display pdf in browser from byte array c# : How to reverse page order in pdf application Library utility azure asp.net windows visual studio 1361039_wordsmith21-part199

197
WordList
© 2010 Mike Scott
Words to make clusters from
"all" : all the clusters involving all words above a certain frequency (this will be s-l-o-w for a
big corpus like the BNC World edition
), or 
"selection": clusters only for words you've selected (eg. you have highlighted BOOK and
BOOKS and you want clusters like book a table, in my book).
To choose words which aren't next to each other, press Control and click in the number at
the left -- keep Control held down and click elsewhere. The first one clicked will go green and
the others white. In the picture below, using an index of the BNC World corpus, I selected 
world and then life by clicking numbers 164 and 167.
How to reverse page order in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate pdf page by page
How to reverse page order in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages on ipad
198
WordSmith Tools
© 2010 Mike Scott
The process will take time. In the case of BNC World, the index knows the positions of all of
the 100 million words. To find 3-word clusters, in the case above, it took about a minute to
process all the 115,000 cases of world and life and find 5,719 clusters like the world
bank and of real life. Chris Tribble tells me it took his PC 36 hours to compute all 3-
word clusters on the whole BNC ... he was able to use the PC in the meantime but that's
not a job you're going to want to do often.
What you see
The "cluster size" must be between 2 and 8 words. 
The "min. frequency" is the minimum number of each that you want to see. 
Here the user has chosen to see any 3-4-word clusters that appear 5 or more times. 
Working constraints
The "max. frequency %" setting is to speed the process up. 
in more detail...
It means the maximum frequency percentage which the calculation of clusters
for a given word will process. This is because there are lots and lots of the very
high frequency items and you may well not be interested in clusters which 
begin with them. For example, the item the is likely to be about 6% of any
word-list (about 6 million of them in the BNC therefore), and you might not want
clusters starting the... -- if so, you might set the max. percent to 0.5% or
0.1% (which for the BNC World corpus will cut out the top 102 frequency
words). You will still get clusters which include very high frequency items in the
middle or end, like the a in book a table, but would not get in my book,
which begins with the very high frequency word in. The more words you
include, the longer the process will take....
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
page. Enable C# users to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. Support to reverse page order in PDF document. RasterEdge
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; pdf rotate just one page
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. Enable move, sort and reorder PDF page in preview.
save pdf rotate pages; how to rotate all pages in pdf
199
WordList
© 2010 Mike Scott
Stop at, like Concord clusters
, offers a number of constraints, such as sentence and
other punctuation-marked breaks. The idea is that a 5-word cluster which starts in one
sentence and continues in the next is not likely to make much sense. 
Max. seconds per word is another way of controlling how long the process will take. The
default (0) means no limit. But if you set this e.g. to 30 then as WordList processes the
words in order, as soon as one has taken 30 seconds no further clusters will be collected
starting with that word. 
batch processing allows you to create a whole set of cluster word-lists at one time.
What they look like
Here is a small set of 3-word clusters involving rabies from the BNC World corpus. 
Some of them are plausible multi-word units. All clusters which appear at least 5 times are shown:
to alter that setting, choose Adjust Settings | Index in the Controller and set the "show if
frequency.." number thus:
Finally, remember this listing is just like a single-word word list. You can save it as a .lst file and
open it again at any time, separately from the index.
118
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf page order reverse; pdf rotate page and save
200
WordSmith Tools
© 2010 Mike Scott
See also: find the files for specific clusters
clusters in Concord
9.12.4
join clusters
The idea is to group clusters like
I DON'T THINK
NO I DON'T THINK
I DON'T THINK SO
I DON'T THINK THAT
etc.
You can join them up in a process like lemmatisation
, either so that the smaller clusters get
merged as 'lemmas' of a bigger one, or so that the smaller ones end up as 'lemmas'.
In this screenshot, shorter clusters have been merged with longer ones so that A BEARING OF
FORTY-FIVE DEGREES relates to several related clusters: 
visible by double-clicking the lemmas to show something like this:
How to do it
Choose Edit | Join | Join Clusters in the WordList menu. The process takes quite a time because
each cluster has to be compared with all those in the rest of the list; interrupt it if necessary by
pressing Suspend
.
189
336
190
82
201
WordList
© 2010 Mike Scott
9.12.5
index lists: viewing
In WordList, open an index as you would any other kind of word-list file -- using File | Open. The
filename will end .tokens. Easier, in the Controller | Previous lists, choose any index you've
made and double-click it. 
The index looks  exactly like a large word-list. (Underneath, it "knows" a lot more and can do more
but it looks the same.)
The picture above shows the top 10 words in the BNC World Corpus. Number 5 (#) represents
numbers or words which contain numbers such as £50.00. These very frequent words are also
very consistent -- they appear in at least 99% of the 4,054 texts of BNC World edition
In the view below, you see words sorted by the number of Texts: all these words appeared 10
times in the corpus but their frequencies vary.
202
WordSmith Tools
© 2010 Mike Scott
You can highlight one or more words or mark them with the 
option, then 
to get a speedy
concordance.
But its best use to start with is to generate word clusters
like these:
See also Making an Index List
WordList clusters
WordList Help Contents
.
196
194
196
180
203
WordList
© 2010 Mike Scott
9.12.6
index exporting
The point of it... 
An index file knows the position of every single word in your corpus and it is possible therefore to
ask it to supply specific data. For example, the lengths of each sentence or each text in the corpus
(in words), or the position of each occurrence of a given word.
How to do it
With an index open, choose File | Export index data,
then complete the form with what you need.
Here we have chosen to export the details about the word SHOESTRING in a given index, and to get
to see all the sentence lengths (of all sentences in the corpus, not just the ones containing that
word).
204
WordSmith Tools
© 2010 Mike Scott
A fragment of the results are shown here:
At the top there are word-lengths of some of the 480 text files, the last of which was 6551 words
long; then we see the details of 5 cases of the word SHOESTRING in the corpus, which appeared
twice in text AJ0.txt, once in J3W.txt etc.; finally we get the word-lengths of all the sentences in the
corpus : the first one only 4 words long.  
This process will be quite slow if you request a lot of data. If you don't check the sentence lengths
you will still get text lengths; it wil  be quicker if you leave the word details space empty.
9.13
menu search
Using the menu you can search for a sub-string within an entry -- e.g. all words containing
"fore" (by entering *fore* -- the asterisk means that the item can be found in the middle of a word,
so *fore will find before but not beforehand, while *fore* will find them both). These searches can
be repeated.
This function enables you to find parts of words so that you can edit your word-list, e.g. by joining
two words as one.
You can search for ends or middles of words by using the * wildcard.
Thus *TH* will find other, something, etc.
*TH will find booth, sooth, etc.
You can then use F8 to repeat your last search.
The search hot keys are:
F8repeat last search (use in conjunction with F10 or F11)
F10
search forwards from the current line
F11
search backwards from the current line
F12
search starting from the beginning
205
WordList
© 2010 Mike Scott
This function is handy for 
lemmatization
(joining words which belong under one entry, such as
seem/ seems/ seemed/ seeming etc.)
See also: 
searching for an entry by typing
9.14
relationships between words
9.14.1
mutual information and other relations
the point of it
A Mutual Information (MI) score relates one word to another. For example, if problem  is often found
with solve, they may have a high mutual information score. Usually, the  will be found much more
often near problem  than solve, so the procedure for calculating Mutual Information takes into
account not just the most frequent words found near the word in question, but also whether each
word is often found elsewhere, well away from the word in question. Since the  is found very often
indeed far away from problem , it will not tend to be related, that is, it will get a low MI score.
There are several other alternative statistics: you can see examples of how they differ here
.
This relationship is bi-lateral: in the case of kith and kin, it doesn't distinguish between the virtual
certainty of finding kin near kith, and the much lower likelihood of finding kith near kin.
There are various different formulae for computing the strength of collocational relationships. The MI
in WordSmith ("specific mutual information") is computed using a formula derived from Gaussier,
Lange and Meunier described in Oakes
, p. 174; here the probability is based on total corpus
size in tokens. Other measures of collocational relation are computed too, which you will see
explained under Mutual Information Display
.
Settings
The Relationships settings are found in the Controller
under Adjust Settings | Index
or in a
menu option in WordList.
See also: Mutual Information Display
Computing Mutual Information
Making an Index List
Viewing Index Lists
WordList Help Contents
.
See 
Oakes
for further information about Mutual Information, Dice, MI3 etc.
190
79
206
309
206
4
234
206
208
194
201
180
309
206
WordSmith Tools
© 2010 Mike Scott
9.14.2
relationships display
The Relationships procedure contains a number of columns and uses various formulae
:
Word 1: the first word in a pair, followed by Freq. (its frequency in the whole index). 
Word 2: the other word in that pair, followed by Freq. (its frequency in the whole index). If you have
computed "to right only
", then Word 1 precedes Word 2.
Texts: the number of texts this pair was found in (there were 56 in the whole index).
Gap: the most typical distance between Word 1 and Word 2.
Joint: their joint frequency over the entire span
(not just the joint frequency at the typical gap
distance).
In line 2 of this display, PURSE occurs 6 times in the whole index, and STRINGS 5 times. They
occur together 5 times -- in other words in this little corpus, strings is always part of the
combination purse + strings. The gap is 1 because strings, in these data, typically
comes 1 word away from purse. The pair purse strings comes in 3 texts.   
As usual, the data can be sorted by clicking on the headers. Above, it was sorted by clicking on
"MI" first and "Word 1" second.
You get a double sort, main and secondary, because sometimes you will want to see how MI or Z
score or other sorting affects the whole list and sometimes you will want to keep the words sorted
alphabetically and only sort by MI or Z score within each word-type. Press Swap to switch the
primary & secondary sorts.
Compare this with the display sorted by Z Score (Oakes
p. 163).
322
210
208
309
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested