display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate all pages in pdf software application dll winforms html asp.net web forms 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks11-part267

PLU 2007 - 2008
109
Mathematics
M
MATH 140: Analytic Geometry and Functions – MR, NS
Different types of functions, their properties and graphs,
especially trigonometric functions. Algebraic skill, problem
solving, and mathematical writing are emphasized. Prepares
students for calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 115 or equivalent
high school material. (4)
MATH 151: Introduction to Calculus – MR, NS
Functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with applications.
Emphasis on derivatives. Prerequisite: Math analysis or pre-
calculus in high school or MATH 140. (4)
MATH 152: Calculus II – MR, NS
Continuation of 151. Techniques and applications of integrals,
improper integrals, ordinary differential equations and power
series, with applications. Prerequisite: MATH 151. (4)
MATH 203: History of Mathematics – MR, NS
A study in the vast adventure of ideas that is mathematics from
ancient cultures to the 20th century. The evolution of the
concepts of number, measurement, demonstration, and the
various branches of mathematics in the contexts of the varied
cultures in which they arose. Prerequisite: MATH 152 or
consent of instructor. (4)
MATH 245: Discrete Structures - MR, NS
Topics of relevance to computer scientists and computer
engineers, including quantified logic, sets, relations, functions,
recursion, combinatorics, and probability. Tools of logical
reasoning, such as induction, proof by contradiction, and
predicate calculus will be taught and applied. 
Prerequisite: MATH 152 (4)
MATH 253: Multivariable Calculus – MR, NS
An introduction to vectors, partial derivatives, multiple
integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 152. (4)
MATH 291: Directed Study
Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual’s needs
or interests; primarily for students awarded advanced placement.
Admission only by departmental invitation. (1 to 4)
MATH 317: Introduction to Proof in Mathematics 
– MR, NS
Introduces the logical methods of proof and abstraction in
modern mathematics. Explores mathematical topics, including
discrete mathematics, while familiarizing students with proof-
related concepts such as mathematical grammar, logical
equivalence, proof by contradiction, and proof by induction.
Prerequisite: MATH 152. (4)
MATH 321: Geometry – MR, NS
Foundations of geometry and basic theory in Euclidean,
projective, and non-Euclidean geometry. 
Prerequisite: MATH 152 or consent of instructor. (4)
MATH 331: Linear Algebra – MR, NS
Vectors and abstract vector spaces, matrices, inner product spaces,
linear transformations. Proofs will be emphasized. Prerequisites:
MATH 152 and one of MATH 245, 253, or 317. (4)
MATH 341: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics – MR, NS
Data description, probability, discrete and continuous random
variables, expectation, special distributions, statements of law of
large numbers and central limit theorem, sampling distributions,
theory of point estimators, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests,
regression (time permitting). Cross-listed with STAT 341.
Prerequisite: MATH 152. (4)
MATH 342: Probability and Statistical Theory – MR, NS
Continuation of MATH 341. Topics may include: joint and
conditional distributions, correlation, functions of random
variables, moment generating functions, inference in regression
and one-way ANOVA, Bayesian and non-parametric inference,
convergence of distributions. Cross-listed with STAT 342.
Prerequisite: MATH 341. (4)
MATH 348: Applied Regression Analysis 
and ANOVA – MR, NS
Linear and multiple regression with inference and diagnostics;
analysis of variance; experimental design with randomization
and blocking. Substantial use of statistical software and
emphasis on exploratory data analysis. Cross-listed with STAT
348. Prerequisite: MATH 341 or consent of instructor. (4)
MATH 351: Differential Equations – MR, NS
An introduction to differential equations emphasizing the
applied aspect. First and second order differential equations,
systems of differential equations, power series solutions, non-
linear differential equations, numerical methods. 
Prerequisite: MATH 253. (4)
MATH 356: Numerical Analysis – MR, NS
Numerical theory and application in the context of solutions of
linear, nonlinear, and differential equations, matrix theory,
interpolation, approximations, numerical differentiation and
integration and Fourier transforms. Prerequisites: MATH 152
and CSCE 144. (4)
MATH 381: Seminar in Problem Solving – MR, NS
Designed to improve advanced problem solving skills. A goal is
participation in the Putnam Competition. Pass/Fail only. May
be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: MATH 152
or consent of instructor. (1)
MATH 411: Mathematics of Risk
This non-GUR course introduces students to the mathematics
underpinning financial investment in the presence of
uncertainty. Students will investigate the employ probability
models to assign values to individual financial instruments and
to portfolios over short and long term time frames. both
analytic solutions and numerical solutions via software will be
developed. Case studies will play a role in the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 152, 341 and 342; ECON 101 or 301;
BUS 335; or consent of the instructor (4)
MATH 433 Abstract Algebra – MR, NS
The algebra of axiomatically defined objects, such as groups,
rings and fields with emphasis on theory and proof. 
Prerequisite: MATH 317, 331. (4)
MATH 446: Mathematics in the Secondary School
Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic
mathematical concepts; principles of number operation,
relation, proof, and problem solving in the context of
arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Cross-listed with EDUC 446.
Prerequisite: MATH 253 or 331. (4)
Rotate all pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf page permanently; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
Rotate all pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate one page in pdf
110
PLU 2007 - 2008
Mathematics • Movement Studies and Wellness Education
M
Movement Studies and 
Wellness Education
253.535.7350
www.plu.edu/~mswe
E-mail: mswe@plu.edu
The primary mission of the Department of Movement Studies
and Wellness Education (MSWE) is to provide quality academic
professional preparation for undergraduate students in areas
related to the study of human movement, especially as it supports
the pursuit of lifelong physical activity and well being (ie. health
& fitness education, recreation, exercise science, pre-physical
therapy, pre-athletic training and health & fitness management).
We strive to prepare future leaders who will positively impact the
health behaviors of individuals and of society through the
education and promotion of life-sustaining and life-enhancing
pursuits.  The successful completion of our majors demands a
strong integration of the liberal arts and sciences with thorough
professional preparation in light of respective state and national
standards, accrediting bodies and certification programs.
Internship experiences are an integral element of all majors in the
department and allow for students to further develop and apply
their education and training in real world, professional settings.
In addition, we provide a diverse array of physical activity
instruction for students as part of the General University
Requirements (GUR) of the university.  The goals of these classes
are to 1) develop in each student a fundamental respect for the
role of physical activity in living, including the assessment of
physical condition and the development of personally designed,
safe, effective and functional fitness programs with attention to
lifetime activities and 2) to expose students to a diversity of
physical activities and experiences in a manner which enhances
understanding of their educational, social, spiritual, ethical and
moral relevance.  Our programs provide opportunities for all
participants to develop and apply a knowledge base regarding
physical activity and psychomotor and behavioral skills, 
which encourages the development of lifelong health and
wellness.
The department offers three degree programs: the Bachelor of
Arts degree in Recreation (BARec), the Bachelor of Arts Degree
in Physical Education (BAPE w/ teacher certification option),
and the Bachelor of Science Degree in Physical Education
(BSPE) which offers four different pre-professional
concentrations: Health & Fitness Management, Exercise Science,
Pre-Physical Therapy and Pre-Athletic Training.  Students
completing these degrees often go on for further graduate study
in physical therapy, sport psychology, athletic training, exercise
science, recreation, public health etc., or enter into professions
such as teaching, personal training, promotions and
management, youth programming, coaching and other areas and
do so in diverse settings such as schools, private health clubs,
non-profit agencies, corporations, professional sport teams, youth
clubs, hospitals, parks and recreation departments and health
departments, among others.  In addition, five distinct minors can
be used to compliment majors within the department, or can be
pursued by majors outside the department in areas of personal or
professional interest.  These minors are Coaching, Fitness &
Wellness Education, Personal Training, Sport & Recreation
Management and Sport Psychology.  
F
aculty:
McConnell, Associate Dean; Evans, Johnson, Hacker,
Kerr, Moore, Stringer, Wood.
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT
Four one-semester hour courses (PHED 100–259), which must
include PHED 100, are required for graduation.
No more than eight of the one-semester hour PE activity courses
may be counted toward graduation. Students are encouraged to
select a variety of activities at appropriate skill levels. All physical
education activity courses are graded on the basis of A, Pass, or
Fail and are taught on a coeducational basis.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(BSPE)
Four concentrations are available under the BSPE Degree:
• EXERCISE SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 
- 64 semester hours
• BIOL 161, 205, 206
• CHEM 105
• HEED 366
MATH 455: Mathematical Analysis – MR, NS
Theoretical treatment of topics introduced in elementary
calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 253, 331; 317 or 433 
(with consent of instructor MATH 433 may be taken 
concurrently). (4)
MATH 480: Topics in Mathematics – MR, NS
Selected topics of current interest or from: combinatorics,
complex analysis, dynamical systems chaos and fractals, graph
theory, group representations, number theory, operations
research, partial differential equations, topology, transform
methods, abstract algebra, analysis. May be taken more than
once for credit. Prerequisites vary depending on the
topic. (1–4)
MATH 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. (1–4)
MATH 495A: Financial Mathematics Internship
A research and writing project in conjunction with a student’s
approved off-campus activity. An oral presentation comparable in
length with those required for MATH 499 is obligatory.
Prerequisites: Senior (or second semester junior) financial
mathematics major; and approval from the department prior to
the commencement of the internship.
MATH 499A: Capstone: Senior Seminar I– SR
Preparation for oral and written presentation of information
learned in individual research under the direction of an assigned
instructor. Discussion of methods for communicating
mathematical knowledge. Selection of topic and initial research.
With Math 499B meets the senior seminar/project requirement.
Prerequisite: Senior (or second semester junior) math major. (1)
MATH 499B: Capstone: Senior Seminar II – SR
Continuation of MATH 499A with emphasis on individual
research and oral and written presentation. With MATH 499A
meets the senior seminar/project requirement. Prerequisite:
MATH 499A. (1)
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
NET example for how to delete several defined pages from a PDF document Dim detelePageindexes = New Integer() {1, 3, 5, 7, 9} ' Delete pages. All Rights Reserved
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; rotate pages in pdf permanently
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file All Rights Reserved
rotate all pages in pdf and save; rotate pdf pages on ipad
PLU 2007 - 2008
111
Movement Studies and Wellness Education
M
• MATH 128 or 140
• PHED 277, 324, 326, 344, 383, 384, 478, 480, 486
• PHED 495 (four semester hours required)
• PHED 499 (four semester hours required)
• STAT 231
• HEALTH AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION - 64 semester hours
• BIOL 205, 206
• CHEM 105
• HEED 266, 366
• PHED 277, 293, 324, 326, 344, 383, 384, 386, 
480, 486
• PHED 495 (four semester hours required)
• PHED 499 (four semester hours required)
• RECR 330, 483
• PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY CONCENTRATION 
- 73 to 74 semester hours
• BIOL 161, 162, 205, 206, 323 or approved alternate 
(four semester hours)
• Two from: CHEM 105, 115/116, 232/234 (eight to 
nine semester hours)
• HEED 281 (two semester hours)
• MATH 128 or 140 (four semester hours)
• PHED 277, 480, 486 (nine semester hours)
• PHED 495 (four semester hours)
• PHED 499 (four semester hours)
• PHYS 125/126, 135/136 (ten semester hours)
• PSYC 101, 320 or 415 (eight semester hours)
• STAT 231 or 232
• PRE-ATHLETIC TRAINING CONCENTRATION 
- 50 semester hours
• BIOL 161, 205, 206
• CHEM 105
• HEED 266, 281
• PHED 277, 326, 480, 486
• PHED 495 (four semester hours)
• PHED 499 (four semester hours)
• PSYC 101
• STAT 231
In addition to the requirements listed above, candidates for the
BSPE degree must meet the College of Arts and Sciences foreign
language requirement.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RECREATION (BAREC)
- 46 semester hours
• BUSA 340 or 358
• COMA 213, 214
• PHED 277, 279, 324, 326, 344, 386
• RECR 296, 330, 360 (two semester hours), 483
• PHED 495 (four semester hours)
• PHED 499 (four semester hours)
• Plus four semester hours of approved electives.
In addition to the requirements listed above, students are
strongly encouraged to complete a minor in a related field.
Students must have a current First Aid and CPR certificate
before their internship. Candidates for the BA Recreation
(BARec) degree must meet the College of Arts and Sciences
foreign language requirement.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (BAPE)
WITH CERTIFICATION
- 61 semester hours required to meet the state endorsement in
Health and Fitness.
• BIOL 205, 206 (eight semester hours)
• HEED 266, 395, 366 (12 semester hours)
• PHED 275 or 298 (two semester hours)
• PHED 277, 279, 293, 294, 297, (ten semester hours)
• PHED 322 (four semester hours)
• PHED 326, 386, 478, 480, 486, 490 (23 semester hours)
• RECR 296 (two semester hours)
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR K-12 TEACHER
CERTIFICATION - 31 semester hours
Initial K-12 teacher certification in Health and Fitness must meet
the requirements established by the School of Education and
Movement Studies for Teacher Certification in addition to the
above requirements for the BAPE with certification.
• EDUC 390, 392
• EDUC/PHED 468, 450
• PSYC 101
• SPED 320
• WRIT 101
Plus a valid first aid card
Students receiving a BAPE with certification are not required to
fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language
requirements. All courses in the major and minor fields are used
for teacher certification must have grades of C or higher.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (BAPE)
WITHOUT CERTIFICATION - 63 semester hours 
• BIOL 205, 206 (eight semester hours)
• HEED 266, 395, 366 (12 semester hours)
• PHED 275 or 298 (two semester hours)
• PHED 277, 279, 293, 294, 297, (ten semester hours)
• PHED 322 (four semester hours)
• PHED 326, 386, 478, 480, 486, 495 (23 semester hours)
• RECR 296 (two semester hours)
In addition to the requirements listed above, candidates for the
BAPE degree without teacher certification must meet the College
of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirements and a Senior
Seminar (PHED 499 - 4 hours).
MINORS
COACHING MINOR: - 18 semester hours
• PHED 411 (4)
• PHED 334 (2)
• PHED 361 (2)
• PHED 390 (4)
• HEED 266 (4)
• HEED 281 (2)
First aid and CPR certificate required.
FITNESS AND WELLNESS EDUCATION
- 20 semester hours
• HEED 266 (4)
• HEED 366 (4)
• PHED 279 (2)
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page This C# demo explains how to insert empty pages to a specific All Rights Reserved
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; pdf reverse page order online
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
1. public void DeletePages(int[] pageIndexes). Description: Delete specified pages from the input PDF file. Parameters: All Rights Reserved.
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; pdf rotate pages and save
112
PLU 2007 - 2008
M
Movement Studies and Wellness Education
• PHED 293 (2)
• PHED 360 (2)
• PHED 384 (3)
• Select One from the following:
• PHED 383 (3)
• PHED 386 (3)
• PHED 486 (3)
PERSONAL TRAINING - 20 semester hours
• BUSA 305 (3)
• HEED 266 (4)
• PHED 293 (2)
• PHED 334 (2)
• PHED 360 (2)
• PHED 383 (3)
• PHED 390 (4)
First aid and CPR certificate required.
SPORT PSYCHOLOGY - 20 semester hours
• HEED 366
• PHED 234, 386, 390
• PSYC 310, 320, 330 (four semester hours required; 
PSYC 101 required prerequisite)
• Select from the following: (four semester hours):
• HEED 262, 365
• PHED 308, 315, 324, 410
SPORT AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT
- 18 to 20 semester hours
• PHED 360 (2)
• PHED 384 (3)
• PHED 495 (4)
• RECR 483 (4)
• Select one from the following:
• BUSA 305 (3)
• BUSA 308 (3)
• BUSA 340 (3)
• BUSA 358 (3)
• Select two to four credits from the following:
• PHED 314 (4)
• PHED 322 (2 or 4)
• PHED 326 (3)
• PHED 334 (2)
• PHED 386 (3)
• RECR 330 (4)
HEALTH EDUCATION
See the Health Education (HEED) section of this catalog to view
course offerings.
RECREATION
See the Recreation (RECR) section of this catalog to view course
offerings.
Course Offerings - Physical Education ( PHED)
PHED 100: Personalized Fitness Programs – PE
To stimulate student interest in functional personally designed
programs of physical activity; assessment of physical condition
and skills; recommendation of specific programs for maintaining
and improving physical health. Should be taken as a first-year
student. (1)
PHED 150: Adaptive Physical Activity – PE
An individualized activity program designed to meet the needs
interests, limitations, and capacities of students who have had
restrictions placed on their physical activity. (1)
PHED 151-199: Individual and Dual Activities – PE
151 (Beginning Golf), 155 (Bowling), 157 (Personal Defense), 162
(Beginning Tennis), 163 (Beginning Badminton), 164 (Pickleball),
165 (Racquetball/Squash), 170 (Skiing), 171 (Canoeing), 172
(Backpacking), 173 (Basic Mountaineering), 175 (Snow-boarding),
177 (Weight Training), 182 (Low-Impact Aerobics), 183 (Power
Aerobics), 186 (Step Aerobics), 192 (Intermediate Tennis), 193
(Intermediate Badminton), 194 (Intermediate Equitation), 197
(Advanced Weight Training). (1 each)
PHED 200-219: Aquatics – PE
200 (Individualized Swim Instruction), 201 (Swimming for Non-
swimmers), 205 (Skin and Scuba Diving), 207 (Basic Sailing),
210 (Intermediate Swimming), 212 (Conditioning Swimming),
216 (Lifeguard Training, 2 credits). (1 each)
PHED 220-240: Rhythms – PE
222 (Jazz Dance Level I), 223 (Yoga), 224 (Current Dance), 225
(Ballroom Dance), 234 (Relaxation Techniques), 240 (Dance
Ensemble). (1 each)
PHED 241-250: Team Activities – PE
241 (Basketball and Softball), 244 (Co-ed Volleyball), 250
(Directed Sports Participation)
PHED 275: Water Safety Instruction – PE
The American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor’s course.
Prerequisite: swim test required. Fulfills one semester hour
towards PE GUR. (2)
PHED 276: Special Topics in Physical Activity - PE
Selected activities as announced by the department. Provides
opportunities for activities not otherwise part of the regular
activity course offerings. (1)
PHED 277: Foundations of Physical Education
The relationship of physical education to education; the
biological, sociological, psychological, and mechanical principles
underlying physical education and athletics. Should be the initial
professional course taken in the Department of Movement
Studies and Wellness Education.
PHED 279: Teaching Physical Activity
Generic teaching and management strategies, design of
instructional materials and techniques for implementing them,
and strategies for working with diverse learners in physical
activity settings. This course is a prerequisite for all teaching
methods courses and should be taken prior to or in conjunction
with the Education Hub. (2)
PHED 293: Teaching Methods: Fitness Activities
Overview, application and evaluation of fitness activities, such as:
aerobics (water, high- and low-impact, step, slide), weight
training, calisthenics circuits, continuous interval training.
Prerequisite: PHED 279. (2)
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Users can rotate PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and go to any pages in easy ways box, note, underline, rectangle, polygon and so on are all can be
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; rotate pages in pdf and save
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF
pdf rotate single page reader; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
113
M
Movement Studies and Wellness Education
PHED 294: Teaching Methods: Invasion Games
Games in which a team tries to invade the other team’s side or
territory by putting an implement into a goal. Activities will
include: basketball, soccer, lacrosse, hockey, and football.
Prerequisite: PHED 279. (2)
PHED 297: Teaching Methods: Net Games
Players attempt to send an object into the playing area on the
other side of a net or barrier. Activities include volleyball, tennis,
badminton, pickleball, and racquetball. Prerequisite: PHED
279. (2)
PHED 298: Teaching Methods: Target and Fielding Games
Participants strike, hit, kick, or throw at targets or objects.
Activities include golf, bowling, archery, softball, kickball, and
track and field. Prerequisite: PHED 279. (2)
PHED 310: Socioeconomic Influences on Health in 
America – A
Examination of the culture, social environment, and pressures
that create a health vulnerability with the American population.
(4)
PHED 314: Team Building for High Performance Teams
Activities designed to facilitate the development of team
camaraderie and effectiveness. Creative, fun, challenging, and
applied team building activities, combined with traditional
training tools to help create learning experiences for students to
actively enhance team cohesion and group productivity. (4)
PHED 315: Body Image – A
Topics include: the connection between women and food,
cultural definitions of beauty, eating disorders, nutrition, and
biosocial factors affecting weight. (4)
PHED 319: Tramping the Tracks of New Zealand – PE
Backpacking several of New Zealand’s world renowned tracks
and hiking up ancient volcano craters, to glacial mountain lakes,
and along sandy ocean beaches. Fulfills one semester hour
towards PE GUR. (4)
PHED 322: Physical Education in the Elementary School
Organization and administration of a developmental program for
grades K-6; sequential and progressive programming; large
repertoire of activities. Observation and/or practicum in public
schools required. (2 or 4)
PHED 324: Physical Activity and Lifespan
The emphasis in this course will be on the role that physical
activity plays in successful aging. An understanding of the
influence of social learning on physical activity behavior through
the lifespan and effective strategies for health promotion 
and activity programming with adult populations will be
addressed. (4)
PHED 326: Adapted Physical Activity
Emphasizes the theory and practice of adaptation in teaching
strategies, curriculum, and service delivery for all persons with
psychomotor problems, not just those labeled “disabled.” (3)
PHED 334: Applied Training and Conditioning
This course presents physiological and kinesiological 
applications to physical training and addresses fundamental
training principles as they relate to physical fitness in the areas 
of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance,
flexibility and body composition. Focus is on training for safe
and effective physical performance for both genders of all ages
and activity interests. (2)
PHED 344: Legal Aspects of Physical Activity
Role of law in sport and physical activity, negligence, tort and
risk management as it relates to legal issues in school, sport, and
recreational settings. (1)
PHED 360: Professional Practicum
Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher,
recreation supervisor, or health care provider. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval. (1 or 2)
PHED 361: Coaching Practicum
Students work under the supervision of a coach. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval. (1 or 2)
PHED 362: Healing Arts of the Mind and Body – A, PE
Designed to introduce alternative therapies of mind-body
processes. History, roots, practice, and cultural significances of
several therapies and practices. Fulfills one semester hour towards
PE GUR. (4)
PHED 372-378: Coaching Theory
Techniques, systems, training methods, strategy, and psychology
of coaching; 372 (Cross Country/Track and Field), 374 (Soccer),
378 (Softball/Baseball). (2 each)
PHED 383: Exercise Testing and Prescription
Provides students involved in the promotion of physical activity
with the basic knowledge necessary to safely conduct exercise,
health and fitness assessments in a variety of community settings.
Topics will include: history of assessment and its role in physical
activity promotion; purpose and methods for pre-evaluation and
screening; assessment and evaluation techniques; prescriptive
program development for health and fitness; bio-psycho-social
implications of assessment and evaluation. (3)
PHED 384: Foundations of Health and Fitness Management
Provides students involved in the promotion of physical activity
with the basic knowledge necessary to understand how health
and fitness are managed in a variety of community settings.
Topics will include: historical and philosophical basis of
community-based health and fitness management; organizational
assessment and evaluation issues; strategies for behavioral change;
strategies for program development, implementation and
marketing; specific examples of different community-based
health and fitness management programs. (3)
PHED 386: Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
Questions of how social psychological variables influence motor
behavior and how physical activity affects the psychological make
up of an individual will be explored. (3)
PHED 387: Special Topics in Physical Education
Provides the opportunity for the exploration of current and
relevant issues in the areas of physical education and exercise
science. (1-4)
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF
pdf reverse page order preview; pdf rotate all pages
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate.tif"); All Rights Reserved
rotate pdf page and save; rotate a pdf page
114
PLU 2007 - 2008
M
Movement Studies and Wellness Education • Music
Music
253.535.7602, 877.254.7001
www.plu.edu/~music
music@plu.edu
The music program at PLU strives to provide every student at the
university with a meaningful and enriching arts experience, ranging
from non-major private lessons or ensemble participation to core
courses to four distinctive academic majors and two academic
minors. Nearly one quarter of the undergraduates at PLU
participate in music annually. The National Association of Schools
of Music accredits the PLU Music Program and its graduates go on
to distinguished and satisfying careers in teaching and performing.
Facilities for exploring the musical arts are outstanding. The
Mary Baker Russell Music Center, with its exquisite Lagerquist
Concert Hall, provides state-of-the-art focus to music study at
PLU. Media-rich classrooms and labs augment studios and
individual practice spaces. Private study in keyboard is available
in piano, organ, and harpsichord. Other private study includes
voice and all string, wind, and percussion instruments, taught by
regularly performing musicians. Professional-quality experience is
available to qualified performers in band, orchestra, choir, jazz,
and chamber ensembles.
F
aculty:
Robbins, Chair; Bell-Hanson, Beegle, J. Brown, Joyner,
Lyman, Nance, Poppe, Powell, Rønning, Tegels, Tutunov, Vaught
Farner, Youtz, Zopfi; assisted by Agent, Anderson, Bloomingdale,
E. Brown, Buchanan, Burns, Campos, Chung, Clubb, Daverson,
Erickson, P. Evans, Grinsteiner, Habedank, Harty, Houston, 
B. Johnson, M. Joyner, S. Knapp, Kunz, B. McDonald, R.
Miller, Ott, F. Peterson, Pettit, Reid, Rhyne, Rine, Seeberger,
Sojka, Spicciati, Treat, Vancil, Walker, Wetherington, Winkle,
Wooster.
For introductory courses to the field of music, see the
descriptions of MUSI 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, and 120.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
First-Year Students
Students intending to major in music should begin the major
music sequences in the first year. Failure to do so may mean an
extra semester or year to complete the program.
• Required courses are:
• MUSI 111, 113 (Music Fundamentals)
• MUSI 120 (Music and Culture) - Class size is limited in 
MUSI 120.
• MUSI 124 (Theory)
• MUSI 125, 126 (Ear Training)
• MUSI 115, 116, 121, 122 (Keyboarding)
MUSI 111 and 113 are prerequisites to MUSI 124. All first-
year students should register for MUSI 113 and 113. A
placement test will be given during the first class meeting of
MUSI 111. Based on the test outcome, students will be placed 
in either MUSI 124, 113 or retained in 111. MUSI 111 and 
113 are half-semester courses.
PHED 390: Applied Exercise and Sport Psychology
A practical, individually-oriented course designed to teach
athletes, trainers, coaches, and teachers a comprehensive variety
of skills and techniques aimed at enhancing sport performance.
Psychological topics include: managing anxiety, imagery, goal
setting, self-confidence, attention control, injury interventions,
self-talk strategies, and team building. (4)
PHED 401: Workshop
Workshops in special fields for varying periods. (1–4)
PHED 411: Coaching Effectiveness
Presents foundational knowledge essential for coaching
effectiveness and success in any sport at a youth, club, or school
level. This course integrates sport science research with emphasis
on practical applications. Organization of this course will be
based on topics such as: coaching philosophy and ethics,
communication and motivation, principles of teaching sport
skills and tactics, evaluation, and team administration,
organization, and management including liability prevention.
The course is designed to meet or exceed NCACE, NASPE,
PCA, and ASEP standards. (4)
PHED 462: Dance Production
An advanced choreography course combining choreography,
costume design, staging, and publicity techniques for producing
a major dance concert. (2)
PHED 478: Motor Learning and Human Performance
Provides basic theories, research, and practical implications for
motor learning, motor control, and variables affecting skill
acquisition. (4)
PHED 480: Exercise Physiology
Scientific basis for training and physiological effect of exercise on
the human body. Lab required. Prerequisite: BIOL 205, 206.
(4)
PHED 486: Applied Biomechanics/Kinesiology
Opportunity to increase knowledge and understanding about the
human body and how the basic laws of mechanics are integrated
in efficient motor performance. (3)
PHED 490: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction
An integrated and instructionally aligned approach to
curriculum design, assessment, development and implementing
instructional strategies consistent with Washington Essential
Academic Learning Requirements. Intended as the final course
prior to a culminating internship, a practicum in the school
setting is required in conjunction with this six-semester hour
course. (6)
PHED 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisite: Consent of the dean. (1–4)
PHED 495: Internship – SR
Pre-professional experiences closely related to student’s career and
academic interests. Prerequisites: Declaration of major, junior
status, and ten hours in the major. (2–8)
PHED 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR (2-4)
PHED 501: Workshops (1–4)
PHED 560: Practicum (1 or 2)
PHED 591: Independent Studies (1–4)
PHED 595: Internship (1–4)
PLU 2007 - 2008
115
M
Music
MUSIC MAJOR DEGREES
• General Requirements
• Entrance Audition
To be admitted to a music major program, prospective
students must audition for the music faculty.
• Declaration of Major
Students interested in majoring in music should complete an
academic program contract declaring a music major during
their first semester of enrollment in the program. They will
be assigned a music faculty advisor who will assure that the
student receives help in exploring the various majors and in
scheduling music study in the most efficient and economical
manner. Majors can always be changed later.
• Ensemble Requirement
Music majors are required to participate every semester in
one of the music ensembles specified in their major.
(Exception: semesters involving study abroad and/or student
teaching.)
• Keyboard Proficiency
Basic keyboard skills are required in all music majors (BM,
BME, BMA, BA). Attainment of adequate keyboard skills is
determined by successful completion (letter grade of “C” or
better) in MUSI 122 Keyboarding II.
• Language Requirement
Vocal performance majors are required to take at least one
year of language study (two regular semesters) in French or
German (see department handbook).
• Music Electives
MUSI 111 and/or MUSI 113 may not count for music
electives in a music major degree program.
• Grades and Grade Point Policy
• Only grades of C or higher in music courses may be
counted toward the major. Courses in which the student
receives lower than a C must be repeated, unless the
department authorizes substitute course work.
• Majors must maintain a 2.5 cumulative grade point
average in academic music courses (private lessons and
ensembles excluded) to remain in the program (see
department handbook).
Music Major Assessment
Students pursuing Bachelor of Music (B.M.), Bachelor of Music
Education (B.M.E.), Bachelor of Musical Arts (B.M.A.) or
Bachelor of Arts in music (B.A.) degrees will have their progress
and potential assessed at the end of the first, sophomore, junior,
and senior years. Assessments are made by the music faculty via
progress reviews, juries, and public presentations. Outcomes are
pass/fail; students who fail an assessment will not be allowed to
continue in the music program (see department handbook).
MUSIC CORE
The following core is required in all music degree programs:
MUSI 120: Music and Culture
4
MUSI 121, 122: Keyboarding
2
MUSI 124, 223, 224: Theory
7
MUSI 234, 333, 334: Music History
9
MUSI 125, 126, 225, 226: Ear Training
4
Total Semester Hours:
26
REQUIRED MUSIC CORE SEQUENCE
All entering first-year students who intend to major in music must
follow the required music core sequence in the indicated years.
YEAR 1
Fall 
MUSI 111/113: Fundamentals – prerequisite to 
MUSI 124
MUSI 115/121: Keyboarding Class (1) per 
placement
MUSI 120: Music and Culture (4) (if preferred, 
can take 120 and Culture spring semester)
MUSI 125: Ear Training I (1)
Spring MUSI 116/122: Keyboarding Class (1) 
per placement
MUSI 124: Theory I (3)
MUSI 126: Ear Training II (1)
MUSI 120: Music and Culture (4), if not taken 
in fall]
YEAR 2
Fall
MUSI 121: Keyboarding I (1) per placement
MUSI 223: Theory II (3)
MUSI 225: Ear Training II (1)
Spring MUSI 122: Keyboarding II (1) per placement
MUSI 224: Jazz Theory Lab (1) &
MUSI 226: Ear Training IV (1)
MUSI 234: History I (3)
YEAR 3
Fall
MUSI 333: History II
Spring MUSI 334: 20th Century Music
Music Core requirements must be fulfilled by enrollment in specific
courses and may not be taken by means of independent study.
• BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) MAJOR
-Maximum of 44 semester hours including:
• Includes Music Core:  (26 semester hours), and
• Four semester hours of ensemble
• Six semester hours (two courses) from MUSI 336, 337, 
and/or 338 
• Four semester hours of private instruction from 
MUSI 201–219 
• Two semester hours of private instruction from 
MUSI 401–419
• Two semester of Senior Project: Research paper and public 
presentation (MUSI 499). See department handbook for 
details). 
• In addition to requirements listed above, BA degree 
candidates must:
• Meet College of Arts and Sciences requirements
(Option I, II); and
• Take a non-music arts elective course in visual arts,
theatre or dance.
• BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION (BME) 
DEGREE
- 63 semester hours
• Bachelor of Music Education: K-12 Choral
• Bachelor of Music Education: K-12 Instrumental (Band) 
• Bachelor of Music Education: K-12 Instrumental 
(Orchestra)
116
PLU 2007 - 2008
Music
M
• MUSIC EDUCATION CORE
All BME degrees include the following music education core 
courses:
Required Components
MUSI 240: Foundations of Music Education
3
MUSI 340: Fundamentals of Music Education
2
MUSI 343: Materials and Methods for Secondary 
General Music
2
MUSI 345: Conducting I
1
MUSI 346: Conducting II
1
MUSI 347: Adaptive Music
1
MUSI 348: Practicum in Music Education
1
MUSI 445: Conducting III
1
MUSI 446: Conducting IV
1
MUSI 469: Student Teaching Seminar
2
Total Semester Hours:
15
• DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
AND LEADERSHIP SEQUENCE
In addition to the music courses listed, all music education
majors are required to take the following courses in the
Department of Instructional Development and Leadership.
Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
Components
EDUC 391: Foundations of Learning
3
EPSY 361: Psychology for Teaching
3
SPED 320: Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect
1
EDUC 468: Student Teaching - Secondary
10
Total Semester Hours:
17 
• MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULA
K–12 Choral (Elementary or Secondary Emphasis)
Music Core
26
MUSI 360–363: Large Ensemble
6
MUSI 204/404/499: ** Private Instruction Voice 
(six semesters*)
6
Music Education Core
15
MUSI 421: Advanced Keyboard (private study)
2
MUSI 440: Methods and Materials for K–9 Music I
2
MUSI 443: Methods for Secondary Choral Music
2
MUSI 441: Methods and Materials of K–9 Music II 
or MUSI 444: Materials for Secondary Choral Music  2
MUSI 453: Vocal Pedagogy
2
Total Semester Hours:
63 
First-year, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior assessments required.
Completion of all music requirements required prior to student
teaching. Department of Instructional Development and
Instruction sequence required.
* Consecutive fall/spring semesters.
** Senior Project: Half recital. 
K-12 Instrumental (Band)
Music Core
26
MUSI 370, 371, 380: Large Ensemble***
5
MUSI 381: Chamber Ensemble
1
MUSI 202–219, 402–419, 499:** Private 
Instruction: Principal Instrument (six semesters*)
6
Music Education Core
15
MUSI 204: Private Instruction - Voice
1
MUSI 241: String Lab
1
MUSI 243/244: Woodwind Laboratory
(1, 1)
MUSI 245/246: Brass Laboratory 
(1, 1)
4
MUSI 247: Percussion Laboratory 
(1)
Music 447: Methods for School Band Music
2
Music 448: Methods for School Band Music
2
Total Semester Hours:
63 
First-year, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior assessments required.
Completion of all music requirements required prior to student
teaching. Department of Instructional Development and
Instruction sequence required.
* Consecutive fall/spring semesters.
** Senior Project: Half recital.
***Minimum four semesters of MUSI 370, 371
K-12 Instrumental (Orchestra)
Music Core
26
MUSI 370, 371, 380: Large Ensemble***
5
MUSI 381: Chamber Ensemble
1
MUSI 202–219, 402–419, 499:** Private 
Instruction: Principal Instrument (6 semesters*)
6
Music Education Core
15
MUSI 204: Private Instruction - Voice 
1
MUSI 241/242: String Lab 
(1, 1)
2
MUSI 243: Woodwind Laboratory 
(1)
1
MUSI 245: Brass Laboratory 
(1)
1
MUSI 427: Percussion Laboratory 
(1) 
1
MUSI 455: String Pedagogy
2
MUSI 456: Methods and Materials for School Strings
2
Total Semester Hours:
63 
First-year, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior assessments required.
Completion of all music requirements required prior to student
teaching. Department of Instructional Development and
Instruction sequence required.
* Consecutive fall/spring semesters.
** Senior Project: Half recital.
*** Minimum four semesters of MUSI 380
• BACHELOR OF MUSICAL ARTS (BMA) DEGREE
Music Core
26
Music Large Ensemble
8
MUSI 202–219: Private Instruction: (4 semesters*)
4
MUSI 402–419:Private Instruction: (4 semesters*)
4
MUSI 336: Making Music
3
MUSI 337: Analyzing Music
3
MUSI 338: Researching Music
3
MUSI 390/391: Intensive Performance Study
4
MUSI 499: Senior Project**
4
Music Electives
3
Total Semester Hours:
62 
Cognate Required: An academic minor or second major 
outside of music.
First-year, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior assessments required.
* Consecutive fall/spring semesters.
** Senior Project: Research paper and public presentation (see
department handbook for details).
• BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE
Music Core
26
Music Private Instruction (see concentrations below)
(eight semesters*)
22*
PLU 2007 - 2008
117
Music
M
Music Ensemble (see concentrations below)
8
MUSI 336: Making Music  
3
MUSI 337: Analyzing Music
3
MUSI 338: Researching Music
3
MUSI 390/391: Intensive Performance Study
4
Music Concentration Module (see below)
7
Music Electives
4
Total Semester Hours:
80 
First-year, Sophomore, Junior and Senior assessments required.
For vocal performance: language study required (see above)
* Consecutive fall/spring semesters; continuous non-jazz study
throughout the program required.
• B.M. CONCENTRATIONS 
• Composition 
Private instruction: MUSI 327/499 (Senior Project) (16);
principal instrument MUSI 202-219/401-419 (8); module
(7): MUSI 345, 346, module electives (5).
• Instrumental
Private instruction: MUSI 205-219 (10), MUSI 401/405-
419/499 (12), including MUSI 499 (Senior Project: full
recital); ensemble: MUSI 370, 371, 380; module (7):
MUSI 345, 346, 358, 381 (2), 454 or 420.
• Organ
Private instruction: MUSI 203/403/499 (Senior Project:
full recital) (22); ensemble: including MUSI 381; module
(7): MUSI 219, 345, 346, 352, 358, 454 or 420.
• Piano
Private instruction: MUSI 202/402 (10), MUSI
201/401/402/499 (12); including MUSI 499 (Senior
Project: full recital); ensemble: large (2), MUSI 351 (2),
MUSI 383 (2), piano ensemble elective (2); module (7):
MUSI 219, 345, 358, 430, 431, 451, 452.
• Voice
Private instruction: MUSI 204/404/499 (Senior Project:
full recital) MUSI 355, 356 (22); ensemble: MUSI 360-
363; module (7): MUSI 345, 353, 358, 366, 453.
• MINORS
• General - 22 semester hours including:
• MUSI 120
• One of the following:
• MUSI 115, 116, 121, 122 or 202 (one semester hour)
• MUSI 124, 125, 126
• Four semester hours of Private Instruction (MUSI 
202-219)
• Four semester hours of Ensemble (MUSI 360-384)
• One of the following:
• MUSI 101-106, 234, 333, 334
• 0-1 semester hour of music elective.
• Specialized - 32 semester hours
Including courses required in the General Minor as listed
above (22 semester hours), plus:
• Four additional semester hours of Private Instruction 
(MUSI 401-419)
• Six additional hours from one of the Bachelor of Music 
concentration modules (see below)
• Or in jazz study as listed below
• JAZZ STUDY AT PLU
• Students interested in pursuing the academic study of
jazz at PLU have three options:
• Specialized Music Minor in Jazz - 32 semester hours
• Including:
• Courses in the general minor (22 semester hours), plus
• Four additional semester hours of private instruction Six 
additional semester hours, including MUSI 103, 224,
and 427
• Jazz students may fulfill the ensemble requirement in the:
• University Jazz Ensemble (MUSI 375); Vocal Jazz
Ensemble (MUSI 378) or combos (MUSI 381) 
• Jazz study in combination with an outside, nonmusic
field (Bachelor of Musical Arts degree) - 62 semester
hours.
Jazz students may major in music under the BMA degree
while combining music studies with a non-music academic
minor or second major.
• Jazz study in combination with nonjazz (classical)
performance study (Bachelor of Music degree) - 80
semester hours.
Instrumental jazz students may major in performance (see
Bachelor of Music below) in which up to half the studio
instruction and recital literature can be in jazz (see academic
program contract for details).
• PRIVATE MUSIC LESSONS - Special fee in addition 
to tuition
• One semester hour
Fall and Spring Semesters: One half-hour private or two one-
hour class lessons per week (12 weeks) in addition to daily
practice. January: Two 45-minute lessons per week in addition
to daily practice. Summer: Six hours of instruction to be
announced in addition to daily practice. Students in piano,
voice, and guitar may be as-signed to class instruction at the
discretion of the music faculty.
• Two semester hours
Fall and Spring Semesters: Two half-hour lessons per week (12
weeks) in addition to daily practice. Summer: 12 hours of
instruction to be announced in addition to daily practice.
• Three or four semester hours
By permission of department only.
Course Offerings – Music (MUSI) 
MUSI 101: Introduction to Music – AR
Introduction to music literature with emphasis on listening,
structure, period, and style. Designed to enhance the enjoyment
and understanding of music. Not open to majors. (4)
MUSI 102: Understanding Music Through Melody – AR
Introduction to the musical arts through exploration of melody
as a primary musical impulse in a variety of musical styles.
Designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of all
music through increased sensitivity to melody. Not open to
majors. (4)
118
PLU 2007 - 2008
Music
M
MUSI 103: History of Jazz – AR
Survey of America’s unique art Form-Jazz: With emphasis on
history, listening, structure, and style from early developments
through recent trends. (4)
MUSI 104: Music and Technology – AR
Survey of the impact of technology on the musical arts, from the
evolution of musical instruments and the acoustic space through
the audio/video/computer technology of today. (4)
MUSI 105:The Arts of China – AR, C
Exploration of a number of Chinese art forms, primarily music
but also including calligraphy, painting, tai chi, poetry, Beijing
opera, film and cuisine. (4)
MUSI 106: Music of Scandinavia – AR, C
Survey of Scandinavian music from the Bronze Age to the
present, with primary focus on the music of Norway, Sweden,
and Denmark. (4)
MUSI 111: Music Fundamentals I – AR
Develops skills in reading and notating music. Rudiments of
musical theory: key signatures, clefs, and major scales. Requires
previous musical experience and the ability to read music.
Partially fulfills the general university requirements in arts; may
be combined with MUSI 113 in a single semester to complete
the general university requirements in arts. (2)
MUSI 113: Music Fundamentals II – AR
A continuation of MUSI 111. Minor scales, intervals, triads and
diatonic 7th chords. Partially fulfills the general university
requirement in arts; may be combined with 111 in a single
semester to complete the general university requirement in arts.
Prerequisite: MUSI 111 or consent of instructor. (2)
MUSI 115: Introduction to Keyboarding – AR
Beginning skills in keyboard performance. Requires no previous
keyboard experience. Prerequisite for Music 116; intended for
music majors or minors in preparation for keyboard requirements
in the music core. Consent of instructor required. (1)
MUSI 116: Basic Keyboarding – AR
A continuation of MUSI 115. Prerequisite: MUSI 115 or
consent of instructor. (1)
MUSI 120: Music and Culture – AR, C
Introduction to ethnomusicological considerations of a variety of
music traditions. Requires no previous music experience. Required
for music majors and minors; prerequisite course for MUSI 124;
corequisite (fall term): MUSI 111/113 or consent of department
chair, (spring term): MUSI 124 or consent of department chair. (4)
MUSI 121: Keyboarding I – AR
Development of keyboarding skills, including sight-reading,
group performance, and harmonization of simple melodies.
Prerequisite: 116 or consent of instructor. (1)
MUSI 122: Keyboarding II – AR
A continuation of MUSI 121. Prerequisite: MUSI 121 or
consent of instructor. (1)
MUSI 124: Theory I – AR
An introduction to the workings of music, including common-
practice harmony, jazz theory, and elementary formal analysis.
Prerequisite: MUSI 113 or consent of instructor. (3)
MUSI 125: Ear Training I – AR
Development of aural skills, including interval recognition, sight-
singing, rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation. (1)
MUSI 126: Ear Training II – AR
Continuation of MUSI 125. Prerequisite: MUSI 125 or consent
of instructor. (1)
MUSI 201A, B, or C: Private Instruction: Jazz – AR
Prerequisite: Two semesters of non-jazz study (MUSI 202-219)
or permission of the Director of Jazz Studies. (1, 2, 3 or 4).
Special fee in addition to tuition. See page 117.
MUSI 202A, B or C: Private Instruction: Piano – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 203A, B or C: Private Instruction: Organ – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 204A, B or C: Private and Class Instruction: Voice –
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 205A, B or C: Private Instruction: Violin/Viola – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 206A, B or C: Private Instruction: Cello/Bass – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 207A, B or C: Private Instruction: Flute – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 208A, B or C: Private Instruction: Oboe/English
Horn – AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 209A, B or C: Private Instruction: Bassoon – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 210A, B or C: Private Instruction: Clarinet – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 211A, B or C: Private Instruction: Saxophone – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 212A, B or C: Private Instruction: Trumpet – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 213A, B or C: Private Instruction: French Horn –
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 214A, B or C: Private Instruction: Trombone – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 215A, B or C: Private Instruction: Baritone/Tuba –
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 216A, B or C: Private Instruction: Percussion – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 217A, B or C: Private and Class Instruction: Guitar
– AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 218A, B or C: Private Instruction: Harp – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
MUSI 219A, B or C: Private Instruction: Harpsichord – 
AR (1, 2, 3 or 4)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested