display pdf in asp.net page : Rotate single page in pdf reader application SDK tool html .net asp.net online dmp2-part1827

Part 
I
Foundation
s
I
n which our heroes learn a great deal about the background of the
data munging beast in all its forms and habitats. Fortunately, they are
also told of the great power of the mystical Perl which can be used to
tame the savage beast. 
Our heroes are then taught a number of techniques for fighting the
beast without using the Perl. These techniques are useful when fighting
with any weapon, and once learned, can be combined with the power of
the Perl to make them even more effective.
Later, our heroes are introduced to additional techniques for using
the Perl—all of which prove useful as their journey continues.
Rotate single page in pdf reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf reverse page order online; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
Rotate single page in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate all pages in pdf; change orientation of pdf page
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to reverse page order in pdf; pdf rotate single page reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
save pdf rotate pages; rotate pdf page
What 
i
s
data mung
i
ng?
5
description of the data, followed by a header row which describes the meaning of
each individual data field. The footer contains the number of records in the file. This
can be useful to ensure that we have processed (or even received) the whole file.
We will return to this example throughout the book to demonstrate data mung-
ing techniques.
1.1.2 Da
t
a recogni
t
ion
You won’t be able to do very much with this data unless you can recognize what
data you have. Data recognition is about examining your source data and working
out which parts of the data are of interest to you. More specifically, it is about a
computer program examining your source data and comparing what it finds against
pre-defined patterns which allow it to determine which parts of the data represent
the data items that are of interest.
In our 
CD
example there is a lot of data and the format varies within different
parts of the file. Depending on what we need to do with the data, the header and
footer lines may be of no interest to us. On the other hand, if we just want to report
that on Sept. 16, 1999 I owned six 
CD
s, then all the data we are interested in is in
the header and footer records and we don’t need to examine the actual data records
in any detail.
An important part of recognizing data is realizing what context the data is found
in. For example, data items that are in header and footer records will have to be
processed completely differently from data items which are in the body of the data.
It is therefore very important to understand what our input data looks like and
what we need to do with it.
Dave's Record Collection
16 Sep 1999
Artist
Bragg, Billy
Black, Mary
Black, Mary
Bowie, David
Bragg, Billy
Worker's Playtime
Cooking Vinyl
1987
Title
Label
Released
Mermaid Avenue
EMI
1998
The Holy Ground
1993
Circus
Grapevine
1996
Hunky Dory
RCA
1971
Bowie, David
Earthling
EMI
1997
6 Records
Grapevine
Figur
e
1.1 Sampl
e
data fil
e
O
ne data record
D
ata 
f
ooter
D
ata header
O
ne data 
f
ield
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions To be more specific, two or more input PDF documents can then saved and output as a single PDF with user
pdf page order reverse; rotate pdf pages in reader
8
CHAPTER 
Data, data mung
i
ng, and Perl
to make use of the data, it will need to be transformed in various ways as it moves
from one system to the next.
This is where data munging comes in. It lives in the interstices between compu-
ter systems, ensuring that data produced by one system can be used by another.
1.2.3 Real
-
world da
t
a munging examples
Let’s look at a couple of simple examples where data munging can be used. These
are simplified accounts of tasks that I carried out for large investment banks in the
city of London.
Loading mul
t
iple da
t
a forma
t
s in
t
o a single da
t
abase
In the first of these examples, a bank was looking to purchase some company
accounting data to drive its equities research department. In any large bank the
equity research department is full of people who build complex financial models of
company performance in order to try to predict future performance, and hence
share price. They can then recommend shares to their clients who buy them and
(hopefully) get a lot richer in the process.
This particular bank needed more data to use in its existing database of company
accounting data. There are many companies that supply this data electronically and
a short list of three suppliers had been drawn up and a sample data set had been
received from each. My task was to load these three data sets, in turn, onto the
existing database.
The three sets of data came in different formats. I therefore decided to design a
canonical file format and write a Perl script that would load that format onto the
database. I then wrote three other Perl scripts (one for each input file) which read
the different input files and wrote a file in my standard format. In this case I was
reading from a number of sources and writing to one place.
Sharing da
t
a using a s
t
andard da
t
a forma
t
In the second example I was working on a trading system which needed to send
details of trades to various other systems. Once more, the data was stored in a rela-
tional database. In this case the bank had made all interaction between systems
much easier by designing an 
XML
file format1 for data interchange. Therefore, all
we needed to do was to extract our data, create the necessary 
XML
file, and send it
on to the systems that required it. By defining a standard data format, the bank
1
The definition of an XML file format is known as a Document Type Definition (DTD), but we’ll get to
that in chapter 10.
10
CHAPTER 
Data, data mung
i
ng, and Perl
Ensuring 
t
ha
t
file 
t
ransfers are comple
t
e
One difficulty to overcome with file transfer is the problem of knowing if a file is
complete. You may have a process that sits on one system, monitoring a file system
where your source file will be written by another process. Under most operating
systems the file will appear as soon as the source process begins to write it. Your
process shouldn’t start to read the file until it has all been transferred. In some
cases, people write complex systems which monitor the size of the file and trigger
the reading process only once the file has stopped growing. Another common solu-
tion is for the writing process to write another small flag file once the main file is
complete and for the reading process to check for the existence of this flag file. In
most cases a much simpler solution is also the best—simply write the file under a
different name and only rename it to the expected name once it is complete.
Data files are most useful when there are discrete sets of data that you want to
process in one chunk. This might be a summary of banking transactions sent to an
accounting system at the end of the day. In a situation where a constant flow of data
is required, one of the other methods discussed below might be more appropriate.
1.3.2 Da
t
abases
Databases are becoming almost as ubiquitous as data files. Of course, the term
“database” means vastly differing things to different people. Some people who are
used to a Windows environment might think of dBase or some similar nonrelational
database system. 
UNIX
users might think of a set of 
DBM
files. Hopefully, most
people will think of a relational database management system (
RDBMS
), whether it
is a single-user product like Microsoft Access or Sybase Adaptive Server Anywhere,
or a full multi-user product such as Oracle or Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise.
Imposing s
t
ruc
t
ure on da
t
a
Databases have advantages over data files in that they impose structure on your
data. A database designer will have defined a databa
s
s
chema, which defines the
shape and type of all of your data objects. It will define, for example, exactly which
data items are stored for each customer in the database, which ones are optional and
which ones are mandatory. Many database systems also allow you to define relation-
ships between data objects (for example, “each order must contain a customer iden-
tifier which must relate to an existing customer”). Modern databases also contain
executable code which can define some of your business logic (for example, “when
the status of an order is changed to ‘delivered,’ automatically create an invoice
object relating to that order”).
Of course, all of these benefits come at a price. Manipulating data within a data-
base is potentially slower than equivalent operations on data files. You may also
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested