display pdf in asp.net page : Rotate individual pages in pdf Library application component asp.net html azure mvc dmp9-part1844

Regular expre
s
s
i
on
s
71
We’ll assume that each English word has just one American translation.8 We’ll also
store our translations in a text file so it is easy to add to them. The program will
look something like this:
1: #!/usr/bin/perl -w
2: use strict;
3:
4: while (<STDIN>) {
5:
6:
s/(\w+)/translate($1)/ge;
7:
print;
8: }
9:
10: my %trans;
11: sub translate {
12:
my $word = shift;
13:
14:
$trans{lc $word} ||= get_trans(lc $word);
15: }
16:
17: sub get_trans {
18:
my $word = shift;
19:
20:
my $file = 'american.txt';
21:
open(TRANS, $file) || die "Can't open $file: $!";
22:
23:
my ($line, $english, $american);
24:
while (defined($line = <TRANS>)) {
25:
chomp $line;
26:
($english, $american) = split(/\t/, $line);
27:
do {$word = $american; last; } if $english eq $word;
28:
}
29:
close TRANS;
30:
return $word;
31: }
How 
t
he 
t
ransla
t
ion program works
Lines 1 and 2 are the standard way to start a Perl script. 
The loop starting on line 4 reads from 
STDIN
and puts each line in turn in the
$_
variable.
Line 6 does most of the work. It looks for groups of word characters. Each time
it finds one it stores the word in 
$1
. The replacement string is the result of execut-
ing the code 
translate($1)
. Notice the two modifiers: 
g
which means that every
8
We’ll also conveniently ignore situations where an English phrase should be replaced by a different phrase
in American, such as “car park” and “parking lot.”
Rotate individual pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate individual pages in pdf; how to rotate one page in pdf document
Rotate individual pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf and save; save pdf after rotating pages
72
CHAPTER 
Pattern match
i
ng
word in the line will be converted, and 
e
which forces Perl to execute the replace-
ment string before putting it back into the original string.
Line 7 prints the value of 
$_
, which is now the translated line. Note that when
given no arguments, 
print
defaults to printing the contents of the 
$_
variable—
which in this case is exactly what we want.
Line 10 defines a caching hash which the 
translate
function uses to store
words which it already knows how to translate.
The 
translate
function which starts on line 11 uses a caching algorithm similar
to the Orcish Manoeuvre. If the current word doesn’t exist in the 
%trans
hash, it
calls 
get_trans
to get a translation of the word. Notice that we always work with
lower case versions of the word.
Line 17 starts the 
get_trans
function, which will read any necessary words
from the file containing a list of translatable words.
Line 20 defines the name of the translations file and line 21 attempts to open it.
If the file can’t be opened, then the program dies with an error message.
Line 24 loops though the translations file a line at a time, putting each line of
text into 
$line
and line 25 removes the newline character from the line.
Line 26 splits the line on the tab character which separates the English and
American words.
Line 27 sets 
$word
to the American word if the English word matches the word
we are seeking.
Line 29 closes the file.
Line 30 returns either the translation or the original word if a translation is not
found while looping through the file. This ensures that the function always returns
a valid word and therefore that the 
%trans
hash will contain an entry for every
word that we’ve come across. If we didn’t do this, then for each word that didn’t
need to be translated, we would have no entry in the hash and would have to search
the entire translations file each time. This way we only search the translations file
once for each unique word.
Using 
t
he 
t
ransla
t
ion program
As an example of the use of this script, create a file called 
american.txt
which con-
tains a line for each word that you want to translate. Each line should have the English
word followed by a tab character and the equivalent American word. For example:
hello<TAB>hiya
pavement<TAB>sidewalk
Create another file containing the text that you want to translate. In my test, I used
Hello.
Please stay on the pavement.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
rotate pdf pages by degrees; how to rotate all pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate single page in pdf reader
Regular expre
s
s
i
on
s
73
and running the program using the command line
translate.pl < in.txt
produced the output
hiya.
Please stay on the sidewalk.
If you wanted to keep the translated text in another text file then you could run the
program using the command line
translate.pl < in.txt > out.txt
Once again we make use of the power of the 
UNIX
filter model as discussed in
chapter 2.
This isn’t a particularly useful script. It doesn’t, for example, handle capitaliza-
tion of the words that it translates. In the next section we’ll look at something a lit-
tle more powerful.
4.2.5 More examples
:
/
e
t
c
/
passwd
Let’s look at a few more examples of real-world data munging tasks for which you
would use regular expressions. In these examples we will use a well-known standard
UNIX
data file as our input data. The file we will use is the 
/etc/passwd
file which
stores a list of users on a 
UNIX
system. The file is a colon-separated, record-based
file. This means that each line in the file represents one user, and the various pieces
of information about each user are separated with a colon. A typical line in one of
these files looks like this:
dave:Rg6kuZvwIDF.A:501:100:Dave Cross:/home/dave:/bin/bash
The seven sections of this line have the following meanings:
1
The username
2
The user’s password (in an encrypted form)9
3
The unique 
ID
of the user on this system
4
The 
ID
of the user’s default group
5
The user’s full name10
6
The path to the user’s home directory
7
The user’s command shell
9
On a system using shadow passwords, the encrypted password won’t be in this field.
10
Strictly, this field can contain any text that the system administrator chooses—but this is my system and
I’ve chosen to store full names here.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
pdf rotate single page reader; rotate pdf page permanently
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
pdf expert rotate page; how to reverse page order in pdf
74
CHAPTER 
Pattern match
i
ng
The precise meaning of some of these fields may not be clear to non-
UNIX
users,
but it should be clear enough to understand the following examples.
Example
:
reading 
/
e
t
c
/
passwd
Let’s start by writing a routine to read the data into internal data structures. This
routine can then be used by any of the following examples. As always, for flexibility,
we’ll assume that the data is coming in via 
STDIN
.
sub read_passwd {
my %users;
my @fields = qw/name pword uid gid fullname home shell/;
while (<STDIN>) {
chomp;
my %rec;
@rec{@fields) = split(/:/);
$users{$rec->{name}} = \%rec;
}
return \%users;
}
In a similar manner to other input routines we have written, this routine reads the
data into a data structure and returns a reference to that data structure. In this case
we have chosen a hash as the main data structure, as the users on the system have no
implicit ordering and it seems quite likely that we will want to get the information
on a specific user. A hash allows us to do this very easily. This raises one other issue:
what is the best choice for the key of the hash? The answer depends on just what we
are planning to do with the data, but in this case I have chosen the username. In
other cases the user 
ID
might be a useful choice. All of the other columns would be
bad choices, as they aren’t guaranteed to be unique across all users.11
So, we have decided on a hash where the keys are the usernames. What will the
values of our hash be? In this case I have chosen to use another level of hash where
the keys are the names of the various data values (as defined in the array 
@fields
)
and the values are the actual values.
Our input routine therefore reads each line from 
STDIN
and splits it on colons
and puts the values directly into a hash called 
%rec
. A reference to 
%rec
is then
stored in the main 
%users
hash. Notice that because 
%rec
is a lexical variable that is
scoped to within the 
while
loop, each time around the loop we get a new variable
11
It seems unlikely that the home directory of a user would be nonunique, but it is (just) possible to imag-
ine scenarios where it makes sense for two or more users to share a home directory.
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for Page. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Rotate Tiff Page. & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; pdf save rotated pages
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for .NET. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF
pdf reverse page order; rotate all pages in pdf file
Regular expre
s
s
i
on
s
75
and therefore a new reference. If 
%rec
were declared outside the loop it would
always be the same variable and every time around the loop we would be overwrit-
ing the same location in memory.
Having created a hash for each line in the input file and assigned it to the correct
record in 
%users
, our routine finally returns a reference to 
%users
. We are now
ready to start doing some real work.
Example
:
lis
t
ing users
To start with, let’s produce a list of all of the real names of all of the users on the
system. As that would be a little too simple we’ll introduce a couple of refinements.
First, included in the list of users in 
/etc/passwd
are a number of special accounts
that aren’t for real users. These will include 
root
(the superuser), 
lp
(a user 
ID
which is often used to carry out printer administration tasks) and a number of other
task-oriented users. Assuming that we can detect these uses by the fact that their full
names will be empty, we’ll exclude them from the output. Secondly, in the original
file, the full names are in the format <forename> <surname>. We’ll print them out
as <surname>, <forename>, and sort them in surname order. Here’s the script:
1: use strict;
2:
3: my $users = read_passwd();
4:
5: my @names;
6: foreach (keys %{$users}) {
7:
next unless $users->{$_}{fullname};
8:
9:
my ($forename, $surname) = split(/\s+/, $users->{$_}{fullname}, 2);
10:
11:
push @names, "$surname, $forename";
12: }
13:
14: print map { "$_\n" } sort @names;
Most of this script is self-explanatory. The key lines are:
Line 6 gets each key in the 
%users
hash in turn.
Line 7 skips any record that doesn’t have a full name, thereby ignoring the spe-
cial users.
Line 9 splits the full name on white space. Note that we pass a third argument to
split.12 This limits the number of elements in the returned list.
12
Notice, however, that we are making assumptions here about the format of the name. This algorithm
assumes that the first word in the name is the forename and everything else is the surname. If the name is
not in this format then things will go wrong. For example, think about what would happen if the name
were “Dame Elizabeth Taylor” or “Randal L. Schwartz.” As always, it is very important to know your data.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
rotate pdf pages on ipad; reverse pdf page order online
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
load, create, convert and edit PDF document (pages) in C# other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
how to rotate one pdf page; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
Part 
I
I
Data munging
I
n which our heroes first come into contact with the data munging
beast. Three times they battle it, and each time the beast takes on a dif-
ferent form. 
At first the beast appears without structure and our heroes fight val-
iantly to impose structure upon it. They learn new techniques for find-
ing hidden structure and emerge triumphant.
The second time the beast appears structured into records. Our
heroes find many ways to split the records apart and recombine them in
other useful ways. 
The third time the beast appears in even more strongly structured
forms. Once again our heroes discover enough new techniques to see
through all of their enemies’ disguises.
Our heroes end this section of the tale believing that they can handle
the beast in all of its guises, but disappointment is soon to follow. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested