display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently control application system web page html asp.net console design_guidelines21-part1750

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
211
objecTiVe                                                                 
Increase the quantity, density, diversity, and distribution of 
canopy, understory, shrub and herbaceous layers in planting 
areas. This may not necessarily mean expanding the plant  
palette, but ratherplant to create a greater diversity of land-
scape types; expanding the palette of landscape types beyond 
lawn and trees has enormous environmental benefits and 
significantly reduced long term costs.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Reduces air pollution, noise pollution, and soil erosion.
 Reduces and treats stormwater runoff via water uptake  
and evapotranspiration.
 Reduces the urban heat island effect by shading pavements 
and lowering local ambient temperatures.
Assists in stabilizing local microclimates and moderating 
weather extremes.
 Provides shading and insulation, reducing energy  
required to heat and cool buildings.
 Trees and plants clustered in groups are better protected 
and healthier, and damage and natural degradation of infra-
structure is reduced by providing shelter from harsh weather.
 Diversity of tree species protects against spread of disease 
and pests that can devastate monoculture plantings.
 Improves public health and quality of life.
 Provides habitat diversity for wildlife.
consiDeraTions                                                           
 Grouped plantings consume greater area than  
individual tree pits.
 Requires expansion of planting palette and sourcing  
of wider variety of plant material than is typically used on a 
large scale within the public realm.
 Increased planting densities are often an issue in communi-
ties concerned about public visibility and the perception of 
crime, and may not be appropriate for all areas.
 Change in planting palette, arrangements, and aesthetics  
within the public realm may require education and 
explanation.
v.7 
increase 
quantit y, density, 
and diversity  
of PLantings
Mendler, Sandra and Odell, William and Lazarus Mary Ann.The HOK 
Guidebook to Sustainable Design Second Edition, Hoboken NJ: John Wiley 
and Sons, Inc.
The Natural Geography of Plants: Gleason & Cronquist: Columbia, 1964
Natural Resources Group. Native Species planting Guide for New York 
City and Vicinity. NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, 1993. http://
www.nycgovparks.org/sub_about/parks_divisions/nrg/documents/Native_
Species_Planting_Guide.pdf
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Ecological 
Communities of NY State. Natural Heritage Program, 1990.
Packard, Stephen and Mutel, Cornelia F. The Tallgrass Restoration 
Handbook Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1997.
Darke, Rick. The American Woodland Garden Portland Oregon: Timber 
Press 2002.
Sauer Jones, Leslie and Andropogon Associates. The Once and Future 
Forest, Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1998.
Society for Ecological Restoration http://www.ser.org/
Tallamy, Douglas. Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain 
Wildlife in Our Gardens. Portland Oregon, Timber Press 2007.
Thompson, William J. and Sorvig, Kim. Sustainable Landscape 
Construction, A Guide to Green Building Outdoors. Washington, D.C.: Island 
Press, 2000.
Trowbridge, P. and Bassuk, N. Trees in the Urban Landscape: Site 
Assessment, Design and Installation. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, 2004.
U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Land Management Bureau. Pulling Together : 
National Strategy for Invasive Plant Management. Washington, D.C.: 1996.
Urban Forest Ecosystems Institute, Tree Standards & Specifications, 
2008. http://www.ufei.org/standards&specs.html
Urban, James. Up By Roots: Healthy Soils and Trees in the Built 
Environment. Champagne, IL: International Arboriculture Society, 2008.
USDA Forest Service. Effects of Urban Forests and their Management on 
Human Health and Environmental Quality. http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/syracuse/
Vegetation of New Jersey: Robichaud & Buell: Rutgers, 1989
Westerfield, Robert and Wade, Gary.BMP in the Landscape. Cooperative 
Extension Service The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and 
Environmental Sciences Circular 873, October 2004.http://www.pubs.caes.
uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/C873.htm
Weslager, C.A. The Delaware Indians; Rutgers, 2000 
Wild Ones Native Plants, Natural Landscapes http://www.for-wild.org/
How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate single page; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate pages in pdf online
212
inTegraTion                                                             
 W.3 Create Absorbent Landscapes 
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat 
 V.9 Reduce Turfgrass
backgrounD                                                              
By improving both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of 
the urban landscape it is possible to both improve ecological 
functioning and urban livability. Increased areas of landscape 
density also encourage greater ecological connectivity and 
habitat. The design of a greater number of landscapes beyond 
the traditional 19th century notion of public parks consisting 
trees, lawns, and ornamental planting beds not only contrib-
utes to greater ecological function, but it also provides the 
setting for more diverse collections of plants and the attendant 
flora and fauna they support.
PracTices                                                                 
Planning 
consiDer bioDiVersiTY on manY scales: siTe, 
neigHborHooD, anD region
 A broader diversity of trees, shrubs, and groundcovers  
is needed in our urban landscapes to guard against the possi-
bility of large scale devastation by both native and introduced 
insect and disease pests. Strips or blocks of uniformity,  
while desirable from an aesthetic standpoint, should be  
scattered throughout the city to achieve spatial as well as 
biological diversity.
Define the urban forest area you are serving and within 
that area follow the 10-20-30 rule for maximum protection 
against the ravages of new pests or outbreaks of old pests.
To the greatest extent possible, urban forest  
should contain: 
 No more than 10% of any single tree species
 No more than 20% of species in any tree genus
 No more than 30% of species in any tree family
This means that although your particular park may have 
more or less diversity, overall you are meeting the forest or 
meadow or shrubland goals of the overall ecological area.
 Increased planting complexity provides an opportunity to 
preserve genetic biodiversity among plantings.
Design
DeVeloP comPlex PlanT PaTTerns anD PaleTTes
 Avoid monoculture plantings.
 Ensure that multiple habitat opportunities are presented.
 Plant in tiered layers — trees, shrubs, and ground covers as 
found in nature; set the stage for plants to form communities 
to become self sustaining.
 Use plants to create and manage microclimates.
 Understand the symbiotic relationships of plants and  
capitalize on them.
Begin construction with invasive species control and 
removal, which continues until the end of a contract when 
new plantings are installed.
 Look not only at species, but also ages of plants, to create 
parks that have the ability to regenerate over time.
Often younger plant material has higher survival rates  
and exhibits faster growth.
At Canarsie Park in Brooklyn, 
approximately 90 tree and shrub 
species and 100 wildflower species 
were used throughout the hills, 
forested wetlands, and mown 
meadow areas.
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET shows you how to redact whole PDF pages. String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document
rotate pages in pdf; rotate one page in pdf reader
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently? developers process target image file and save edited image
how to rotate page in pdf and save; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
213
PlanT To creaTe a greaTer DiVersiTY of lanDscaPe TYPes
 Look for opportunities to create a greater variety of  
landscape types including: 
Fresh water and salt water wetlands
Marshes 
Grass and wildflower meadows, both wet and dry
Woodlands
Forests 
 Look for opportunities to expand people’s ideas of  
appropriate garden types including:
Butterfly gardens 
Fragrance gardens 
Rain gardens 
Shade gardens 
Green roofs 
Alpine gardens 
sPecifY PlanTs from a DiVersiTY of aPProPriaTe sPecies, 
genus, familY, anD culTiVar
 Diseases and pests tend to follow the taxonomic categories 
of host plants at the species, section, series, genus, or family 
levels. By avoiding monocultural or taxonomic class domi-
nance, there is a better chance that infestation and disease 
will not be as widespread and devastating. Specifying a more 
complex, varied planting palette makes the visual impacts of 
disease and predators the less obvious and objectionable.
creaTe more anD Denser lanDscaPes
 Increased landscaping and especially increased landscape 
density improves urban environments.
creaTe laYereD lanDscaPes
 Layered landscapes improve urban environments by:
Mimicking natural habitats 
Increasing available natural habitats and  
promoting species migration between habitat  
fragments throughout the city
Improving the health of plantings by: 
 h  Protecting each other from wind throw and leaf scorch
 h  Allowing for the development of better root systems,  
 which strengthens plants against disease and drought
Promoting better rooting, which also protects trees  
 from wind throw
Increasing leaf mass of clustered plants helps protect  
 against erosion caused by drip splash 
Reducing peak runoff velocities, allowing for better  
 absorption of stormwater
Offering greater spatial definition and scale in the  
environment, mitigating between human scaled spaces  
and the scale of larger trees and buildings
Providing increased therapeutic and restorative value  
to people’s outdoor experience through the development  
of landscapes that present a variety of colors, textures,  
and seasonality
for furTHer informaTion
City of Seattle, Office of Sustainability and Environment, Landscape and 
Grounds Management. http://www.cityofseattle.net/environment/documents/
Landscape&GroundsManagementPolicy.doc
Cool Communities, Urban Shade Trees. Rome, Georgia. http://www.
coolcommunities.org/urban_shade_trees.htm
Colorado Tree Coalition, Benefits of Trees in Urban Areas. http://www.
coloradotrees.org/benefits.htm
Harris, Richard W. Arboriculture: Integrated Management of Landscape 
Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1992, chapter 5, “Leaf 
Scorch of Trees and Shrubs.”Purdue University, March 2002. http://www.ces.
purdue.edu/extmedia/bp/bp_25_w.pdf
Mendler, Sandra and William Odell, The HOK Guidebook to Sustainable 
Design. Hoboken: Wiley and sons, 2000 pp.55-57.
Montgomery County Planning Commission. Planning by Design — Street 
Trees Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. http://www.montcopa.org/plancom/
PDF%20Files/Street%20Trees.pdf
Nowak, David J. The Effects of Urban Trees on Air Quality. USDA Forest 
Service. Syracuse, NY. http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/syracuse/gif/trees.pdf
Nowak, David J., Crane, Daniel E. and Dwyer, John F. Compensatory Value 
of Urban Trees in the United States. Journal of Arboriculture 28(4): July 2002.
Nowak, David J. and O’Connor, Paul R. USDA Forest Service. Syracuse 
Urban Forest Master Plan: Guiding the City’s Forest Resource into the 21st 
Century. 2001. http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/newtown_square/publications/tech-
nical_reports/pdfs/2001/gtrne287.pdf
Phillips Jr., Leonard E. Urban Trees. McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1993.
Rhode Island Statewide Planning Program, Trees as Community 
Infrastructure: The Value of Urban Forests. Rhode Island 
Urban and Community Forest Plan. http://www.planning.ri.gov/forest-
plan/pdf/Part3.PDF
Romalewski, Steven, et al. Urban Canopy Enhancements through 
Interactive Mapping Project in New York City.Final Report to the USDA 
Forest Service. http://www.oasisnyc.net/resources/street_trees/pdf/
FinalTitleVIIIreport.pdf
The Regional Plan Association. Building a Metropolitan Greensward.
The Regional Plan Association and Environmental Action Coalition. 
Keeping the Green Promise: An Action Plan for New York City’s Urban Forest.
Santamour, Frank. Trees For Urban Planting: Diversity Uniformity, And 
Common Sense. METRIA 7: Trees for the Nineties: Landscape Tree Selection, 
Testing, Evaluation, and Introduction Proceedings of the Seventh Conference 
of the Metropolitan Tree Improvement Alliance The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, 
Illinois. June 11-12, 1990.http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/nurs-
ery/metria/metria07/m79.pdf
United States Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency 
Landscaping for Energy Efficiency. http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer-
info/factsheets/landscape.html
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
rotate one page in pdf; pdf rotate page
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET
rotate single page in pdf; pdf rotate all pages
214
objecTiVe                                                                  
Plan and coordinate utility locations and installation  
requirements with proposed planting and soil designs  
to avoid construction compromises and long term  
maintenance conflicts.
benefiTs                                                                         
 Protects existing trees and vegetation.
 Preserves critical soil resources and rooting areas  
for plantings.
 Allows for ease of maintenance access in the future.
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Requires the design team to coordinate utility and  
planting plans.
Specialized excavation and tunneling operations to  
preserve existing trees increases installation costs.
 Longer meandering utility runs increase costs.
inTegraTion                                                                             
 S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance
 V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation 
PracTices                                                                     
Design
ProTecT exisTing Trees anD VegeTaTion from inTrusion 
bY siTe uTiliTies
 The primary course of action should be to locate all pro-
posed utility runs outside of the critical root zone of existing 
trees and vegetation.
 Where utilities need to pass through areas of existing veg-
etation, plan for specialized construction requirements such 
as hand digging, air spade, or mechanically tunneling under 
the roots with a horizontal directional drill and hydraulic or 
pneumatic air excavation technology.
laYouT THe siTe uTiliTies in clearlY DefineD corriDors
 Coordinate the proposed locations of site utility  
structures and utility runs with the existing and proposed  
site planting.
Poor coordination inevitably results in compromised 
planting since most often planting takes place after the 
installation of the site utilities when it is too expensive to 
dig up the utilities and move them and reinstall the  
planting soils.
 Draw coordinated utility corridors on site utility and planting 
plans; locate corridors dimensionally or with coordinates so 
that locations can be determined and verified by contractors 
and the construction manager.
coorDinaTe THe Design of uTiliTies in PlanTing beDs
 Carefully plan out differential soil density (compaction) 
requirements between planting bed requirements (typically  
80 to 85%) and utility requirements (typically 95% or higher).
Install utility structures in planting beds with sufficient 
foundations to prevent settlement or displacement during 
normal operations.
 Plan utility manholes, hand holes, and vaults in planting 
beds with clear access points and adequate room for mainte-
nance equipment and vehicles.
 Locate utilities at sufficient depth to avoid primary rooting 
areas and provide detectable warning tape over all utility runs 
to allow for future detection.
 Do not place tree rootballs directly over subdrainage lines 
where rootballs could crush lines or cause future damage.
 Avoid aggressive rooting trees and plants in proximity to util-
ity corridors to avoid root penetration and damage.
 Use root barrier technologies to protect sensitive utility 
structures from root penetration and damage.
 Provide adequate subsurface drainage for wet utility valves 
and structures so as to not saturate surrounding planting soils.
 Provide adequate separation between plants and mechanical 
units that exhaust air or generate excessive heat.
 Avoid planting near thermal utilities such as steam lines or 
buried high voltage conduits since heat from these utilities will 
damage the roots of new plantings.
for furTHer informaTion
Algonquin Gas Transmission Pipeline, Morris Co. NJ Andropogon 
Associates
http://www.smartgrowthonlineaudio.org/np2008/233-b.pdf-
Craul, Phillip and Craul, Timothy. Soil Design Protocols for Landscape 
Architects and Contractors. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006.
Craul, Phillip. Urban Soils: Applications and Practices. New York: John 
Wiley & Sons, Inc.1999.
Fazio, James R. Trenching & Tunneling Near Trees. The National Arbor Day 
Foundation. 1995.
Sauer, Leslie. The Once and Future Forest. Island Press, 1998.
Urban, James. Up By Roots. Champaign, IL: International Society of 
Arboriculture. 2008.
v.8 
avoid utiLit y 
confLicts witH 
PLanting areas
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
also is able to change view orientation by clicking rotate button for C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations
pdf reverse page order online; pdf page order reverse
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text example describes how to redact whole PDF pages. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document
how to rotate all pages in pdf; pdf save rotated pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
215
objecTiVe                                                                  
Reduce the use of turfgrass in new or existing areas. Establish 
a meadow or use native ground covers in lieu of turfgrass  
wherever possible. Use lower maintenance turfgrass species 
where recreational activities warrant the need for mown grass.
benefiTs                                                                   
 Reduces water consumption.
 Minimizes the need for pesticides, fertilizer, and  
fumigants, substantially reducing maintenance costs and 
environmental impact.
 Significantly reduces chemical and nutrient loading of 
groundwater and surface water bodies.
 Reduces the need for supplemental irrigation and  
conserves potable water.
 Eliminates the need for regular mowing, reducing mainte-
nance costs, energy consumption, and air and noise pollution.
 Reduces damage to trees from mowing.
Strengthens native plant communities, habitat, and  
local ecosystems.
 Encourages healthy soil.
 Reduces erosion due to deeper root systems of  
turfgrass alternatives.
Increases potential for onsite stormwater management 
including ground recharge and water quality improvement.
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Requires education and adaptation of landscape  
aesthetic expectations.
 Plantings other than turfgrass may have higher initial  
installation costs than conventional turfgrass.
 Establishing weed free meadows requires a longer  
establishment period than traditional turfgrass.
 Some alternative turfgrass and ornamental grass species  
can be invasive.
 Can require management training.
Performance goal                                                   
 Reduce turfgrass areas and introduce both turf grass  
alternatives and alternative landscape types wherever possible.
 Remove all turfgrass within a 4 foot diameter (minimum)  
of tree trunks.
inTegraTion                                                               
 V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes 
J  V.6 Use an Ecological Approach to Planting Design 
 V.7 Increase Quantity, Density and Diversity of Plantings 
backgrounD                                                                 
Concerns about energy consumption, air and noise pollu-
tion, drought, water shortages, and the health effects of lawn 
chemicals give good reason to reconsider the ubiquity of lawn 
areas in parks. New York’s climate and soils are generally 
suitable for many turfgrass choices, but during warm summer 
months and during drought conditions lawns become stressed.  
As a result, regular irrigation and fertilizing is often required 
to maintain a plush green lawn look and for turfgrass to survive 
extensive use. 
From a maintenance standpoint, lawns require a large 
amount of time and resources to maintain. Lawn maintenance 
equipment also produces air and noise pollution and may  
damages trees.
From a stormwater management perspective, lawns absorb 
much less stormwater than forests or meadows. Heavily 
compacted turf soils or turf with substantial thatch build up 
are virtually impermeable, contributing to stormwater runoff 
volumes. Turfgrass is shallow rooted and is not able to stabilize 
stream banks. 
From an ecological standpoint, traditional mowed turfgrass 
offers little biodiversity to support beneficial insects, songbirds 
or other elements of our natural environment. 
PracTices                                                                                   
Design
 Reduce use of turf especially in shaded, steeply sloped, 
natural or hard to maintain areas.
 Wherever possible, replace turf with mulch, ground covers, 
naturalized vegetation, or low maintenance grasses.
 Coordinate selection of nonturfgrass areas with drainage pat-
terns, located to optimize stormwater infiltration.
 Select native or well adapted species requiring minimal or 
no maintenance over time.
 Specify a combination of pioneer and successional species.
 Use turfgrass only for specific functions (sports, passive 
recreation). Specify drought resistant, lower maintenance 
turfgrass species.
 See V.4 Design Water Efficient Landscapes
limiT Turf areas To THose neeDeD for PracTical 
PurPoses
 Do not use turfgrass within 4 foot diameter (minimum)  
of tree trunks.
 Reduce turf areas to the greatest extent possible. 
 Consider planting alternatives to traditional  
turfgrass species.
consiDer alTernaTiVe PracTices for mainTaining 
Turf grass
 Mow less frequently to leave longer turf heights and coordi-
nate such designated areas with Parks Inspection Program  
v.9 
reduce 
turfgrass
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
commonly used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF the default local path or adjust save location in btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in display
rotate pdf pages on ipad; how to change page orientation in pdf document
216
to assure that this does not result in inspection failure once 
the park is completed.
 Use drought tolerant plants instead of turfgrass along pave-
ments and other areas where there is likely to be significant 
radiant heat gain
consiDer lower mainTenance anD less nuTrienT 
inTensiVe fescue Turfgrass
TYPes incluDe:
 Festucarubra, Creeping Red Fescue 
 Festucarubra ssp. commutate, Chewings Fescue 
 Festucaovina, Sheep Fescue 
 Festucalongifolia, Hard Fescue
 Festucabrevipila, Hard Fescue 
 Festucaarundinacea, Tall Fescue 
 Low maintenance types 
Kentucky 31, Fawn, Alta, Chesapeake, Clemfine
 Original turf types: 
Rebel, Falcon, Olympic,Mustang, Falcon 
 Improved second generation turf types: 
Rebel II, Apache, Bonanza, Jaguar II 
 Moderately low growing turf types: 
Rebel Jr., Hubbard 87 
 Ultra dwarf turf types: 
Bonsai, Shortstop, Mini Mustang 
consTrucTion
 Follow recommended procedures for protecting  
planted areas.
 Prepare soil prior to native grass/meadow/turfgrass installa-
tion to minimize use of fertilizer and pesticide. Consider  
differences in fertility needs when specifying soil amendments.
 Many native grass species may require lower nutrient  
levels to survive thus eliminating the need for fertilizers and 
reducing the risk of invasive species.
mainTenance
 Where turf is used, mow grass higher than conventional 
mowing height to conserve water and energy.
 Leave grass clippings on turf to reduce moisture loss; a 
mulching mower can be used.
 Reduce use of fertilizer and pesticides in conjunction with 
selected lower maintenance species.
 Where no mow grass is used, mow once per month to  
once per year.
Where meadow grass/wildflowers are used, mow  
every 1-2 years.
 Choose mowing time to avoid disturbing wildlife and  
prevent spread of weed seed.
Fall mowing can create food for insects and invertebrates.
Spring mowing, when timed poorly, can disturb ground 
nesting birds.
 Follow biointensive integrated pest management 
recommendations.
 See M.7 Use Biointensive Integrated Pest Management  
to Promote Landscape Health
moniToring
 Monitor meadows for encroachment of invasive species.
 Reseed immediately after removal of invasive species.
for furTHer informaTion
The State of New Jersey has developed the Municipal Environmental 
Resource Inventory that provides maps and data to facilitate sensitive site 
design in municipalities. The State’s Municipal Land Use Law extends this 
recognition to requiring alternatives to turfgrass to protect stormwater 
runoff from carrying pollutants emanating from turfgrass.
The Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary System for golf courses (endorsed 
by the U.S. Golf Association) promotes landscaping that benefits wildlife. 
Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary System for Golf Courses. http://acspgolf.
auduboninternational.org/
The National Park Service and General Services Administration (which 
subsTiTuTe THe use of TraDiTional 
Turfgrass wiTH low meaDow anD 
weTlanD grasses, ornamenTal grasses, 
grass- like grounDcoVers, anD mosses 
incluDing:
 Agrostis perennans, Autumn Bentgrass
 Agrostis stolonifera, Creeping Bentgrass
 Andropogon gerardii, Big Bluestem
 Aristida stricta, Wiregrass
 Bouteloua gracilis, Blue Grama
 Buchloe dactyloides, Buffalo Grass
 Carex flacca, Blue Sedge
 Carex appalachia, Appalachian Sedge
 Carex pennsylvanica, Wood Sedge
 Carex plantaginea, Plaintain-leafed Sedge
 Carex stricta, Tussock Sedge
 Carex vulpinoidea, Fox Sedge
 Dicranum scoparium, Rock Cap Moss
 Eragrostis spectabilis, Purple Love Grass
 Leucobryum glaucum, Large White Moss
 Luzula acuminate, Hairy Wood-Rush
 Muhlengergia cuspidate, Plains Muhly
 Panicum virgatum, Switchgrass
 Poacompressa, Canada Bluegrass
 Polytrichum juniperinum, Juniper Haircap Moss
 Puccinellia distans, Alkali Grass
 Sorghastrum nutans, Indian Grass
 Spartina patens, Salt Meadow Cordgrass
 Sporobolus heterolepsis, PrarieDropseed
 Sisyrinchium angustifolium, Blue-eyed Grass
 Schizachyrium scoparium, Little Bluestem
 Thuidium delicatulum, Fernleaf Moss
Note: This list is not exhaustive, and individual 
designers need to coordinate the list with their actual 
site conditions.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
217
In this meadow, only a narrow path is mowed, allowing access while limiting 
maintenance and water needs.
218
objecTiVe                                                                    
Street trees provide myriad benefits to urban landscapes, but 
the health of street trees is often compromised by constraints 
to their growth. Street trees should be planted whenever space 
and regulations allow. Each tree pit should be designed to 
optimize the future health of the tree, allowing it to reach its 
full potential.
benefiTs                                                                     
 Captures stormwater in leaves of trees as well as within 
pervious tree pits.
 Reduces urban heat island effect through shading.
 Street tree longevity reduces replacement rates and provides 
healthier trees.
 Species selection for tolerance of site specific conditions 
can improve success rates.
 Street tree diversity reduces risk of species specific  
disease impacts.
 Connected tree pits improve tree health and storm- 
water capture.
 Creates shade and reduces energy use.
consiDeraTions                                                         
 Higher initial cost to create larger pits.
 Engineered soils used to expand root growth area may 
require more expensive materials, proprietary products, or 
increased contractor education.
 Larger pits may not be feasible in heavily congested areas.
Drainage from pits can be impacted by surrounding utilities, 
subways, and poorly draining soils.
Performance goal                                                     
 Increase tree pit size to largest allowable size and connect 
tree pits whenever possible. 
 Create tree pits that allow water and air both into and out  
of the tree pit. Combine tree pits with stormwater goals  
wherever possible.
backgrounD                                                        
Different tree pits are appropriate for different sites, but tree 
pits should always be sized as large as possible to allow for 
root growth. This improves the longevity and size of trees, both 
of which impact the benefits trees can provide. A mature tree 
offers carbon sequestration, shading and cooling, stormwa-
ter capture, noise reduction, and higher property values far 
beyond a smaller and less mature tree. Fostering tree growth 
v.10 
imProve street 
tree HeaLtH
administers 100 government facilities in D. C.) have both adopted inte-
grated pest management (IPM), a move that has resulted in a 90% reduc-
tion in pesticide use, a 33% reduction in fertilizer use and a 10% reduction 
in emissions. 
Benson, John and Maggie Roe. Landscape and Sustainability. Spoon 
Press, 2000
Bormann, F. Herbert, Diana Balmori, and Gordon T. Geballe, Redesigning 
the American Lawn, 2nd ed. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001), 
p. 129.54.
Cullina, William. Native Ferns Moss and Grasses. New York: Houghton 
Mifflin Company, 2008.
Darke, Rick. The Encyclopedia of Grasses for Livable Landscapes. 
Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2007.
Ernst Conservation Seeds (supplier), 9006 Mercer Pike, Meadville, PA 
16335. www.ernstseed.com
Gitlitz, Jennifer. Trashed Cans: The Global Environmental Impacts of 
Aluminum Can Wasting in America. MU Environmental Network News July 
2004 Vol. 10 No. 7
Green, Robert, and Grant Kleinch. Turfgrass Best Management Practices. 
California Fairways, January-February 2004
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. “Gardening and Landscaping with 
Native Plants.” http://www.wildflower.org
Mendler, Sandra and William Odell. The HOK Guidebook to Sustainable 
Design New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2000.
Thompson, J. William and Kim Sorvig. Sustainable Landscape 
Construction Island Press, 2000.
University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. “Your Landscape Can Be 
Beautiful, Water Efficient and Easy On The Environment. http://www.unce.
unr.edu/publication/EB9502/ChapterTwelve.html
Weaver, Jan. Curbing the Lawn. MU Environmental Network News July 
2004 Vol. 10 No. 7
The Worldwatch Institute. Special Focus: The Consumer Society State of 
the World 2004. http://www.globalwaterpolicy.org/pubs/SOW04water
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iv: Best Practices in site systems
|
vegetation
|
219
reduces replacement rates and their subsequent costs.
Concerns over saturated soils and tree toppling should  
be addressed and solved through under drainage and other 
methods. The NYC Green Codes Task Force is currently review-
ing a comprehensive sidewalk specification that will provide 
protocols for how to treat this complicated but important 
design approach.
Many factors impact tree pit size and tree growth. Within 
urban areas, conflicts of use in congested spaces make locat-
ing tree pits and sizing them appropriately very difficult. Bus 
shelters, lighting, bike racks, hydrants, and driveways all 
share the same space with street trees. Sight lines cannot be 
blocked by trees, and overhead wires can lead to heavy prun-
ing as trees grow. Below ground, utilities and poorly drained, 
compacted soils negatively impact tree growth capacity. 
However, making a determination about the long term goals 
of trees in tree pits can have profound impact on New York’s 
ecosystem. Designers should decide, preferably on a city wide 
scale, the goal of street trees. Are we designing for trees that 
achieve 100 year status or for a young, healthy urban forest of 
lesser age that requires more frequent replacement?
PracTices                                                                  
Planning
Considering all street tree placement options at an earlier 
stage in planning provides for better tree pit design in the 
future. Consider the needs of trees at the beginning of plan-
ning stages and account for them in proposals.
ouTline all Tree PiT limiTaTions
 Consider all regulations, setbacks, and requirements for 
street tree pits; contact the forestry division for information.
 Outline tree pit locations and consider possible sizes and 
possibilities of connecting with other areas of soil.
Design
Street tree plantings can be designed to optimize health in 
a variety of ways. The size of the tree pit has the most direct 
impact on growth capacity, but protection of the tree above 
ground is also very important.
increase Tree PiT siZe
 Generally a minimum size for tree pits is complicated,  
relying on species and desired final size.
Smaller tree pits prevent large shade trees from ever 
reaching their maximum size.
If larger trees or shade is desired, design tree pits that 
account for the final desired tree pit size.
For example, a 120 cubic foot tree pit only allows  
for a 10’ crown, while a 1000 cubic foot tree pit allows  
for a 30’ crown.
 A depth of 3’ is generally recommended, as most tree  
roots grow above this depth.
 The tree pit length and width can vary widely, and the  
two measurements do not need to be the same.
 Often, longer rectangular tree pits allow for more space for 
the tree on narrow sidewalks.
 Retrofit existing pits and increase their size.
 Empty pits often indicate that the pit size was not success-
ful before and improving the pit will increase the likelihood of 
successful tree establishment.
 In areas where tree pit sizes are limited, plant appropriate 
species. Large shade trees should not be placed in tree pits 
too small to allow for maturity. Match feasible pit size with tree 
species most likely to succeed.
allow for PerVious coVer of Tree PiTs wHeneVer 
Possible
 Direct stormwater into tree pits whenever possible. Consider 
designing tree pits to accept larger volumes of stormwater, but 
factor in underdrainage needs in its design.
 In lower trafficked areas, leave tree pits open or vegetated. 
Understory plant growth can often serve as an indicator of 
water stress before the tree shows signs, encouraging adjacent 
property owners to water trees.
 In areas of higher traffic, pervious pavers allow for walking 
over pits while reducing soil compaction.
 Use paver spacing that allows for water to move through 
without causing tripping or ADA concerns.
 Consider fencing or guards around the perimeter of the tree 
pit — not around the tree itself.
 Consider means of protecting the tree from injury from pets, 
car doors, and other urban tree perils.
 If possible, locate tree pits on the building side of the  
sidewalk rather than the street side.
 In heavily trafficked areas, more substantial pavement  
may be necessary.
 Use engineered soils or other technologies than allow  
for root growth underneath pavements.
Ideally, these areas should connect with larger blocks of 
green space, as many engineered solutions limit the void 
space available for root growth.
connecT Tree PiTs
 Connecting tree pits opens up additional space for root 
growth and lateral water flow. Increasing the area available for 
trees improves their health and survival rates.
 Tree pits can be connected below ground, with pervious or 
impervious pavements separating the trees, allowing for pedes-
trian access across the continuous pit.
 Connect street trees adjacent to park areas with interior 
green space. Roots can benefit and increase growth, nutrient 
and water availability for street trees.
PlanT meDians anD oTHer areas aDjacenT To large 
PaVeD areas
 Medians are often areas of low pedestrian traffic, allowing 
greater amounts of space to be allotted for street trees.
 Create large and/or continuous tree pits with large shade 
trees to increase shading and cooling benefits.
 Allow for adequate space for large shade trees to become 
220
Porous paving over a portion of this tree pit allows for increased soil volume and 
infiltration without limiting pedestrian traffic.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested