display pdf in asp.net page : How to rotate a single page in a pdf document control application system azure web page asp.net console design_guidelines7-part1760

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
71
objecTiVes                                                                 
Decrease damage to the environment caused by material 
harvesting, production, installation, and use. Increase material 
resilience and ease of maintenance.
benefiTs                                                                   
 Preserves the rain forest and other ecosystems 
 Reduces carbon dioxide and pollution emission 
 Decreases the heat island effect and stormwater runoff 
 Reduces construction waste disposal 
 Reduces energy consumption 
Reduces hazardous emissions and fumes 
 Use of local resources and manufacturing facilities reduces 
transport costs and benefits the local economy. 
 Using recycled materials reduces landfill burdens, carbon 
emissions, and mining of raw materials. 
 Use of locally available recycled materials may reduce cost. 
 Specification of a material that can provide employment 
and habitat preservation, such as sustainably grown wood, can 
increase its production and availability. 
 Properly specified materials are resistant to rot, and vandal-
ism, decreasing repair and replacement costs. 
consiDeraTions                                                          
 Quality assurance and quality control are required with  
new materials. 
New materials must be tested before use and evaluated 
after installation, before they can be widely specified. 
The use of unique designs, non standard materials or 
unusual methods may require reengineering. 
Can be difficult and more expensive to source sustainably 
managed or certified materials. 
backgrounD                                                              
The careful selection of site materials and assemblies is a crit-
ical part of high performance landscapes. Historically, design-
ers have chosen site materials primarily based on performance 
criteria, initial cost, and aesthetics. The urgency of climate 
change, air pollution, rising fuel costs, ecological destruction, 
and loss of natural resources is changing the focus of critical 
selection criteria.12 Three aspects of sustainability — environ-
mental, social and economic — impact material’s production 
and use are now important to consider. 
The full life span of environmental, social, and economic 
considerations include extraction of raw materials associated 
with renewability and extraction of raw materials, fabrica-
tion and shipping of elements, installation side effects, 
maintenance methods and frequency, and potential for recy-
cling and reuse should be fully considered.
Materials selection needs to be considered in tandem  
with overall high performance goals for a site and the specific 
BMP strategies to achieve those goals. Some materials are 
justified solely based on their environmental benefits such as 
reduced embodied energy, low toxicity or durability. Others 
materials or assemblies may not be entirely green or sustain-
able when judged on their own, but when they contribute to 
the overall success of a site strategy or goal they may actu-
ally be justified. For example, a locally produced material 
may have a higher initial cost, yet the material’s use may be 
contributing to the well-being of the local economy, supporting 
local industry and livelihoods, which is of long term benefit to 
the community as a whole.
Quantity is an important factor. The material with the least 
impact is one that is not used at all. Reducing the volume  
of material used can have a large effect on the overall environ-
mental impact of a project. Quality and longevity are impor-
tant as well. Materials that need little repair conserve scarce 
maintenance resources, and can prolong the capital replace-
ment cycle.
PracTices                                                                
Meg Calkins outlined key principles to be considered when 
selecting materials that contribute to high performance 
landscapes:13
cHoose maTerials anD ProDucTs THaT minimiZe resource use
 Choose products and assemblies that use fewer materials. 
 Use reused materials and products. 
 Use recycled materials. 
 Use materials that favor high levels of both pre- and post-
consumer recycled content. 
 Use materials that are made from agricultural waste. 
 Use materials or products with reuse potential. 
 Use renewable materials. 
 Use materials or products from manufacturers with product 
take-back programs. 
cHoose maTerials anD ProDucTs wiTH low enVironmenTal 
imPacTs
 Use materials that do not cause environmental harm in  
their harvesting or production. 
 Use sustainably harvested or mined materials. 
 Use minimally processed materials. 
 Use materials that are low polluting and require low  
water or low energy use in their extraction, manufacture,  
use or disposal. 
 Use materials that are made with energy from renewable 
sources such as wind or solar power. 
 Use local materials. 
cHoose maTerials or ProDucTs Posing no or low Human anD 
enVironmenTal HealTH risks
 Use low emitting materials or products. 
d.8 
cHoose 
materiaLs wiseLy
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate all pages in pdf preview; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
How to rotate a single page in a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf preview
72
 Use materials or products that avoid toxic chemicals or by-
products in their entire life cycle. 
cHoose maTerials THaT assisT wiTH susTainable siTe 
Design sTraTegies
 Use products that promote a site’s hydrological, soil, vegeta-
tive, habitat or climatic health and improve overall ecological 
functioning. 
 Use products and assemblies that reduce the urban heat 
island effect. 
 Use products and assemblies that reduce energy and water 
consumption during site operations. 
cHoose maTerials or ProDucTs from comPanies wiTH 
susTainable social, enVironmenTal anD corPoraTe 
PracTices
wHen cHoosing maTerials, consiDer THe serVice life of 
THe maTerial
 Choose materials that are resilient in the park environment, 
resistant to rot and vandalism. 
 Service life costs are critical to high performing landscapes.
 Initial material costs need to be balanced against durability 
of a material when considering the long term cost of a park’s 
upkeep so as to not burden the city with high maintenance 
and capital replacement costs. 
leT “reuse be reinsPiraTion”
14
The reuse of materials can lead to aesthetic and educational 
opportunities that challenge viewers, redefining how materi-
als are perceived and utilized in the landscape. The reuse of 
onsite materials provides an opportunity to celebrate a site’s 
past and give it a unique character due to the patina of wear.
PaVing
PaVe less
Decreased pavement can help decrease stormwater runoff volume 
and velocity. it can also improve water quality, infiltration and 
recharge for vegetative areas. one of the simplest ways to reduce 
pavement impact is to reduce pavement areas. consider the follow-
ing strategies to reduce pavement areas:
 Reduce parking space sizes, including the designation of 
30% of all spaces for compact vehicles. 
Reduce width of driving lanes on roadways and within 
parking lot aisles. 
 Reduce parking space sizes by allowing cars to overhang 
planting areas or porous aggregate stone strips at the edge 
of parking areas. 
 Reduce the number of paved parking spaces by develop-
ing shared parking strategies with adjacent property owners. 
 Base parking space counts on average use rather  
than peak or maximum use needs, while still adhering  
to local codes. 
 Consider the use of stabilized grass paving areas for  
infrequent use areas. 
 Be aware reductions in roadway width or parking area 
sizes or mandated parking space counts often requires  
variances from code requirements. 
use Porous PaVing
use porous pavement such as stabilized gravel, porous concrete, 
porous aggregate unit pavers, stone or concrete unit pavers, and 
decks in hardscape areas that are suitable for infiltration. consider: 
 Clogging of cells in porous pavements 
 Possible adverse changes to the soil pH caused by  
leaching from pavers and crushed stone 
 The need to change the design of the subgrade to favor a 
porous sub base and minimally compacted subgrade 
 Existing tree root impact 
 Pavement lifting caused by roots 
minimiZe THe urban HeaT islanD effecT
The urban heat island affect is the increase in ambient tem-
perature due to heat absorption and storage by urban areas. 
This causes longer and hotter days. Pavement is a primary 
cause of this phenomenon. One way to measure a pavement’s 
potential for urban heat island effect is to measure its albedo, 
or solar reflectance index (SRI). SRI is measured on a scale of 
0 (0% for full absorption) to 100 (100% reflectance).
Dark pavement has a lower albedo, meaning it will absorb 
solar energy and will likely convert it into stored heat. Light 
pavement has a higher albedo. It will reflect solar energy  
and therefore has less potential to absorb light and store heat. 
New asphalt typically has an SRI of 0. Even with aging and 
associated lightening of color, over time asphalt pavement 
will only achieve an SRI of 12 to 14. The U.S. Green Building 
Council Leadership in Energy and Environment (LEED®)  
rating systems encourage an SRI of 29 or better as a perfor-
mance benchmark as a way of reducing overall urban heat 
island effect.
The best way to decrease the heat absorption of pavement is 
to decrease its area, to shade it with trees, or place it in areas 
shaded by buildings or park structures.
concreTe
The manufacture of cement is highly energy intensive, and 
releases high levels of CO
2
in the calcination process. One 
percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the United 
States are due to cement production. Also, the components 
to make cement and the aggregates used in concrete must be 
excavated from the earth, which can have negative effects on 
habitat and water quality.
At the same time, concrete is a convenient and relatively 
inexpensive construction material, and it will most likely  
be continued to be used. With that in mind, it is important  
to reduce the environmental impact of concrete to make it  
a more sustainable construction material. The most effec-
tive tactics are to use less concrete, and to use concrete with 
recycled aggregate.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf rotate pages separately; save pdf rotated pages
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability to remove a range of pages from PDF file. How to delete a single page from a PDF document.
pdf expert rotate page; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
73
use recYcleD maTerials
recycled materials can be used in place of virgin materials for the 
fuel, cement, and aggregate components of concrete. by partially 
replacing cement with industrial byproducts, greenhouse gas emis-
sions can be reduced, and disposal of these byproducts is reduced 
as well.
 Concrete is generally composed of 7% to 15% cement. 
A portion of this cement can be replaced by supplementary 
cementitious materials (SCMs) such as fly ash (up to 25%), 
slag cement (up to 60%), and silica fume (5% to 7%).
recycled aggregates, such as recycled concrete or asphalt, can be 
used in place of virgin aggregates in concrete.
 Coarse aggregates in concrete can be replaced 100% by 
recycled aggregates, assuming they meet ASTM standards. 
 Only 10% to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete should 
be replaced with recycled fine aggregates.
There are a number of things to consider when using recycled 
aggregates: 
 Changes in water absorption properties
 The chloride content of recycled concrete
 Concrete that uses recycled concrete as aggregates can 
have a higher shrinkage and creep potential. This should be 
considered in the design process. 
 Obtaining a mixture that will meet ASTM standards 
Testing of concrete mixtures including recycled content 
is required to ensure they meet standards and project 
requirements. 
Implement a process during construction for the con-
tractor to submit all required testing data. 
reDuce energY use
 Local manufacturers of concrete produced with recycled 
materials should be used as suppliers to limit as much as  
possible energy consumed in transport. 
 Locating a concrete supplier in the region that regularly 
uses local materials and recycled content to make concrete 
mixtures that are tested and perform adequately can reduce 
the time and effort required to create new concrete mixtures 
for each new project. 
 When demolishing existing concrete, determine the feasibil-
ity of reusing these waste materials to manufacture concrete 
onsite or nearby rather than disposal in a landfill. 
use more susTainable comPonenTs
 Consider specifying steel and fiber reinforcement and  
supports that contain high percentages of recycled content. 
The Parks Department used recycled fly ash, an industrial byproduct, in new concrete boardwalks throughout New York City, including this one at Coney Island.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
rotate one page in pdf reader; reverse pdf page order online
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
rotate pdf pages in reader; rotate pdf page permanently
74
 When using wood formwork for concrete, consider using 
wood that is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) 
for sustainability. 
 Concrete admixtures, release agents, vapor retarders, and 
curing materials that are water, vegetable, or soy based and 
have low toxicity and VOC emissions should be used whenever 
possible. 
 Waterstops that do not contain VOCs and do not require 
additional solvents and adhesives are preferable. 
 Natural clay or mineral coloring pigments should be used  
if possible. 
use less concreTe
The most effective measure is to reduce the quantities used. every 
effort should be made to rethink standard details to find ways to 
decrease widths of curbs and thicknesses of slabs when practical. 
reDuce albeDo
concrete has a high albedo or reflective value and, thus, can 
reduce urban heat island effects by reflecting rather than absorbing 
sunlight. when choosing surface materials, the benefits of concrete 
to reduce urban heat island effect should be considered. new white 
Portland cement concrete pavement has an sri of 86.
15
use Porous concreTe wHeneVer Possible
opportunities to use porous concrete for stormwater infiltration 
should be considered when conditions are suitable. see BMP W.7  
Use Porous Pavements. 
asPHalT
Asphalt pavement is typically composed of a mix of virgin 
stone and sand aggregates and a liquid petroleum based 
asphaltic binder. Asphalt pavement is the most commonly 
used site and road construction material, accounting for some 
90% of new roads. It is inexpensive, flexible, easily placed 
without formwork, and it is reasonably durable. Additionally, 
asphalt pavement can accommodate a wide range of surface 
finishes which affect its aesthetic characteristics and extend 
its life cycle. A properly installed asphalt pavement will last 
between 15 and 20 years and can be resurfaced without 
removal of its full paving section.16
Despite asphalt pavement’s benefits, its use has numerous 
environmental and human health impacts including the use 
of nonrenewable petroleum and aggregate resources, poten-
tially hazardous air emissions, and fumes from mixing and 
placement. Asphalt pavements are almost always installed as 
impermeable surfaces, concentrating runoff quantities and 
nonpoint source pollutants. Asphalt pavement is also a signifi-
cant contributor to urban heat island effect resulting from its 
dark surface.17 
In recent years a number of new approaches to the use 
and design of asphalt have been developed, which greatly 
reduce its negative impacts. Recycled aggregate can reduce 
the amount of virgin aggregate and asphalt binder. Light 
colored aggregate can be rolled into the top course with a tack 
coat or a light colored aggregate can be specified for the top 
course to decrease the darkness of the asphalt. Many of these 
improvements can be easily applied to the renovation and new 
construction of parks facilities.
leaVe exisTing asPHalT in Place
in existing parks, the top of the existing asphalt can be milled and a 
new top course applied. care must be taken to bridge cracks with engi-
neering fabric, and use sufficient tack coat to ensure proper bonding. 
use THinner PaVemenT secTions
study design alternatives that allow for a reduction of asphalt pave-
ment thicknesses. 
 Consider anticipated traffic volume and vehicle weights. 
 Modify pavement resiliency with mix design including the 
use of flexible aggregates and other admixtures. 
 Use geotextile fabrics between pavement courses to pro-
vide additional cracking resistance. 
 Use geotextile fabrics and/or geogrids as part of the aggre-
gate base design to increase foundation stability. 
use recYcleD maTerials
a simple way to green asphalt is to incorporate recycled products 
into mix designs to reduce the use of virgin petroleum, sand, and 
stone aggregates. it is fairly common practice to make use of some 
recycled materials in asphalt. according to the u.s. environmental 
Protection agency and the federal Highway administration, about  
90 million tons of asphalt pavement is reclaimed each year, and over 
80 percent of that total is recycled.
18
reclaimed asphalt pavement (raP) is the most commonly used 
recycled component in asphalt pavements. raP can be recycled into 
pavement that is as high, or even higher, in quality as pavements 
made of all virgin materials.
 Asphalt pavements made with RAP can be recycled 
repeatedly. 
 The asphalt cement — the glue that holds the pavement 
together — retains its ability to function as glue or cement, 
so that it is reused for its original purpose. 
 The aggregates in the original pavement (sand and gravel) 
are also conserved through repeated use. 
 Dedicated supply often requires careful coordination 
with asphalt plants and often incurs significant additional 
expense, which can be mitigated by identifying insufficient 
installation areas at one time to maximize cost/benefit. 
 Scheduling issues with non-standard mix designs and 
construction techniques may occur. 
 There are a variety of products that can be used to signifi-
cantly reduce the use of virgin stone aggregate including: 
Asphalt roofing shingles 
Recycled tire aggregate 
Air cooled blast furnace slag 
Glass cullet 
consiDer THe use of Porous asPHalT To encourage 
sTormwaTer infilTraTion
Porous asphalt pavement has been successfully used in low traffic 
areas for more than two decades in the united states. 
 In addition to its obvious stormwater management and 
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi
rotate individual pdf pages reader; rotate pages in pdf permanently
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save from file or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
75
water quality benefits, porous asphalt pavements have been 
shown to be cooler, less prone to damage from freeze thaw 
cycles, and to provide better traction during heavy rains or in 
freezing conditions. 
 Coordinate porous asphalt with pavement base course and 
under drainage details. 
 Consider use of porous asphalt under hex block and other 
unit pavers that offer surface porosity. 
increase PaVemenT surface albeDo
standard asphalt pavement’s black color has been shown to be 
a significant contributor to urban heat island effect. There are a 
number of surface treatments that can be used to improve asphalt 
pavement’s sri including:
 Light colored aggregate in the top course 
 Light colored aggregate rolled into the wearing course 
with a tack coat 
 Shot-blasting to remove black asphalt surface and expose 
lighter aggregate 
 Epoxy bonded aggregate wearing courses 
 Painted surfaces 
in addition to reduced urban heat island contribution, surface treat-
ments benefits also include:
 Extended pavement life by reducing asphaltic cement 
oxidation from UV exposure 
 Depending on the type of coating surfaces, can be made 
softer, or more slip resistant 
  Surface treatment installation should be coordinated 
with overall construction to avoid damage from subsequent 
construction activities. 
lower asPHalT insTallaTion TemPeraTures
asphalt paving techniques now include warm mix asphalt pavement. 
Hot asphalt paving is mixed at a temperature of 275°f-325°f. at 
these temperatures there are visible emissions and considerable risk 
to workers installing the materials. warm mix asphalt pavement is 
mixed at 140°f to 275°f. This reduces installation emissions, energy 
use, and provides cooler working conditions for workers.
maximiZe THe life of PaVemenT wiTH PreVenTaTiVe 
mainTenance sucH as crack filling, resurfacing, anD 
rePairs
Preventative maintenance is the key to long lasting asphalt pave-
ment. a study by the wisconsin DoT of preventative maintenance 
programs in arizona, montana, and Pennsylvania found a cost savings 
ranging between $4 and $10 in rehabilitation costs with every dollar 
spent on preventative maintenance. The same study also concluded 
that the earlier the preventative maintenance was conducted, the 
lower the costs.
19
subbase aggregaTes anD beDDing maTerials
There are a number of materials that can be used in place of 
or as a supplement to new crushed stone.
recYcleD concreTe aggregaTe
use of recycled concrete aggregate (rca) is particularly 
advantageous in metropolitan areas such as new York city, where 
sources of waste concrete are plentiful, landfill space is at a pre-
mium, and disposal costs are high. consider benefits of using rca in 
the subbase, such as:
 New York City does not limit the percentage of RCA  
used in its specifications. 
 Can stabilize soft, wet soils early in construction by  
virtue of the porosity of aggregates 
 RCA derived from air-entrained concrete has double  
the absorptivity of virgin aggregates. 
 Drainage is better and subbase is more permeable  
than conventional granular subbase because of lower  
fines content. 
 RCA used in subbase layer exhibits beneficial  
engineering performance. 
 Provides a cost savings
consider limitations of using rca in the subbase:
 It is important to wash the RCA aggregates to decrease 
alkaline leachate.
Alkaline leachate may occur if there is free lime and/
or unhydrated cement, raising the pH of adjacent soil and 
water and potentially harming plants and trees. 
Alkaline leachate has the potential to cause chlorosis  
in street trees. 
 Consider using high alkaline plants if leaching  
is predicted. 
 Leachates may form precipitates that clog geotextiles and 
prevent free drainage from the pavement structure. 
recYcleD asPHalT PaVemenT
recycled asphalt Pavement (raP) can be crushed and blended with 
conventional aggregates for use as coarse and/or fine aggregate in 
the pavement subbase layer.
benefits of using raP in the subbase include the following:
 Adhesive presence of asphalt results in a better bearing 
capacity over time. 
 Drainage is better and subbase is more permeable  
than conventional granular sub-base because of lower  
fines content. 
 RAP is plentiful in New York City.
limitations of using raP in the subbase include:
 Grinding or pulverizing (rather than crushing) may  
result in the generation of undesirable fines. 
 Adhesiveness of asphalt can make placement and  
finish grading difficult. 
 Adequate compaction must be ensured to avoid post 
construction settlement. 
 Stockpiled aggregate can agglomerate and harden; it  
may have to be recrushed and rescreened. 
 The optimum moisture content for RAP blended  
aggregates is reported to be higher than for conventional 
granular material. 
air cooleD blasT furnace slag
air cooled blast furnace slag (acbfs) referred to simply as slag in 
many specifications, is a by-product of iron manufacturing that is 
crushed and screened and then used as a subbase material.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
change orientation of pdf page; rotate pages in pdf and save
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages.
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
76
beneficial properties of using acbfs in the subbase:
 New York City does not limit the percentage of ACBFS  
use in its specifications. Conventional design procedures 
can be used. 
 Lower compacted unit weight of ACBFS aggregate yields 
greater volume for a weight equivalent to conventional 
aggregates. 
 High level of stability of ACBFS aggregates provides good 
load transfer even when placed on weak subgrade.
limiting properties of using acbfs in the subbase:
 Adequate separation from water must be maintained. 
When ACBFS is placed in strata with poor drainage condi-
tions or with exposure to slow moving water, sulfurous 
leachates are possible. 
glass culleT
since there is a reliable, dedicated supply of recycled glass and 
ceramics in nYc, consider its use in subbase applications. when 
crushed to a fine aggregate size, glass cullet exhibits properties 
similar to conventional fine aggregates or sand.
beneficial properties of using glass cullet in the subbase:
 15% by mass additions of glass cullet yield bearing 
capacities nearly equal to conventional aggregate.
beneficial properties of using glass cullet in the subbase:
 Poor durability is exhibited by large particles. The use of 
glass cullet for coarse aggregate is not recommended. 
 Recommended limit is 20% by mass. 
 Deleterious substances such as labels and food residue 
must be controlled at the materials recovery facility. There 
should be no more than 1% by mass, of which no more  
than 0.05% is paper. 
flowable fill
Flowable fill is a low strength material that is mixed to slurry 
and is used as an economical fill or backfill material. It can be 
designed to support traffic without settling and still have the 
ability to be readily excavated at a later date. The basic com-
position is a mixture of coal fly ash (95%), water, coarse aggre-
gate, and Portland cement. It gains strength in 20 minutes, 
and is also selfleveling. It is particularly useful for backfill in 
utility trenches, building excavations, bridge abutments, foun-
dation subbase, pipe bedding, and filling abandoned utilities 
and voids under pavements. 
wooD
Wood is used primarily for park benches, tables, and decking. 
It is one of the hardest park materials to substitute. The most 
rot resistant and attractive woods are from rain forest environ-
ments, however their harvesting is detrimental to the tropi-
cal forests. Domestic substitutes do not match the strength, 
dimensional stability, rot resistance, and appearance of tropi-
cal hardwoods. Plastic lumber has limiting tactile, appearance, 
and strength attributes. Steel for furniture and concrete for 
decking are emerging as the most viable alternatives.
Design for Parks DeParTmenT salVageD wooD
 Recycle onsite or offsite used wood before purchasing new.
 Always inspect site furniture, decking, and structures to see 
if the wood is in good condition and can be salvaged for other 
park projects. If so, this must be called out in the construction 
documents, including the level of care that must be taken in 
its removal, storage, and transport. 
 Work with park maintenance staff to find an appropriate 
location to store or supply recycled wood. 
use smallesT siZe anD lowesT graDe wooD Possible for 
aPPlicaTion
 Using the minimum quality necessary reduces demand  
for old growth wood harvesting, and supports the production  
of smaller, more renewable material. The smaller the wood  
size and more rapid its growth, the faster that resource can 
replace itself. 
 Design to use nominal board sizes, which assures less 
wasted wood from cutting. 
 Design to lengths and sizes that are regularly available. 
 Do not sacrifice rot protection or dimensional stability. 
use wooD from susTainablY manageD foresTs
 Depending on production and harvesting method, wood can 
be a renewable resource, as well as a carbon sink, so source 
and method of harvesting is critical.
 Look for Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood. 
This material is more expensive and harder to source, but 
guarantees that: “forests have to be managed to meet the 
social, economic, ecological, cultural and spiritual needs of 
present and future generations”.20 Some consider this wood 
to be of a higher quality than plantation grown wood due to 
longer rotation cycles and the superior quality of older trees. 
FSC criteria include: 
Compliance with all international laws and treaties 
Long term land rights 
Recognition of indigenous peoples’ rights 
Long term well being of workers 
Sharing of forest benefits 
Reduction of environmental impact and maintenance  
of ecological function 
Appropriate management plans 
Appropriate monitoring and assessment 
Maintenance of High Conservation Value Forests21 
Promotion of conservation and restoration of  
natural forests 
consiDer wHaT TreaTmenTs are necessarY
 In cases where wood preservation is necessary, select the 
technique with the lowest toxicity and environmental impact 
that will accomplish desired effect. Reference Table 10-10 
Wood Preservative Treatment Summary Table of Materials for 
Sustainable Sites (p.310-312)22 
 Advances in waterborne wood preservatives and wood modi-
fied by heat have opened up a variety of alternatives to copper 
and chromate-based preservatives. 
 Heat treated or “Torrified” wood is a promising wood 
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
77
treatment to consider for bench slats and decking. 
 Specify decay-resistant woods if possible and suitable. 
Reference Table 10-8 of Materials for Sustainable Sites  
(p. 302-304).23 
 Use natural and low VOC wood finishes. 
 Consider impacts of finish on the health of the installer  
and end user. 
 Engineered wood products use smaller wood and wood 
scraps to create larger and stronger wood materials. They 
reduce waste and demand of less renewable larger wood. 
 Avoid materials with binders containing formaldehyde,  
a known carcinogen. 
reclaimeD TroPical wooD
 If tropical wood is determined to be the only choice  
due to rot resistance, dimensional stability, strength, and 
appearance criteria, use the minimum amount and specify 
reclaimed wood. 
Consider cypress as an alternative. 
 Decrease the quantity required by examining all feasible 
substitutes and decreasing the member size. 
 Tropical woods are commercially available from salvage of 
ships and structures, but may be blemished. 
 Rot resistant woods such as cypress are available from 
salvage of structures and from sunken logs.
Park furniTure anD Decking
Bench slats and decking planks are hard to specify due to the 
requirements for rot resistance, strength, appearance, and 
tactile quality. As we are phasing out the use of tropical woods 
we are exploring alternatives. The Parks’ Specification office 
is engaged in ongoing research for alternatives, and should be 
consulted. Current thinking at the time of publication is:
 Plastic lumber is satisfactory for benches and tables  
when it is reinforced or the span is reduced so the slats  
will not deflect. 
It is problematic when used for decking due to  
structural deflection, flammability, and coefficient  
of expansion. 
It is satisfactory in small deck installations where it can 
be adequately supported and there are no vehicular loads. 
There are different types of plastic lumber, so it is 
important to review the plastic section of this document. 
 White oak is satisfactory for bench slats only if it is to be 
painted. It is strong, rot resistant and dimensionally stable, 
but lacks the longevity of other options and secretes tan-
nins, which stain. 
 Torrified poplar, yellow pine, or red oak can be used  
for decking and bench slats. This heat treated wood is 
strong, dimensionally stable, rot resistant, and attractive 
without painting. 
 Steel furniture is an ideal wood alternative for  
park furniture. 
Care must be given to the choice of the size,  
composition, and coating of the seating members 
Smaller, lighter colored steel slats hold less heat  
than dark and heavy ones. 
The quality of the coating is of extreme importance  
in order to prevent corrosion. 
 Aluminum is less desirable due to its scrap value. 
 Black locust is satisfactory for decking or other  
applications when cupping and twisting of the plank  
can be tolerated. It is strong and rot resistant, but not 
dimensionally stable. 
 White cedar is satisfactory for cladding and large planks 
when its softness is not a problem. It is rot resistant, dimen-
sionally stable and attractive. 
 Structural concrete decking seems to be the most sus-
tainable choice for boardwalks. The storm and sun effects 
on wood on ocean front boardwalks are extreme, and the 
replacement cycle of twenty years is unsustainable. 
Where the budget allows, decorative pavers may be 
installed on top of the decking. 
When the budget is lower, decorative patterns may be 
cast into the planks, or into a topping slab of concrete. 
 Some treated lumber is satisfactory for marine applica-
tions. However, it deteriorates under sunlight and must 
be periodically replaced. This is another instance where con-
crete alternatives should be considered. 
PlasTics
While plastics offer many benefits, some pose risks to human 
and environmental health. The manufacture of virgin plastics 
from fossil fuels is causing serious damage to our environment. 
Refining petroleum and manufacturing virgin plastics con-
sumes energy and releases pollution, some of which is highly 
toxic. All fossil fuel-based plastics contain or release some 
carcinogens at some point in their lifecycle. Some — such as 
PVC and polystyrene — rely upon additional toxic chemicals, 
which make their environmental health impact even greater. 
On the other hand, plastic lumber reduces demand for other 
materials having serious environmental impacts. Clearly some 
plastics, such as PVC and polystyrene, are easily replaced by 
other materials, including other plastics, and can be phased 
out of production and use. 
Phasing out some plastics, halting the indiscriminate use 
of plastics, increasing the societal commitment to manda-
tory plastics recycling, and increasing investment in biobased 
plastics holds out the prospect that some plastics may have a 
role in a sustainable economy. In that context, recycled plastic 
could play a role in reducing the demand for virgin plastic 
resin and the volume of plastic waste.24 
Composite products are usually more difficult to recycle 
than single resin products, have fewer end markets, and are 
therefore inherently less valuable to secondary markets than 
a pure product. There is no evidence to suggest that there 
will be an end market for synthetic composite lumber prod-
ucts, other than the original manufacturer. It is not likely to 
be economically feasible to systematically return all plastic 
lumber to the manufacturer at the end of its service life. At 
the present time, however, all plastic lumber products suitable 
for demanding structural or high load bearing applications 
78
rely upon one of these combinations for added strength. 
These applications include bridge supports and railroad ties. 
Composite plastic lumber has advantages in these applications 
that may outweigh the disadvantages of these composites, 
such as leaching while in service.25 
faVor cerTain PlasTics oVer oTHers
 High recycled content, specifically high post-consumer 
recycled content 
 Polypropylene is comparatively benign. 
 Polyethylene both high density (HDPE) and low density 
(LDPE), are recyclable resins associated with fewer chemical 
hazards and impacts. 
 Produced from resins from local municipal recycling  
programs, cutting transportation costs and supporting the  
local economy 
limiT use of cerTain PlasTics
 Fiberglass-reinforced or polystyrene-blended structural 
plastic lumber can be used for structural applications such as 
railroad ties and bridge supports, as a less toxic alternative to 
chemically treated wood. 
 Products with multiple commingled recycled consumer plas-
tics will have more contaminants and inconsistent properties. 
They also support token markets for plastics that otherwise are 
largely unrecyclable, and many of which are highly toxic. This 
perpetuates the use of plastics that should be phased out. 
 Wood-plastic composites are a blend of wood fiber with plas-
tics. It is believed that blending the polyethylene with another 
material is likely to limit long term recycling options. 
 It is unknown whether or not a plastic lumber product 
containing biodegradable materials can be technically recycled 
after 10 or more years of exposure to the elements.26 
aVoiD PlasTics maDe wiTH:
 Fiberglass for nonstructural applications (such as decking 
boards, benches, and tables) 
 Predominantly nonrecycled plastics (alternatives with high 
recycled content are readily available) 
 Synthetic composites (with the exception of high load- 
bearing or demanding structural applications) 
There appears to be no clear environmental advantage 
and numerous environmental disadvantages to these 
mixtures, because of the chemical hazards and associated 
impacts. 
 PVC and polystyrene are associated with more chemical haz-
ards and impacts throughout their lifecycle than other plastics. 
 Lack of a viable recycling option after the service life of  
the product 
consiDer enD-of-life recYclabiliTY
in order to make a significant long term impact on reducing resource 
use and disposal, it is not only important that plastic lumber include 
recycled content, but also that the lumber product itself be recy-
clable at the end of its life. 
consiDer HigH Volume PurcHasing
government agencies and other high volume purchasers can specify 
environmentally preferable products in their purchasing policies.
 Procurement contracts with plastic lumber vendors can 
encourage collection and recycling of plastic lumber prod-
ucts once they have served their intended use. 
 The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Operational 
Services Division, specifies in its procurement language for 
recycled plastic equipment that “it is desirable that bidders 
offer recycling options” for such products.27 
for furTHer informaTion
Asphalt Pavement Alliance, “Asphalt: Recycling and Energy Reduction”, 
Lanham, MD: Asphalt Pavement Alliance, October 2006.
http://www.hotmix.org/images/stories/recycling_and_energy_reduction.pdf
Burak, Rob and Smith, David. Meeting Sustainability Goals with 
Segmental Concrete Paving. Interlocking Concrete Pavement Magazine. 
November 2008, pp. 28-35.
Cahill, Thomas, Adams, Michele, and Marm, Courtney. Stormwater 
Management with Porous Pavements. Government Engineering. March-April 
2005: 14-19.
Calkins, Meg. Materials for Sustainable Sites: A Complete Guide to the 
Evaluation, Selection, and Use of Sustainable Construction Materials. 
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons,, Inc., 2008.
Chacon, Mark. Architectural Stone: Fabrication, Installation and 
Selection. New York: John Wiley and Sons. 1999
Ferguson, Bruce. Porous Pavements. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2005.
Ferguson, Bruce. Porous Pavements: The Overview. Paper for the Ready 
Mix Concrete Foundation, March 31, 2006.
http://www.rmc-foundation.org/images/PCRC%20Files/Applications% 
20&%20Case%20Studies/Porous%20Pavements%20-%20The%20
Overview.pdf
Green Affordable Housing Coalition. Fact Sheet No. 5 Deck Lumber 
Alternatives. July 2006
http://frontierassoc.net/greenaffordablehousing/FactSheets/
GAHCfactsheets/5-DeckLumberAlternatives.pdf
Harvie, Jamie and Lent, Tom. PVC-Free Pipe Purchasers’ Report. 
Washington, DC: The Healthy Building Network, Draft 2002. http://www.
healthybuilding.net/pvc/pipes_report.pdf
Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute, Permeable Pavements. Website 
accessed December 2, 2008.
http://www.icpi.org/design/permeable_pavers.cfm
Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute, Permeable Interlocking 
Concrete Pavement: A Comparison Guide to Porous Asphalt and Pervious 
Concrete. February 2008. http://www.icpi.org/myproject/PICP%20
Comparison%20Brochure.pdf
Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute, Permeable Interlocking 
Concrete Pavements, 3rd Edition. Herndon, VA: Interlocking Concrete 
Pavement Institute, 2002.
International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). IDA Practical Guide 2: Effects of 
Artificial Light at Night on Wildlife. Tucson, Arizona: IDA, Inc., October 2008. 
http://data.nextrionet.com/site/idsa/pg2-wildlife.pdf
Krishnaswamy, Prabhat and Lampo, Richard. Recycled-Plastic 
Lumber Standards: From Waste Plastics to Markets for Plastic-Lumber 
Bridges. Standardization News, 2001. http://www.astm.org/SNEWS/
DECEMBER_2001/wsd_dec01.html
National Asphalt Pavement Association. Porous Asphalt Pavements for 
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
79
Stormwater Management: Design Construction and Maintenance Guide, 
Lanham, MD: National Asphalt Pavement Association, November 2008.
National Asphalt Pavement Association, Warm Mix Asphalt Web Site. 
www.warmmixasphalt.com
National Asphalt Pavement Association, Warm-Mix Asphalt: Best 
Practices, Lanham, MD: National Asphalt Pavement Association,  
December 2007.
National Asphalt Pavement Association Technical Working Group. 
“Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) Guide Specifications for Highway Construction”, 
December 2008.
http://www.warmmixasphalt.com/submissions/93_20081209_WMA%20
Specification%20version%201.07%20Final_WMATWG.pdf
National Ready Mixed Concrete Association, Flowable Fill Website, visited 
November 24, 2008. 
http://www.flowablefill.org/applications.htm
National Ready Mixed Concrete Association Guide Specification for 
Controlled Low Strength Materials (CLSM) http://flowablefill.org/CLSM%20
Specifications%201.pdf
National Ready Mixed Concrete Association, Pervious Concrete Mix Design 
and Materials, Website accessed December 2, 2008. http://www.pervious-
pavement.org/mixture%20proportioning.htm
Newcomb, David. “Warm Mix Asphalt: The Future of Flexible Pavements.” 
Powerpoint Presentation at the 12th Annual Minnesota Pavement 
Conference. St. Paul, MN, February 14, 2008.
http://www.dot.sate.mn.us/materials/paveconf/Newcomb.pdf
New York City Department of Design and Construction (NYCDDC). 
Sustainable Urban Site Design Manual New York: NYCDDC, 2008. http://
www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/html/design/sustainable_home.shtml
New York City Department of Design and Construction and Design Trust 
for Public Space. High Performance Infrastructure Guidelines: Best Practices 
for the Public Right of Way. New York: New York City Department of Design 
and Construction and Design Trust for Public Space, 2005.
New York City Department of Transportation, Street Design Manual, 
February, 2009. www.nyc.gov/streetdesignmanual
Plastic Lumber Trade Association, P.O. Box 211, Worthington, MN 56187 
www.plasticlumber.org
Platt, Brenda, Lent, Tom and Walsh, Bill. The Healthy Building Network’s 
Guide to Plastic Lumber. Washington, DC: The Healthy Building Network, 
2005. http://www.healthybuilding.net/pdf/gtpl/guide_to_plastic_lumber.pdf
Robbins, Alan. Defining the Value Proposition of Environmental Plastics, 
Plastic Lumber in the Marketplace and the Environment. For presentation at 
the Society of Plastic Engineers, Global Plastics Environmental Conference, 
Detroit, Michigan, February 18 & 19, 2004. http://www.plasticlumber.org/
public/pdfs/GPECValueProposition.pdf
http://www.healthybuilding.net/pvc/Thornton_Enviro_Impacts_of_PVC.pdf
Roseen, Robert and Bellestero, Thomas. Porous Asphalt Pavements  
for Stormwater Management. Hot Mix Asphalt Technology May/June 2008, 
pp. 26-34.
The University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center, Porous Asphalt 
Pavement for Stormwater Management. 2008.
http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/pubs_specs_info/porous_ashpalt_fact_sheet.pdf
http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/pubs_specs_info/napa_pa_5_08_small.pdf
The University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center, UNHSC Design 
Specifications for Porous Asphalt Pavement and Infiltration Beds. April 2008.
http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/pubs_specs_info/unhsc_pa_spec_07_07_
rev_4_08.pdf
The University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center, Pervious Concrete 
Pavement for Stormwater Management. 2008.
http://www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/pubs_specs_info/unhsc_pervious_con-
crete_fact_sheet_4_08.pdf
Thornton, Joe. Environmental Impacts of Polyvinyl Chloride Building 
Materials. Washington, DC: Healthy Building Network, 2002.
Zettler, Rick. “Warm Mix Stands Up to Its Trials.” Better Roads Magazine, 
February, 2006. http://obr.gcnpublishing/articles/feb06a.htm
12 Calkins, Meg. Materials for Sustainable Sites: A Complete Guide to the Evaluation, Selection, 
and Use of Sustainable Construction Materials. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons,, Inc., 2008, 
pp. iv-v.
13 Calkins, pp. 3-9.
14 Thompson, William and Sorvig, Kim. Sustainable Landscape Construction: A Guide to Green 
Building Outdoors. Washington, D.C.: Timber Press, 2000. p. 196.
15 Thompson
16 Calkins, p. 199.
17 Calkins, p. 199.
18 Asphalt Pavement Alliance, “Asphalt: Recycling and Energy Reduction”, Lanham, MD: 
Asphalt Pavement Alliance, October 2006.
19 Calkins, p. 216 
20 Forest Stewardship Council. http://www.fsc.org/
21 Sourcebook for Landscape Analysis of High Conservation Value Forests. http://www.proforest.
net/objects/publications/HCVF/hcvf-landscape-sourcebook-final-version.pdf
22 Calkins, 2008.
23 Calkins, 2008.
24 The Healthy Building Network’s Guide to Plastic Lumber. p. 13. http://www.healthybuilding.
net/pdf/gtpl/guide_to_plastic_lumber.pdf
25 The Healthy Building Network’s Guide to Plastic Lumber. p. 16.
26 The Healthy Building Network’s Guide to Plastic Lumber. p. 16.
27 The Healthy Building Network’s Guide to Plastic Lumber. p. 19.
80
objecTiVe                                                                 
Provide safe and playable athletic fields to meet the increasing 
demand and societal health need for active recreation without 
expanding fields into lawns and other natural areas of parks 
valued for passive use and ecological benefit. Use synthetic 
turf on fields only when the anticipated soil compaction, levels 
of use, or length of season make grass impractical. Favor 
designs that provide excellent playing surface, stormwater 
infiltration, lowest heat retention, and meet appropriate envi-
ronmental guidelines. 
benefiTs                                                                   
 Allows for 25 to 50% more use of sports fields than natural 
turf fields due to reliable playability, elimination of the need 
to close the fields for wet and soggy field conditions, and 
required closures for annual reseeding and periodic grass 
reestablishment. 
 Provides trip hazard free and smooth playing surface  
with good traction and reliable shock absorption, improving 
quality of play and reducing risk of impact related injuries. 
 Reduces energy consumption and pollution from  
internal combustion powered equipment required for  
mowing and aeration. 
 Reduces water usage due to elimination of irrigation 
requirements.
 Reduces the use of fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides 
associated with turf maintenance. 
 Potential to serve as a stormwater management device  
providing onsite detention, filtration, and infiltration. 
 Potential to incorporate recycled material including infill, 
turf fibers, and backing if properly selected and specified. 
consiDeraTions                                                       
Synthetic turf components consist of a variety of natural and 
man-made chemicals. Several scientific research studies car-
ried out in the United States and Europe have assessed poten-
tial exposures and health risks for people using turf fields con-
taining crumb rubber. According to the Department of Health 
and Mental Hygiene’s (DOHMH) review of these research find-
ings, health effects are unlikely from exposure to the levels of 
chemicals found in crumb rubber. DOHMH also completed an 
air quality survey to measure the air above synthetic turf fields 
containing crumb rubber infill for chemicals. Results show that 
air quality at the synthetic turf fields surveyed is similar to the 
air quality at natural grass fields. Others have reported similar 
findings. Testing of synthetic turf products preinstallation will 
ensure products meet appropriate environmental guidelines. 
 There has been press concerning the potential of synthetic 
turf to spread methicillin-resistant Staphylcoccus aureus 
(MRSA) among players. Bacterial infections, such as MRSA, 
have not been shown to be caused by synthetic turf fields. 
 While an increased risk for human health effects as a result 
of exposure to chemicals in crumb rubber was not identified 
by the review, heat has been identified as a concern. Synthetic 
turf fields absorb heat from the sun and get hotter than soil or 
natural grass. Measures should be taken to reduce potential 
for heat related illness: 
Shade and drinking water should be made accessible for 
field users to stay cool and hydrated. 
Heat warning signs should be posted at all athletic fields. 
Field staff should be instructed about potential heat 
related risks involving synthetic turf, including overheating 
and dehydration. 
New technologies should be assessed as they become 
available that help to reduce the field temperature. 
Infill type cannot be located in areas prone to flooding. 
 While made from highly recyclable materials, few opportuni-
ties exist for recycling synthetic turf and infill at the end of 
product life. 
 Field installations are prone to seam failure due to  
poor installation. 
Warranties are at times unreliable due to installers  
going out of business. 
Designers must stay aware of emerging issues and assess 
newer generation synthetic turf materials and construction 
assembly strategies. 
 Use purchasing protocols to select the best synthetic turf 
products and require suppliers to provide information on 
chemical content, heating absorbency properties, environmen-
tal factors, and health and safety factors. 
backgrounD                                                                
People generally like to see grass in their parks, and it is 
important to provide high quality lawns so that real nature 
with all of its environmental and psychological benefits can 
be experienced. This requires enforcing rules which prohibit 
active uses on passive use lawns in order to prevent them from 
being compacted and turned into dust bowls. It is important to 
have alternative places for active recreation sports nearby.
Natural turf fields cannot be maintained in heavily used 
active use areas unless they are closed when wet and closed 
annually in September, October, and November for grass 
reestablishment. The soil structure required for premier grass 
fields such as the Great Lawn in Central Park require a soil 
high in sand to reduce compaction, the use of irrigation and 
fertilizer, and a closely monitored closure system when fields 
are wet. This level of care is beyond the means of most park 
operations budgets and staff allocations. 
Synthetic surface allows maximum use of the fields without 
closure, so they can be reliably permitted constantly, decreas-
ing the need for additional fields required to meet growing 
demand. Permittees may use the fields in any weather condi-
tion, year round, avoiding closures required for rain or grass 
reestablishment. 
d.9 
use syntHetic 
turf wiseLy
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested