display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate one page in pdf document application control tool html azure wpf online design_guidelines6-part1759

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
61
that the designer receives relevant comments. 
 Encourage community members to share what they know 
about the current use of the site, its problems and opportuni-
ties, as well as their needs and aspirations. 
 Avoid creating a simple wish list, as you need to know less 
tangible concerns as well. 
 Ask probing questions to tease out specifics. 
 Designate a notetaker, create a record of information gath-
ered, problems identified, decisions made, and next steps. 
 Keep notes on a flip chart so there is a visible record of 
everyone’s comments regardless of significance. 
 As designs progress, describe how community input from 
earlier in the design process has informed the design. 
 Establish a sign-in sheet with contact information, especially 
email addresses for future invitations and follow up questions. 
 Be accessible to participants before and after the meeting. 
 Introduce yourself to individuals and get to know their con-
cerns, make notes so you can contact them later for follow up 
questions and to report progress in their areas of interest. 
oVercome obsTacles of ParTiciPaTorY Processes
 Treat the community as a partner in seeking the best design 
solutions within constraints, rather than as a client. 
 Encourage the public to understand and accommodate the 
design schedule. 
 Manage expectations of local participants and inform them 
about budget and design constraints. 
 Encourage the community to respect the designer’s role and 
use input-gathering to incorporate the community’s expertise. 
 Identify opinion leaders and consult with them on difficult 
issues prior to public meetings. 
communiTY ProjecTs
 Consider opportunities for the community to aid in planning, 
building, and/or maintaining elements of the park. 
Gardens 
Tree plantings 
It’s My Park Day 
 If applicable, work out the community’s responsibilities for 
maintaining and caring for the project. 
 Consider community-created art and signage to reflect local 
culture and history. 
 Consider allocating space for community gardening or tree 
planting to give participants the opportunity to cultivate the park. 
 Be wary of challenges to hands-on projects, including: 
Organizational complexities and rivalries 
Slow timing 
Approval complications 
Exclusivity of themes that lack relevance to some  
park users 
Lack of sustained commitment to project upkeep,  
which would burden agency maintenance staff. 
use THe caPiTal Process To increase communiTY 
inVolVemenT in Parks
 Encourage the community surrounding a park to use the 
space for activities and events. 
 Foster a sense of park ownership within the community 
that encourages long term commitment to park health and 
maintenance. 
 Seek Partnerships for Park’s help in encouraging community 
groups to better organize and promote themselves. 
 Seek partnerships with existing groups and institutions such 
as schools and community centers. 
 Create a relationship with local organizations to achieve a 
better understanding of the site ecology and history. 
 Promote local support of the proposed design to minimize 
conflict during regulatory approval reviews and public  
comment periods. 
Design Parks wiTH sPace for flexible use
 Design parks that permit a variety of programming and uses. 
 Encourage a greater diversity of park users, as well as allow 
different uses to evolve as neighborhoods change. 
sTaY connecTeD anD informeD During consTrucTion
 Engage key stakeholders to inform neighbors about the 
capital project and the incorporation of community input into 
the design. 
 On large projects use the Parks web site to keep the  
community informed about the project’s construction. 
 Create signage in appropriate languages and post on the 
construction site fence: 
Inform people about plans for the new park and when  
it will reopen. 
Refer people to other neighborhood parks to visit  
during construction. 
celebraTe THe Park oPening
 The Borough offices and Partnerships for Parks can invite 
community members to help plan a ribbon cutting event that 
is inclusive of all local stakeholders. 
 At the opening, acknowledge the contributions of commu-
nity members and make the event memorable for everyone  
who attends. 
In NYC’s Chinatown, Parks worked with Hester Street Collaborative, a local 
nonprofit, to hold a day of workshops that engaged local participants to develop 
new park ideas.
How to rotate one page in pdf document - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
reverse page order pdf online; rotate pages in pdf permanently
How to rotate one page in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages and save; pdf rotate all pages
62
ensure ongoing mainTenance anD Programming
 Encourage community volunteers who played a role in 
design to become long term park stewards, contributing to 
planting, cleaning, programming and other activities. 
 For more information, refer to M.4 Partner with Private 
Sector and Local Community to Assist with Maintenance. 
for furTHer informaTion
Faga, Barbara. Designing Public Consensus: The Civic Theater of 
Community Participation for Architects, Landscape Architects, Planners and 
Urban Designers (Wiley, 2006)
This publication examines public process implemented in projects of dif-
ferent scales, and reveals the lessons learned by the design practitioners. 
http://www.designingpublicconsensus.com/
People Make Parks Kit: Partnerships for Parks and Hester Street 
Collaborative — a non-profit that engages residents and students in 
underserved NYC neighborhoods in participatory architectural projects 
— are working together to produce the People Make Parks Kit, a guide to 
community involvement in park design. Contact kate.louis@parks.nyc.gov 
for more information. 
Allen and Pike Street Malls: In the summer 2008, the United Neighbors to 
Revitalize Allen and Pike Coalition and Hester Street Collaborative organized 
an innovative input-gathering process to inform the renovation of this 
median park. For more information visit: 
www.hesterstreet.org/newsletters/october08.html#allen
PlaNYC Regional Parks: In the summer of 2007, Partnerships for Parks 
coordinated efforts to collect surveys and hold community meetings about 
plans for regional parks slated for reconstruction with funding through 
the Mayor’s PlaNYC initiative. Read about these efforts in Partnerships 
for Parks’ newsletter, The Leaflet: www.partnershipsforparks.org/4058/
Partnerships_for_Parks_Winter_2008_Leaflet
Grant Park and Dred Scott Bird Sanctuary: Volunteers at this site in the 
Bronx demonstrated the power of community input in park design simply by 
attending a planning meeting and sharing their local knowledge.
http://www.partnershipsforparks.org/3951/
Partnerships_for_Parks_Summer_2007_Leaflet
objecTiVe                                                                   
Accommodate the full range of recreational and park use pref-
erences expected from the local community — including pro-
jected future residents — throughout the planning and design 
of parks. Use Universal Design concepts to ensure access for 
users of a variety of ages and abilities, including persons with 
mobility, visual, hearing, or cognitive impairments. 
benefiTs                                                                     
J
Increases participation in park facilities and open spaces
 Flexibility of use allows parks to evolve as user groups do
 Provides recreational opportunities for diverse groups
 Encourages park use by less engaged groups
 Promotes social interaction and integration 
 Provides a variety of safe and challenging ground level  
and elevated activities for all children, including those  
with disabilities
 Ensures compliance with ADA guidelines and best practices 
for accessibility
consiDeraTions                                                       
Not everyone’s preferences can be accommodated, espe-
cially in smaller neighborhood parks. 
 Identifying user groups can be time consuming and chal-
lenging, especially if language barriers exist. 
 Requires time for designer to interface with the public 
Even if the designer attempts to reach all user groups, some 
people might feel excluded. 
 Implementation may be challenging in developing acces-
sible solutions for older facilities built before the current 
accessibility standards existed. 
May increase cost of project and lead to tradeoffs. 
inTegraTion                                                                 
 D.2 Plan for Connectivity & Synergy 
backgrounD                                                            
While young children and seniors are often given specific  
use areas, other ages and stages of life have equally valid 
needs, which are crucial to a park’s success. Cultural prefer-
ences are powerful determinants of active and passive park 
use. Neighborhood demographics change over the life of a 
park, sometimes rapidly, so it is important to understand how a 
d.5 
design for Broad 
aPPeaL and 
accessiBiLity
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
If you are looking for a solution to conveniently delete one page from your PDF document, you can use this VB.NET PDF Library, which supports a variety of PDF
pdf rotate one page; rotate individual pdf pages reader
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying
how to rotate one pdf page; how to change page orientation in pdf document
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
63
neighborhood is changing so the park can accommodate  
that change. 
People’s physical abilities are highly varied. It is important 
to understand park use from the point of view of the disabled 
user, who could be a child, a parent, a caregiver or a visitor. 
Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires 
that each program, service, or activity conducted by a public 
entity, when viewed in its entirety, be readily accessible to and 
usable by individuals with disabilities. This program acces-
sibility standard — providing access to programs, not just 
to facilities — permits a broader and more flexible range of 
solutions to existing access problems. Program accessibility 
may be achieved through structural methods, or by relocating 
a program to an alternate, accessible facility. Local govern-
ments are not required to remove physical barriers in every one 
of their existing buildings and facilities so long as they make 
their programs accessible to individuals who are unable to use 
an inaccessible existing facility. The ADA Design Guidelines 
established requirements for barrier free design in new con-
struction and planned alterations. 
Parks must ensure that newly constructed and reconstructed 
buildings and facilities are free of architectural and commu-
nication barriers that restrict access or use by individuals with 
disabilities. When Parks undertakes alterations to an existing 
facility, the reconstructed portions are designed to comply with 
ADA guidelines. 
PracTices                                                                 
Planning
consiDer siTe conTexT anD neigHborHooD inPuT in 
selecTing siTe Programming
 Evaluate use of the site 
User surveys in the park and community can be a valu-
able tool to determine who is using the park. 
Often certain groups don’t show up at outreach meet-
ings, yet the desires and needs of these invisible groups are 
important to represent in the design. 
 Consider the extent to which certain amenities are overused 
at the site or in nearby parks, indicating a demand for addi-
tional amenities. 
 Consider the extent to which certain amenities are under-
used, indicating a shift in demand. 
 Review community board district needs statements and 
demographic trends. 
 Work with Friends groups, Partnerships for Parks, and 
Borough Commissioners’ offices to identify local park advo-
cates and community leaders. 
 Based on community input, consider and prioritize other 
amenities, landscape features, or types of recreation. 
See D.4 Engage Public Participation. 
 See D.2 Plan for Connectivity & Synergy. 
ProViDe boTH sPecific use areas anD flexible ones
 Pay particular attention to the recreational and developmen-
tal needs of children of all ages, including adolescents who do 
not participate in team sports. 
 Address cultural preferences of new immigrants such as 
cricket, soccer, tai chi. 
 Anticipate infrastructural and spatial needs for programming 
by different user groups. 
 Anticipate how demand for amenities will change as neigh-
borhood demographics and context shift. 
 Design parks with flexible spaces that can accommodate a 
variety of users and changes in use. 
 Do not create conflict between user groups. 
Noisy activities should not be next to quiet passive areas. 
Activities such as dog runs and basketball courts should 
not be located close to residential areas due to potential 
noise problems. 
encourage awareness of naTural, culTural, HisTorical, 
anD enVironmenTal asPecTs of siTe
 Investigate site history, including: 
Previous site uses 
Historically significant events at or near site 
Ecologically significant plant or animal communities 
 Include significant site elements within site analysis, and 
respond as necessary within design. 
ProViDe PleasanT PaTHwaYs anD Views To encourage Park 
use anD moVemenT THrougH Parks
 Provide amenities such as benches, water fountains  
and bathrooms. 
 Provide designated walking path circuits or trails  
with resting areas. 
aPPeal To olDer users anD THose wiTH PHYsical 
imPairmenTs
 Provide an age friendly bench design with full back support 
and armrests. 
 Provide a two-tier drinking fountain for people of varying 
heights and those who have trouble bending. 
 In restrooms, provide an ambulatory accessible toilet for 
people who use canes or walkers. 
 Foster intergenerational activities and opportunities to help 
encourage interaction among all users. 
DeVeloP ParTnersHiPs To inform Public abouT Park 
ameniTies anD acTiViTies
 Expand partnerships between Parks, senior centers, public 
libraries, and other local institutions to foster stewardship of 
the park as well as lifelong learning and cultural engagement. 
 Understand the demographics of the community you are 
communicating with. 
 Translate and post information about park events and 
resources broadly. 
 Include bulletin boards in recreation centers, libraries, and 
community centers. 
 Make use of media including the Parks website and com-
munity newspapers. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to another NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
pdf save rotated pages; pdf rotate page
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
pdf rotate single page; saving rotated pdf pages
64
Designing for accessibiliTY
Plan for inDePenDenT, barrier-free access To Public 
recreaTional faciliTies
 Consider accessibility needs in all park projects, including: 
Playgrounds 
Sports fields 
Tennis courts 
Recreation centers 
Boat slips, docks, and fishing piers 
Beaches 
Restaurants 
Golf courses 
Swimming pools 
Restrooms 
Natural areas and trails 
 Wherever possible and desirable, exceed accessibility 
requirements. 
Design accessible feaTures
 Consult Parks’ in-house ADA contact person, who can be 
used as a resource for designers. 
 Provide accessible routes and entrances. 
 When renovating restrooms, provide at least one standard 
wheelchair-accessible toilet if feasible. 
 For projects involving historic properties, provide access 
while preserving special building features and finishes. 
 Incorporate accessible features, including: 
Drinking fountains 
Picnic tables 
Bleachers 
Benches with adjacent wheelchair spaces 
Accessible parking spaces 
Accessible playground equipment 
Ramps, curb-ramps, and transfer platforms 
Directional signage, doorway hardware 
Detectable warnings 
Handrails, elevated planters 
Elevated sand boxes. 
if necessarY, consiDer equiValenT faciliTaTion
 Ensure that designs, products or technologies that depart 
from guidelines provide equivalent access. 
 Ensure substantially equivalent or greater accessibility and 
usability is provided. 
ProViDe accessible work areas
 Design employee work areas so that employees with disabili-
ties can approach, enter, and exit the areas. 
 Modify work stations as needed to include maneuvering 
space and adjustable shelving, as reasonable accommodations 
for employees with disabilities. 
Design for accessibiliTY
 Ensure that all primary entrances in new park sites and 
buildings — those used for day-to-day pedestrian ingress and 
egress — are accessible. 
 Ensure accessible routes to park buildings coincide with 
general circulation paths. 
 In new park structures, ensure that the accessible route 
does not pass through kitchens, storage rooms, restrooms, 
closets or similar spaces, if it is the only accessible route. 
 Regrade portions of sites, where necessary, to avoid  
step barriers. 
 Raise the grades around comfort stations and other build-
ings to eliminate the need for a step. 
for furTHer informaTion
Hooper Leonard J. Landscape Architectural Graphic Standards. Wiley and 
Sons, October 2006. 
Americans with Disabilities Act and Architectural Barriers Act 
Accessibility Guidelines (2004), The United States Access Board 
(Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board) (800) 872-
2253. www.access-board.gov
ICC/ANSI A117.1-2003, Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities, 
American National Standards Institute, Inc. 
www.iccsafe.org
Proposed ADA Standards for Accessible Design, June 2008. U.S. 
Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Public Access Section. (800) 
514-0301, (202) 514-0301. www.ada.gov 
Universal Design New York 2, Danise Levine, Editor in Chief, 2003, Center 
for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access, University at Buffalo, The 
State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, ISBN 0-9714202-3-8. 
The City of New York Building Code, July 2008, ISBN-978-1-58001-716-9. 
City of New York Parks and Recreation http://www.nycgovparks.org/
facilities/playgrounds
f Accessible playgrounds include: 
Playground for All Children, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park 
World Ice Arena & Natatorium, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park 
Morningside Park Playground, 116th St, Manhattan 
Al Oerter Recreation Center, Queens 
Mullaly Park, Bronx 
Sorrentino Recreation Center, Queens
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
A PDFDocument object contains all information about source PDF document file. PDFPage: As for one page of PDFDocument instance, RasterEdge VB.NET PDF annotator
pdf rotate page and save; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
unnecessary page from target existing PDF document file. Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more
how to rotate just one page in pdf; pdf rotate single page reader
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
65
Boardwalks like this one allow universal access to views and habitat, giving all visitors direct experience of environmental aspects of site.
The play equipment at this playground on Manhattan’s Upper West Side is designed to allow access to all children, including those with wheelchairs. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF
rotate pdf page permanently; rotate all pages in pdf file
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
This C#.NET example describes how to copy an image from one page of PDF document and paste it into another page. // Define input and output documents.
rotate pdf page and save; rotate pdf page by page
66
objecTiVe                                                                    
Plan and design parks and landscapes to promote active fit-
ness, improve air quality and microclimate, and enhance the 
health and wellbeing of park users.
benefiTs                                                                     
 Encourages healthy behavior 
 Provides access to fitness and recreation 
 Encourages neighborhood interaction 
 Citywide changes in park design can have a cumulative 
impact on city air quality. 
 Mitigating urban heat island effect within parks can cool 
surrounding neighborhoods. 
 Addresses the emerging health epidemic of obesity 
consiDeraTions                                                        
 Difficult to quantify benefits created by individual  
parks on city as a whole 
 Accommodating the recreational preferences for all  
park users is challenging. 
 Choosing between creating recreation areas and  
landscape can be challenging, especially in areas that are 
underserved in both. 
 Overuse of recreational fields creates maintenance  
issues and additional costs. 
 Poorly constructed or maintained landscapes will fail  
to improve air quality and microclimate. 
backgrounD                                                             
Parks play a unique role in urban public health. They are the 
nexus of passive and active recreational activities, which pro-
vide fitness opportunities that offer a range of health benefits, 
including improved cardiovascular health, stress reduction, 
enhancement of physical strength and flexibility, and improved 
coordination. At the same time parks and landscapes contain 
vegetation that provides valuable ecosystem services and 
health benefits such as air quality improvement and evapora-
tive cooling. Quality park design and programming can help 
improve fitness and reduce obesity, improve air quality, miti-
gate the urban heat island effect, and reduce asthma rates. 
PracTices                                                                 
fiTness
eValuaTe HealTH anD wellness oPPorTuniTies
 Research local public health and wellness concerns, such as 
fitness or asthma rates. 
 Reach out to local participants as well as public  
health experts. 
See D.4 Engage Public Participation. 
 In areas where health issues are evident, consider how the 
design and programming of the park site could help. 
creaTe fiTness oPPorTuniTies for all PoPulaTions
 Determine what fitness facilities are available, and supple-
ment those with needed facilities. 
 Encourage active recreation for a diversity of user groups. 
Suggestions include: 
Play opportunities for children that build coordination, 
flexibility, and strength 
Address the preferences of new immigrants such as 
cricket, soccer, tai chi 
Exercise opportunities for parents adjacent to or within 
playgrounds and sports fields 
Incidental areas for stretching and strength building for 
adults, especially senior citizens 
Bikeways 
Attractive stairs that encourage use 
Attractive areas for exercising, and exercise classes. 
 Encourage passive recreation, including: 
Walking trails 
Nature trails. 
 Use materials that enhance the exercise activity such as  
soft surfaces for running and exercising. 
encourage acTiViTY THrougH connecTiViTY
 Encourage use through connecting different open spaces, 
work places, schools, and residential areas with bikeways and 
pedestrian networks. 
air qualiTY & microclimaTe
assess Tree canoPY coVerage
 Survey existing trees within the site. 
Assess species type, canopy coverage, degree of coverage, 
and tree health status. 
 Survey trees surrounding the site to assess need for 
increased canopy cover.
 Work with the Forestry Division to determine the street tree 
canopy coverage in the park’s neighborhood. 
 Create a plan indicating current shading patterns and  
proposed additions. 
Overlay shading with site features to analyze which  
areas receive adequate shade and which are in need of 
greater coverage. 
d.6 
imProve 
PuBLic HeaLtH 
The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has 
finalized the New York City Community Air Survey (NYCCAS) after 
collaboration with specialists and community stakeholders. NYCCAS 
will measure, at a minimum of 130 street level locations in each 
season each year, nitrogen oxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, fine particle 
mass, elemental carbon, and the metal content of air. These collab-
orative air quality monitoring efforts could inform park and landscape 
design initiatives.
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
67
Greenways like this one along Manhattan’s West Side, provide connections  
between parks to a variety of users and provide opportunities for many kinds  
of physical activity.
68
 Seek to increase canopy cover in areas with low overall 
cover, particularly in underserved areas. 
reDuce summerTime surface TemPeraTures THrougH 
reDuceD solar absorPTion anD HeaT reTenTion
 Assess urban heat islands on or near the site. 
 Where possible, replace paved areas with permeable cover-
age, allowing for infiltration of groundwater. 
 Consider reradiated heat from walls and ground planes. 
 Increase the albedo and emissivity of paved sections to 
reduce solar absorption and heat retention. 
 Plant additional vegetation in paved areas receiving substan-
tial sunlight to reduce urban heat island effects as well as cool 
the park in warmer months. 
 Consider incorporating water features during summer 
months to increase evaporative cooling. 
 In general, seek to create comfortable microclimates 
throughout the site, especially in seating areas, recreational 
areas, and child play areas. 
conDucT collaboraTiVe local air qualiTY sTuDY
 In problem areas evaluate studies and consult experts, or 
conduct studies to assess air quality and identify sources of 
pollution impacting park site. 
Assess impacts of park design or reconstruction. 
 These studies can be compared with assessment after park 
designs have been implemented. 
assess local PolluTanT sources
 Assess site and surroundings for sources of localized  
air pollutants. 
Evaluate impacts of active roadways, especially those  
with commercial traffic. 
Evaluate neighboring industries and land uses. 
Engage public stakeholders in these efforts. 
Plan Park Programs anD lanDscaPe feaTures To minimiZe
imPacT of local PolluTion
 At sites adjacent to pollution sources, design park edge fea-
tures to serve as buffers to reduce wind, filter large particles 
and exhaust from the air, and reduce noise. 
 Locate seating areas, playgrounds, athletic fields and other 
areas of sensitive use as far as possible from sources of pollu-
tion. Distance greatly reduces exposure to ground level pollut-
ers such as vehicles. 
 Preserve valuable existing vegetation and soils. 
 Maximize vegetation on site. 
See V.6 Use an Ecological Approach to Planting. 
 When installing vegetation, design planting beds to encour-
age long term growth and vitality. 
encourage ouTDoor comforT
 Provide seating areas around amenities such as  
playgrounds, gardens, and sports fields. 
 Provide seating areas in attractive and comfortable 
locations. 
 Provide shade trees near seating areas and ensure 
that planting beds are large enough for mature canopy 
development. 
 Integrate other landscape design features with seating  
and activity areas to create comfortable microclimates and 
pleasing spaces. 
use enVironmenTallY benign maTerials
 Minimize volatile organic compounds in park materials. 
 Consider the health of park workers as well as park users 
when selecting materials and cleaning products. 
 Reuse materials onsite or from nearby sites to reduce  
transportation related impacts on air quality. 
 Reduce the use of harmful chemical products and  
soil amendments. 
See S.3 Prioritize the Rejuvenation of Existing Soils 
Before Importing New Soil Materials. 
 See D.8 Choose Materials Wisely. 
conDucT a HealTH imPacT assessmenT (Hia)
 Assess your project’s design criteria in order to reveal  
quantifiable health/safety impacts that will accrue from  
the redesigning of the parkland and maximizing its  
sustainable features. 
for furTHer informaTion
Dee Merriam, FASLA / Centers for Disease Control / 4770 Buford Highway, 
MS-F60 / Atlanta, GA 30341 / dmerriam@cdc.gov 
Martha Droge, AICP, ASLA, LEED AP / Coordinator / Kitsap County Parks 
and Recreation Dept, / 614 Division Street, MS-1 / Port Orchard, WA 98366 / 
360-337-5362 / mdroge@co.kitsap.wa.us 
A PDF of the PowerPoint presentation that Dee Merriam and Martha Droge 
delivered at ASLA’s National Convention, October 2008, is available online: 
“Wellness by Design: Applying Health Impact Assessments to Community 
Planning and Design Projects” http://www.asla.org/uploadedFiles/CMS/
Resources/TueB3.pdf 
PlaNYC Air Quality Goals, http://www.nyc.gov/html/planyc2030/html/
plan/air.shtml
Air Quality Index: www.airnow.gov
Physical Fitness Guidelines: www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/recom-
mendations/older_adults.htm
Health Effects Institute: www.healtheffects.org/about.htm
Cardiovascular Health: www.cdc.gov/cvh
EPA Aging Initiative: www.epa.gov/aging
Designing Healthy Places: www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces
Health Statistics: www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm
Place Making Tools for Health and Community Design, Project for 
Public Spaces: http://www.pps.org/info/placemakingtools/issuepapers/
health_community
Enrique Penalosa, Why Parks are Important to Cities: A transcript of a 
keynote address at the Urban Parks Institute’s “Great Parks/Great Cities” 
Conference, July 30, 2001: http://urbanparks.pps.org/topics/whyneed/
newvisions/penalosa_speech_2001
Brown, Robert; Gillespie, Terry. Microclimatic Landscape Design: Creating 
Thermal Comfort and Energy Efficiency. Wiley and Sons, August 1995. http://
www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471056677.html
California Asthma Partnership Strategic Plan: http://www.asthmapartners.org
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
69
objecTiVe                                                                  
Anticipate changes at park sites and surrounding areas that 
may result from climate change. Determine strategies to miti-
gate and adapt to the affects of climate change while promot-
ing the long term resilience of parks and landscapes. 
benefiTs                                                                    
 Enables parks and landscapes to adapt to and remain  
resilient in the face of climate change
 Creating parks can be an efficient means of addressing  
flood control.
 Well designed, constructed and maintained landscapes  
can help sequester carbon dioxide.
 Landscapes can also reduce ambient temperatures by  
provide shading and evaporative cooling.
 Helps reduce energy use
consiDeraTions                                                       
Quantifying the benefits of individual parks in citywide  
mitigation and adaptation is challenging. 
 It is difficult to predict all of the impacts of climate change, 
particularly regarding flooding and extreme weather events, 
particularly whether changes in precipitation levels will hinder, 
alter or even enhance natural vegetation growth. 
 Storm frequencies and flooding levels anticipated due to 
climate change may exceed existing codes. 
Higher costs of more extensive infrastructure may be  
difficult to justify. 
backgrounD                                                             
According to the New York City Panel on Climate Change, the 
metropolitan region is extremely likely to experience warmer 
temperatures in the coming decades, more likely than not to 
experience increased precipitation, and extremely likely to 
experience sea level rise.11 Furthermore, the likely increase in 
the frequency of extreme weather events is expected to create 
a variety of conditions that could harm the city’s population 
as well as its infrastructure, parks, and landscapes. These 
impacts include heat waves that are more frequent, intense, 
and longer lasting; brief and intense precipitation events that 
can cause flooding and sewage overflows; storm related coastal 
flooding; and possibly increased drought periods. Based on 
these projected impacts, the New York City Panel on Climate 
Change is currently working to devise strategies that can be 
implemented citywide to protect the city and adapt to changes 
caused by climate change.
global climaTe moDel ProjecTions for THe 
new York ciTY region
mean annual temperature increases:
1.5 to 3 F° by the 2020s 
3 to 5 F° by the 2050s 
4 to 7.5 F° by the 2080s 
mean annual precipitation increases:
0 to 5% by the 2020s 
0 to 10% by the 2050s 
5 to 10% by the 2080s 
mean annual sea level rise:
2 to 5 inches by the 2020s 
7 to 12 inches by the 2050s 
12 to 23 inches by the 2080s 
Rapid Ice Melt scenario: 41 to 55 inches by the 2080s 
PracTices                                                                 
Planning
conDucT a ciTYwiDe climaTe cHange imPacT surVeY for 
Park areas
 Identify park sites and other landscaped amenities that  
are vulnerable to: 
Sea level rise 
Damage from violent storms 
Invasive species and pests 
Landscape succession 
Temperature related impacts 
Salt water intrusion 
 Give special attention to waterfront landscapes, geographi-
cally exposed landscapes, and sites with a history of flooding. 
 Evaluate presence of invasive species as climatic  
conditions change. 
 Determine strategies for increasing the resistance and  
resilience of specific park and landscape assets. 
 In areas that have high risk for future flooding, consider devel-
oping adaptation plans to offer protection and increase resilience. 
 Consider how natural areas or constructed landscapes along 
waterways could serve as buffers to surrounding inhabited areas. 
 Assess potential for new and expanded disease vectors and 
their habitats in parks and natural landscapes. 
DeVeloP climaTe aDaPTaTion Plans for Vulnerable 
exisTing Parks anD lanDscaPes
 Hard Infrastructure 
Drainage 
Utilities 
Asphalt design and materials 
Pile and pier design 
Fixed playground structures 
 Assess site’s risk of flooding due to 50 and 100 year  
storms or larger. 
d.7 
mitigate and 
adaPt to 
cLimate cHange
70
Examine maps that predict floods and coastal erosion 
hazard areas. 
Use flood estimates for larger design storms and account 
for increased intensity of storms. 
Keep abreast of updates to flood projections. 
 Determine acceptable levels of risk for the site. 
 Consider how flooding events would impact the site. 
Pay particular attention to sensitive features including 
buildings, ornamental plantings, large trees, storage areas, 
and historic assets. 
 Determine if any of the following practices will offer 
increased protection: 
Engineering solutions such as regrading and stormwalls 
Altered plantings 
h  Salt-tolerant species 
 Inundation-tolerant species 
 Hearty species 
Stormwater best management practices 
Management / maintenance changes 
Increasing tidal wetland coverage in coastal locations. 
 Determine strategies for remediating damaged landscape 
features, including fallen trees and invasive species.
 Identify the most effective site adaptation measures and 
create an adaptation plan for the site that could either be 
undertaken incrementally or as part of future work plans. 
assess anD seek To enHance THe carbon caPTure anD 
sTorage PoTenTial of lanDscaPe anD soil feaTures
 Seek to increase understory planting wherever possible to 
increase biomass. 
 Assess the greenhouse gas liabilities of different strategies 
for dealing with dead or dying trees. 
Design 
conDucT a climaTe imPacT assessmenT for new Parks 
anD lanDscaPes
 Determine future risks related to climate change and  
opportunities for mitigation. 
 Determine acceptable levels of risk for the site. 
 Consider exceeding requirements for storm frequencies  
and sizes. 
 Consider onsite stormwater management strategies. 
 Consider how the site could aid in citywide adaptation  
to climate change. 
 When possible, engage the public (residents, stakeholders, 
local environmental groups) in climate impact assessment. 
Design To minimiZe risks relaTeD To climaTe cHange
 In site planning, locate sensitive site features in  
locations that are less prone to flooding. 
 Create absorbent landscapes and utilize onsite  
stormwater management. 
See Part 4: Water, in particular W.3 Create  
Absorbent Landscapes. 
 Select species that can tolerate the anticipated range  
of temperatures, rainfall patterns, and potential inundation 
from sea level rise. 
 In situations where inundation may become a problem, 
utilize species that tolerate intermittent flooding and are less 
sensitive to salt water. 
 Select trees with special care, especially along waterfronts. 
 Use proactive park design as an opportunity for public edu-
cation on flooding. 
Explain anticipated changes and how the park is planned 
for long term viability. 
 Design landscapes to provide canopy cover, shading, and evapo-
rative cooling in order to reduce the urban heat island effect. 
minimiZe imPacT of siTe consTrucTion on new York ciTY’s 
municiPal carbon fooTPrinT anD THe global carbon buDgeT
 Research materials with low carbon footprints and surfaces 
with high reflectance and emissivity. 
See D.8 Choose Materials Wisely. 
 Source materials locally whenever possible. 
 Minimize soil disturbance during construction. 
See S.2 Minimize Soil Disturbance. 
 Use energy efficient and low emissions construction equip-
ment that meet and exceed the requirements of Local Law 77. 
mainTenance & oPeraTions
 Evaluate presence of invasive species as climatic  
conditions change. 
 Periodically monitor and assess the effectiveness of the 
site’s Climate Adaptation Plan. 
 Asses site for damage following extreme weather events. 
 Track climate impacts on site over time in an easily  
accessible registry or database. 
 Reassess and modify the Climate Adaptation Plan as  
new climate data become available or as changes to the site 
necessitate modification. 
for furTHer informaTion
Carbon Footprint and Redesign of Pedestrian Pathways for the New York 
City Parks and Recreation Department: Final Report (April, 2008)
http://community.seas.columbia.edu/cslp/presentations/spring08/
Material%20Pathwaycarbon%20Footprint%20And%20Redesign%20Of%20
Pedestrian%20Pathways.pdf
The level of flooding risk is available through the city’s Hurricane 
Evacuation Zone Finder: http://home2.nyc.gov/html/oem/downloads/pdf/hur-
ricane_map_english_06.pdf
NYC Department of Environmental Protection Climate Change Program 
Assessment and Action Plan
A Report Based on the Ongoing Work of the DEP Climate Change Task Force; 
May 2008, Report 1
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dep/html/news/climate_change_report_05-08.shtml
New York City’s Climate Change Adaptation Plans and documents, http://
www.nyc.gov/html/planyc2030/html/plan/climate.shtml
11
New York City Panel on Climate Change (2009). Climate Risk Information. http://www.nyc.gov/
html/om/pdf/2009/NPCC_CRI.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested