
disease problems.
Select species, varieties, and cultivars of plantings  
that are known to be naturally resistant.
 Avoid Asian longhorned beetle host plants in  
quarantine zones.
 Carefully consider plants that are currently known to be  
susceptible to nearly uncontrollable infestation such as 
Fraxinus species and emerald ash borer or Tsuga canadensis 
and wooly adelgid.
Understand that plant diseases morph over time and 
assess the ramifications of eliminating species due to  
current problems.
 Avoid combinations of plants that serve as the host species 
for organisms that attack other plants.
For example, junipers are the host plant for a fungus that 
attacks crab apples, roses, and a variety of other plants in 
the Rosacea plant family.
 Coordinate construction schedule with plant availability and 
success rate at time of planting.
sPecifY THe ProPer PlanT for THe ProPer locaTion
 Plants that are properly situated in terms of sun/shade  
exposure, wind resistance, and soil type tend to thrive.
 Poorly situated plans tend to be stressed and are therefore 
more susceptible to disease and pest infestation.
 Select plants (nonnative, native, and naturalized) that are 
bred for vigorous growth and resistance to disease and pest 
resistance in difficult sites.
 Strongly rely on locally grown native or naturalized  
species that are well adapted to our climate; these plants  
will be accustomed to our cycles of drought, disease and 
natural predators.
 Marge Garguillo has compiled extensive lists of NYC native 
plants for NYC Parks’ Natural Resources Group. Contact  
NRG for copies of these lists.
DeVeloP meTHoDs for Procuring PlanT maTerial THaT go 
beYonD THe usual sPecificaTion from a PlanT caTalog
 Develop cooperative propagation programs with another 
agency, organization, or interested nursery.
In New York, the Greenbelt Native Plant Center is a  
10 acre greenhouse and nursery complex owned and  
operated by Parks.
The Nursery’s mission is to provide locally derived native 
plants for city sponsored natural area restoration and  
management projects.
 Hire a local naturalist or botanist.
Have this local specialist provide a technical review of 
planting plans, collect seeds from local seed banks,  
review plant palettes for ecosystem appropriateness, and 
check for invasive plants.
 Investigate and use local nurseries growing  
indigenous plants.
 It is often useful to contract with these local experts  
to monitor projects during the first several years of  
establishment to fine tune the planting plan especially  
when planting for restoration.
Collect local seeds or cuttings and find a nursery to grow 
the plants until the site is ready for planting.
 This requires more coordination on the planting  
plan earlier in the project and alternative procurement 
procedures, but often yields stronger, better adapted 
plants and preserves local ecotypes that would otherwise 
be lost to development.
 To the extent possible, specify seedling stock, not clonal 
stock, cultivars or horticulturally enhanced trees to avoid  
limiting genetic variation, although some disease resistant 
varieties maybe worth including.
 Avoid substitutions.
Coordinate tree species selection with locally  
available growers to avoid undesirable substitutions  
during construction.
 Poor planning and improper scheduling should  
not be an acceptable excuse for compromising the  
design of a planting palette that is designed for  
specific plantings suited to their site and at the  
same time achieve a specified diversity either on site  
or within the park’s neighborhood.
Require landscape contractor to identify nursery sources  
at time of bid to reduce likelihood of substitutions.
coorDinaTe PlanT siZe anD aVailabiliTY wiTH wHaT is 
aVailable in THe local or regional markeT Place
 Consider contract growing, on an advanced or separate  
project schedule, for required plant material that is otherwise 
not available.
 Require growing conditions similar to site conditions to 
reduce risks associated with acclimatization.
recogniZe THaT lanDscaPes are baseD on growTH anD 
cHange oVer Time
 Develop plant community goals for set periods of time  
(5 years, 10 years, 25 years, 100 years).
210
For example, a site may succeed from young deciduous, 
wooded groves into mature deciduous groves with an  
ericaceous understory, ground cover and leaf litter.
 Develop long term management plans that require monitor-
ing of landscape over time and anticipate changes to the plan.
For example, successional landscapes that move from field 
to forest may require selective removal of woody invasive  
species and the introduction of deciduous tree seedlings of 
types not found in surrounding remnant forests.
 Plan for succession based on remaining adjacent  
ecosystems or a planned additive planting approach.
 Consult with a landscape ecologist to set performance goals.
DeVeloP a long Term mainTenance Plan wiTH THe 
mainTenance DiVision
 See M.3 Provide Maintenance Plans for New Parks 
 Develop management plans with which to reinforce the  
short and long term landscape goals.
 Develop budget projections of funds necessary to manage 
the landscape and amend it or thin it according to the plan.
 Develop management strategies and plans to foster the 
ecosystem goals.
 Develop maintenance plans that account for years one and 
two, such as watering, weeding and invasive management, 
then layout goals for year three and beyond.
 Educate the maintenance crews during the design phase.
Develop maintenance plans adapted to the maintenance 
crews’ methods of working and available equipment.
Where this is not possible, work with maintenance crews 
to develop alternative maintenance techniques and to plan 
for the purchase of new maintenance equipment.
Quantify the amount of work required.
Prioritize tasks to deal with staff and budget deficiencies, 
and provide priorities based on area as well as season.
 Develop methods for ongoing site monitoring.
Review baseline plant ecosystems.
Review ongoing maintenance activities including  
time and budget.
Create a site journal with photos.
consTrucTion
 Conduct a prebid meeting to inform contractors of any  
contract grown materials, specific local ecotype requirements, 
and the importance of the plantings to the success of the  
high performance landscape.
 Brief the construction team on any alternative planting  
patterns, techniques, and specifications.
 Insure contractors have demonstrated expertise.
 Do not accept plant substitutions that compromise the 
ecological integrity of the overall design.
 Review substitutions with the team biologist if  
possible and/or applicable.
 Monitor importation and installation of plant material.
mainTenance
DesignaTe a siTe manager anD gain familiariTY wiTH THe 
PlanTings anD managemenT Plan
 Review the management plan. 
 Review the maintenance plan every few years to account for 
and to adapt to site and use changes.
 Keep photo records and written logs to document the 
successes and failures of all planting and management 
techniques.
 The anticipated future agency site manager (after the 
completion of establishment) should participate in quarterly 
review during construction to learn the specific needs of  
the site.
Maintenance managers and staff should attend at least 
monthly site meetings with the designer, construction 
inspector, and establishment period contractor to learn  
the requirements of the planting areas and any special 
maintenance procedures that might be required including 
nontraditional, plantings including: 
 Grass and wildflower meadows 
 Perennial plantings 
 Native planting areas 
 Wetlands 
 Rain gardens 
 Green roofs 
for furTHer informaTion
Bormann, F. Herbert, Balmori, Diana, and Geballe Gordon T. Redesigning 
the American Lawn: A Search for Environmental Harmony, Second Edition. 
Yale Universtiy: Worzalla Publishing NY. 2001.
Calkins, Meg. Materials for Sustainable Sites. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & 
Sons, Inc., 2009.
Druse, Ken and Roach, Margaret. The Natural Habitat Garden. Clarkson 
Potter, NY. 1994.
Daniels, Stevie. The Wild Lawn Handbook: Alternatives to Traditional Front 
Lawn. Macmillian. 1995.
Earth Island Institution. 300 Broadway, Suite 28, San Francisco CA 94133 
http://www.earthisland.org/
Edinger, G.J., D.J. Evans, S. Gebauer, T.G. Howard, D.M. Hunt, and A.M. 
Olivero (editors). 2002. Ecological Communities of New York State. Second 
Edition. A revised and expanded edition of Carol Reschke’s Ecological 
Communities of New York State. (Draft for review). New York Natural Heritage 
Program, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, 
NY. http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/29384.html
Guinon, Marylee. Guidelines for Gene Conservation through Propagating 
and Procuring Plants for Restoration, Sycamore Associates. Lafayette CA 
94549, 510-284-1766.
H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment The 
State of the Nation’s Ecosystems, Cambridge UK: Cambridge University 
Press, 2002.
Harker, Donald; Libby, Gary; Harker, Kay; Evans, Sherri and Evans, Marc.
Landscape Restoration Handbook Second Edition. New York, NY: Lewis 
Publishers, 1999.
Hightshoe, Gary Native Trees, Shrubs, and Vines for Urban and Rural 
America, Van Nostrand Rainhold 1993.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested