display pdf in asp.net page : Save pdf after rotating pages application SDK tool html wpf windows online design_guidelines8-part1761

HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
81
PracTices                                                                
Planning
consiDer THe use of sYnTHeTic Turf in areas wHere THe 
benefiTs are maximiZeD sucH as HeaVilY useD aTHleTic 
fooTball, soccer, anD oTHer sPorTs
 The numerous performance benefits of synthetic turf allow 
high use programmatic demands on a consistent basis in loca-
tions where play field demand is so high and natural turf fields 
simply are not feasible.
 Synthetic turf use may be appropriate in those locations 
where not using synthetic turf would mean a complete loss of 
active open space programming for a neighborhood. 
 Synthetic turf fields should not be considered a primary 
response to programming needs. Before considering the use 
of synthetic turf, if budgets allow and park space is available 
consider these alternatives: 
Construction of multiple fields to allow rotating field 
closure enabling natural turf areas to recover and regenerate 
between high utilization periods 
Construction of over sized field configurations to allow 
play areas to periodically shift to allow natural turf areas to 
recover and regenerate between high utilization periods 
Construction of sand-based engineered soil natural turf 
fields that are compaction resistant and rapid draining 
Consider the viability of rigorous management and main-
tenance of fields where high use is anticipated, potentially 
requiring some sort of public/private funding arrangements 
to pay for the high costs of non-standard care 
 Maintenance costs 
 Replacement frequency 
consiDer brownfielD managemenT PoTenTial of 
sYnTHeTic Turf
Since synthetic turf fields require a sandwich of turf and 
drained aggregate base, they can be easily modified to act as 
a barrier between people and contaminated ground conditions. 
The advantage of synthetic turf systems as a barrier system is 
that they may minimize the need for deeper imported soil fills, 
saving environmental and construction costs without  
compromising public health.
consiDer siTe locaTion anD ProximiTY To flooD Zones or 
areas of HigH grounD waTer
synthetic turf fields are designed to allow stormwater to rapidly move 
through the surface into the basecourse system. for this reason, 
synthetic turf fields should not be located in areas where they are 
prone to flooding, since floodwaters may lead to clogging of the turf 
grass carpet.
 Overland surface flows associated with flooding lead to 
the flotation and washout of the infill material, exposing the 
turfgrass fibers and leading to increased wear, more rapid 
aging, and increased maintenance costs. 
 In locations of fluctuating high groundwater, where the 
subsurface drain system does not mitigate subsurface flows, 
there is potential for upward moving water to lead to the 
flotation and washout of the infill material, exposing the 
turfgrass fibers and leading to increased wear, more rapid 
aging, and increased maintenance costs. 
 Where synthetic turf is used as an infiltration and ground-
water recharge system, adequate filtration depth and separa-
tion from seasonal high groundwater should be considered. 
Design
consiDer THe ProPerTies of THe fielD wHen Designing 
anD sPecifYing THe Turf sYsTem
 Turf height and infill weight 
 Shock pads 
 Gmax rating (impact attenuation) 
 Heat absorption 
 Life span 
 Playability 
consiDer THe sTormwaTer managemenT PoTenTial of 
sYnTHeTic Turf
unfortunately, the benefits of synthetic turf as a porous pavement 
system are not always harnessed for stormwater management. The 
base course of a traditional synthetic turf system is usually designed 
as a six inch aggregate base with a regularized subsurface drain pipe 
system for evacuating stormwater as quickly as possible to a storm 
sewer. However, a porous surface system can be designed to allow 
stormwater to pass through the turf carpet and then be stored and 
infiltrated into the subsurface soil. given the large size of a sports 
field area, the subsurface detention is quite cost efficient. 
 Given the proper subsoil conditions, the base course of 
a synthetic turf field can be designed to act as a retention 
system for stormwater, allowing for filtration, infiltration, and 
groundwater recharge. 
 Stormwater retention requires that the field system be 
designed to accommodate stormwater retention and infiltra-
tion without flooding the field and dispersing infill materials. 
 By properly calculating stormwater events and modifying 
the base course depth and aggregate composition as well as 
the subsurface piping design, the underside of synthetic turf 
systems can be modified to allow for stormwater detention 
Synthetic turf fields offer resilient year-round play in for high-demand sports  
in heavily-used areas, such as this soccer field in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park 
in Queens.
Save pdf after rotating pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate all pages; rotate all pages in pdf
Save pdf after rotating pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page few degrees; reverse page order pdf
82
and infiltration. 
 Backing of the turf must be porous. 
 Subgrade must not be overly compacted. 
 Provision should be made for overflow into the  
stormwater system. 
sPecifY recYclable anD nonToxic sYnTHeTic Turf 
maTerials
 To the extent possible, specify recyclable materials. 
 Require certified testing of all materials before installation. 
 Meet Parks specifications for testing synthetic turf fibers 
and infill materials for heavy metals and semi-volatile organic 
content when applicable. 
 Synthetic turf fibers should meet ASTM F2765 specifica-
tions for lead content.
Decrease HeaT exPosure
 Provide shade on the field perimeter for cooling areas  
for field users. 
 Provide misting posts and drinking fountains.
 Evaluate innovative strategies that can reduce the field 
temperature (e.g., allow water to transpire through the field 
from the drainage area below, and use infill materials that are 
designed to reflect and not store radiant energy). 
carefullY consiDer PermanenT marking oPTions
 Field marking for multiple sports must be carefully consid-
ered to avoid confusion.
 Permanent glued-down striping is vulnerable to ripping out 
and lifting, which can be hazardous. 
 In many instances, it is most practical to install permanent 
tic marks which facilitate annually repainted markings. 
consTrucTion
require THe conTracTor To ProViDe qualiTY TesTs afTer 
insTallaTion as necessarY
 Fiber 
 Infill 
 Gmax 
require THe use of laser guiDeD graDing equiPmenT To 
consTrucT sYnTHeTic Turf fielDs
since synthetic turf fields are highly porous surfaces, they are typi-
cally designed to be only slightly contoured, with slopes less than 
one percent. construction of such a flat surface over a large area is 
extremely difficult to achieve and costly using conventional tripod 
and transit surveying equipment. additionally, such flat areas are 
nearly impossible to grade or check by eye.
 Experienced sports field contractors have found that it 
is considerably more cost effective and easier to construct 
synthetic turf fields using laser guided grading equipment. 
 The use of laser guided equipment is especially important 
in the grading the field’s subgrade which determines the 
proper slope of the field’s subsurface drainage system. 
ProTecT THe subsurface Drainage sYsTem During 
consTrucTion
after the preparation of the field’s subgrade, the subsurface drain-
age piping grid is installed and then covered by the aggregate base 
course. since the subsurface drainage system is a critical compo-
nent to the functioning of the field system, care should be taken to 
protect the drainage pipe from being crushed or moved during the 
installation of the aggregate base.
 The layout of the pipe system and the subsequent delivery 
and placement of the aggregate should be sequenced 
so that delivery trucks are not driving or turning over the 
installed pipes. 
 Only lightweight grading equipment should be operated 
over the aggregate once it has been placed on top of the 
piping system to avoid crushing or shifting pipe alignment. 
TesT Turf Prior To final accePTance
Prior to the final acceptance of the synthetic turf field, tests should 
be taken at numerous points across the field to ensure acceptable 
and consistent gmax performance across the field.
 Gmax testing on synthetic turf fields should be completed 
by an independent testing lab using ASTM F355-A. Do 
not use the Clegg Test method (ASTM F1702), which is 
intended for use on natural turf fields and requires calibra-
tion for comparative testing on synthetic turf testing.28 
 Gmax tests should be taken on a regular grid spacing 
allowing for at least one reading per 7,500 square feet 
 Upon completion of installation, an average synthetic turf 
field Gmax should be 100 +/-10 with no one point testing 
greater than 115. 
moniTor consTrucTion closelY
The glue used to fasten seams together is a costly component of the 
job, with climatic restrictions. This is a frequent area of failure due 
to improper application rates and methods.
 A resident engineer should be present during all gluing 
operations to confirm that seams are properly glued  
with the correct amount of glue. The contractor’s work  
and glue application rates must be closely monitored  
during installation. 
oPeraTion
Train anD equiP sTaff To ProPerlY mainTain sYnTHeTic
Turf fielD
 Specialty equipment required to maintain the field should 
be included in the capital project. 
 Field supervision and staff should receive training in  
the maintenance and inspection of the field. 
 Guarantee information should be copied and provided  
to the staff. 
 Maintain shade, drinking water, and heat warning signs  
at all athletic fields. 
 Train field staff about potential heat related risks involving 
synthetic turf, including overheating and dehydration 
Field staff should be able to recognize symptoms of  
heat related illness. 
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial Without losing any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image That is to say, after you run following powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf rotate just one page; rotate all pages in pdf file
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
design
|
83
 Routinely inspect older generation grass fiber fields and 
assess for lead dust if grass fibers are visibly deteriorated. 
eValuaTion 
all fielDs THaT use new sYsTems sHoulD be insPecTeD
To confirm comPliance wiTH THe guaranTee, anD To
DeTermine if THe fielD Performance warranTs fuTure use
 Require annual Gmax testing by an independent testing lab 
to determine the performance of the synthetic turf. 
It is anticipated that the Gmax of a field will increase over 
time due to compaction under normal use, especially if the 
infill material includes sand. 
Dramatic increases in Gmax readings may indicate a need 
for more specialized maintenance or removal and replace-
ment of infill in a localized area. 
At no point should Gmax be allowed to exceed 200 in  
any area, though 175 is a recommended maximum average 
rating for a field. 
 Look for all of the items covered by the guarantee, including: 
Wear 
Lifting 
Unraveling 
for furTHer informaTion
American Sports Builders Association, Synthetic Turf Manual
Blumenfeld, Jared, Director, San Francisco Department of the 
Environment, Letter to San Francisco Department of Recreation and Parks 
Regarding the use of synthetic turf on city athletic fields, January 9, 2008.
http://www.cityfieldsfoundation.org/documents/DOE_ArtificialTurfLetter_
RPD.pdf
Brown, David R. “Artificial Turf: Exposures To Ground-Up Rubber Tires 
Athletic Fields, Playgrounds, Gardening Mulch”. ed. by Nancy Alderman, 
Susan Addiss, and Jane Bradley. New Haven: Environment & Human Health, 
Inc., 2007
http://www.ehhi.org/reports/turf/turf_report07.pdf
The Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC) at Mt. Sinai School 
of Medicine has been on the cutting edge of documenting the public health 
impacts of plastics, including synthetic turf. 
E-mail contact: info@cehcenter.org
Website home page: http://www.mountsinai.org/Patient%20Care/
Service%20Areas/Children/Procedures%20and%20Health%20Care%20
Services/CEHC%20Home 
Claudio, Luz. “Synthetic Turf: Health Debate Takes Root.” Environmental 
Health Perspectives, VOLUME 116, NUMBER 3, March 2008, pp. 116-122. 
http://www.ehponline.org/members/2008/116-3/EHP116pa116PDF.PDF
Denly, E., Rutkowskitri, K., and Vetrano, K. “A Review Of The Potential 
Health And Safety Risks From Synthetic Turf Fields Containing Crumb 
Rubber Infill.” Prepared for New York City Department of Health and Mental 
Hygiene New York, NY, May 2008. Website Accessed 03/17/10. http://www.
nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/eode/turf_report_05-08.pdf 
Mcnitt, Andrew And Petrunak, Dianne. “Evaluation of Playing Surface 
Characteristics of Various In-Filled Systems” State College, Pa: The 
Pennsylvania State University. Website Accessed 02/01/09. 
http://cropsoil.psu.edu/mcnitt/infill8.cfm
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. “Fact Sheet on 
Synthetic Turf Used in Athletic Fields and Play Areas.” Website Accessed 
03/17/10. http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/eode/eode-turf.shtml.
San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, “Synthetic Playfields 
Task Force Findings and Department Recommendations.” August, 2008. 
http://www.superfill.net/dl010808/SFParks_Playfields_8.21.08.pdf
Sports Turf Solutions, “Gmax Testing on Artificial Turf.” Website Accessed 
02/02/09.
http://www.turftest.com/gmax-artificial.html
Steinbach, Paul. “Unnatural Selection”. Athletic Business, November, 
2008.
http://www.athleticbusiness.com/articles/article.
aspx?articleid=1907&zoneid=24
Sustainable Gardening Australia, “Turf Wars - Real Turf, Fake Turf and 
the Environment.” Website Accessed 02/01/09. http://www.sgaonline.org.au/
info_turfwars.html
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention “Potential Exposure to Lead in Artificial Turf”. 
Website accessed 02/01/09. http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/artificialturf.html
Vetrano, K. “Air Quality Survey Of Synthetic Turf Fields Containing Crumb 
Rubber Infill” Prepared for New York City Department of Health and Mental 
Hygiene New York, NY, March 2009. Website Accessed 03/17/10.
28
Andrew McNitt and Dianne Petrunak. “Evaluation of Playing Surface Characteristics of 
Various In-Filled Systems” State College, PA: The Pennsylvania State University. Website 
accessed 02/01/09.
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
and print such documents and images as JPEG, BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF, PDF, etc. Upload, Open, Save & Download Images & Docs with Web Viewer. After creating a
rotate one page in pdf; pdf reverse page order online
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
of this VB.NET image cropping process: decode the source image file to bitmap, crop bitmap and save cropped bitmap to original image format. After you run this
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; pdf page order reverse
84
86    integrate constructaBiLity reviews into tHe design Process 
88    use Proactive Procurement strategies 
90    create construction staging & sequencing PLans 
94    reduce dieseL emissions 
96    imPLement a recycLing & waste management PLan 
99    imProve contractor quaLification evaLuation and Parks staff training 
102  imPLement a PuBLic information Program during construction
Part iii: 
Best Practices  
in site Process
construction
Part III contains Best Practices (BPs) in planning and design, 
construction, and maintenance. Opportunities and considerations 
for improving park design and decreasing maintenance costs 
are described, as well as increasing the lifespan of park 
projects. Upfront acknowledgment of site constraints and future 
maintenance costs will improve the success of the design and 
reduce maintenance and reconstruction costs. Construction best 
practices will minimize construction damage. Maintenance and 
operations are the most important component of any successful 
park, and incorporation of maintenance concerns will improve the 
ability of the operations division to operate the site successfully. 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Q 2: After I apply various image processing functions to source image file editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image
rotate individual pages in pdf; pdf save rotated pages
VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
hotspot annotation styles before and after its activation img = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName & & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to rotate one page in pdf document; save pdf rotate pages
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
85
inTroDucTion
Design alone does not make a park sustainable. Parks must be 
built in such a way that the sustainable features function prop-
erly. Often long term maintenance problems can be directly 
attributed to poor construction practices that damage vegeta-
tion or result in irreversibly compacted soils. Unfortunately, the 
effects of this damage may not become visible for a year or two 
after a contractor has completed the work.
Improper construction planning, lax oversight, or lack of 
expertise among contractors or supervising resident engineers 
all contribute to poor long term performance of park facilities. 
Inadequate building practices along with improper design 
or material selections are symptomatic of a larger problem: 
construction thinking — the ways in which we build our parks 
and the materials choices we make — is not well integrated in 
the design process. Design teams need to think through how a 
project is built in order to maximize its long term performance. 
Anticipating potential construction problems or site logistics 
constraints can result in more sustainable parks.
High performance landscape guidelines seek to make 
construction practices more sustainable or “greener.” The 
environmental impacts of construction can be greatly improved 
by adopting more stringent contractor performance require-
ments. City agencies including LMCC, DOT, and DDC now 
mandate these practices and the local construction industry 
has adopted them. In the end improving the way we build 
parks should improve the performance of park facilities, help 
conserve resources, and mitigate unintended environmental 
degradation associated with construction.
keY PrinciPles
INTEGRATE CONSTRUCTION THINKING INTO THE DESIGN 
PROCESS. Designers should understand how things are con-
structed. Constructability reviews should happen early enough 
and often enough in the design process to allow designers and 
construction staff to avoid creating problems. Designers should 
review new methods or materials with the Specifications and 
Construction Divisions to determine and review past use or 
recommendations for application.
DEVELOP CONTRACT DOCUMENTS THAT CAREFULLY 
ARTICULATE CONTRACTOR PERFORMANCE REqUIRE-
MENTS. Contract documents that include specific equipment 
and operational criteria, materials requirements, recycling 
programs, work limit lines, site protections, and proper sched-
uling and sequencing of work will allow for closer manage-
ment of site construction practices. Clear requirements and 
benchmarks for performance will make it easier for Parks to 
hold contractors accountable for the quality of their work. 
Unless contract documents set the standard for acceptable 
practices, it will be virtually impossible to change the method 
of construction while the work is in progress.
ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT TRAINING OF CONTRAC-
TORS AND PARKS CONSTRUCTION OVERSIGHT STAFF. 
Contractors will tend to favor older, less sustainable construc-
tion methods and materials unless they are trained to build 
in more responsible ways. Parks construction professionals 
and supervising designers need to be sufficiently trained to 
oversee sustainable construction techniques and materials 
handling. They need to be able to direct contractors who are 
not familiar with sustainable practices and to enforce new 
contract requirements. By improving overall understanding of 
sustainable goals and the critical interrelationships between 
soil, vegetation, and water systems all parties will have a  
better sense of how to operate sustainably.
CELEBRATE CONSTRUCTION SUCCESSES AND REWARD 
INNOVATION. IT IS CRITICAL TO ELEVATE THE IMPOR-
TANCE OF GOOD CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES AND CRITI-
CAL PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS. Too often we only reward 
projects that look good immediately upon completion. We 
often fail to appreciate less glamorous projects that are 
properly built and actually improve economic, environmental 
or social metrics within our city. As sustainable requirements 
and practices are worked into the Parks design and construc-
tion process, design and construction staff as well as contrac-
tors will develop skills and techniques that will benefit future 
projects. It is important to share this wisdom with the capital 
design staff on a regular basis, in order to build a culture of 
continuous improvement.
KEEP RECORDS AND MAKE DATA EASILY AVAILABLE.  
It is critical for the design staff to understand what works 
and what does not during construction, especially as they 
begin to try new, more sustainable approaches to design and 
materials selection. Keeping track of what works will allow 
for the development of better standard drawings, details, and 
specifications. Careful more detailed recording of the costs 
associated with new features is also important to allow design 
staff to better budget for sustainable construction features. 
Documenting costs trends over multiple years will also be 
important to see if the local construction industry is able to 
improve costs as they become more familiar with sustainable 
practices and materials.
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF CONSTRUCTION’S VISIBILITY TO 
EDUCATE THE PUBLIC. Construction in parks presents an 
important opportunity to show a public commitment to improv-
ing the quality of life in the city. Let the public know what is 
going on and how and why projects will improve environmen-
tal, social and economic performance. Educating the public 
about each new park project promotes an understanding of 
how parks function within the larger city-wide ecological and 
social system. Publicizing the sustainability goals and objec-
tive for new park construction projects is a way to build the 
public’s appreciation of the environmental benefits.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
on image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document Method for Drawing Rubber Stamp Annotation. After you have
reverse page order pdf online; rotate single page in pdf file
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
What's more, after you have created a basic PDF document viewer in your VB.NET Windows application, more imaging viewer Save current PDF page or the
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf and save
86
objecTiVe                                                                    
Ensure that Parks projects are cost-effective and easily 
buildable. 
benefiTs                                                                       
Informs design decisions with realistic considerations of 
building construction methods and logistics
Comprehensively conceived plans have fewer cost and 
scheduling overruns.
Facilitates implementation of high performance goals
Construction Managers can help work around constraints.
Uncovers contradictions and ambiguities in construction 
documents
consiDeraTions                                                        
J  The creation of a constructability review team will be a 
burden for existing staff or require new staffing. 
J  If staff or staff expertise is not available, consultants would 
add soft costs to individual projects.
backgrounD                                                              
The integration of construction planning into the design phase 
can be useful in establishing project goals, budgets, schedules 
and cost or time-saving strategies. Discussions can lead to 
creative solutions to project challenges.
Constructability reviews insure clarity and coordination of 
construction documents and specifications. These reviews 
verify correctness of construction details and material choices.
Constructability reviews assure coordination of drawings 
and specifications among all trades. For complex projects and 
especially with projects that include buildings, constructabil-
ity reviews serve to unify all aspects of the project. Cross-
referencing the trades also helps avoid possible conflicts and 
overlapping jurisdictions among the various trade contracts. 
Reviews can be used to identify code compliance issues and 
their impact on design details and cost. 
Other issues highlighted during the constructability 
review process include phasing, coordination with facilities 
operations, and the sequencing of construction operations. 
Additionally, the review assures compliance with regulatory 
criteria, such as proper submission format and procedure, 
adherence to Wick’s Law, and Procurement Policy Board 
issues. Common inconsistencies recognized by the review 
team include missing or incomplete building code analysis and 
improper use of standardized drawings and specifications.
PracTices                                                                 
Planning & Design
esTablisH consTrucTabiliTY reView Teams
constructability reviews require skilled and experienced people who 
understand how contractors work and how drawings and specifica-
tions might be interpreted by the contractor.
 Ideally, constructability review teams would come from 
in-house staff that are familiar with Parks standards as well 
as common goals and concerns. 
 If in-house staff are not available, consider hiring both 
design and construction management consultants to assist 
with reviews. 
Consultant reviewers should have specialized skills in 
contracting, park building, construction of sustainable 
landscapes, and the necessary subspecialty skills needed 
for specific projects including architects, engineers, 
ecologists, landscape architects, stormwater specialists, 
soil scientists, and so on. 
engage consTrucTabiliTY reViewers earlY in THe 
Design Process
ideally constructability review should begin as early in the process 
as possible, but no later than the traditional design development 
phase (approximately 65-70% project completion) phase.
 Often constructability reviews are useful at a concept 
development or master planning stage to identify basic 
issues of access, budgetary contingencies for anticipated 
complications, schedules or other unusual concerns that 
may be specific to the proposed project program or site. 
Constructability review teams can be useful in setting 
place-holder allowances early in the planning process 
before design decisions are fully worked out.
 Obtain assistance from construction managers to identify 
key logistical, scheduling, budgeting and bidding issues. 
 Determine whether internal construction staff could pro-
vide necessary expertise or whether it would be preferable to 
hire construction managers. 
use consTrucTabiliTY reView Teams To assisT wiTH 
DeVeloPing anD reViewing cosT esTimaTes, scHeDules anD
final biD DocumenTs
Design projects need to be considered in context of how and when 
they will be constructed. often the skills needed to plan a project 
from start to completion lay outside of the design staff assigned to 
the project. constructability review teams can assist design staff in:
 Minimize situations that could lead to contractor disputes, 
cost over-runs, change orders and unexpected bid prices
 Developing detailed project schedules 
Advertizing of bids 
Realistic duration of bids 
c.1  
integrate 
constructaBiLit y 
reviews into tHe 
design Process
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Draw and Write Text and Graphics on
After creating text on Word page, users are able doc, fileNameadd, New WordEncoder()) 'save word End powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate pdf page and save
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
construction
|
87
Length of time required for the procurement of goods, 
preparation of shop drawings, completion of material 
deliveries and site mobilization
Duration of various construction phases, including site 
preparation, utility installation, rough grading, building 
construction, interface with public utilities, and final 
contract close-out 
for larger or comPlex ProjecTs consiDer using a 
consTrucTion manager in lieu of in-House Design sTaff
Determine whether internal construction staff can provide the 
necessary expertise (and time commitment) or whether it would be 
preferable to hire a construction manager (cm) to act as an owner’s 
representative for Parks to coordinate the project from the design 
development phase through end of construction.
cms can be used to assist with:
 The “front-end” documents including administrative, 
specifications and bidding documents
 Development and coordination of multiple contractor 
bid packages if necessary, especially if the project triggers 
Wicks Law compliance. 
 Considering the viability of issuing accelerated or “early 
start” bid packages that can be used to shorten the duration 
of construction work. 
 Overseeing other bid related logistics including:
Requirements for bonds and insurance 
Prevailing wage requirements 
Mobilization requirements
 Assisting with the bid phase work including: 
Identification of well-suited contractors 
Conducting pre-bid meetings and site visits 
Evaluation of contractor bids and post-bid interviews
consTrucTion
consiDer THe use of a cm as a general conTracTor as 
well as a consTrucTion manager
 Consider whether this arrangement would be advantageous 
by allowing greater flexibility in the procurement of work 
among a variety of specialty subcontractors. 
 Learn from the construction process. 
 Designers should observe the construction of critical or 
novel construction operations to obtain first-hand knowledge 
of construction operations. This knowledge can then inform 
future designs, cost estimates and specifications.
PosT consTrucTion
DeVeloP feeDback forms To inform Design sTaff abouT 
misTakes anD inefficiencies THaT can be correcTeD on 
Drawings anD sPecificaTions on subsequenT ProjecTs
The development of high performance guidelines should not be 
static. agency staff should continue to strive for improved ways to 
design and deliver projects.
 Consider implementing a formal project “lessons learned” 
meeting for each project as it is being closed out with the 
contractor. 
Include designers, managers, construction, mainte-
nance and operations staff and even the contractor in the 
meeting to encourage open dialog about the ways things 
might be done better the next time.
Identify possible contractor innovations that may result 
in improvements to standard specifications and drawings.
Identify possible products or suppliers who may be 
good resources for future projects.
Require Parks designer, construction staff and the 
contractor to complete a questionnaire after each project, 
to include: questions about the capital process in general 
and customized questions about the project specifically 
and any piloted or otherwise novel features.
examPles                                                                   
Battery Park City, Hudson River Park, the Highline, the United 
Nations and other projects within New York have engaged both 
design and construction management firms during the design 
and construction process to assist project design teams and 
owner-agency with the development of construction schedules, 
phasing and logistics plans, bid packages, and cost estimates.
88
objecTiVe                                                                  
Improve procurement of sustainable materials and specialized 
construction services.
benefiTs                                                                    
 Potentially broadens the pool of contracting companies 
 Potentially eliminates general contractor mark-ups on 
specialty contractor work such as soil remediation, invasive 
species removal, and green roof construction 
 Allows for a direct contractual relationship with  
specialty contractors 
J  Potentially increases control over selection of quality con-
tractors and the scheduling and administration of their work
consiDeraTions                                                       
 Some of the recommendations contained in this section  
go beyond the power and authority of the Parks Department. 
The suggestions are included to create an awareness of what 
might be possible. 
 State and City-wide Law prescribe how projects have  
to be bid. 
 Changes in procurement strategies would require City  
and possibly state approvals. 
 Pre-purchasing for multiple projects requires increased 
planning and coordination of capital project schedules.
J  Use of multiple contracts requires increased  
construction coordination. 
 May increase resident engineer or construction  
management fees 
J  Policy changes may be needed to change the  
procurement processes. 
backgrounD                                                            
High performance landscapes are dependent on skilled 
contractors who can operate without damaging existing soils, 
vegetation, and waterbodies. Contractors need to be experi-
enced in the performance of specialized tasks such as invasive 
species control, natural area restoration, and green roof con-
struction. Use of sustainable products such as porous concrete 
and low temperature asphalt require a willing contractor who is 
familiar with the product. Prior to awarding them contracts for 
work,  contractors should be required to demonstrate experi-
ence in these areas to ensure that they will be able to follow  
specifications and bid the job competently and competitively. 
This requires some manner of qualifying the contractors, either 
before bidding or before award.
Some materials (such as trees of a particular species) need 
to be ordered well in advance because they need to be propa-
gated. Other materials such as soil need to be sourced ahead 
of time because they need to meet a detailed specification. In 
both instances it would be desirable for Parks to have suppli-
ers who have agreed to provide these materials at a fixed price 
for periods of time, so that any contractor working on a Parks 
project would be able to incorporate those materials into their 
job without being encumbered by lengthy procurements. This 
would potentially yield significant project savings. 
PracTices                                                                
DeVeloP a Pre-PurcHasing Program or suPPlY-onlY 
conTracTs for maTerials
often, projects will require specific materials in order to meet their 
sustainability goals. for example, for the PlaNYC reforestation 
initiative undertaken by Parks, a procurement contract was created 
for multiple nurseries to produce 8,000 trees annually of specific 
species and genotype over an 8 year period. The nurseries produced 
the plant material and were required to deliver minimum numbers 
of truckloads within city limits. similar approaches could be used 
for soil materials, compost, mulch, native plants, and materials that 
require high levels of quality control.
 Pre-plan and combine common material needs across 
multiple contracts. 
Seek to leverage competitive prices for materials that 
might be too costly to order on a per-project basis. 
Seek to reduce manufacturing and supply lead times, 
improve shipping efficiencies and streamline contractor 
submittals.
Use large scale pre-purchasing for multiple projects 
annually to entice suppliers to provide more sustainable 
products that would otherwise be considered “custom.” 
Pre-purchasing from a range of suppliers may also 
provide Parks with a greater ability to provide quality 
control since Parks inspectors would only need to visit 
and test a limited number of suppliers. Contractors would 
then be able to purchase materials that have effectively 
completed the Quality Assurance process typically accom-
modated by contractor submittals. 
encourage or require PurcHase of locallY aVailable 
anD / or susTainable maTerials or serVices To THe exTenT 
legallY anD logisTicallY Possible
The purchase of locally produced goods serves important sustain-
ability goals of minimizing excessive transportation costs and associ-
ated pollution and gasoline consumption. The use of local companies 
to manufacture goods and provide services helps develop local green 
jobs. Purchasing goals would be incentives to the development of 
local nurseries, recycling facilities, site furnishing manufacturers 
and a variety of specialty contracting companies.
 Investigate existing or proposed tax incentives, public 
financing and other means of encouraging local green jobs. 
 Consider providing specific contract target goals for 
c.2 
use Proactive 
Procurement 
strategies
HigH Performance LandscaPe guideLines
|
Part iii: Best Practices in site Process
|
construction
|
89
percentages of materials or services purchased from  
manufactures or suppliers within New York City or  
surrounding region. 
Follow a similar approach used by City and State  
agencies for meeting WBE/MBE goals.
 Reference NYC’s Environmentally Preferred Purchasing 
law: http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/downloads/pdf/
eppmanual.pdf
 Promote awareness within the Department and the local 
contracting community of sources of locally available and 
sustainably produced materials, products and services 
through newsletters, pre-bid meetings and comprehensive 
listing of sustainable suppliers and specialty contractors.
 Use combined agency purchasing power to increase 
demand for locally produced materials and supplies. 
imProVe THe qualiTY of conTracTors Performing 
sPecialTY work
Hiring experienced and high quality contractors who are capable  
of constructing high performance landscapes can be challeng-
ing within the standard new York city bidding practices. Typically 
competitive bidding in new York city results in the selection of 
contractors based on the lowest price bid with limited assurance of 
actual ability of the contractor to perform the work in a way that it is 
specified. requirements contracts and pre-qualified contractors are 
two strategies that could be explored to allow Parks to improve the 
quality of contractors.
requiremenTs conTracTs
in requirements contract projects, bidders provide unit prices based 
on standard specifications and drawings with minimal site or project-
specific information. These contracts are used primarily to advance 
contractor bidding while projects are still in design, shortening the 
time from conception to construction. Typically successful require-
ments contractors then build park projects and Parks pays the 
contractor based on the unit prices in his bid for a range of expected 
construction items. requirements contracts have historically been 
awarded to general contractors who use either in-house staff or 
specialty subcontractor to perform work. The disadvantage is that 
projects requiring more specialized work will end up paying more 
for the work since it will be run through a general contractor who is 
entitled to mark up the price of their work.
This requirements contract system, which is very successful for 
Parks, could be further refined to develop requirements contracts 
for specialty work, thereby encouraging specialty contractors to 
bid on work they are both qualified to do and interested in, giving 
Parks greater flexibility to award critical, high performance work, or 
ecologically sensitive items to more qualified contractors.
Pre-qualifY conTracTors
Parks could consider a formal specialty contractor pre-qualifying 
program. The nYc Department of Design and construction has suc-
cessfully used a contractor pre-qualification process to select con-
tractors for highly specialized construction work where it is essential 
that only competent and experienced vendors be invited to bid.
The pre-qualification process, which has been vetted by the 
Procurement Policy board, offers a new approach to contracting that 
may offer improved results over the traditional Parks approach of 
selecting contractors based on the lowest responsible bid. Typically 
specialty contractors have a hard time competing with larger general 
contractors. specialty contractors also are often not interested in 
bidding on large projects that only include a small portion of work 
that they focus on.
interested firms can respond to advertisements for pre-qualified 
bidders by requesting the pre-qualification requirements package 
which details the qualification and experience needed to undertake 
the work of specific contract types. The response is evaluated; 
firms that have met the criteria for pre-qualification are selected. 
once final bid documents are available for bid, only those firms who 
have been pre-qualified will be invited to submit competitive bids. 
after a bid opening, which all pre-qualified firms can attend, the 
firm with the lowest responsible bid will be awarded the contract.
29
Pre-qualification would be especially useful for projects involving 
specialized skills including:
 Invasive plant management 
 Stormwater management systems including constructed 
wetlands, infiltration basins and other devices 
 Green roof construction 
 Porous pavement installation 
 Ecological plantings 
 Brownfield restoration 
 Abatement of hazardous materials 
To encourage more biDDers To PrePare beTTer biDs, 
Plan THe biD sequence To coinciDe wiTH conTracTor
“Down Time”
 Whenever possible, avoid site contractors’ busy periods  
during the early spring or late fall seasons since contractors 
are often too preoccupied to spend the time required to  
carefully plan their bid responses. 
Site work bids are generally best when due in January and 
February, when contactors are looking to secure work for the 
coming season. 
Bidding during the mid summer is an alternative since 
work is already in place and contactors are looking for work 
for the mid to late fall seasons. 
realisTicallY Plan THe Timing of conTracTor biDs anD
awarDs on comPlex ProjecTs
 For projects requiring extensive planning, soil work, plant 
material purchasing or other specialized construction, consider 
bidding and awarding the projects a full season ahead of the 
actual start of construction.
 Allow contractors sufficient time to source materials and 
obtain submittal approvals required for construction. 
 Stipulate milestones for completion of early lead items in 
the bid documents and project schedules to coincide with 
anticipated construction start and end dates. 
examPles                                                                   
Hudson River Park Trust uses multiple contracts to optimize 
the purchasing of construction services. Park construction 
has been parceled into a number of construction contracts 
90
including general site work, marine construction, stone 
masonry, paving, irrigation, landscaping. It is common practice 
for building contracts to separate furniture and equipment 
purchases from the actual building contracts.
for furTHer informaTion
f New York City of Design and Construction, “Design + Construction 
Excellence: July 2007 Progress Report .” July 2007.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/downloads/pdf/dcei_2007.pdf
29 New York City of Design and Construction, “Design + Construction Excellence: July 2007 
Progress Report.” July 2007, p. 13.
objecTiVe                                                                      
Create detailed construction staging and sequencing  
plans to understand and control how contractors will perform 
their work on the site with the specific goals of protecting  
soil, vegetation, and water resources throughout the duration 
of construction.
benefiTs                                                                   
J  Improves the design team’s understanding of the scope of 
work, results in clearer construction documentation and more 
accurate bidding and scheduling
J  Elevates the importance of best management practices 
and their required use to the construction managers, resident 
engineers, and contractors during construction
J  Clearly identifies and protects zones of existing stormwater 
management, vegetation, soil or water resources 
consiDeraTions                                                       
J  The preparation of additional plans and specifications can 
sometimes increase project design costs.
J  If staging and sequencing plans are too rigid they will not 
allow for a contractor to propose more innovative or efficient 
alternatives.
J  Requirements to protect site features, to sequence construc-
tion in particular ways or to increase documentation require-
ments can increase construction costs.
backgrounD                                                          
High performance construction requires careful preconstruc-
tion planning to achieve environmental, economic, and main-
tenance / operations goals. The development of sequencing 
and staging plans serves several purposes.
As design documents, they inform the design team  
about the full extent of construction impacts on the  
site, including space planning requirements and post  
construction restoration needs.
As bid documents, they inform the contractor of the basic 
operational requirements and coordination necessary to 
complete the work properly.
As submittal documents, they confirm the contrac-
tor’s commitment and understanding of high performance 
c.3 
create 
construction 
staging & 
sequencing PLans
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested