HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part ii: site assessment
|
site tyPes
|
51
consiDer PlanT HealTH issues
Typically, plantings over structures must contend with a longer 
list of plant health impacts than other urban plantings. Take 
this into account when designing planting areas and selecting 
plant species. Issues include: 
J limited root zone and depth 
J increased heat from pavements and belowground structures 
J poor drainage or engineered drainage with no access to 
water table 
J soil freezing 
J plant desiccation due to increased exposure to wind 
J mulch loss due to wind 
J need for more carefully calibrated irrigation to avoid  
soil saturation 
use engineereD sYsTems for comPlex siTes
Incorporating sustainable design practices in parks on struc-
tures can be difficult, but the use of more engineered design 
solutions allows for increased benefits.
J Increase planting areas 
Connect planting areas under pavements when possible. 
Protect planting areas from heavy traffic. 
If necessary, limit planting to shallow rooted and 
smaller plant material. 
J Utilize infiltration systems whenever possible. 
Higher rates of infiltration in engineered systems allow 
for the surrounding areas to be less pervious while still 
managing water on site. 
J Consider detention when infiltration is not possible due  
to underground structures.
Design systems to delay discharge to sewers  
through storage. 
Use stormwater for planting areas with underdrain 
structures to remove excess runoff. 
Account for the different soil freezing patterns  
over structures.
Provide for increased wind protection. 
consiDer green roof insTallaTion
There are many incentives that make green roofs an attractive 
option for city buildings. However, feasibility must be consid-
ered, including cost of installation.
J Assess the capacity for a structure to bear additional weight. 
Retrofitted buildings may require lighter green roof 
options; however, some older buildings were constructed 
with higher loading capacity than more modern buildings. 
A structural engineer is required to determine live and 
dead load limits. 
J Perform a cost benefit analysis for a green roof vs. other 
design options. 
Green roofs are often the most viable option in dense 
areas, or on constrained sites. 
Where space is available and buildings are smaller, 
it may be better to simply shade the structures with 
surrounding large trees and manage stormwater onsite 
surrounding the building.
Design To oPTimiZe benefiTs of a green roof
Some of the benefits green roofs provide are directly related to 
the way in which they are designed. 
By selecting plant species to provide optimized evapo-
transpiration over succulants such as sedum, the evapora-
tive cooling benefits of the roof are increased.
J Deeper growing media can hold larger volumes of water 
and support a more diverse plant palette. These systems 
also have higher rates of evaporative cooling due to more 
water availability and to the greater size and species of plant 
types supported. 
Design for resilience anD ease of 
mainTenance
J Consult members of the Parks Department’s Five Borough 
office on green roof design experiences at their facility. 
J Contact the horticultural department for information on the 
newly formed green roof maintenance crew to discuss capabili-
ties and capacity. 
J Provide detailed drawings that show locations of all hidden 
utilities for the park and the structure. Show the waterproof-
ing and protection layer details to the maintenance crew and 
provide copies to them.
J Design an easy to maintain and winterized irrigation system. 
J Provide hose bibs no more than 75 feet from all planting 
areas to minimize hose runs. 
J Design to conserve maintenance time and funding. 
J Learn the amount of maintenance funding and staffing 
levels for a park before beginning a design, and then design 
within the maintenance budget. 
J Do not include specialty items that will require  
frequent replacement. 
J Use materials and design details that are resilient. 
J Do not put drainage structures and valves under  
safety surfacing. 
J Provide manuals for equipment operation and repair, tools, 
and replacement parts in a locked cabinet on site. 
J Provide training to operations personnel and gardeners. 
J See W.8 Create Green and Blue Roofs.
Pdf rotate just one page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf file; how to rotate page in pdf and save
Pdf rotate just one page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages individually; save pdf rotate pages
52
Part III contains Best Practices (BPs) in planning and design, 
construction, and maintenance. Opportunities and considerations 
for improving park design and decreasing maintenance costs 
are described, as well as increasing the lifespan of park 
projects. Upfront acknowledgment of site constraints and future 
maintenance costs will improve the success of the design and 
reduce maintenance and reconstruction costs. Construction best 
practices will minimize construction damage. Maintenance and 
operations are the most important component of any successful 
park, and incorporation of maintenance concerns will improve the 
ability of the operations division to operate the site successfully. 
54  integrate maintenance PLanning into tHe design Process   
57  PLan for connectivity and synergy 
59  deveLoP a site Preservation and Protection PLan 
60  engage PuBLic ParticiPation 
62  design for Broad aPPeaL and accessiBiLity 
66  imProve PuBLic HeaLtH 
69  mitigate and adaPt to cLimate cHange 
71  cHoose materiaLs wiseLy 
80 use syntHetic turf wiseLy
Part iii: 
Best Practices  
in site Process
design
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Able to separate one PDF file into two PDF PDF page processing functions by just following attached C# PDF Page Processing: Rotate PDF Page - detailed guidance
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PDF document pages, or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an
rotate pdf pages in reader; rotate one page in pdf
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
53
TK
inTroDucTion
Designers are well-suited to the challenges of creating high 
performance parks. They are educated to understand and 
respond creatively to an extremely broad range of factors 
including the site context as well as scientific and social prob-
lems. Designers choreograph dozens of elements: the experien-
tial effects of light, texture, color, and sound; the sequence of 
visitor movement and rest, view and enclosure. They anticipate 
changes to the site over time from day to night, through sea-
sons, and over many years. 
All the while designers are looking for relationships between 
the problems, seeking responses that are appropriate, eco-
nomical, and artistic. They don’t automatically accept the 
standard way of doing things; they know innovative solutions 
can have powerful social and environmental effects, changing 
the way we think about and use familiar park places, features, 
and typologies. Good designers are opportunistic, seeing pos-
sibilities that others may overlook.
This manual asks designers to deepen their understanding 
of the biological and social issues that affect the performance 
of a park, and tackle a host of increasingly important issues, 
including public health and climate change. Projects that 
can successfully integrate this expanded field of concerns 
into design will last longer, enjoy more support, and be more 
cost efficient than projects that fail to do so. Designers who 
embrace the broad scope of high performance landscape 
design will be more effective in creating the open spaces 
needed for the 21st century city.
keY PrinciPles
High performance projects require a designer to address the 
site at a biological level. The designer must understand the 
soil, water, and vegetation at a scientific level. In order to 
achieve the highest level of performance, and benefit to the 
climate, natural systems must be protected; constructed land-
scapes must be highly considered. 
In public projects, especially large scale projects, there is 
no single author. Designers cannot work in isolation; they need 
to consult with experts, the park operators, and community 
members. Each brings expertise and knowledge to increasingly 
complex sites and existing conditions. There are also many 
invested stakeholders in even the smallest projects. Reaching 
out to and engaging the appropriate spectrum of stakeholders 
will bring more ideas, resources, and support to a project, from 
design to construction to maintenance. 
Know your constraints and work creatively within them. 
Sustainable design begins with a tough assessment of con-
straints — site, capital and operational budgets, regulatory, 
and others. Within this envelope, designers can exercise their 
full creativity. The best designs use the constraints as an orga-
nizing or generative principle. 
Parks help cultivate good stewardship and civic responsibil-
ity. Good park design heightens people’s experience of their 
surroundings, broadens their understanding of urban systems, 
and inspires them to become stewards of park projects. Ideally, 
people using these parks are more engaged in how that park 
functions — where stormwater goes, how green spaces offset 
carbon emissions, how open spaces help bolster confidence 
in investment in surrounding neighborhoods. Informed and 
engaged people are better equipped to talk about and take 
action on these issues in the broader public realm. 
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Easy to rotate the current picture or file page through just a button click; Commonly used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page TIFF and
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; pdf reverse page order online
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
be easily integrated into many MS Visual Studio .NET applications to create PDF with just a few VB.NET: Create a New PDF Document with One Blank Page.
how to rotate all pages in pdf; save pdf rotated pages
54
objecTiVe                                                                   
Integrate maintenance considerations into the planning 
and design process as decision making rather than after 
the completion of the proposed design. This will produce 
designs that are more resilient, attractive, and cost effective 
over time.
benefiTs                                                                     
J  Allows the design team to acknowledge and address main-
tenance concerns early in the planning and design process in 
order to inform critical design and material decisions
J  Decreases maintenance costs by requiring the design team 
to understand and weigh initial construction costs versus life 
cycle costs as part of the design process, especially during 
value engineering
J  Increases the probability that projects will be maintained 
properly by requiring the design team to anticipate mainte-
nance costs and design to stay within the operating budget
J  Increases the probability that site and operational knowl-
edge will be incorporated into the design, and the gardeners 
and maintenance personnel will be more vested in the project 
by including them in the design process
consiDeraTions                                                        
J  Meaningful collaboration of maintenance and design person-
nel will require scheduled time to work together. 
J  Productive collaboration will require the development of a 
shared set of goals and objectives. 
J  Detailed maintenance plans require specialized skills and 
experience and therefore requires additional design time and 
fees to complete if undertaken by outside consultants. 
J  Accurately priced maintenance plans can show that main-
tenance costs over the life of the project (typically 30 to 50 
years) will be higher than construction costs. 
inTegraTion                                  
backgrounD
Maintenance costs for a built project usually exceed the cost 
of construction. It is not unusual for a project’s annual main-
tenance and long term capital maintenance costs to exceed 
construction costs by 10 to 20 times over the life cycle of a 
project. 9  For this reason any reduction in maintenance costs, 
when multiplied over time, can be truly significant.
PracTices                                    
Planning
DeVeloP a consensus on accePTable leVels of serVice
To be effective as part of the design process, maintenance planning 
requires consensus on maintenance goals and objectives among 
park system administrators, capital planners and designers, and park 
maintenance managers.
J A general consensus on the acceptable levels of main-
tenance (often referred to as levels of service) is required. 
They are generally applied to a variety of park types and 
locations throughout the city.
j Clear articulation of these levels of service is essential 
for maintenance decision making.
j Defines acceptable maintenance practices and  
serves as a baseline for design and operational decisions 
moving forward 
J  The idea of levels of service is generally understood within 
the parks and recreation industry; the National Recreation 
and Park Association (NRPA) developed a tiered level of 
service standards that have been used across the country for 
many decades. NRPA standards identify six levels of main-
tenance that range from highest (1) to lowest (6). These 
standards have been benchmarked against current and past 
practices and acknowledge the unique nature and needs of 
each type of park area.10
j Level 1 is reserved for special, high visibility areas that 
require the highest level of maintenance. 
j Level 2 is the norm one expects to see on a regular, 
recurring basis. It is the desired standard.
j Levels 3 and 4 are just below the norm and result from 
staffing or funding limitations.
j Level 5 is one step before the land is allowed to return 
to its original state.
j Level 6 is land that is allowed to return to its original 
natural state or that already exists in that state.
j Further refinement and articulation of what each of 
these levels entails, as well as the identification of rep-
resentative parks within each of the five boroughs, would 
allow administrators, designers, and managers across the 
parks system to gain collective understanding of what 
acceptable maintenance practices would be. 
d.1 
integrate 
maintenance 
PLanning 
into tHe 
design Process
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
functions, including extracting one or more page(s) from PDF document. To utilize the PDF page(s) extraction function in VB.NET application, you just need to
pdf page order reverse; rotate pdf pages on ipad
VB Imaging - VB MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Resolution = 96 'set rotation barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 barcode 100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf"). Below is just an example of generating an
rotate single page in pdf; pdf rotate pages separately
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
55
ProjecT mainTenance cosTs
for existing parks, it is satisfactory to understand the staff required 
to provide the current level of service and then determine what 
additional or fewer services will be required. for new parks, a more 
detailed projection is needed. The data that are required to accu-
rately project maintenance costs include:
j Current site specific and borough wide staffing levels 
j Description of staff positions, including labor rates  
and benefits 
j Description of maintenance crew types 
j Identification of typical maintenance tasks by park  
area specialty element 
j Identification of maintenance task frequencies as  
defined by the levels of service 
j Identification of maintenance equipment required  
by maintenance task and crew type 
j Identification of what additional equipment will  
be needed 
j Identification of typical utility charges for various  
facilities and features 
j Identification of security staffing 
j Identification of management costs 
consiDer HisTorical mainTenance neeDs in ProjecTing 
new ones
Develop historical data related to past maintenance efforts to serve 
as a baseline comparison for designers as they begin to evaluate the 
maintenance implications of their plans.
J  This maintenance programming resource database might 
include, but not be limited to, the following: 
j Maintenance facilities as a typical cost by park type 
j Historic maintenance unit costs per acre, by level of 
maintenance 
j Cost to maintain specialty items on a square foot, 
linear foot, or per item basis 
j Historic maintenance cost escalation factors 
j Historic contracted services costs
j Historic maintenance equipment costs
j Historic replacement life cycles for key materials  
or facilities 
DeVeloP an accessible, regularlY uPDaTeD mainTenance 
DaTabase for use bY Design sTaff in THe DeVeloPmenT 
of mainTenance Planning efforTs anD scoPe of work 
DescriPTions
J  Include data referenced above in an easily located and up-
to-date format.
J  Develop comparable costs by facility and level of service.
Design
ProViDe a mainTenance buDgeT imPacT sTaTemenT
J  Estimate levels of service, staffing, material, and equipment 
costs required, both during the establishment period and over 
the anticipated life cycle, at the master plan, schematic design, 
design development, and final construction document phases 
J  Budget impact statements should differentiate between 
programmatic elements and major material assemblies within 
the park that may have varying life expectancies or user wear.
J  Impact statements should realistically anticipate levels of 
usage by the public as part of the anticipated life cycle analy-
sis for each area or major element. 
J  Specialty elements should be individually itemized or 
expressed on a linear foot, square foot, or acre basis to allow 
designers to make both qualitative and quantitative adjust-
ments to proposed designs.
J  Impact statements should provide data on space require-
ments for anticipated materials, equipment, staff, and staging 
areas required for regular park maintenance.
J  Use the final maintenance budget impact statement and sup-
porting data generated from the final construction documents to 
form the basis of the comprehensive park management plan for 
use by the staff after the completion of the project.
mainTenance ProjecTions sHoulD Take inTo accounT THaT 
leVels of mainTenance will VarY bY season
J  Selectively maintaining some areas more and some areas 
less can lead to long term cost efficiencies.
J  For landscape areas, clearly define anticipated visibility 
and levels of service anticipated as part of the park’s design 
aesthetic intent. 
J  Plan site circulation to allow some paths to be left uncleared 
during winter seasons. 
J  Reduce the need for regularly mown lawns in all areas. 
Introduce low frequency mown meadows and turf mixes where 
appropriate. 
J  See further V.9 Reduce Turf Grass 
look aT THe Design from THe mainTenance sTanDPoinT
J  Understand just how much of a burden the project will 
place on the existing system.
j In some cases, it may be possible to reduce maintenance 
staffing or material resources through careful coordination 
and consideration. 
j If a project increases maintenance needs, the design pro-
cess should clearly articulate those needs for budgeting and 
staffing purposes so that the park’s facilities will be properly 
maintained.
incorPoraTe mainTenance neeDs inTo Designs
a sample of typical concerns:
J  Plan walkway and roadway widths to accommodate antici-
pated maintenance vehicle widths and turning radii without 
damage to curbing or softscape areas. 
J  Do not use vulnerable pavements such as bluestone in 
vehicle areas. 
J  Provide access gates for all enclosed planting beds.
J  Provide water access points that allow all areas to be 
reached by a 100’ hose. 
j In areas inaccessible by hose, design accordingly, as 
watering will not be feasible. 
j Design planted areas to receive an appropriate amount 
of stormwater from paved areas in order to enhance  
plant vitality. 
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
specific formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx the target TIFF page(s) accurately and quickly; Rotate single or TIFF page(s) at one time just as you
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate individual pages in pdf
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
96;// set resolution barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0;// set 100F, 100F)); docx.Save(outputDirectory + "Sample_Barcode.pdf"); }. Below is just an example of
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate pages in pdf expert
56
J  Coordinate utility infrastructure for easy access and 
maintenance. 
j Coordinate utility corridors with walkway and roadway 
locations to allow for future vehicle access and repairs 
without significantly damaging landscape areas. 
j Provide adequate clear space around pump stations, 
transformers, storage tanks, and other fixed equipment to 
allow for regular access, ventilation and repair. 
j To the extent possible, locate utility vaults and boxes 
within pavement areas rather than lawn or planting beds. 
j Avoid locating drains or other utility boxes within  
safety surface areas or areas with high volume traffic 
desire lines. 
j Place water lines below the frost line, and use water 
fountains that do not require winterization. 
consulT mainTenance ParTners sucH as THe DeParTmenT 
of TransPorTaTion
J  Coordinate pole placement for easy access and mainte-
nance, away from areas vulnerable to vehicle damage. 
J  Choose luminairs that are not vulnerable to vandalism. 
for furTHer informaTion
references:
City of Oakland, CA, Lake Merritt Park Master Plan, 2002. 
http://www.oaklandnet.com/community/Chapter6MaintenancePlan.pdf
Earth Plan Associates, Inc. “Chapter 4 Park Maintenance” in  
2006-2010 Parks and Recreation Master Plan, Auburn Indiana Parks  
and Recreation Department, 2005.
http://www.ci.auburn.in.us/departments/parks&recreation/2006_2010_
VisionPlan/4-Maintenance.pdf
Feliciani, Et. Al. Operational Guidelines for Grounds Management. 
Ashburn, VA: Published jointly by APPA, National Recreation and Park 
Association, and Professional Grounds Management Society, 2001.
Fickes, Michael. “Six Steps to Grounds Maintenance Master Planning”. 
College Planning & Management April 2000: v3 n4 p47-50
http://www.peterli.com/cpm/resources/articles/archive.php?article_id=49
Lavallee, Andrew. “Sustainable Parks—Design and Planning” in 
Recreation Management Magazine, April 2005. 
http://www.recmanagement.com/2005olgc03.php
Palmer, Dave. Landscape Installation & Maintenance - Are the Rules 
Changing? The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Cooperative 
Extension Service, University of Florida
http://prohort.ifas.ufl.edu/files/pdf/publications/HC-RulesChanging.pdf
U.S. National Park Service, 100+ Best Management Practices: Defining 
What a Green Park Looks Like, May, 2006.
http://www.fs.fed.us/sustainableoperations/documents/
BestManagementPractices.pdf
Professional Grounds Management Society Professional Grounds 
Management Society, 720 Light Street, Baltimore, MD 21230 (410) 223-2861 
http://www.pgms.org/
9 Palmer, Dave. Landscape Installation & Maintenance - Are the Rules Changing? The Institute 
of Food and Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension Service (IFAS), University of Florida
10 Earth Plan Associates, Inc. “Chapter 4 Park Maintenance” in 2006-2010 Parks and 
Recreation Master Plan, Auburn Indiana Parks and Recreation Department, 2005.
Designers should look to M&O staff as a resource for existing conditions and needs for a given site during the design process. The Parks Department’s M&O Capital Project 
Input Form quickly aggregates pertinent information about the current state and uses of a given park. 
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
How to Rotate, Merge Word Documents Within VB.NET of the web page, here we just describe each Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rotate one page in pdf document; reverse page order pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. The last one is for rendering PowerPoint file to raster image Gif. This demo code just converts PowerPoint first page to Gif image.
rotate one page in pdf reader; pdf rotate pages and save
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
57
objecTiVe                                                                  
Connect parks to other circulation routes, ecological areas 
and social systems to increase the vitality and functionality 
of all. Connect to nearby green spaces such as blue belts, 
waterways, and wildlife sanctuaries, to provide greater habitat 
connectivity, and watershed functionality. Connect parks to 
greenways and bike routes to expand those routes, and provide 
easy access to parks, as well as opportunities for recreation by 
bicycle commuters. Connect to social networks as well, such 
as adjacent streetscapes, land uses, and character creating 
opportunities for synergy with existing activities, commercial 
areas and special needs populations.
benefiTs                                                                      
J  Expands bicycle networks
J
Allows for better access to and through parks
J
Connected areas of natural vegetation will improve habitat 
quality and transfer of native vegetation.
J
Connected parks provide more opportunity for neighbor-
hoods to share complementary resources.
J
Increases tree canopy coverage
J
Increases the function of the watershed
J
Increasing access to parks by connecting park lands to each 
other as well as to population centers improves park vitality 
and encourages greater use. 
consiDeraTions                                                         
J
Bicycle and pedestrian conflict 
J
Spread of invasive species 
J
Local program needs can shift over time 
inTegraTion                                                                 
 V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation 
 V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat 
backgrounD                                                               
Adjacent land uses will largely determine predominant 
user groups for parks. With attention paid to transportation 
accessibility and neighborhood connectivity, park spaces can 
become greater than the sum of their parts. Park connectivity 
efforts can be planned in tandem with, and reinforce, efforts 
to increase tree canopy coverage, develop green infrastructure, 
revitalize streetscapes and commercial corridors, and bolster 
active modes of transportation.
PracTices                                                                    
eValuaTe THe siTe’s ProximiTY To green areas, neTworks 
anD comPlemenTarY lanD uses
 Map the area near the park, identifying: 
Other park lands and public open spaces 
Greenways, blue belts and wildlife sanctuaries 
Bicycle routes and storage racks 
Program sites such as sports fields and playgrounds 
Waterways and waterfront parks 
Cultural sites such as museums and performance halls 
Schools and college campuses 
Point sources for special needs users such as senior  
centers, day care, and handicapped service providers 
Commercial corridors and pedestrian attractors 
Green markets and other street-level commerce 
Other points of interest that complement and  
encourage park use 
Public transportation stops and stations 
 Map existing pedestrian, bicycle, and auto circulation in the 
site and surrounding areas. 
 Evaluate and prioritize opportunities for enhancing park 
access and connectivity. 
 Create opportunities for cross-programming, collaboration, 
and engagement with nearby organizations and resources. 
PromoTe ecological connecTiViTY To enHance ecological 
connecTiViTY for naTiVe PlanT sPecies, birDs, insecTs 
anD oTHer fauna
 Create habitat connectivity to waterfronts, wetlands, bird 
migration corridors 
See V.3 Protect and Enhance Ecological Connectivity  
and Habitat 
 Work with Parks foresters to increase tree canopy cover in 
the neighborhood surrounding the park 
d.2  
PLan for 
connectivit y 
and synergy 
Sited in the underserved Hunts Point neighborhood in the Bronx, Barretto Point Park 
created a destination along a planned waterfront greenway.
58
See V.10 Improve Street Tree Health 
 Preserve existing plant communities and trees when pos-
sible and beneficial, especially if they are unique to the area. 
See V.1 Protect Existing Vegetation 
 Protect site features during construction.
See C.3 Create Construction Staging & Sequencing Plans 
PromoTe waTersHeD connecTiViTY
 Examine water flows across the site and look for  
opportunities to allow water to pass over the site or into  
adjacent drainage areas. 
enHance Park connecTions for PeDesTrians anD cYclisTs
 Use greenways and bikeways to link parks to areas of  
population to increase use and access. 
 Provide bike racks and water fountains along greenways.
Design Park circulaTion for accessibiliTY
 Determine critical obstacles to accessibility to park 
entrances along major access corridors.
 Work with appropriate jurisdictions to minimize obstacles. 
 Ensure that sidewalks providing access to parks have  
curb cuts. 
 If a park entrance is not accessible, install signage  
indicating the nearest accessible entrance. 
 Make every effort to integrate ramps into the path system in 
such a way as to avoid the need for separate routes and ramps 
with an obtrusive appearance. 
 Design accessible routes between entry and exit points to 
accessible park features. 
ProViDe PleasanT PaTHwaYs anD Views To encourage Park 
use anD moVemenT THrougH Parks
 Provide amenities that encourage prolonged use of park 
space, such as benches, water fountains, and comfort stations. 
 Provide designated walking path circuits or trails with  
resting areas. 
 See also D.5 Design for Broad Appeal and Accessibility. 
 Consider safety concerns in remote parks or areas of parks 
and address through design and programming. 
 Separate bicycles from pedestrians whenever possible. 
 When bicycles are mixed with pedestrians, increase  
sightlines at potential points of conflict such as intersections 
and entrances. 
 Connect remote areas to more trafficked portions of the park 
and allow for easy travel and destination sightlines. 
 Evaluate needs for lighting, visibility, comfort stations, and 
emergency services.
ProViDe ouTDoor acTiViTY areas for aDjacenT uses
 Provide activities for nearby populations with  
limited mobility. 
Senior centers 
Day care centers 
Handicapped care or training centers 
 Merchants associations 
 Cultural institutions 
 Schools in need of athletic and cultural venues 
exPanD Visual anD cHaracTer connecTiViTY
 Connect to visually appealing corridors that contain  
landscape and streetscape features in order to extend park 
qualities into the surrounding urban fabric. 
 Greenstreets and bicycle paths can extend the landscape 
quality of park lands into the surrounding urban fabric,  
creating visually appealing and robust landscaped approaches 
to parks. 
 Capitalize on borrowed views and long range vistas. 
for furTHer informaTion
New York City Trees and Greenstreets Program. http://www.nycgovparks.
org/sub_your_park/trees_greenstreets.html
The Greenstreets program is a partnership between the Department of Parks 
& Recreation and the Department of Transportation. Launched in 1996, 
Greenstreets is a citywide program to convert paved, vacant traffic islands 
and medians into greenspaces filled with shade trees, flowering trees, 
shrubs, and groundcover.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/bike/home.shtml
Coutts, C. “Greenway Accessibility and Physical Activity Behavior.” 
Environment and Planning B, (2008) 35(3), 552-563 http://www.envplan.
com/abstract.cgi?id=b3406
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
59
objecTiVe                                                                    
Avoid damaging the site during construction
benefiTs                                                                     
J Prevents irreversible soil compaction and tree damage
J Preserves soil profiles and micro fauna
J Preserves natural features
consiDeraTions                                                        
J Restricting site access and staging will increase cost of 
construction if the site is overly constrained. 
PracTices                                                                   
Planning
 Have a small footprint. Consolidate higher impact design 
elements such as buildings and pavement areas in order to 
preserve large swaths of existing ecosystem or to allow for 
areas of hydrologic restoration. 
 As part of the early concept and master planning phase, 
develop a preservation and protection plan diagram coordi-
nated with soil and vegetation preservation that divides the 
site into five basic zone types: 
Zones of protection where existing hydrology will not  
be disturbed, which include appropriate buffer zones for 
surface water features such as, streams, lakes, wetlands 
Zones that, based on site program, will have minimal 
disturbance 
Zones for built elements 
Zones where construction traffic (both vehicular and 
pedestrian) will be allowed and, to the extent possible, coin-
cide with planned building locations, parking lots, roadways, 
and walks 
Zones of construction operation and materials stockpiling, 
which should be limited to areas where planned building 
locations, parking lots, roadways, and walks would occur 
 Design the first two zones as large as possible to protect 
them from construction traffic. 
 Consider the possibility of zones of soil where residual  
or managed contamination may be present, where specially 
managed zones could be required to be overlaid on the above 
five zones. 
See S.5 Testing, Remediation and Permitting for Sites 
with Contaminated Soils 
Design
 Contract documents should clearly indicate the extent  
and requirement of site preservation and protection in  
order to allow the contractor to easily identify costs and  
schedules to perform their work. Clear documents allow for 
ease of enforcement of the requirements and, ultimately,  
lead to better results. 
 Prepare site staging and sequencing plan as part of the 
contract documents. 
 Include tree protection and fencing as a pay item in  
the contract. 
locaTe consTrucTion acTiViTY Zones afTer DeVeloPing a 
siTe PreserVaTion anD ProTecTion Plan
coordinate with other design consultants, including architects, site 
utility engineers, construction managers and/or resident engineers, 
to ensure that protection and preservation zone locations and sizes 
allow sufficient room for the construction of the proposed site 
improvements and not just the improvements themselves. unrealistic 
preservation and protection zones create undue hardship for con-
tractors leading to inflated bids and unenforceable site restrictions 
during construction.
 Be sure to consider the needs for equipment access and 
maneuverability in and around buildings, utility trenches, 
rock outcroppings, stairs, walls, and other new or existing site 
features when establishing protection and preservation zones. 
 Work with contractors early in the process to stress the 
importance of protection zones and to develop a plan for 
minimizing the construction area. 
consTrucTion
 Be sure to consider the needs for equipment access and 
maneuverability in and around buildings, utility trenches, 
rock outcroppings, stairs, walls and other new or existing site 
features when establishing protection and preservation zones. 
 Consider the sequence of work. 
d.3 
deveLoP a site 
Preservation and 
Protection PLan
When this sidewalk 
was reconstructed, 
existing street trees 
were not incorporated 
into site protection 
plans. During the 
design phase, include 
methods and plans to 
preserve existing trees 
during construction.
60
objecTiVe                                                                  
Engage public participation and awareness early on and 
throughout the process of park design.
benefiTs                                                                    
J
Promotes community ownership of the park 
J
Encourages involvement of volunteers in park upkeep 
J
Incorporates valuable, local knowledge that can inspire 
design innovation 
J
Promotes awareness about sustainable design consider-
ations that may be invisible but are essential 
J
Community support helps obtain required approvals. 
consiDeraTions                                                          
J
Requires time for designer to engage with the public 
J
Public participation can slow down the design process if  
not well managed. 
J
Even if the designer attempts to reach all user groups some 
people might feel excluded.
J
Not everyone’s preferences can be accommodated, and 
there is a danger or creating unrealizable expectations. 
backgrounD                                                              
Community involvement is the most important ingredient in 
vibrant public spaces. A participatory design process engages 
local residents and stakeholders in the creation of their park, 
which leads to a sense of ownership and ideally inspires long 
term stewardship. Community members can also help the 
designer obtain a depth of understanding about the site and 
the neighborhood that site visits cannot provide. 
Identifying “the community” can be challenging. The NYC 
Department of Parks & Recreation, in collaboration with 
the City Parks Foundation, supports Partnerships for Parks 
(PfP) that facilitates community involvement in city parks. 
Partnerships for Parks staff work with a network of volunteers 
and local groups devoted to caring for parks, and can  
connect designers to key stakeholders who can inform the 
design process. 
PracTices                                                                   
Plan for a ParTiciPaTorY Design Process
 Work with the Borough Commissioner’s office  to identify 
local stakeholders and with Partnership for Parks staff to 
assemble community representatives. 
 Seek participation from park users, volunteers, and stake-
holder organizations, and adjacent point sources of users such 
as schools and friends of the park groups. 
 Go to where user groups congregate to interview them, as a 
full range of users don’t always attend public meetings. 
Skate parks 
Schools 
Elder homes 
 Determine ways to engage community participation in each 
step of the park design process. 
 Ensure that the participatory design process is inclusive of 
underrepresented groups such as immigrants and youth. 
 Plan to hold public meetings at times and places that are 
convenient to the public. 
 Schedule meetings well in advance, and communicate the 
invitations effectively. 
 On large projects it is important to report back at  
intervals so stakeholders may participate in the establishment 
of priorities. 
analYZe THe Park siTe anD THe neigHborHooD
 Reach out to locals who know the site best and can share 
knowledge that the designer might miss. 
 Ask about site conditions and how the space is used. 
For example, useful information includes ‘this spot gets 
muddy after a rain,’ or ‘seniors gather at those benches in 
the shade.’ 
 Encourage community members to provide cultural,  
historical, and neighborhood context to inform a locally  
resonant design. 
collecT communiTY inPuT anD feeDback
 Research existing community agendas for open space, such 
as 197a plans, community board statements of need, etc. 
Many communities have already prioritized their open space 
needs, which provide good background for new sites. 
 Encourage committed participants to speak with their  
neighbors and fellow park users and then report back. 
 Communicate what kinds of input are useful. 
 Depending on the size of a project, designers can  
use a variety of tools to collect input from a wide range  
of users, including: 
Individual interviews 
Surveys, gathering only useful information, and formatted 
for easy correlation such as multiple choice 
Web sites 
Community design meetings 
Creative activities or games that allow people to show 
their vision of their ideal park 
Interactive maps 
Non-language based methods of providing feedback 
(important in efforts to involve new immigrants). 
Public meeTings
 Clearly communicate the purpose of the meeting, design 
timeline, and budget. 
 Present the site analysis, and constraints of the project, to 
participants in an accessible way. 
 Help the public interpret what they are looking at to ensure 
d.4 
engage PuBLic 
ParticiPation 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested