display pdf in iframe mvc : How to save a pdf after rotating pages software Library cloud windows asp.net .net class 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks0-part264

PLU
COURSE CATALOG
UNDERGRADUATE - GRADUATE
2007-2008
PACIFICLUTHERANUNIVERSITY2007-2008
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate pdf pages
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pdf pages individually
A C A D D E E M I I C  C C A L E N D D A A R
2007 - 2008
2008 - 2009
Summer Session 2007
Term I 
Monday, June 4 – Saturday, June 30
Memorial Day Holiday
Monday, May 28
Term II 
Monday, July 2 – Saturday, July 28
Independence Day Holiday 
Wednesday, July 4
No Classes  – PLU Offices are closed
Workshop Week
Monday, July 30 – Saturday, August 5
Term III 
Monday, July 30th – Saturday, August 18
Semester Ends (after last exam)
Saturday, August 18
Fall Semester 2007
Orientation
Thursday,August 30 – Monday, September 3
Labor Day
Monday, September 3
PLUOffices are closed
Classes Begin
7 a.m., Tuesday, September 4
Opening Convocation
9a.m., Tuesday, September 4
Classes resume at 11:50 a.m.
Mid-Semester Break
Friday, October 19
No Classes – PLU Offices are open
Thanksgiving Recess Begins
1:35 p.m., Wednesday, November 21
PLU offices are closed Thursday-Friday
Thanksgiving Recess Ends
7 a.m., Monday, November 26
Classes End
Saturday, December 8 
Final Examinations
Saturday, December 8 – Friday, December 14
Semester Ends (after last exam) 
Friday, December 14
December Commencement
Saturday, December 15
January Term 2008
Classes Begin
Thursday, January 3
Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Holiday
Monday, January 21
NoClasses – PLUoffices areclosed
Classes End
Thursday, January 31
Spring Term2008
Classes Begin
Thursday, February 7
Presidents’ Day Holiday
Monday, February 18
No Classes; PLU offices are closed
Spring/Easter Break Begins
Friday,March 21
PLUoffices closed on Friday
Spring/Easter Break Ends
7 a.m., Monday, March 31
Classes End
Saturday, May 17
Final Examinations
Monday,May 19 – Saturday,May 24
Semester Ends (after last exam)
Saturday,May 24
May Commencement
2:30 p.m., Sunday, May 25
Worship Service begins at 9:30 a.m.
Summer Session 2008
Term I
Monday, June 2 – Saturday June 28
Term II
Monday, June 30 –Saturday, July 26
Independence Day Holiday
Friday, July 4
No Classes – PLU Offices are closed
Term III
Monday, July 28 –Saturday, August 16
Includes Workshop Week July 28 - August 2
Labor Day Holiday
Monday, September 1
No Classes – PLU Offices are closed
Fall Semester 2008
Orientation
Thursday,September 4 – Monday, September 8
Classes Begin
7 a.m., Monday, September 8
Opening Convocation
9a.m., Monday, September 8
Classes dismiss at 8:30 a.m.
Classes Resume at 11:30 a.m.
Mid-Semester Break
Friday, October 24
No Classes – PLU Offices are open
Thanksgiving Recess Begins
1:35 p.m., Wednesday, November 26
PLU offices are closed Thursday-Friday
Thanksgiving Recess Ends
7 a.m., Monday, December 1
Classes End
5 p.m., Saturday, December 13
December Commencement
10:30 a.m., Saturday, December 13
Final Examinations
Monday, December 15 –Saturday, December 20
Semester Ends (after last exam)
Saturday, December 20
January Term 2009
Classes Begin
7 a.m., Monday, January 5
Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Holiday
Monday, January 19
No Classes – PLU offices are closed
Classes End
5 p.m., Saturday, January 31
Spring Semester 2009
Classes Begin 
7 a.m., Thursday, February 5  
Presidents’ Day Holiday
Monday, February 16
No Classes; PLU offices are closed
Spring Break Begins
7 a.m., Saturday, March 23
Spring Break Ends
5 p.m., Saturday, March 28
Easter Recess
7 a.m., Friday, April 10
No Classes; PLU offices are closed
Classes Resume
11:15 a.m., Monday, April 13
Classes End
5 p.m., Saturday, May 16
Final Examinations
Monday, May 18 –Friday, May 22
Semester Ends (after last exam)
Friday, May 22
May Commencement
2:30 p.m., Sunday, May 24 
Worship Service begins at 9:30 a.m.
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial Without losing any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated
change orientation of pdf page; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image That is to say, after you run following powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate pdf page permanently; reverse pdf page order online
PLU 2007 - 2008
1
TableofContents
Contact Information
2
Educational Philosophy, Mission and Vision
Educational Philosophy
3
General Information
6
General University Requirements (GURs)
7
Academic Policy and Procedures
20
Student Life & Campus Resources
26
Curriculum Information
Academic Structure
34
Degrees
34
Majors & Minors
34
Course Numberings
36
Academic Internship/Cooperative Education
37
Anthropology
38
Art
41
Arts and Communication, School of
43
Arts and Sciences, College of
44
Biology
45
Business, School of
48
Chemistry
54
Chinese
56
Chinese Studies
57
Classics
58
Communication and Theatre
58
Computer Science & Computer Engineering
64
Dance
69
Economics
69
Education and Movement Studies, School of
71
Educational Psychology
72
Engineering, Dual Degree
72
English
73
Environmental Studies
78
First-Year Experience
7, 13
French
79
Geosciences
79
German
82
Global Education Opportunities
82
Global Studies
84
Greek
85
Health Education
85
History
86
Humanities, Division of
90
Individualized Major
90
Instructional Development and Leadership
91
International Core
99
International Honors
9, 99
Languages and Literatures
100
Latin
102
Legal Studies
106
Mathematics
106
Table of Contents
Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
2007-2008
To become familiar with PLU degree requirements, See General University Requirements on page 7.
To learn more about major and minor requirements, see specific department pages starting on page 34.
Movement Studies and Wellness Education
110
Music
114
Natural Sciences, Division of
122
Norwegian
122
Nursing, School of
123
Philosophy
129
Physics
131
Political Science
133
Pre-Professional Studies
136
Psychology
139
Publishing and Printing Arts
142
Recreation
142
Religion
142
Scandinavian Area Studies
145
Sign Language
146
Social Sciences, Division of
146
Sociology and Social Work
147
Spanish
151
Special Education
151
Statistics
152
Theatre
153
Women’sand Gender Studies
155
Writing
157
Graduate Studies
General Information
158
Admission
158
Policies & Standards
159
Tuition & Fees
162
Financial Aid
162
Master of Arts (Conflict Analysis and Collaborative 
Problem Solving, Summer 2008)
162
Master of Arts in Education
163
Master of Arts in Education (Initial Certification)
163
Master of Arts (Marriage & Family Therapy)
170
Master of Business Administration
172
Master of Fine Arts (Creative Writing)
175
Master of Science in Nursing
177
Joint Degrees: MBA/MSN
180
Undergraduate Admission Information
Admission
182
Financial Aid
185
Tuition, Fees, and Payment Information
197
University Guidelines
202
Administration
Board of Regents
211
AdministrativeOffices
212
The Faculty
214
Index
224
The information contained herein regarding Pacific Lutheran University is accurate at the time of publication. However,
the university reserves the right to make necessary changes in procedures, policies, calendar, curriculum, and costs at its
discretion. Any changes will be reflected on the university Web site at www.plu.edu/print/catalog.
Listed in this catalog are courses and summaries of degree requirements for majors, minors, and other programs in the
College of Arts and Sciences, and the Schools of Arts and Communication, Business, Education and Movement Studies, and
Nursing. Detailed degree requirements, often including supplementary sample programs, are available in the offices of the
individual schools and departments. Advising by university personnel inconsistent with published statements is not binding.
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
and print such documents and images as JPEG, BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF, PDF, etc. Upload, Open, Save & Download Images & Docs with Web Viewer. After creating a
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; how to reverse pages in pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
of this VB.NET image cropping process: decode the source image file to bitmap, crop bitmap and save cropped bitmap to original image format. After you run this
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
2
PLU 2007 - 2008
CONTACTINFORMATION
Contact the Office of:
(Area code 253) ) E-mail
For Information About:
President
535.7101
president@plu.edu
General university information
Provost
535.7126
provost@plu.edu
Academic policies and programs, faculty appointments, and 
curriculum topics, Academic Planning and Institutional 
Research
Vice President for Student Life  535.7191
slif@plu.edu
Residence halls, counseling center health services, diversity center, 
career services, student employment, campus safety, student 
leadership, co-curricular activities, and disability services
Admission
535.7151
admission@plu.edu
General information, admission of students, and publications 
1.800.274.6758
for prospective students and advanced placement; support for 
international students.
Vice President for Admission
535.7151
admission@plu.edu
Admission, Student Services Center and Financial Aid
and Enrollment Services
Alumni and Parent Relations
535.7415
alumni@plu.edu
Alumni and parent programs and services
Campus Concierge
535.7411
concierg@plu.edu
Campus phone numbers, help desk, and information,
www.plu.edu/~concierg/ ID Cards, Lute Buck$
Campus Ministry
535.7464
cmin@plu.edu
Chapel, Saturday and Sunday worship, care, pastoral support, 
and religious life at the university
Campus Safety and Information 535.7441
campussafety@plu.edu
Campus parking, safety, and information
Vice President for Development 
and University Relations
535.7177
development@plu.edu
Gifts, bequests, grants, the annual fund, and church relations
Financial Aid
535.7134
finaid@plu.edu
Financial aid
Vice President for Finance 
535.7121
finance@plu.edu
Financial management and administrative services
and Operations
Wang Center for 
535.7577
wangctr@plu.edu
Short and long-term study away programs; international internships; 
faculty and student research grants; PLU International Gateway 
Programs; symposia; supportfor visiting international scholars
Registrar
535.7131
registrar@plu.edu
Transfer credit evaluation, graduation, class schedules, grades 
and classroom scheduling
Student Services Center
535.7161
ssvc@plu.edu
Payment contracts, billing inquiries, transcripts, schedules,
1.800.678.3243
registration, veterans questions, general financial aid 
questions and verification of enrollment
Ramstad Commons
535.7459
ramstad@plu.edu
Academic Advising, Academic Assistance, Academic Internships, 
Career Development, Center for Public Service, Student 
Employment, Volunteer Center
Contact Information
The university is located at South 121st Street and Park Avenue in suburban Parkland. Office hours are
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Offices are closed for chapel on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. during the school year. The university observes most legal holidays.
The University Center maintains an information desk, called Campus Concierge, that is open 
daily from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday). 253.535.7411 or
www.plu.edu/~concierg
Visitors are welcome at any time. Special arrangements for tours and appointments may be made
through the Office of Admission.
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Q 2: After I apply various image processing functions to source image file editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate all pages in pdf and save
VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
hotspot annotation styles before and after its activation img = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName & & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate pages in pdf online; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
3
EducationalPhilosophy
E D U C AT IO O NA L  PH H I L OS O PH Y, M M I I S S S IO O N A A ND  V V I I S S IO O N
Integrative Learning Objectives
The Integrative Learning Objectives (ILOs) provide a common
understanding of the PLU approach to undergraduate education.
These objectives offer a unifying framework for understanding
how our community defines the general skills or abilities that
should be exhibited by students who earn a PLU bachelor’s
degree. Therefore, they are integrative in nature. The ILOs are
intended to provide a conceptual reference for every department
and program to build on and reinforce in their own particular
curricula the goals of the General University Requirements. They
also assist the university in such assessment-related activities as
student and alumni surveys. Not all ILOs are dealt with equally
byevery program, much less by every course. The ILOs do not
represent, by themselves, all of our understanding of education.
Rather, they are a part of a more complex statement of
educational philosophy.
The ILOsare meant to serve as a useful framework that unifies
education throughout the University, while disciplinary study
provides students with the knowledge and understanding of a field
that will allow them to function effectively in their chosen area.
The Faculty of Pacific Lutheran University establishes the
educational philosophy that shapes and supports the curriculum and
programs of study. This philosophy is reflected in statements of
educational goals, objectives and principles. Of particular
significance to all students are statements about learning objectives,
general education and writing throughout the curriculum.
Mission and Vision
“PLU seeks to empower students for lives of thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership and care – for other people, for their communities,
and for the earth” (PLU 2010, p. 1).
This single statement of mission captures the identity, strengths and purpose of Pacific Lutheran University. In addition, a formal 
statement of mission, adopted in 1978, provides an historical perspective on the University’s understanding of its core purposes:
Long committed to providing an education distinguished for quality, in the context of a heritage that is Lutheran and an
environment that is ecumenically Christian, PLU continues to embrace its primary mission: the development of knowledgeable
persons equipped with an understanding of the human condition, a critical awareness of humane and spiritual values, and a
capacity for clear and effective self-expression.
For all who choose to seek a PLU degree, the university offers opportunity to pursue a variety of programs of academic worth
and excellence. Its standards of performance demand a finely trained faculty as well as highly skilled administrative and support
staff.In its institutional emphasis on scholarship, the University views the liberal arts as providing the necessary and essential
foundation for the technical training and education in the professions which modern society requires.
The university aims to cultivate the intellect, not for its own sake merely, but as a tool of conscience and an instrument for
service. The diversity and variety of cultural programs and personal services offered by the university are intended to facilitate
this positive development of the student as a whole person in order that our students might function as members of society. In
other words, PLUaffirms that realization of one's highest potential as well as fulfillment of life's purpose arise in the joy of
service to others. To aid its students in sharing this understanding, the university seeks to be a community in which there is a
continuing and fruitful interaction between what is best in education and what is noblest in Christian edification.
This deliberate and simultaneous attention to the religious dimension of the total human experience and to the standards of
scholarly objectivity, coupled with clear recognition of the integrative impulse in each, is the essence of PLU.
InJanuary 2003, the Board of Regents adopted the long-range plan, PLU 2010: The Next Level of Distinction. The 2010 planning
process clarified, reaffirmed, and elaborated on the mission statement and set forth a vision for the future based on past accomplish-
ments and future aspirations. As the university looks to 2010 and beyond, five aspirations frame its direction, its hopes, and its goals:
strengthening academic excellence, expanding community engagement, enhancing global perspectives and local commitments,
nurturing a sense of life as vocation, and seeking fiscal strength.
Copies of the long-range plan are available in the Offices of the President and the Provost.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
on image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document Method for Drawing Rubber Stamp Annotation. After you have
permanently rotate pdf pages; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
What's more, after you have created a basic PDF document viewer in your VB.NET Windows application, more imaging viewer Save current PDF page or the
rotate pdf pages and save; reverse page order pdf online
4
PLU 2007 - 2008
These four statements describe the knowledge base expected of
all PLU graduates:
• A broad knowledge of the basic liberal arts and sciences.
• An understanding of the interconnections among these basic
liberal arts and sciences that provide the broad framework for
living with the complexities of life.
• An in-depth knowledge of a specified area of knowledge 
designated as a major within the university.
• An understanding of the interconnections among the basic 
liberal arts and sciences and the in-depth knowledge of her/his
specified major area.
In addition to the knowledge base described above, and an
awareness of how different disciplinary methodologies are used,
every student at Pacific Lutheran University is expected to
develop the following abilities:
Critical Reflection
• Select sources of information using appropriate research 
methods, including those employing technology, and make 
use of that information carefully and critically.
• Consider issues from multiple perspectives.
• Evaluate assumptions and consequences of different
perspectives in assessing possible solutions to problems.
• Understand and explain divergent viewpoints on complex
issues, critically assess the support available for each, and
defend one’sown judgments.
Expression
• Communicate clearly and effectively in both oral and 
written forms.
• Adapt messages to various audiences using appropriate media,
convention or styles.
• Create symbols of meaning in a variety of expressive media,
both verbal and nonverbal.
Interaction with Others
• Work creatively to identify and clarify the issues of concern.
• Acknowledge and respond to conflicting ideas and principles,
and identify common interests wherepossible.
• Develop and promote effectivestrategies and interpersonal
relationships for implementing cooperativeactions.
Valuing
• Articulate and critically assess one’s own values, with an
awareness of the communities and traditions that have helped
to shape them
• Recognize how others have arrived at values different from
one’s own, and consider their views charitably and with an
appreciation for the context in which they emerged. Develop a
habit of caring for oneself,for others, and for the
environment.
• Approach moral, spiritual, and intellectual development as a
life-long process of making informed choices in one’s
commitments.
• Approach one’scommitments with a high level of personal
responsibility and professional accountability.
Multiple Frameworks
• Recognize and understand how cultures profoundly shape
different assumptions and behaviors.
• Identify issues and problems facing people in every culture
(including one’s own), seeking constructive strategies for
addressing them.
• Cultivate respect for diverse cultures, practices, and traditions.
Adopted by Faculty Assembly November 11, 1999.
Principles of General Education 
The university’s mission is to “educate students for lives of
thoughtful inquiry, leadership, service, and care—for other
people, for their communities, and for the earth.” Emerging from
the university’s Lutheran heritage, our mission emphasizes both
freedom of inquiry and a life engaged in the world. Our location
in the Pacific Northwest, and our commitment to educate
students for the complexities of life in the 21st century, also
shape the university’s educational identity.
The university aims to produce global citizens, future leaders,
and whole, richly-informed persons. At the heart of the
university is the general education curriculum. Through this
program of study, students begin the process of shaping not only
acareer, but more importantly a life of meaning and purpose.
This general education, in which students grapple with life’s most
fundamental questions, is deepened and complemented by the
specialized work students undertake in their majors. An
education is a process, and the following three components that
inform the general university requirements are not discrete, but
interconnected and mutually supportive.
Values:The university sustains the Lutheran commitment to the
life of the mind, to engagement and service in the world, and to
nurturing the development of whole persons—in body, mind,
and spirit. As described in the university’s long-range plan PLU
2010, these values are fundamental, and they are inseparable
from each other.As important, PLUoffers an education not only
in values, but in valuing. Pacific Lutheran University helps
students thoughtfully shape their values and choices, realizing
that imagination and decision giveto a human life its unique
trajectoryand purpose, and always understanding that life gains
meaning when dedicated to a good larger than oneself. Located
in the Pacific Northwest and on the Pacific Rim, the university is
well-situated to address global issues, social diversity and justice,
and care for the earth.
Knowledge: An education at Pacific Lutheran University makes
students the center of their own education. The best education
understands knowledge as saturated with value and meaning, as
much produced as acquired. It is a communal undertaking,
involving both knower and context. We understand academic
disciplines, as well as multi-disciplinary fields of inquiry, as ways
of knowing. They do more than organize knowledge. They
define the questions, methods, and modes of discourse by
which knowledge is produced. Students arerequired to study
across a range of these disciplines to gain an understanding of 
the ways in which educated people understand themselves and
the world.
Skills and Abilities: As described bythe university’s Integrative
Learning Objectives, skills and abilities that characterize an
education at Pacific Lutheran University are essential for the
cultivation of the potentials of mind, heart, and hand. They are
inseparable from what it means to knowand to value. They
EducationalPhilosophy
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Draw and Write Text and Graphics on
After creating text on Word page, users are able doc, fileNameadd, New WordEncoder()) 'save word End powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate all pages in pdf file
PLU 2007 - 2008
5
EducationalPhilosophy
include the ability to express oneself effectively and creatively, 
to think critically, to discern and formulate values, to interact
with others, and to understand the world from various
perspectives.
Ageneral education at Pacific Lutheran University affirms the
relationships among rigorous academic inquiry, human
flourishing in a diverse world, and a healthy environment. Such
an education requires first and foremost a faculty of exceptional
scholar-teachers, committed to educating the whole student, and
understanding that learning is active, engaged, and in the best
sense transformative.
Adopted by the Faculty Assembly, 
December 10, 2004
Writing Throughout the Curriculum
Pacific Lutheran University is a community of scholars, a
community of readers and writers. Reading informs the intellect
and liberates the imagination. Writing pervades our academic
lives as teachers and students, both as a way of communicating
what we learn and as a means of shaping thoughts and ideas.
All faculty members share the responsibility for improving the
literacy of their students. Faculty in every department and school
make writing an essential part of their courses and show students
how to ask questions appropriate to the kinds of reading done in
their fields. Students write both formal papers and reports and
informal notes and essays in order to master the content and
methods of the various disciplines. They are encouraged to
prepare important papers in multiple drafts.
6
PLU 2007 - 2008
GeneralInformation
G E N N E E R R A L  I I N N F F O R R M A A T I I O N
Academic Program
Pacific Lutheran University uses a 4-1-4 calendar, which consists of
two 15-week semesters bridged by a four-week January term. The
January term’s intensive, four-week format is designed to offer stu-
dents a unique pedagogical opportunity. It supports study away, in-
depth focus on a single theme or topic, and the use of student-cen-
tered and active-learning pedagogies. The January term’s intensive
format also supports other pedagogical activities that contribute to
building an intentional culture of learning inside and outside the
classroom. It offers an opportunity for an intensive First-Year
Experience Program that combines rigorous academic study with
co-curricular activities that serve the goals of the First-Year
Program – thinking, literacy and community.Further, the January
term offers the opportunity to orient students to PLU’s mission,
supportthem in understanding howthey position themselves
within the PLU community and the world, and support them as
they embrace their role as activecitizens.
Course credit is computed by semester hours. The majority of
courses are offered for four semester hours. Each undergraduate
degree candidate must complete a minimum of 128 semester
hours with an overall grade point average of 2.00. Departments
or schools may set higher grade point requirements. 
Degree requirements are specifically stated in this catalog.
Students are responsible for becoming familiar with these
requirements and meeting them.
Accreditation
Pacific Lutheran University is accredited by the Northwest
Commission on Colleges and Universities (8060 165th Avenue
NE, Suite 100, Redmond, WA 98062-3981), an institutional
accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher
Education Accreditation and/or the Secretary of the U.S.
Department of Education.
In addition the following programs hold specialized
accreditations and approvals:
Business-The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business (AACSB International)
Chemistry(including certified Biochemistry and Chemical Physics 
Options) - American Chemical Society
Computer Science (BS)-Computing Accreditation 
Commission of ABET
Education-National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education
Marriage and Family Therapy-Commission on Accreditation
for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American
Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
Music -National Association of Schools of Music
Nursing-Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and 
Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission
Physical Education, BAPE degree-National Council on 
Accreditation of Teacher Education
Social Work-Council on Social Work Education
Any current or prospective student may, upon request directed to
the president’s office, review a copy of the documents pertaining
to the university’s various accreditations and approvals.
Enrollment
3,340 full-time students; 300 part-time students
(as of September,2006)
Environs
Located in suburban Parkland, PLU has a picturesque 126-acre
campus. The university’s geographical setting affords students a
wide variety of both recreational and cultural entertainment
options. Recreationally, the grandeur of the Pacific Northwest
encourages participation in hiking, camping, climbing, skiing,
boating and swimming.
The two most notable natural features in the area are Mt. Rainier
and Puget Sound. The distinctive realms of the Cascade and
Olympic mountain ranges and forests of Douglas Fir complete one
of the most naturally tranquil environments in the United States.
Students can also enjoythe aesthetic offerings of nearby Seattle
and Tacoma. These city centers host a variety of performing and
recording arts and provide dozens of galleries and museums as
well as unique shopping and dining experiences.
Faculty
240 full-time teaching equivalent faculty; approximately 55 part-
time faculty. (as of September 2006, per IPEDS definition)
History
Pacific Lutheran University was founded in 1890 by a group of
mostly Norwegian Lutherans from the Puget Sound area. They
were led by the Reverend Bjug Harstad, who became PLU’s first
president. In naming the university, these pioneers recognized the
important role that a Lutheran educational institution on the
Western frontier of America could play in the emerging future of
the region. They wanted the institution to help immigrants
adjust to their new land and find jobs, but they also wanted it to
produce graduates who would serve church and community.
Education—and educating for service—was a venerated part of
the Scandinavian traditions from which these pioneers came.
Although founded as a university, the institution functioned pri-
marily as an academy until 1918, when it closed for two years. It
reopened as the two-year Pacific Lutheran College, after merging
PLU 2007 - 2008
7
with Columbia College, previously located in Everett. Further
consolidations occurred when Spokane College merged with PLC
in1929. Four-year baccalaureate degrees were first offered in
education in 1939 and in the liberal arts in 1942. The institution
was reorganized as a university in 1960, reclaiming its original
name. It presently includes a College of Arts and Sciences; pro-
fessional schools of the Arts and Communication, Business,
Education, Nursing, and Physical Education; and both graduate
and continuing education programs.
PLU has been closely and productively affiliated with the Lutheran
church throughout its history. It is now a university of the
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), owned by the
more than six hundred congregations of Region 1 of the ELCA.
Many influences and individuals have combined to shape PLU
and its regional, national, and increasingly international reputa-
tion for teaching, service, and scholarship. A dedicated faculty
and staff have been extremely important factors. The school has
enjoyed a strong musical tradition from the beginning, as well as
noteworthy alumni achievements in public school teaching and
administration, university teaching and scholarship, the pastoral
ministry, the health sciences and healing arts, and business. At
PLU the liberal arts and professional education are closely inte-
grated and collaborative in their educational philosophies, activi-
ties, and aspirations.
Late-Afternoon, Evening and 
Saturday Classes
To provide for the professional growth and cultural enrichment
of persons unable to take a traditional college course schedule,
the university conducts late-afternoon, evening, and Saturday
classes. In addition to a wide variety of offerings in the arts and
sciences, there are specialized and graduate courses for teachers,
administrators, nurses and persons in business and industry.
Retention of First-Year Students
The retention of entering first-year students has been monitored
since 1972. The data for the past fifteen years are presented in
the following table:
Retention of Entering First-Year Students
Fall
To Sophomore
To Junior
To Senior
Year
Year
Year
1988
75.7%
65.4%
62.7%
1989
80.9%
70.1%
66.0%
1990
77.4%
66.0%
63.5%
1991
81.3%
71.1%
67.9%
1992
79.9%
73.4%
68.1%
1993
79.8%
70.2%
66.5%
1994
78.3%
67.8%
64.8%
1995
78.0%
67.4%
63.6%
1996
84.3%
74.1%
69.7%
1997
83.3%
74.8%
69.6%
1998
80.2%
69.5%
66.5%
1999
80.1%
69.9%
65.7%
2000
82.0%
73.6%
68.1%
2001
80.6%
70.6%
65.4%
2002
83.1%
77.3%
70.6%
2003
82.0%
73.2%
67.6%
2004
81.5%
70.8%
2005
81.7%
To implement the commitment to the general education of all of its
students, the university provides a strong liberal arts base for all
baccalaureate degree programs through the program of general
university requirements (GURs). Accordingly, all undergraduate
students must satisfactorily complete all GURs. No course used to
satisfy one GUR may be used to satisfy another, except for limited use
in the Perspective on Diversity requirements.
Specific Requirements – All
Baccalaureate Degrees
Line 1.The First-Year Experience
The Examined Life: Into Uncertainty and Beyond
The first-year program provides a supportively challenging context in
which to begin the quest for, and adventure of, a larger vision for life.
University education is about more than skills; at PLU it is about lib-
erating students for critical and committed living, combining well
developed critical capacities with compassion and vision for service in
amulticultural, ideologically plural world.
Inaddition to orientation and advising programs, the first-year pro-
gram is composed of three requirements. One of the two seminars
must be taken in the student’s first semester. First-year program
requirements must be completed during the student’s first year.
This requirement must be met by all students entering PLU with
fewer than 20 semester hours.
• Inquiry Seminar:Writing
(four semester hours) – FW,WR
These seminars focus on writing, thinking, speaking, and
reading. They involve writing as a way of thinking, of learn-
ing, and of discovering and ordering ideas. Taught by facul-
ty from the university’s various departments and schools,
these seminars are organized around topics that engage stu-
dents and faculty in dialogue and provide the opportunity
to examine issues from a variety of perspectives.
Note:Credits earned by Advanced Placement-English and
International Baccalaureate-English do not satisfy this
requirement, though they may be used for elective credit.
Students with officially transcripted college writing courses,
including those in Washington State’s Running Start pro-
gram, are eligible to enroll in the writing seminar for credit,
or they may choose to use their previous credits to satisfy
this requirement. 
GENERAL  UNIVERSITY 
REQUIREMENTS
GeneralUniversityRequirements
8
PLU 2007 - 2008
GeneralUniversityRequirements
• Inquiry Seminar 190
(four semester hours) – F
Inquiry Seminars are courses specially designed for first-
year students, which will introduce students to the methods
and topics of study within a particular academic discipline
or field. Inquiry Seminars also emphasize the academic skills
that are at the center of the First-year Experience Program.
Working with other first-year students in a small-class set-
ting that promotes active, seminar-style learning, students
practice fundamental skills of literacy, thinking and commu-
nity as they operate within that particular discipline. In
addition to fulfilling major and minor requirements, an
Inquiry Seminar may fulfill no more than one GUR.
• First-Year January Term 
(four semester hours)
All first-year students must enroll in a course during J-term.
In addition to fulfilling major or minor requirements, a
course taken during J-term used to fulfill this requirement
may fulfill no more than one GUR.
Line 2.Mathematical Reasoning (four semester hours) – MR
Acourse in mathematics or applications of mathematics, with
emphasis on numerical and logical reasoning and on using
appropriate methods to formulate and solveproblems. This
requirement may be satisfied by any four semester hours from
mathematics (except MATH 091), byCSCE 115 or bySTAT
231.This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion
(with at least a B average) of the equivalent of four years of col-
lege preparatory mathematics (through mathematical analysis or
calculus or equivalent) in high school.
Infulfilling the Math Reasoning Requirement, students with
documented disabilities will be given reasonable accommodations
as determined bythe Coordinator for Students with Disabilities
and the appropriate faculty member in consultation with the 
student.
Line 3.Science and the Scientific Method 
(four semester hours) – SM
Ascience course that teaches the methods of science, illustrates
its applications and limitations, and includes a laboratory compo-
nent. At least one of the courses taken to meet this requirement,
or to meet the Core I, Line E requirement, must be in the physi-
cal or biological sciences.
Line 4.Writing Requirement (four semester hours) – WR
All students must complete four semester hours in an approved
writing course. First-year students satisfy this requirement
through the Writing Seminar.
Line 5.Perspectives On Diversity 
(four to eight semester hours)
Acourse in each of the following two lines.
• Alternative Perspectives (four semester hours) – A
Acourse that creates an awareness and understanding of
diversity in the United States, directly addressing issues
such as ethnicity,gender,disability,racism, or poverty.
• Cross-Cultural Perspectives (four semester hours) – C
Acourse that enhances cross-cultural understandings
through examination of other cultures. This requirement
may be satisfied in one of three ways: 
• A course focusing on the culture of non-Euro-
American societies;
• A foreign language course numbered 201 or above
(not sign language) used to satisfy the entrance
requirement, or completion through the first year
of college level of a foreign language (not sign
language) other than that used to satisfy the
foreign language entrance requirement. (A foreign
language completed through the second year of
college level may also be used to simultaneously
satisfy Option I, or a completion of a foreign
language through the first year of college level
may also be used to simultaneously satisfy Option
II of the College of Arts and Sciences requirements
[see below]); or
• Participation in an approved semester-long study
abroad program (January term programs are 
evaluated individually.)
Note:Four semester hours of Perspectives on Diversity
courses may be used to fulfill another general university
requirement. The remaining four hours must be a course
that does not simultaneously fulfill any other general uni-
versity requirement. These four semester hours may, howev-
er, satisfy a requirement in the major or minor.
Transfer students entering as juniors or seniors must take
one Perspectives on Diversity course (four semester hours)
at PLUthat does not simultaneously fulfill another general
university requirement, or must show that they have satis-
fied both the AlternativePerspectives and Cross-Cultural
Perspectives lines of the requirement.
Line 6.Physical Education (four semester hours) – PE
Four different physical education activity courses, including
PHED 100. One hour of credit may be earned through approved
sports participation (PHED250). All activities are graded on the
basis of A, Pass, or Fail.
Line 7.Senior Seminar/Project (two - four semester hours as
designated by the academic unit of the student’s major) – SR
Asubstantial project, paper,practicum, or internship that culmi-
nates and advances the program of an academic major. The end
product must be presented to an open audience and critically
evaluated byfaculty in the student’sfield. With approval of the
student’smajor department, interdisciplinary capstone courses
such as the Global Studies Research Seminar may fulfill this
requirement.
Line 8.Distributive Core (32 semester hours)
• Arts/Literature (eight semester hours,four from 
each line) – AR,LT
•Art, Music, or Theatre – AR
•Literature (English or Languages and 
Literatures) – LT
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested