display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate all pages in pdf Library control component .net web page azure mvc 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks10-part266

PLU 2007 - 2008
99
I
International Core • International Honors Program
Special Education
See the Special Education (SPED) section of this catalog to view
course offerings.
Graduate School
See the Graduate School of Education section for graduate-level
courses in Education (EDUC), Educational Psychology (EPSY) and
Special Education (SPED). 
acquire a common background, IHON students take the
required IHON 111-112 (190) sequence in their first year,
before taking 200-level courses. Exceptions to this sequence can
be made for transfer students, or for students who are accepted
into the Honors Program during their first year at PLU.
With prior approval by the IHON chair, an appropriate
semester-long course abroad may take the place of one 200-level
IHON course. Such a course must focus on a contemporary
issue, be international in scope, interdisciplinary, and require
honor’s-level critical thinking and writing. One 301 modern
language course intentionally designed to meet program
objectives (Chinese, French, German, Norwegian, Spanish) may
also replace one 200-level IHON course when the student
completes supplementary IHON expectations.
Multiple sections of IHON 111 are offered every Fall semester;
and sections of IHON 112 (190) every Spring semester;
beginning Fall 2008, varying IHON 200-level courses will be
offered every semester including J-Term; one IHON 300-level
course will be offered during the academic year 2008-09, and
one each semester thereafter. Students are strongly encouraged to
complete the required seven courses in the IHON Program by
the end of their junior year in order to focus on completion of
majors and related research during their senior year.
GPA REQUIREMENTS
Students in the International Honors Program must maintain a
cumulative overall GPA of 3.00. Names of students who fall
below a 3.00 will be forwarded to the student’s IHON advisor.
Students will have one semester to bring their GPA up to a 3.00.
If the 3.00 GPA is not achieved, students will be asked to dis-
enroll from the program. Procedures for assignment of general
education credits will be in place for students who do not
complete the Honors Program.
Course Offerings – International Core (INTC) 
IHON 111: Authority and Discovery – 1H
Explores through varying disciplinary approaches the historical
roots of contemporary global issues through a deep study of
selected moments of the past before and during the Italian
Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Scientific Revolution. 
At least one unit on the Far East, the development of Islam, 
Africa, or other non-western areas of the world are frequently 
included. (4)
IHON 112 (190): Liberty and Power – 1H
Explores through varying disciplinary approaches the historical
roots of contemporary global issues through a deep study of
selected moments of the past through the Enlightenment, the
American and French Revolutions, and the Industrial
Revolution. Evolutionary science, medical advances, women’s
rights movements, socialism, imperialism, and romanticism in
literature and the arts are among topics of study. At least one unit
on the Far East and other areas of the non-western world are
frequently included. (4)
IHON 251: Imaging the Self – H2
The study of literary and visual arts drawn from different world
cultures that reveal how the self is discovered and constructed
through images and other forms of creative expression,
accompanied by reflection on and creative expression of one’s
own cultural identity and understanding of self. (4)
International Honors Program
253.535.7630
www.plu.edu/~external/majors/honors-program
The International Honors Program is a challenging and creative
way to satisfy most core curriculum requirements, reflecting
PLU’s unique mission and emphasis upon the liberal arts.
Consisting of interdisciplinary and some team-taught courses,
this multi-year program consisting of seven required courses,
explores contemporary issues and their historical foundations
through an integrated and multi-national approach. The program
attracts inquisitive, caring students from all disciplines. Many
Honors students choose to live in a designated wing of Hong
International Hall, our international residence; whether inside or
out, participants in the IHON Program form a thriving
living/learning community.
F
aculty C
ommittee
: Brown, Chair; Alexander, Halvorson, Sklar,
Storfjell, Torvend.
INTERNATIONAL HONORS REQUIREMENTS
Seven courses, 28 semester hours distributed as follows:
• International Honors 111-112 (190): Origins of the 
Contemporary World - Eight semester hours
Normally taken sequentially in the first year. These courses
explore from a global perspective the historical roots of 
contemporary events, values and traditions.
• Four 200-level International Honors courses - 16 
semester hours
Normally taken in the second and third year. A wide range 
of these courses are offered every semester, and during 
J-Term.
• One 300-level International Honors course - Four 
semester hours taken after or with the last 200-level 
course.
POLICIES AND GUIDELINES FOR INTERNATIONAL
HONORS
The three levels of IHON courses are built sequentially upon one
another in terms of content and learning objectives. In order to
International Core
Special Note: Upper class students currently enrolled in the
International Core Program will have available to them an appro-
priate number of 200 and 300-level INTC courses in which to
enroll so they may complete their program requirements. These
courses will be available through Spring 2009. Contact the
INTC Program advisor at 253.535.7630 for details.
Rotate all pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf
Rotate all pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate single page in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf preview
100
PLU 2007 - 2008
International Honors Program • Languages and Literature
I
IHON 252: Imaging the World – H2
An exploration of how humans in different parts of the world
perceive, interpret, and shape their own worlds and cultural
identities. (4) 
IHON 253: Gender, Sexuality, and Culture – A, H2
Uses multicultural, international, and feminist perspectives to
examine issues such as socialization and stereotypes, relationships
and sexuality, interpersonal and institutional violence, revolution
and social change in the U.S. and in other selected international
contexts. (4)
IHON 254: Topics in Gender – H2
Examines specific topics in gender studies with selected
comparative examples from international contexts. (4)
IHON 261: Twentieth-Century Origins of the Contemporary
World – H2
Investigates how life on earth and – through scientific and
technological innovations – the earth itself witnessed
fundamental change during the 20th century. Major events will
serve as touchstones for explaining processes leading from
nationalism to postmodern globalization, as expressed through
political, economic, biological, artistic, and other lenses. (4)
IHON 262: The Experience of War – H2
An interdisciplinary survey of modern and contemporary
warfare, drawing on poetry, novels, war memoirs, art, music, and
film, and stressing the experiences and decisions of people who
have participated in war as combatants or civilians. (4)
IHON 263: The Cultures of Racism – H2, A
Examines different forms of racism and their manifestations in
countries with troubled histories such as the United States of
America, South Africa, and Haiti. (4)
IHON 264: Human Rights – H2
Examines human rights practices and instruments, both western
and non-western, from historical, philosophical, contemporary,
political, and pragmatic perspectives. Challenges students to
think shrewdly about particular international human rights
strategies that can gain real political legitimacy and achieve actual
protection. (4)
IHON 265: Twentieth Century Mass Movements – H2
Uses a comparative approach to study the histories of ideological
and religious movements occurring during and after World War
II. Potential examples for investigation include the Nazi
persecution and extermination of European Jews and related
Christian resistance, the American civil rights movement, and
recent movements in the Middle East and Africa. (4)
IHON 271: Post-Colonial Issues – H2
Explores post colonial issues such as political instability,
relationships to land, media and publications procedures and
access, development of racial stereotypes, and formation of
national identity in selected regions of the world. (4)
IHON 272: Cases in Development – H2, C
Traces the origins, models, perspectives, and contexts for
interpreting the phenomenon of development in selected areas of
the world. Focuses additionally on how people in developing
parts of the world think and act to bring about social change.
Taught abroad on occasion. (4)
IHON 273: Cultural Globalization – H2
An exploration of the flow of cultural expression and shifting
personal and ethnic identities and values created by today’s
accelerated global interdependence. Case studies and background
readings reveal the complexities and tensions inherent in the
exchange of language, music, imagery, and other cultural
expressions, and the way people throughout the world experience
their everyday lives. (4)
IHON 281: Energy, Resources and Pollution – H2
Considers worldwide usage of energy and natural resources, and
the degradation caused by pollution using scientific, social
scientific, political, and ethical approaches. (4)
IHON 282: Population, Hunger, and Poverty – H2
Examines population growth, food supply, and poverty as they
relate to global environmental problems. (4)
IHON 283: Conservation and Sustainable Development –
H2, SM
An examination of the relationships among people, natural
resources, conservation and sustainable development in a global
society. Comparative studies about how historical, political,
societal, economic, biological, and political factors affect
contemporary resource management and policy. Laboratories, set
within the context of conservation biology, include computer
simulations and field studies. (4)
IHON 326: The Quest for Social Justice: Systems and Reality
– H3
Uses systems (holistic models) to comprehend the search for
justice by humankind in the past, the present, and for the future,
calling upon students to identify and articulate their own
assumptions and perspectives on social justice. (4)
IHON 327: Personal Commitments, Global Issues – H3
Examines the place of religious and philosophical commitments
and traditions as resources in social actions and movements
designed to transform suffering. analysis particular global
problems in depth from multiple ethical and disciplinary
frameworks. Asks students to identify and articulate their own
assumptions about what constitutes effective ethical action. (4)
Languages and Literatures
253.535.7678
www.plu.edu/~lang
lang@plu.edu
In-depth understanding of world cultures and an ability to speak
languages other than one’s own are in increasing demand in
today’s competitive workplace. These skills are viewed as essential
to successful leadership and full participation in the integrated
yet culturally diverse world of the twenty-first century. The study
of languages and literatures at PLU is a serious academic
enterprise as well as an exciting and dynamic cross-cultural
adventure. While advancing their proficiency in a language,
students develop critical and aesthetic sensibilities in addition to
highly sought after cross-cultural skills and experience.
Additionally, students develop an enhanced appreciation of their
own language and cultural history. All students of languages are
strongly encouraged to participate in one of the numerous study
abroad courses offered during the January term as well as fall and
spring semester programs. For further information, see the
Global Education section in this catalog or visit the Wang Center
for International Program’s Study Away Catalog.
The department offers a wide range of courses, not only in
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document Dim detelePageindexes = New Integer() {1, 3, 5, 7, 9} ' Delete pages. All Rights Reserved
rotate pdf pages and save; saving rotated pdf pages
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file All Rights Reserved
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to rotate just one page in pdf
PLU 2007 - 2008
101
Languages and Literature
L
Advanced Placement Credit
Students with scores of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement
Examination in areas represented in the Department of
Languages and Literatures can receive four additional semester
hours upon completion of the course (with a grade of C or
better) into which they place through PLU’s placement
examination. Advance placement credit is not awarded for 100-
level courses.
Senior Project
Students majoring in a foreign language enroll in 499
concurrently with another upper-level course in the major. The
instructor of the latter course normally supervises the student’s
senior project: a research paper, internship, or other approved
project. The student presents a summary of the completed
assignment at an open departmental forum. (2-4)
Prospective Teachers
Students preparing to teach in a junior or senior high school may
earn either a Bachelor of Arts degree in French, German,
Norwegian, or Spanish along with certification from the School of
Education and Movement Studies, or a Bachelor of Arts in
Education degree with a teaching major or minor in French,
German, Norwegian, or Spanish. Secondary teaching minors are
also available in Chinese and Latin. Elementary teaching majors
are available in all of the above languages. All students are
required to take LANG 445 (Methodologies) and LANG 446
(Theories) for certification. See the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership section of this catalog for
certification requirements and the Bachelor of Arts in Education
requirements.
English as a Second Language
The School of Education and Movement Studies and the
Department of Languages and Literatures have partnered with
the Washington Academy of Languages to offer a summer
program leading to a certificate in Teaching English as a Second
Language. This eight-week intensive summer institute is offered
late June through early August. Prospective teachers can
complete additional requirements to obtain an ESL
Endorsement. For more information, please contact
lang@plu.edu or 253-535-8330.
FIELDS OF STUDY:
Courses in the Department of Languages and Literatures are
offered in the following general fields in addition to elementary,
intermediate, and advanced language:
• Cultural History
• In English
• CLAS 250: Classical Mythology 
• CLAS 321: Greek Civilization 
• CLAS 322: Roman Civilization 
• SCAN 150: Introduction to Scandinavia 
• SCAN 321: Topics in Scandinavian Culture and Society
• SCAN 322: Scandinavia and World Issues
• SCAN 327: The Vikings 
• SPAN 341: The Latino Experiences in the U.S.
• In Respective Language
• FREN 321: French Civilization and Culture
• GERM 321: German Civilization to 1750
languages at all levels, but also in cultures, literatures, and
linguistics, both in the original language and in English
translation. Instruction is given in American Sign Language
through the Department of Communication and Theatre..
F
aculty:
K. Haque, Chair; C. Berguson, R. Brown, K.
Christensen, E. Davidson, Holmgren (on leave 2007-8), M.
Jensen, M. Ferrer-Lightner, P. Manfredi (on leave 2007-8), P.
Martinez-Carbajo, E. Nelson, C. Palerm, J. Predmore, R. Snee,
T. Storfjell, S. Taylor, T. Williams, B. Yaden; assisted by P.
Blaine, J. Li, and A. Strum.
COURSES THAT MEET DISTRIBUTIVE CORE
REQUIREMENTS
CHIN 271: China Through Film – AR, C
An exploration of the history and recent directions of Chinese
cinema, the relationship between film and other Chinese media,
film, and the Chinese government, and the particular appeal of
Chinese film on the international market. No prior study of
Chinese required. Cross-listed with THEA 271. (4)
Literature Requirement – LT
All departmental literature courses, offered both in the original
language and in English translation, meet this requirement.
Perspectives on Diversity: Cross-Cultural Perspectives – C
All language courses numbered 201 and above including CHIN
371, FREN 341 and LANG 272 meet this requirement. All
first-year (100 level) foreign language courses (excluding
American Sign Language) not previously studied also meet this
requirement.
Perspectives on Diversity: Alternative Perspectives – A
SPAN 341 and 441 will meet this requirement.
Bachelor of Arts Majors and Minors
The department offers majors in Chinese Studies, Classics,
French, German, Norwegian, Scandinavian Area Studies, and
Spanish. Minors are offered in Chinese, Chinese Studies,
French, German, Greek, Latin, Norwegian, and Spanish.
All majors must complete a Capstone: Senior Project within the
department. Majors must complete at least 12 semester hours in
residence at PLU, four of which must be taken either in the
senior year or upon return from a study abroad program. 
Minors must complete at least eight hours in residence. 
Specific requirements (and variations from the above) for
specific majors and minors are listed below.
Language Resource Center
The language curriculum at all levels features use of PLU’s state-
of-the-art multimedia Language Resource Center, located in the
Mortvedt Library. Advanced students have the opportunity to
work as assistants in the center, gaining computer expertise
while accelerating their language skills.
Placement in Language Classes
Students planning to continue the study of French, German or
Spanish must take a language placement test in their language of
interest prior to registering for courses at PLU. The placement test
can be taken online at www.plu.edu/~lrc or in person at the
Language Resource Center on the 3rd floor of Mortvedt Library.
The test takes approximately 20 minutes to complete and
issues prompt feedback on placement recommendation. Students
should follow the placement recommendation they receive.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific All Rights Reserved
rotate single page in pdf file; reverse pdf page order online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
1. public void DeletePages(int[] pageIndexes). Description: Delete specified pages from the input PDF file. Parameters: All Rights Reserved.
rotate pdf pages; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
102
PLU 2007 - 2008
Languages and Literatures
L
• GERM 322: German Civilization Since 1750
• SPAN 321: Civilization and Culture of Spain
• SPAN 322: Latin American Civilization and Culture
• Literature
• In English
• CHIN 372: Chinese Literature in Translation
• CHIN 231: Masterpieces of European Literature
• CLAS 250: Classical Mythology
• FREN 221: French Literature and Film of the Americas
• LANG 271: Literature and Society in Modern Europe
• LANG 272: Literature and Social Change in Latin 
America
• SCAN 241: Scandinavian Folklore
• SCAN 341: Topics in Scandinavian Literature
• SCAN 422: 19th and 20th Century Scandinavian 
Literature
• SPAN 341: The Latino Experience in the U.S.
• SPAN 441: U.S. Latino Literature
• In Respective Language
• FREN 421, 422: Masterpieces of French Literature
• FREN 431, 432: 20th Century French Literature
• GERM 421: German Literature from the Enlightenment 
to Realism
• GERM 422: 20th Century German Literature
• SPAN 325: Introduction to Hispanic Literacy Studies
• SPAN 421: Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
• SPAN 422: 20th Century Literature of Spain
• SPAN 423: Special Topics in Spanish Literature and 
Culture
• SPAN 431: Latin American Literature, 1492-1888
• SPAN 432: 20th Century Latin American Literature
• SPAN 433: Special Topics in Latin American Literature 
and Culture
Course Offerings – Languages (LANG)
LANG 271: Literature and Society in Modern Europe - LT
Reading and discussion of works in English translation by
authors like Flaubert, Ibsen, and Thomas Mann often enriched
through selected film adaptations. Emphasis on social themes,
including life in industrial society, the changing status of
women, and class conflict. (4)
LANG 272: Literature and Social Change in Latin 
America - C, LT
Readings in English translation of fiction from modern Latin
America. Discussions focus on social and historical change and
on literary themes and forms in works by authors such as Carlos
Fuentes and Gabriel García Márquez. (4)
LANG 445: Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and
English as a Second Language
Theories and related techniques for teaching languages K-16
within their cultural context, including direct methods, content-
based instruction, proficiency orientations, and the integration
of technologies. Attention given to variations in approach for
those teaching English as a second language. No prerequisites.
Required for teacher certification in a language and for minor in
English as a Second Language. Strongly recommended for
elementary major in a language. Cross-listed with EDUC 
445. (4)
LANG 446: Theories of Language Acquisition
Principles of language acquisition with specific classroom
applications. Special attention given to the needs of different
language groups in acquiring English. Comparison of sound
systems and structures of languages ESL teachers are most 
likely to encounter. Required for minor in English as a 
Second Language. (4)
LANG 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
LANG 492: Independent Studies (1–4)
LANG 598: Non-thesis Research Project (1–4)
CLASSICS AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
• CLASSICS
Major: 44 semester hours.
See the Classics (CLAS) section of this catalog for course offerings 
and description of the classics major, page 58.
• GREEK
Minor in Greek
20 semester hours, which may include 101–102.
Course Offerings – Greek (GREK)
GREK 101, 102: Elementary Greek
Basic skills in reading classical, koine, and patristic 
Greek. (4, 4)
GREK 201, 202: Intermediate Greek – C
Review of basic grammar, reading in selected classical and 
New Testament authors. (4, 4)
GREK 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
• LATIN
Minor in Latin
20 semester hours, which may include 101–102
Course Offerings – Latin (LATN)
LATN 101, 102: Elementary Latin
Basic skills in reading Latin; an introduction to Roman 
literature and culture. (4, 4)
LATN 201, 202: Intermediate Latin – C
Review of basic grammar; selected readings from Latin 
authors. (4, 4)
LATN 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
MODERN LANGUAGES
• CHINESE
Minor in Chinese
20 semester hours which may include CHIN 101-102. 
Course Offerings – Chinese (CHIN)
CHIN 101, 102: Elementary Chinese
Introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Basic skills in listening,
speaking, reading and writing. Laboratory practice required. (4, 4)
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages in easy ways box, note, underline, rectangle, polygon and so on are all can be
pdf rotate page and save; pdf rotate single page
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate pdf page
PLU 2007 - 2008
103
Languages and Literatures
L
CHIN 201, 202: Intermediate Chinese – C
Develops further the ability to communicate in Mandarin 
Chinese, using culturally authentic material. Laboratory 
practice required. Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent. (4, 4)
CHIN 271: China Through Film – AR, C
An exploration of the history and recent directions of Chinese 
cinema, the relationship between film and other Chinese 
media, film, and the Chinese government, and the particular 
appeal of Chinese film on the international market. No prior 
study of Chinese required. Cross-listed with THEA 271. (4)
CHIN 301, 302: Composition and Conversation – C
Review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; 
reading of contemporary authors as models of style; and 
conversation on topics of student interest. Conducted in 
Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 202. (4)
CHIN 371: Chinese Literature in Translation – C, LT
An introduction to the most important works and writers of
Chinese literary traditions, from early times to the modern
period. Poetry, prose, drama, and fiction included. Film
presentations supplement the required readings. No
knowledge of Chinese required. (4)
CHIN 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
CHIN 492: Independent Studies (1–4)
CHIN 499: Capstone (1–4)
• FRENCH 
Major in French
A minimum of 36 semester hours beyond FREN 101-102,
including FREN 201-202, 301-302, 321, 499 and three 400-
level courses, one of which must be completed in the senior year.
Minor in French
20  semester  hours,  excluding  FREN  101–102  and including
FREN 201–202, 301, and two additional upper-division courses.
Course Offerings – French (FREN)
FREN 101, 102: Elementary French
Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic 
skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab 
attendance required. (4, 4)
FREN 141: French Language and Caribbean Culture 
in Martinique
Offered on the campus of the Université des Antilles et de la 
Guyane in Martinque, includes daily intensive language study, 
a home stay, excursions and activities related to the history and
culture of the French West Indies, meetings with writers and 
political figures, and a fieldwork project. May not be counted 
towards French major or minor. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or 
permission of instructor. (4)
FREN 201, 202: Intermediate French – C
Review of basic grammar, development of vocabulary and
emphasis on spontaneous, oral expression. Reading selections
which reflect the cultural heritage and society of the
Francophone world. Lab attendance required. (4, 4)
FREN 221: French Literature and Film of the 
Americas – C, LT
Through literature and film, a study of the experience of
migration, integration, conflict, and ethnicity in the Americas
from a Francophone perspective. To include today’s geographical
areas of Quebec, Nova Scotia, United States, Haiti, Martinique,
and Guadeloupe. Special attention given to issues of gender,
color, historical heritage, language, and economic status of
French and Creole speakers in the Caribbean and North
America. Class conducted in English. All literature translated
into English; films with English subtitles. (4)
FREN 241: French Language and Caribbean Culture in
Martinique
See FREN 141 for description. May be counted towards
French major or minor. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or
permission of instructor. (4)
FREN 301, 302: Composition and Conversation – C
Advanced grammar, stylistics, composition, and conversation
within the historical context of Francophone culture, history,
and literature. Prerequisite: FREN 202. (4, 4)
FREN 321: Civilization and Culture – C
Development of French society from early times to the
present, as portrayed in art, music, politics, and literature,
within their socio-historical context. Prerequisite:
FREN 202. (4)
FREN 341: French Language and Caribbean Culture 
in Martinique – C
See FREN 141 for description. May be counted towards
French major or minor. Prerequisite: FREN 301 or
permission of instructor. (4)
FREN 421, 422: Masterpieces of French 
Literature – C, LT
Social and aesthetic importance of works representative of
major periods from the Middle Ages through the nineteenth
century. May include Christine de Pizan, Rabelais,
Montaigne, Moliére, Pascal, Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo, and
Baudelaire. Prerequisite: FREN 302. (4, 4)
FREN 431, 432: 20th-Century French Literature – C, LT
Social and aesthetic importance of selected 20th-century
writers from France and other francophone countries. May
include Gide, Camus, Sartre, Beckett, Aimé Césaire, Miriama
Bâ, Ousmane Sembéne. Prerequisite: 
FREN 302. (4, 4)
FREN 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
FREN 492: Independent Studies (1–4)
FREN 499: Capstone: Senior Project – SR (4)
• GERMAN
Major in German
A minimum of 36 semester hours beyond GERM 101–102,
including GERM 201–202, 301–302, 321–322, 499, and
two 400-level courses
Minor in German
20 semester hours, excluding GERM 101–102 and including
GERM 201–202, 301, and two additional upper-division
courses.
Course Offerings – German (GERM)
GERM 101,102: Elementary German
Basic skills of oral and written communication in classroom
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages in reader
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate.tif"); All Rights Reserved
how to change page orientation in pdf document; pdf page order reverse
104
PLU 2007 - 2008
Languages and Literatures
L
and laboratory practice. Use of materials reflecting
contemporary German life. (4, 4)
GERM 201, 202: Intermediate German – C
Continued practice in oral and written communication in
classroom and laboratory. Use of materials which reflect
contemporary life as well as the German cultural 
heritage. (4, 4)
GERM 231, 331: Language, Art and Culture in the 
New Germany
This interdisciplinary course based in Cologne, Germany,
combines German language instruction and an authentic
home stay experience with language immersion and close
cultural study of the three main German-speaking countries,
Germany, Austria and Switzerland. (4, 4)
GERM 301, 302: Composition and Conversation – C
Intensive review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic
usage; use of contemporary authors as models of style.
Conversation on topics of student interest. Prerequisite:
GERM 202 or equivalent. (4, 4)
GERM 321: German Civilization to 1750 – C
From the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment. A survey of
German culture and its expression in creative works of art,
music and literature, with particular emphasis on Martin
Luther and the Protestant Reformation. 
Prerequisite: GERM 202. (4)
GERM 322: German Civilization Since 1750 – C
From the Enlightenment to the present. This survey covers
representative works and trends in German politics,
philosophy, literature, art and music, with emphasis on the
Age of Goethe and Beethoven. 
Prerequisite: GERM 202. (4)
GERM 401: Advanced Composition and Conversation – C
Emphasis on idiomatic German using newspapers and 
other current sources for texts. Strongly recommended for
students planning to obtain a credential to teach German 
in public secondary schools. Students should take this 
course in the junior or senior year. Prerequisite:
GERM 302. (4)
GERM 421: German Literature From the 
Enlightenment to Realism – C, LT
Representative works of German literature from about 1750
to 1890, including Sturm and Drang, Classicism and
Romanticism. Readings will include such authors as Goethe,
Schiller, Büchner, and Keller. 
Prerequisite: GERM 302. (4)
GERM 422: 20th Century German Literature – C, LT
Representative works from Naturalism to the present,
including Expressionism and Socialist Realism. Works from
both east and west, and will include such authors as Brecht,
Kafka, Thomas Mann, Rilke, and Seghers. 
Prerequisite: GERM 302. (4)
GERM 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
GERM 492: Independent Studies (1–4)
GERM 499: Capstone: Senior Project – SR (4)
• NORWEGIAN 
Major in Norwegian
A minimum of 36 semester hours, including NORW 101–102,
201–202, 301–302, and SCAN 421 or 422.
Minor in Norwegian
20 semester hours, which may include NORW 101–102
Course Offerings – Norwegian (NORW)
NORW 101, 102: Elementary Norwegian
Basic skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing are
introduced and practiced in an interactive classroom
atmosphere. Readings introduce contemporary Norwegian
culture and society. (4, 4)
NORW 201, 202: Intermediate Norwegian – C
Continuing development of written and oral skills, with a
review of basic grammar, development of short essay writing, an
emphasis on conversation, and an introductory overview of
Norwegian history and society. Readings also offer insights into
contemporary culture and provide springboards for students to
express their own opinions. Prerequisite: NORW 102. (4, 4)
NORW 301: Conversation and Composition – C
Review of grammar, and development of advanced written
and oral skills. Contemporary fiction, non-fiction and film
serve as models of style and usage, and as the basis for
conversation and writing. Prerequisite: NORW 202. (4)
NORW 302: Advanced Conversation and Composition – C
Emphasizes the finer points of grammar and stylistics,
focusing on the production of advanced written compositions
and further refinement of conversational skills. Readings are
drawn from literature spanning the last two centuries, and
serve as the springboard for discussion of such topics as
current social debates, language history and national identity.
Prerequisite: NORW 301. (4)
NORW 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
NORW 492: Independent Studies (1–4)
NORW 499: Capstone: Senior Project – SR (4)
• SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES 
MAJOR IN SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES
40 semester hours. A cross-disciplinary approach to the study
of Scandinavia. 
See the Scandinavian Area Studies section of this catalog, 
page 140.
• SPANISH 
Major in Spanish
A minimum of 36 semester hours beyond SPAN 201,
including 202, 301, 321, 322, 325 and three 400-level
courses. 
In addition, students must complete SPAN 499. 
At least two 400-level courses—one focusing on Spain and
another on Latin America—must be completed at PLU. 
One 400-level course must be completed in the senior year. 
Majors are strongly encouraged to pursue at least one
semester of study in a Spanish-speaking country on a program
approved by the Spanish faculty. 
PLU 2007 - 2008
105
Languages and Literatures • Latin
L
Majors may not normally fulfill the requirements for the
major through the election of 300-level courses during their
senior year.
Minor in Spanish
20 semester hours, including:
SPAN 202, 301, 325, and two additional upper-division
courses. 
Course Offerings – Spanish (SPAN) 
SPAN 101, 102: Elementary Spanish
Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic
skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab
attendance required. Students with more than two years of
high school Spanish must enroll in SPAN 102. (4, 4)
SPAN 201, 202: Intermediate Spanish – C
A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections
which reflect the Hispanic cultural heritage as well as
contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. (4, 4)
SPAN 231, 331: Intensive Spanish in Latin America – C
An intensive Spanish course offered in a Latin American
country and geared to students at the intermediate
(equivalent to SPAN 201 or 202) and advanced (equivalent to
301) language level. Course includes four and one half hours
of class per day for a four-week period, a home stay, a service
project, excursions, and guest lectures on a variety of topics
related to the history and culture of the host country.
Placement at the SPAN 231 or 331 levels is determined by
the student’s background and experience in Spanish.
Prerequisites: SPAN 102. (4)
SPAN 301: Advanced Grammar and Composition – C
Advanced grammar, stylistics, and composition; conversation
based on everyday situations, current events, and pertinent
literary selections. Prerequisite: SPAN 202. (4)
SPAN 321: Civilization and Culture of Spain – C
Development of Spanish society from early times to the
present as reflected in architecture, painting, and literature,
within their socio-historical context. Prerequisite: SPAN 301
(or concurrent enrollment). (4)
SPAN 322: Latin American Civilization and Culture – C
Historic, artistic, literary, sociological, and geographic 
elements shaping the development of the Latin American
region. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 (or concurrent 
enrollment). (4)
SPAN 325: Introduction to Hispanic Literary 
Studies – C, LT
Acquaints students with techniques of literary analysis, as
applied to examples of narrative, poetry, drama, and essay in
the Spanish and Latin American literary traditions. Reading,
writing, and speaking-intensive. Ongoing review of advanced
grammar. Prerequisite: SPAN 301. (4)
SPAN 341: The Latino Experiences in the U.S. – A, LT
Exploration of the histories, experiences, and contributions of
the Latino peoples in the United States as they appear in
Latino literature and film. Course content is enriched 
through related service learning experience. Readings are in
English. May count toward major, but not toward minor in
Spanish. (4)
SPAN 401: Advanced Spanish Grammar – C
Study of Spanish at the most advanced level with an 
emphasis on syntactical differences between English and
Spanish. Strongly recommended for those who plan to 
teach Spanish at the secondary level. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 301. (4)
SPAN 421: Masterpieces of Spanish Literature – C, LT
A concentrated study of major writers and movements in
Spanish literature from its origins to 1898. Prerequisite:
SPAN 325. (4)
SPAN 422: 20th-Century Literature of Spain – C, LT
Drama, novel, essay, and poetry of Spain from the
“Generation of 1898” to the present. Prerequisite: SPAN
325. (4)
SPAN 423: Special Topics in Spanish Literature and
Culture – C, LT
An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific
aspect or topic in Spanish literature, such as Spanish women
writers or the relationship of film to other types of cultural
production. May be repeated for credit with different topic.
Prerequisite: SPAN 325. (4)
SPAN 431: Latin American Literature, 
1492-1888 – C, LT
A study of representative genres from the colonial period to
the end of the 19th century. Prerequisite: SPAN 325. (4)
SPAN 432: 20th-Century Latin American 
Literature – C, LT
Development of the literature of Mexico, Central and South
America from the Modernista movement (1888) to the
present. Prerequisite: SPAN 325. (4)
SPAN 433: Special Topics in Latin American Literature
and Culture – C, LT
An opportunity to pursue an in-depth study of a specific
aspect or topic in Latin American literature and culture, such
as Latin American women writers, Latino narrative, or Latin
American film and literature. May be repeated for credit with
different topic. Prerequisite: SPAN 325. (4)
SPAN 441: U.S. Latino Literature – A, LT
Course introduces students to critical concepts in the field of
Latino/a literature. through an examination of narrative texts
from different times and places, we will focus on how U.S.
Latino/a writers reinscribe native roots, cultures and languages
in order to respond to the uncertainties of geographical
displacement. For Spanish majors and for English majors with
prior approval from the Chair of the English Department. (4)
SPAN 499: Capstone: Senior Project – SR (4)
Latin
To view curriculum requirements, please go to Department of
Languages & Literature, page 102.
106
PLU 2007 - 2008
Legal Studies • Mathematics
L
Legal Studies
253.535.7660
www.plu.edu/~legalstd/
lgst@plu.edu
Legal Studies is an interdisciplinary minor program of study
focusing on the nature of law and judicial process. Consistent
with the purposes of the American Legal Studies Association, the
Legal Studies Program at PLU provides alternative approaches to
the study of law from the academic framework of the Divisions
of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Schools of
Communication and Art and of Business. The faculty teaching
within the program emphasize the development of a critical
understanding of the functions of law, the mutual impacts of law
and society, and the sources of law. Students completing a minor
in Legal Studies pursue these objectives through courses, directed
research, and internships in offices and agencies involved in
making, enforcing, interpreting, and communicating “the law” in
contemporary American civil society.
F
aculty
:
Dwyer-Shick, Chair; Hasty, Jobst, Kaurin, Klein,
Lisosky, MacDonald, Menzel, Rowe.
MINOR
20 semester hours including PHIL 328, POLS 170, and 12
additional semester hours, selected in consultation with the
program’s chair.
ANTH 375: Law, Politics, and Revolution – C, S1 
BUSA 303: Business Law and Ethics 
BUSA 304: Business Law and Ethics for Financial Professionals
BUSA 408: International Business Law and Ethics 
COMA 421:Communication Law 
ECON 325:Industrial Organization and Public Policy – S2 
PHIL 328: Philosophical Issues in the Law - PH
POLS 170: Introduction to Legal Studies – S1
POLS 371: Judicial Process – S1
POLS 372: Constitutional Law – S1
POLS 373: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties – S1
POLS 374: Legal Studies Research – S1
POLS 381: Comparative Legal Systems – C, S1
POLS 471: Internship in Legal Studies – S1
Mathematics
253.535.7400
www.plu.edu/~math 
math@plu.edu
Mathematics is a many-faceted subject that is not only extremely
useful in its application, but at the same time is fascinating and
beautiful in the abstract. It is an indispensable tool for industry,
science, government, and the business world, while the elegance
of its logic and beauty of form have intrigued scholars,
philosophers, and artists since earliest times.
The mathematics program at PLU is designed to serve five main
objectives: (1) to provide backgrounds for other disciplines, (2)
to provide a comprehensive pre-professional program for those
directly entering the fields of teaching and applied mathematics,
(3) to provide a nucleus of essential courses which will develop
the breadth and maturity of mathematical thought for continued
study of mathematics at the graduate level, (4) to develop the
mental skills necessary for the creation, analysis, and critique of
mathematical topics, and (5) to provide a view of mathematics as
a part of humanistic behavior.
F
aculty:
M. Zhu, Chair; Benkhalti, B. Dorner, C. Dorner,
Heath, Meyer, Sklar, Stuart, Wu.
Beginning Classes
Majors in mathematics, computer science and engineering, and
other sciences usually take MATH 151 and MATH 152
(calculus). Math 151 is also appropriate for any student whose
high school mathematics preparation is strong. Those who have
had calculus in high school may omit MATH 151 (see Advanced
Placement section) and enroll in MATH 152 after consultation
with a mathematics faculty member. Those who have less
mathematics background may begin with MATH 140 before
taking MATH 151. MATH 115 provides preparation for MATH
140.
Business majors may satisfy the requirement for the business
degree by taking MATH 128, 151, or 152. (Math 115 provides
preparation for MATH 128.)
Elementary education majors may satisfy the requirement for the
education degree by taking Math 123. (Math 115 provides
preparation for MATH 123.)
For students who plan to take only one mathematics course, a
choice from MATH 105, 107, 123, 128, 140, or 151 is advised,
depending on interest and preparation.
Placement Test
A placement test and background survey are used to help insure
that students begin in mathematics courses that are appropriate
to their preparation and abilities. Enrollment is not permitted in
any of the beginning mathematics courses (MATH 105, 107,
115, 123, 128, 140, 151) until the placement test and
background survey are completed. The placement exam is
available at
http://banweb.plu.edu/pls/pap/hxskmplc.P_MathIntro.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT POLICY
The policy of the Mathematics Department regarding
mathematics credit for students who have taken the AP Calculus
exams (AB or BC) or the International Baccalaureate Higher
Level Mathematics Exam (IBHL) is as follows:
Exam Score Credit
AB 3*MATH 151*
AB 4,5 MATH 151
BC 3 MATH 151
BC 4,5 MATH 151 and 152
IBHL 4,5 MATH 151
IBHL 6,7 MATH 151 and 152
*Consult with instructor if planning to take MATH 152.
PLU 2007 - 2008
107
Mathematics
M
If a student has taken calculus in high school and did not take an
AP exam or IBHL exam, then the student may enroll in MATH
152 after consultation with a mathematics faculty member. In
this case no credit is given for MATH 151.
MATHEMATICS AND GENERAL UNIVERSITY
REQUIREMENTS 
(see General University Requirements)
All mathematics courses will satisfy the mathematical reasoning
requirement (line two of the general university requirements). At
least four semester hours are needed. All mathematics courses will
satisfy the natural sciences, computer science, mathematics (NS)
GUR: The Distributive Core. At least four semester hours are
needed. A course cannot simultaneously satisfy mathematical
reasoning (MR) and science and scientific method (SM) GURs.
In fulfilling the Math Reasoning Requirement, students with
documented disabilities will be given reasonable accommodations
as determined by the Coordinator for Students with Disabilities
and the appropriate faculty member in consultation with the
student.
MATHEMATICS AND THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND
SCIENCES REQUIREMENT 
(see College of Arts and Sciences Requirements)
All mathematics courses will satisfy the logic, mathematics,
computer science or statistics part of Option III of the College of
Arts and Sciences requirement. A course cannot simultaneously
satisfy Option III of the College of Arts and Sciences
requirement and a general university requirement.
MATHEMATICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
• The foundation of the mathematics program for majors
includes:
• MATH 151, 152, 253: Three-semester sequence of calculus
• MATH 331 (Linear Algebra)
Students with a calculus background in high school may receive
advanced placement into the appropriate course in this sequence.
Students who have taken calculus in high school but do not have
credit for MATH 151 do not need to take MATH 151 for the
mathematics major or minor. However, they still need to
complete the number of hours in mathematics as stated in the
requirements.
Upper-division work includes courses in introduction to proof,
linear algebra, abstract algebra, analysis, geometry, differential
equations, statistics and numerical analysis. See the description of
the courses and the major (either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of
Science) for more detail. Students majoring in mathematics
should discuss scheduling of these courses with their advisors.
For example, MATH 499 extends over two semesters beginning
with MATH 499A in the fall semester. May graduates begin this
capstone course in the fall semester of the senior year, while
December graduates must begin this course in the fall semester of
their junior year. MATH 499A is only offered in fall semester
and must be taken before MATH 499B which is only offered in
the spring.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR
• Mathematics - 34 semester hours of mathematics, four
hours supporting
Required: MATH 151, 152, 253, 317, 331, 341, 433, 
455, 499A, 499B
Required Supporting: CSCE 144
Also strongly recommended is one of the following:
CSCE 371; ECON 345; PHYS 153, 163
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR
• Mathematics -42 semester hours of mathematics, eight 
or nine hours supporting
Required: MATH 151, 152, 253, 317, 331, 341, 433, 455,
499A, 499B
Eight semester hours from: MATH 321, 342, 348, 351, 
356, 381, 480
Required supporting: CSCE 144 and one of the following:
CSCE 348, 371; ECON 345; PHYS 153, 163
• Financial Mathematics Major - 47 to 49 semester hours
Required semester hours
• Business: nine semester hours
• Economics: four to eight semester hours (Not including 
ECON 101 and 102)
• Mathematics: 28 to 32 semester hours (Not including 
capstone hours)
• Capstone: two to four semester hours (Directed Research 
or Internship)
Prerequisites
• Business: BUSA 302 or permission of instructor for 
business courses
• Economics: ECON 101; ECON 102 or permission of
instructor of ECON 345
• Mathematics: MATH 140 or placement into MATH 151 
or higher
• Co-Requisite strongly recommended: PHIL 225 - Business
Ethics (satisfies Philosophy GUR)
Required courses for Major
Within the following groups of alternative courses, the
following are highly recommended for this major: 
ECON 344 and MATH 342
Following Courses Required:
• BUSA 335: Financial Investments (3)
• BUSA 437: Financial Analysis and Strategy (3)
• ECON 345: Math Topics in Economics (4)
• MATH 151: Calculus I (4)
• MATH 152: Calculus II (4)
• MATH 253: Multivariate Calculus (4)
• MATH 331: Linear Algebra (4)
• MATH 342: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (4)
(STAT 231 may be substituted with math department
permission)
• MATH 411: Mathematics of Risk (4)
108
PLU 2007 - 2008
Mathematics
M
Two of following courses required: (may only count either
ECON 344 or MATH 348)
• ECON 344: Econometrics (4)
• MATH 342: Probability & Statistical Theory (4)
• MATH 348: Applied Regression Analysis and ANOVA
• MATH 351: Differential Equations (4)
• MATH 356: Numerical Analysis (4)
One of the following courses required:
• BUSA 337: International Finance (3)
• BUSA 438: Financial Research and Analysis (3)
Capstone Experience required: (Either MATH 495A or 
both MATH 499A and 499B)
• MATH 495A: Financial Mathematics Internship (2-4)
• MATH 499A: Capstone - Senior Seminar I (1)
• MATH 499B: Capstone - Senior Seminar II (1)
• Mathematics Education Major - 46 to 47 semester hours
Required Courses
• MATH 151, 152, 203, 253, 317, 321, 331, 341, 433,
499A, 499B and MATH/EDUC 446
• One of: MATH 351, PHYS 153/163, or CSCE 144
• Strongly Recommended: MATH 455
Note: The BS Degree with a major in Mathematics Education
together with either a BAE degree in secondary education or a
Master’s Degree in Education provides a path to teacher
certification in secondary mathematics in Washington State.
Passing the West-E exam in mathematics is also required for
teacher certification in secondary mathematics. Completion of
the required math courses listed for the degree gives adequate
preparation for the West-E exam.
MINORS
• Actuarial Science - A minimum of 24 semester hours 
chosen from the following courses:
• BUSA 302, 304, 335
• ECON 101, 301, 323, 343
• MATH 331, 342, 348, 356
Also strongly recommended: MATH 253
At least 12 hours must be from mathematics and at least 
four from economics.
• Mathematics - 20 semester hours of mathematics courses,
including:
• MATH 151, 152, and either 253 or 245
• and eight hours of upper-division mathematics courses, 
excluding MATH 446.
• Statistics -A minimum of 16 semester hours to include:
• CSCE 120 or 144; STAT 341
• And at least eight hours from among the other statistic
courses (MATH 342 and 348 are strongly recommended).
See the Statistics section of this catalog for more detail. Statistics
courses taken for the statistics minor may not be simultaneously
counted as elective credit for the Bachelor of Science major.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
See Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
section of this catalog.
Course Offerings – Mathematics (MATH)
Fall
MATH 105, 115, 123, 128, 140, 151, 152, 253, 
317, 331, 341, 381, 433, 446, 499A 
January 
Term
MATH 107, 123, 203
Spring MATH 115, 128, 140, 151, 152, 245,
253, 321, 331, 342, 348, 351, 356, 455,
480, 499B
Alternate 
Years
Odd Years: MATH 203, 348, 351; 
Even Years: MATH 342, 356
A grade of C or higher is required in all prerequisite courses. A
placement test and background survey are required before
registering for beginning mathematics courses if prerequisites
have not been completed at PLU.
MATH 105: Mathematics of Personal Finance – MR, NS
Emphasizes financial transactions important to individuals and
families: annuities, loans, insurance, interest, investment, 
time value of money. Prerequisite: PLU math entrance
requirement. (4)
MATH 107: Mathematical Explorations – MR, NS
Mathematics and modern society. Emphasis on numerical and
logical reasoning. Designed to increase awareness of applications
of mathematics, to enhance enjoyment of and self-confidence in
mathematics, and to sharpen critical thought in mathematics.
Topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: PLU math
entrance requirement. (4)
MATH 115: College Algebra and Trigonometry - MR, NS 
A review of algebra emphasizing problem solving skills. 
The notion of function is introduced via examples from
polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic and 
exponential functions. We also explore inverse trigonometric
functions, identities, graphing and solution of triangles.
Appropriate as preparation for MATH 123, 128 and 140.
Prerequisite: PLU math placement exam and two years of high
school algebra. (4) 
MATH 123: Modern Elementary Mathematics – MR, NS
Concepts underlying traditional computational techniques; a
systematic analysis of arithmetic; an intuitive approach to algebra
and geometry. Intended for elementary teaching majors.
Prerequisite: A qualifying score on the math placement test or a
grade of C or higher in MATH 115. (4)
MATH 128: Linear Models and Calculus, An Introduction –
MR, NS
Matrix theory, linear programming, and introduction to calculus.
Concepts developed stressing applications, particularly to
business. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra or
MATH 115. Cannot be taken for credit if MATH 151 (or the
equivalent) has been previously taken with a grade of C or
higher. (4)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested