PLU 2007 - 2008
129
Nursing • Philosophy
P
beginning leadership and resource management skills.
Prerequisites: NURS 360, 370, 380, achievement of Senior I
status. (4)
NURS 430: Nursing Situations with Communities
Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to
apply the nursing process to situations with the community as
client. Prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 420,
achievement of Senior I status. (5)
NURS 440: Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult
Health II
Focuses on the core knowledge and competencies necessary to
apply the nursing process to situations with individuals
experiencing complex alterations in health. Prerequisites: NURS
360, 370, and 380, achievement of Senior I status. (4)
NURS 441: Senior Seminar
NURS 460: Health Care Systems and Policy
Analysis of the social, political, legal, and economic factors that
influence health care including trends in health policy and ethical
issues relevant to health care delivery. Open to non-nursing
students with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite for
majors: NURS 260, Senior II. (2)
NURS 478: Elective Clinical Experience
An exploration and application of nursing knowledge and roles
in a selected clinical environment. Pass/fail option. Open to
students who have completed their junior-level nursing courses
or have received permission of the faculty. (1–4)
NURS 480: Professional Foundations II
Critical evaluation of role transition into professional nursing.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in NURS 499,
achievement of Senior II status. (2)
NURS 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisite: Permission of the dean. (1–4)
NURS 493: Internship Abroad (1–4)
NURS 499: Capstone: Nursing Synthesis – SR
Synthesis of core knowledge, competencies, professional values,
and leadership skills in nursing situations mentored by a
professional nurse preceptor. Prerequisites: NURS 420, 430,
440, 441, prior or concurrent enrollment in NURS 460 and
480, achievement of Senior II status. (6)
See the Graduate School of Nursing for graduate level courses.
Philosophy
253.535.7213
www.plu.edu/~phil 
phil@plu.edu
Philosophy is the parent academic discipline that gave birth to
today’s variety of arts and sciences. It examines basic issues in all
fields and explores connections among diverse areas of life. In
philosophy the most fundamental and enduring of questions are
addressed: How can humans gain knowledge about their world?
What limits are there to that knowledge? What is the ultimate
nature of the universe? In particular, what is the nature of the
human person, and what role or purpose is ours? How should we
live? Are there moral, aesthetic, and religious values that can be
adopted rationally and used to guide our decisions? Study in
philosophy acquaints students with major rival views of the
world, encourages them to think precisely and systematically, and
helps them to see life critically, appreciatively, and whole.
F
aculty
:
G. Johnson, Chair; Cooper, Hogan, Kaurin, McKenna,
Menzel, Phelps.
Uses of Philosophy
Courses in philosophy help students who (1) recognize
philosophy as a central element in a quality liberal arts education;
(2) wish to support their undergraduate work in other fields,
such as literature, history, political science, religion, the sciences,
education, or business; (3) plan to use their study of philosophy
in preparation for graduate study in law, theology, or medicine;
or (4) are considering graduate work in philosophy itself, usually
with the intention of teaching in the field.
Undergraduate study in philosophy is not meant to train
specifically for a first job. Instead, it serves to sharpen basic skills
in critical thinking, problem solving, research, analysis,
interpretation, and writing. It also provides critical perspective on
and a deep appreciation of ideas and issues that have intrigued
humanity throughout the ages, including those central to the
Western intellectual heritage. This prepares students for a great
variety of positions of responsibility, especially when coupled
with specialized training in other disciplines. Those with the
highest potential for advancement generally have more than just
specialized training; rather, they bring to their work breadth of
perspective, intellectual flexibility and depth, and well-honed
skills in critical thought and communication.
Why a Philosophy Requirement
Students who take philosophy engage in a systematic and
sustained examination of the basic concepts of life, such as
justice, knowledge, goodness, and the self. By scrutinizing
methods, assumptions, and implications, they are able to explore
lifelong questions of meaning, thought, and action. They acquire
historical perspective on the diversity of human thought and
tolerance for the considered opinions of others. Through the
collective exploration of, and reasoned argument over, difficult
ideas, students develop autonomy in their decision-making.
Philosophy is vital to the formation of meaning and purpose in
students’ lives and provides an indispensable framework for
developing a sense of vocation - Who am I? What values should
we hold? What really is the common good to which I might
contribute? What kind of life should I live? In short, the active
study of philosophy is essential “to empower students for lives of
thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership and care — for other
persons, for the community and for the earth.”
University Core Requirement
The Distributive Core I requirement of four semester hours in
philosophy may be satisfied with any course offered except for
PHIL 233: Formal Logic.
The initial course in philosophy is customarily PHIL 121, PHIL
125, or a 200-level course that provides a more focused topic but
Pdf rotate pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf page order reverse; rotate pdf page
Pdf rotate pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate all pages in pdf file; rotate pdf pages in reader
130
PLU 2007 - 2008
Philosophy
P
is still at the introductory level (PHIL 220, 223, 228, 230, 238,
253). The 300-level courses are suited for students with
particular interests who are capable of working at the upper-
division level. Courses offered through correspondence, on-line,
and independent studies are not accepted to meet core
requirement in philosophy.
MINOR
16 semester hours of approved philosophy courses; for transfer
students, at least eight hours must be taken at PLU. Students
considering a minor should discuss their personal goals with
departmental faculty.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR 
• Minimum of 32 semester hours, including PHIL 233, 
330, 332, and 499.
• On approval of the department, one course (four hours) in
another field of study may be used for a double major in
philosophy if it has a direct relationship to the student’s
philosophy program. Transfer students will normally take 16
or more of their 32 hours at PLU. Students intending to
major in philosophy should formally declare this with the
department chair and choose a departmental advisor.
• Students must be a declared philosophy major in order to be 
eligible for departmental scholarships.
HONORS MAJOR
In addition to the above requirements for the major:
• PHIL 493: Honors Research Project, including an honors 
thesis written under the supervision of one or more faculty 
members and presented to the department.
• Completion of the departmental reading program of
primary sources. Honors majors in philosophy are expected to
complement their regular courses by reading and discussing
three or four important works under the personal supervision
of department faculty. The reading list should be obtained at
an early date from the department chair. It is best that the
reading program not be concentrated into a single semester,
but pursued at a leisurely pace over an extended period.
• At least a 3.30 grade point average in philosophy courses, 
including at least a “B” in PHIL 493.
Course Offerings – Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 121: The Examined Life – PH
Introduces philosophy by considering perennial topics and issues,
such as what makes an action right or wrong and whether belief
in God is reasonable. Includes a focus on developing skills in
critical and systematic thinking. (4) 
PHIL 125: Ethics and the Good Life – PH
Major moral theories of Western civilization, including
contemporary moral theories. Critical application to selected
moral issues. (4)
PHIL 220: Women and Philosophy – A, PH
An examination and critique of historically important theories
from Western philosophy concerning women’s nature and 
place in society, followed by an examination and critique of 
the writings of women philosophers, historic and 
contemporary. (4)
PHIL 223: Biomedical Ethics – PH
An examination of significant controversies in contemporary
biomedical ethics, of major moral philosophies, and of their
interrelationships. (4)
PHIL 224: Military Ethics – PH
An examination of major ethical theories (Aristotle, Stoicism,
Kant and Mill) and their applications to current moral issues in
warfare and the military including: morality of war, laws of war,
military culture and the warrior ethos, the role of the military in
international affairs and terrorism. (4)
PHIL 225: Business Ethics – PH
Application of moral theories and perspectives of relevance to
business practices. Examination of underlying values and
assumptions in specific business cases involving, e.g., employer-
employee relations, advertising, workplace conflict, and
environmental and social responsibilities. Pass/fail options do
not apply to business majors either declared or intending to
declare. (4)
PHIL 228: Social and Political Philosophy – PH
An examination of major social and political theories of Western
philosophy (including Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill,
Marx). Includes feminist and non-Western contributions and
critiques. Can count for a Political Science minor. (4)
PHIL 230: Philosophy, Animals, and the Environment – PH
Examines issues such as resource distribution and consumption,
obligations to future generations and the nonhuman life. Various
moral theories are examined and applied to ethical issues such as
preservation of endangered species, animal experimentation,
factory farming, resource consumption, pollution, and
population growth. Concepts such as wilderness, nature/natural,
and consciousness are also addressed. (4)
PHIL 233: Formal Logic
Principles of sound reasoning and argument. Development and
practical use of formal logical systems, with a focus on symbolic
logic. Includes an introduction to inductive and abductive
reasoning. Not for philosophy core requirement; counts toward
Option III of the College of Arts and Sciences requirement. (4)
PHIL 238: Existentialism and the Meaning of Life - PH
An introduction to the philosophical movement known as
Existentialism. The course will explore themes central to human
experience (such as alienation, guilt, suffering, joy and boredom),
with a goal of asking how existentialism engages these ideas
relative to the question of human meaning. As an introductory
course we will survey specifically the major thinkers of this
tradition and illustrate how existentialism connects to other areas
such as religion, psychology and literature. (4) 
PHIL 253: Creation and Evolution – PH
Examination of the controversy surrounding the origin of life.
Includes a historical introduction to the controversy;
investigation into the nature of science, faith, evidence, and facts;
and critical evaluation of three major origin theories: creationism,
theistic evolution, and non-theistic evolution. (4)
PHIL 291: Directed Studies (1–4)
PHIL 328: Philosophical Issues in the Law – PH
An examination of philosophical issues in law using actual cases
as well as philosophical writings. Topics may include the nature
of law, judicial reasoning, rights, liberty, responsibility, and
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
rotate pages in pdf expert; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
PLU 2007 - 2008
131
Philosophy • Physics
P
punishment. Prerequisite: One previous philosophy course, or
POLS 170, or permission of instructor. (4)
PHIL 330: Studies in the History of Philosophy – PH
In-depth study of major figures, texts, and topics in a selected
historical period. These may include: ancient, sixteenth to
eighteenth century, Kant and the nineteenth century. May be
repeated for credit. (4)
PHIL 332: Themes in Contemporary Philosophy – PH 
In-depth study of selected themes and issues in 20th- and 21st-
century philosophy. These may includes: Analytic, Pragmatism,
and Continental. May be repeated for credit. (4)
PHIL 350: God, Faith, and Reason – PH
Classical and contemporary views of traditional issues regarding
the nature and rationality of religious belief, with a focus on
monotheistic religions and a unit on religious pluralism.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or religion. (4)
PHIL 353: Topics in Philosophy – PH
Study of selected topics in philosophy, such as value theory,
science, metaphysics, epistemology, feminism, film or health care.
May be repeated for credit. (2-4)
PHIL 491: Independent Reading and Research
Prerequisite: Departmental consent. (1–4)
PHIL 493: Honors Research Project
The writing of an honors thesis and final completion of the
reading program in primary sources required for the honors major.
Presentation of thesis to department majors and faculty. (4)
PHIL 499: Capstone: Advanced Seminar in Philosophy – SR
Exploration in a seminar format of an important philosophical
issue, thinker, or movement. Topic to be announced at the time
course is offered. Prerequisite: Three philosophy courses or
consent of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)
Physics
253.535.7534
www.nsci.plu.edu/phys 
physics@plu.edu
Physics is the scientific study of the material universe at its most
fundamental level: the mathematical description of space and time,
and the behavior of matter from the elementary particles to the
universe as a whole. A physicist might study the inner workings of
atoms and nuclei, the size and age of the universe, the behavior of
high-temperature superconductors, or the life cycles of stars.
Physicists use high-energy accelerators to search for quarks; they
design new laser systems for applications in medicine and
communications; they heat hydrogen gases to temperatures
higher than the sun’s core in the attempt to develop nuclear
fusion as an energy resource. From astrophysics to nuclear
physics to optics and crystal structure, physics encompasses some
of the most fundamental and exciting ideas ever considered.
F
aculty:
Louie, Chair; Gerganov, Greenwood, Rush, Starkovich,
Tang.
PHYSICS MAJOR
The physics major offers a challenging program emphasizing a
low student-teacher ratio and the opportunity to engage in
independent research projects. There are two introductory course
sequences, College Physics and General Physics; the General
Physics sequence incorporates calculus and is required for the
Bachelor of Science major.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR
• PHYS 153, 154, 163, 164, 223, 331, 332, 333, 336, 354,
356, 499A, 499B. 
• Strongly recommended: PHYS 401 and 406
• Chemistry 341 or PHYS 321 may be substituted for PHYS 333
• Required supporting courses: CHEM 115; MATH 151, 
152, 253
A typical BS physics major program is as follows:
First-year
PHYS 153, 163
MATH 151, 152
Sophomore
PHYS 154, 164, 223, 354
MATH 253
Junior
PHYS 331, 332, 336, 356
CHEM 115
Senior
PHYS 333, 401 or 406, 499A, 499B
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR
• PHYS 153 or 125; 154 or 126; 163 or 135; 164 or 136; 223,
499A, 499B
Plus eight additional, upper-division semester hours in physics. 
Required supporting courses: MATH 151, 152, 253.
MINOR
• PHYS 153 or 125; 154 or 126; 163 or 135; 164 or 136; 223
Plus eight additional semester hours in physics (excluding
PHYS 110), of which at least four must be upper division.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN APPLIED PHYSICS
Also available is a major in Applied Physics, which includes a
substantial selection of courses from engineering to provide a
challenging and highly versatile degree. Applied Physics can 
lead to research or advanced study in such areas as robotics—
with application in space exploration or joint and limb
prosthetics; growth of single-crystal metals, which would be
thousands of times stronger than the best steels now available;
mechanics of material failure, such as metal fatigue and fracture;
turbulence in fluid flow; photovoltaic cell research for solar
energy development; or applications of fluid flow and
thermodynamics to the study of planetary atmospheres and
ocean currents.
While many Applied Physics graduates pursue professional
careers in industry immediately after graduation from PLU, the
program also provides excellent preparation for graduate study in
nearly all fields of engineering.
• PHYS 153, 154, 163, 164, 223, 331, 334, 354, 356, 
499A, 499B
• CSCE 131
Plus four courses, one of which must be upper division, selected
from: 
• CSCE 245, 345, 346
• PHYS 210, 240, 333; PHYS 336 may be substituted for 
PHYS 240
• Chemistry 341 or PHYS 321 may be substituted for PHYS 333
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; PDFDocument doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex); // Output the new
rotate one page in pdf; rotate pdf pages by degrees
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
pdf save rotated pages; save pdf rotated pages
132
PLU 2007 - 2008
Physics
P
Required supporting courses: 
• CHEM 115
• CSCE 144 or 240
• MATH 151, 152, 253
A typical applied physics program is as follows:
First-year
PHYS 153, 163
CSCE 131
MATH 151, 152
Sophomore
PHYS 154, 164, 240, 354
MATH 253
Junior
PHYS 223, 333, 356
CHEM 115, CSCE 144
Senior
PHYS 331, 334, 499A, 499B
CSCE 245
Course Offerings – Physics (PHYS)
Fall
PHYS 110, 125, 135, 154, 164, 240, 331, 
333, 356, 499A
Spring 
PHYS 126, 136, 153, 163, 210, 223, 321,
332, 334, 336, 354, 499B
Summer 
PHYS 110, 125, 126, 135, 136 
Alternate Years PHYS 321, 332, 401, 406
A grade of C- or better is required in all prerequisite courses.
PHYS 110: Astronomy – NS, SM
Stars and their evolution, galaxies and larger structures,
cosmology, and the solar system. Emphasis on observational
evidence. Evening observing sessions. Prerequisite:
MATH 111 or Math placement score of 111 or above. (4)
PHYS 125: College Physics I – NS, SM
An introduction to the fundamental topics of physics. It is a non-
calculus sequence, involving only the use of trigonometry and
college algebra. Concurrent registration in (or previous
completion of) PHYS 135 is required. Prerequisite: MATH 128
or 140 (or equivalent by placement exam) with a C- or higher. (4)
PHYS 126: College Physics II – NS, SM
An introduction to fundamental topics of physics. It is a non-
calculus sequence, involving only the use of trigonometry and
college algebra. Concurrent registration in (or previous
completion of) PHYS 136 is required. Prerequisite: 
PHYS 125 with a C- or higher.
PHYS 135: College Physics I Laboratory 
Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with
the College Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS
125 is required. (1)
PHYS 136: College Physics II Laboratory 
Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with
the College Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS
126 is required. (1)
PHYS 153: General Physics I – NS, SM
A calculus-level survey of the general fields of physics, including
classical mechanics, wave motion, and thermodynamics.
Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS 163
is required. Concurrent registration in (or previous completion
of) MATH 152 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: MATH
151 with a C- or higher. (4)
PHYS 154: General Physics II – NS, SM
A calculus-level survey of the general fields of physics, including
electricity and magnetism, and optics. Concurrent registration in
(or previous completion of) PHYS 164 is required.
Prerequisites: MATH 152, PHYS 153 with a C- or higher. (4)
PHYS 163: General Physics I Laboratory 
Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with
the General Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS
153 is required. (1)
PHYS 164: General Physics II Laboratory 
Basic laboratory experiments are performed in conjunction with
the General Physics sequence. Concurrent registration in PHYS
154 is required. (1)
PHYS 210: Musical Acoustics - NS, SM
A study of sound and music using physical methods; vibrating
systems; simple harmonic motion; wave motion; complex waves
and Fourier synthesis; wave generation in musical instruments;
physiology of hearing; architectural acoustics; electronic
recording and amplification. Includes weekly laboratory. No
prerequisites in physics or mathematics beyond the PLU entrance
requirements are assumed. (4)
PHYS 223: Elementary Modern Physics – NS
A selected treatment of various physical phenomena which are
inadequately described by classical methods of physics.
Interpretations which have been developed for these phenomena
since approximately 1900 are presented at an elementary level.
Prerequisites: PHYS 154 and MATH 253. (4)
PHYS 240: Engineering Statics – NS
Engineering statics using vector algebra; equilibrium of rigid
bodies; equivalent force and moment systems; centroids and
center of gravity; trusses and frames; methods of virtual work;
shear and bending moment diagrams; moments of inertia.
Prequisite: PHYS 153. (4)
PHYS 321: Introduction to Astrophysics - NS
Application of physics to the study of stellar structure, galactic
astronomy, and cosmology. Introduction to observational
techniques. Prerequisites: PHYS 154 and MATH 253.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 223 is recommended. (4)
PHYS 331: Electromagnetic Theory – NS
Electrostatics, dipole fields, fields in dielectric materials,
electromagnetic induction, and magnetic properties of matter, in
conjunction with the development of Maxwell’s equations.
Prerequisites: PHYS 153, 154 and MATH 253. (4)
PHYS 332: Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics – NS
Proceeding from Maxwell’s equations, the generation and
propagation of electromagnetic waves is developed with
particular emphasis on their application to physical optics.
Prerequisite: PHYS 331. (4)
PHYS 333: Engineering Thermodynamics – NS
Classical, macroscopic thermodynamics with applications to
physics, engineering, and chemistry. Thermodynamic state
variables, cycles, and potentials; flow and non-flow systems; pure
substances, mixtures, and solutions; phase transitions;
introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: 
PHYS 153 and MATH 253. (4)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
pdf rotate pages separately; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Steps to Rotate image.
how to rotate one pdf page; save pdf rotate pages
PLU 2007 - 2008
133
Political Science
P
PHYS 334: Engineering Materials Science – NS
Fundamentals of engineering materials including mechanical,
chemical, thermal, and electrical properties associated with
metals, polymers, composites, and alloys. Focus on how useful
material properties can be engineered through control of
microstructure. Prerequisites: PHYS 154; CHEM 115. (4)
PHYS 336: Classical Mechanics – NS
Applications of differential equations to particle dynamics; 
rigid body dynamics, including the inertia tensor and Euler’s
equations; calculus of variations; Lagrange’s equations and 
the Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics; symmetries and
conservation laws. Prerequisites: PHYS 154 and 
MATH 253. (4)
PHYS 354: Mathematical Physics I – NS
Ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, functions of
a complex variable, and contour integration are developed in the
context of examples from the fields of electromagnetism, waves,
transport, vibrations, and mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 154
and MATH 253. (4)
PHYS 356: Mathematical Physics II – NS
Fourier analysis, boundary-value problems, special functions, and
eigenvalue problems are developed and illustrated through
applications in physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 354. (4)
PHYS 401: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics – NS
The ideas and techniques of quantum mechanics are developed.
Concurrent registration in (or previous completion of) PHYS
356 is required. (4)
PHYS 406: Advanced Modern Physics – NS
Modern theories are used to describe topics of contemporary
importance such as atomic and sub-atomic phenomena, plasmas,
solid-state, and astrophysical events. Prerequisite: PHYS 401. (4)
PHYS 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
PHYS 497: Research (1–4)
PHYS 498: Research (1–4)
PHYS 499A: Advanced Laboratory I - SR
Selected experiments from both classical and modern physics are
performed using state of the art instrumentation. With 499B
meets the senior seminar/project requirement. (1)
PHYS 499B: Advanced Laboratory II – SR
Continuation of PHYS 499A with emphasis on design and
implementation of a project under the guidance of the physics
staff. With PHYS 499A meets the senior seminar/project
requirement. Prerequisite: PHYS 499A. (1)
Political Science
253.535.7595
www.plu.edu/~pols
pols@plu.edu
The student of politics seeks to understand how governments are
organized and structured, how political processes are employed,
and the relationship of structures and processes to societal
purposes. Political activity embodies and reflects the full range of
human values. The study of politics includes real world events
while at the same time asking how well political systems work,
what purposes they ought to serve, and what effects result from
political activity. Political science encourages a critical
understanding of government and politics in the belief that a
knowledgeable, interested, and aware citizenry remains vital to a
democratic society.
F
aculty:
Kelleher, Chair; Chavez, Dwyer-Shick, Grosvenor,
Olufs.
Courses in political science explore various topics in American
government and politics, international relations and foreign
policy, comparative government and area studies, political
philosophy and theory, and public policy and law. The
department provides pre-professional training leading to careers
in teaching, law, government, and related fields.
Students of political science are strongly encouraged to combine
the academic study of government and politics with practical
experience by participating in one of the internship programs
sponsored by the department.
The department sponsors or otherwise encourages active student
participation in political life through class activities and through
such campus organizations as the Young Democrats and the
Young Republicans.
There are no prerequisites for political science courses, except as
noted. Prior consultation with the instructor of any advanced
course is invited. Students wishing to pursue a major or minor in
political science are requested to declare the major or minor with
the department chair as soon as possible.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR
36 semester hours
Required courses: POLS 101, 151, 325, 499 (16 semester hours)
Distributional requirement: One course from each of Group A
and Group B (eight semester hours)
Group A –  American Government and Public Policy
POLS 338, 345, 346, 353, 354, 361, 363, 34, 
368, 31, 372, 373
Group B –  International Relations and Comparative 
Government
POLS 331, 332, 347, 380, 381, 383, 384,
385, 386
Research and Writing Requirement: One 300-level course
designated as an “intensive writing course” indicating that it has
a substantial research/writing component. Courses that qualify in
Group A are: POLS 345, 353, 354, 361, 372 and 373. courses in
Group B are: POLS 331, 332, 380, 384 and 385.
Electives: Minimum of 12 semester hours selected from the
Political Science curriculum
Majors should plan their course of study in consultation with their
departmental advisor. An internship (POL 450, 458, 464 or 471)
may be substituted for POLS 499 when its graded requirements
include research and writing a substantive capstone report/project.
Students must pre-plan this option with the appropriate faculty
intern supervisor in consultation with the department chair.
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
rotate all pages in pdf preview; pdf rotate one page
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
how to rotate pdf pages and save; pdf reverse page order preview
134
PLU 2007 - 2008
Political Science
P
MINOR
Minimum of 20 semester hours including POLS 101 and POLS
151. Minor programs should be planned in consultation with the
departmental chair or a designated adviser.
Concurrent Attainment
No more than eight semester hours taken to satisfy other major
or minor requirements may also be applied to the political
science major. No more than four such semester hours may also
be applied to the political science minor.
Residency
A minimum of 12 semester hours for the major and eight
semester hours for the minor must be taken in residence at PLU.
MINOR IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS
24 semester hours, including POLS 345 (required) and 20 from
economics, political science, sociology, or statistics.
This minor offers an interdisciplinary study designed to support
many major programs whose content has implications for public
affairs and is particularly useful to students contemplating careers
in public service or graduate study in public administration,
public affairs, and related programs.
The Public Affairs minor includes the following requirements:
• POLS 345: Government and Public Policy
• At least five additional courses from three of the following
groups (courses which are taken as part of a major program
may not also count toward the Public Affairs minor): 
• Political Science - minimum of eight semester hours if this 
minor is selected
• POLS 151: American Government
• POLS 354: State and Local Government 
• POLS 363: Politics and the Media
• POLS 364: The Legislative Process
• Economics - minimum of eight semester hours if this minor is
selected
• ECON 101, 102: Principles of Macroeconomics and 
Microeconomics (or ECON 111: Principles of 
Microeconomics: Global and Environmental)
• ECON 321: Labor Economics
• ECON 327: Public Finance
• ECON 325: Industrial Organization and Public Policy 
• Sociology - minimum of 4 semester hours if this minor is 
selected
• SOCI 240: Social Problem
• SOCI 413: Crime and Society
• Statistics - minimum of 4 semester hours if this minor is 
selected
• STAT 231: Introductory Statistics
On approval by the Public Affairs advisor, up to eight semester
hours may be earned through participation in an internship
program as a substitute for courses listed above (except POLS
345). Internship opportunities are offered through several
departments, and through the Cooperative Education Program,
and provide students with actual work experience in diverse
public and private agencies. Students interested in internships are
urged to consult with their academic advisors and with intern
faculty advisors at an early date.
Students interested in the Public Affairs minor should declare the
minor in the Department of Political Science and consult with
the department’s Public Affairs advisor.
MINOR IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION 
Requires 20 semester hours as follows:
Four required courses:
POLS 331: International Relations (4)
POLS 332: International Conflict Resolution (4)
COMA 340: Conflict and Communication (4)
COMA 441: Conflict Management (4)
One elective - chosen from the following, or another course
selected in consultation with the minor’s faculty coordinator:
POLS 210: Global Perspectives (4)
COMA 304: Intercultural Communication (4)
MINOR IN LEGAL STUDIES
20 semester hours. For additional information, see Legal Studies.
PRE-LAW
For information, see Pre-professional Programs on pg. ????.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
For information, see Department of Instructional Development and
Leadership.
Course Offerings – Political Science (POLS) 
POLS 101: Introduction to Political Science – S1
An introduction to the major concepts, theories, ideas, and fields
of study relating to politics and governmental systems. (4)
POLS 151: American Government – S1
A survey of the constitutional foundations of the American
political system and of institutions, processes, and practices
relating to participation, decision-making, and public policy in
American national government. (4)
POLS 170: Introduction to Legal Studies – S1
An examination of the nature of law, judicial process, and
participant roles in the legal system. (4)
POLS 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change – C, S1
A survey of global issues: modernization and development;
economic change and international trade; diminishing resources;
war and resolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity.
(Cross-listed with ANTH 210 and HIST 210.) (4)
POLS 231: Current International Issues – S1
A survey course in international relations with emphasis on
current events. (4)
POLS 322: Scandinavia and World Issues - S1
This course traces the involvement of the Scandinavian countries
in world organizations, such as the United Nations and the roles
the countries have played in world politics. The focus will be on
the Nordic approach to democracy, aid to developing countries
PLU 2007 - 2008
135
Political Science
P
and peace making, as well as initiatives, projects and activities in
which Scandinavians are currently involved around the world.
Cross-listed with SCAN 322. (4)
POLS 325: Political Thought – S1
A survey of the origin and evolution of major political concepts
in ancient, medieval, and early modern times. Can count for a
Philosophy major or minor. (4)
POLS 326: Recent Political Thought – S1
A critical examination of the major ideologies of the modern
world. (4)
POLS 331: International Relations – S1
A systematic analysis of the international system highlighting
patterns in state interaction. Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 332: International Conflict Resolution - S1
This course will study several examples of peace processes and
compare them with conflict reduction/resolution models. At any
given time in recent years, over thirty violent conflicts, most of
them internal but some also external, tear apart societies, produce
extensive suffering, and threaten regional stability. Several
strategies have been tried, some relatively successfully, to end
such violence and begin the long, difficult process of achieving
peace. Intensive writing course. (4) 
POLS 338: American Foreign Policy – S1
The role of the United States in international affairs. An 
analysis of the major factors in the formulation and execution 
of the United States foreign policy and its impact on other
powers. (4)
POLS 345: Government and Public Policy – S1
An integrated approach to the nature of public policy, with
emphasis on substantive problems, the development of policy
responses by political institutions, and the impacts of policies.
Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 346: Environmental Politics and Policy – S1
An examination of environmental problems from political
perspectives, including international and domestic political
contexts and methods of evaluating policies. (4)
POLS 347 Political Economy – S1
An examination of the ways that politics and economics
coincide. Topics include the development of capitalism, socialist
approaches, international issues, regional examples, and methods
of study. Prerequisite: POLS 101 and ECON 101 or 102 or
111. (4)
POLS 353: United States Citizenship and Ethnic 
Relations – A, S1
This course will focus on the political incorporation in the
United States polity of a variety of ethnic communities by
studying the evolution of United States citizenship policy.
Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 354: State and Local Government – S1
Governmental structures, processes, and policy at state, local, and
regional levels of the American system. Intensive writing 
course. (4)
POLS 356: Creating Community: Public 
Administration, S1
This course examines public service and civic engagement. It is
designed to teach students about public administration by
exploring methods of building community through public
service. Major issues in public administration will be covered as
well as its central importance in the implementation of public
policies and in sustaining a democratic polity. (4)
POLS 361: Political Parties and Elections – S1
Study of party and electoral systems with particular emphasis on
American parties and elections. Examination of party roles in
elections and government; party financing; interest groups and
political action committees; and voting behavior. Intensive
writing course. (4)
POLS 363: Politics and the Media – S1
The role of mass media in American government, politics, and
policy. Attention to political culture, public opinion, polls and
surveys, press freedom and responsibility, and governmental
regulation, secrecy, and manipulation. (4)
POLS 364: The Legislative Process – S1
A study of theory, organization, and procedure of the Congress
and other legislative bodies in the United States. (4)
POLS 368: The American Presidency – S1
Study of the nation’s highest political office in terms of the roles
and expectations of the office, styles of leadership, presidential
decision-making, powers and limitations, and the interaction of
personality and institution. (4)
POLS 371: Judicial Process – S1
An examination of legal processes in various adjudicatory
settings. Primary attention given to judicial processes focusing on
American civil and criminal law. (4)
POLS 372: Constitutional Law – S1
The constitutional basis of governmental powers in the United
States with special emphasis given to judicial review, separation of
powers, federalism, interstate commerce, and political and
constitutional restrictions on governmental power. Intensive
writing course. (4)
POLS 373: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties – S1
The constitutional basis of rights and liberties in the United
States with special emphasis given to freedom of expression and
association, religious freedom, rights in criminal proceedings, due
process, and equal protection. Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 374: Legal Studies Research – S1
Introduction to various methods of legal analysis, research, and
writing. (4)
POLS 380: Politics of Global Development - S1
Designed to provide information, concepts, and alternative
perspectives needed to study development as a global issue within
the international political context. Examples of how general
world trends manifest themselves in specific countries will be
covered as well as case studies of successful development 
projects. Intensive writing course. (4)
136
PLU 2007 - 2008
Political Science • Pre-Professional Studies
P
POLS 381: Comparative Legal Systems – C, S1
Study of legal systems around the world as they actually work
within their respective political, economic, social, and cultural
contexts. Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 383: Modern European Politics – S1
A study of the origins and development of the European Union
and an examination of the governmental systems and political
cultures of key European states, including France, Germany, Italy,
and the United Kingdom. (4)
POLS 384: Scandinavian Government and Politics – S1
This course examines the governmental structures and political
processes of the Scandinavian countries. It does so in the context
of the region’s historical development, its political cultures and
ideologies, the distinctive Scandinavian model of political
economy and welfare, and the place of Scandinavia in the
international system. (4)
POLS 385: Canadian Government and Politics – S1
The governmental system and political life of Canada, with
special attention to the constitution, political parties, nationalism
and separatism in Quebec, self-government of native peoples,
and comparative study of Canadian and U.S. political 
cultures. Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 386: The Middle East – C, S1
Contrasts the history and aspirations of the Arab Nations with
the reality of European dominance and its legacy, the formation
of the present Arab states and Israel. Intensive writing course. (4)
POLS 401: Workshops and Special Topics – S1 (1–4)
POLS 431: Advanced International Relations – S1
Examines various theories of international conflict
management, including in-depth analysis of historical examples.
The development of international law and international
governmental organizations are also considered. Prerequisite:
POLS 331. (4)
POLS 450: Internship in Politics – S1
Internship in the political dimensions of non-governmental
organizations. By departmental consent only. (1-8)
POLS 455: Internship in International and Comparative
Politics 
Internship overseas or with a US agency or organization that
engages in international issues and activities. By departmental
consent only. (1-8)
POLS 458: Internship in Public Administration – S1
An internship with a government department or agency. By
departmental consent only. (1-8)
POLS 464: Internship in the Legislative Process – S1
An opportunity to study the process from the inside by working
directly with legislative participants at the national, state or local
level. By department consent only. (Internships with the
Washington State Legislature are open only to juniors and seniors
with at least one year at PLU.) (1–12)
POLS 471: Internship in Legal Studies – S1
An internship with a private or public sector agency or office
engaged in legal research, litigation, or law enforcement. By
departmental consent only. (1-4)
Pre-Professional Studies
The following pre-professional studies do not constitute
academic majors, but are programs of study designed to facilitate
further graduate or professional work after completion of a
disciplinary major at PLU.
HEALTH SCIENCES
www.nsci.plu.edu/hsc
The Division of Natural Sciences health sciences committee
advises students aspiring to careers in the health sciences.
Students having such interests are encouraged to obtain a health
sciences advisor early in their program. Summarized below are
pre-professional requirements for many health science areas;
additional information is available through the health science
committee. Catalogs and brochures for many schools and
programs are available in the Rieke Science Center.
Dentistry, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine
The overwhelming majority of students entering the professional
schools for these careers have earned baccalaureate degrees,
securing a broad educational background in the process. This
background includes a thorough preparation in the sciences as
well as study in the social sciences and the humanities. There are
no pre-professional majors for medicine, dentistry or veterinary
medicine at PLU; rather students should select the major which
best matches their interests and which best prepares them for
alternative careers. In addition to the general university
requirements and the courses needed to complete the student’s
major, the following are generally required for admission to the
professional program:
• BIOL 161, 162, 323 
• CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331, and 332
(all with laboratories) 
• MATH 140
• PHYS 125 and 126 or PHYS 153 and 154 
(with appropriate laboratories)
• Check with a health science advisor for exceptions or for 
additions suggested by specific professional schools.
Medical Technology
The university no longer offers a medical technology degree, but
continues to provide academic preparation suitable for admission
to medical technology, hematology, and clinical chemistry
programs. Minimal requirements include: 
• BIOL 161, 162, 323, 328, 407, 448
• CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331 (with laboratory 333),
332 (with laboratory 334)
• MATH 140
• Recommended courses include: BIOL 332, 348, 441;
CHEM 403; PHYS 125, 126, 135, 136.
POLS 491: Independent Studies
By department consent only. (1–4)
POLS 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR
Intensive study into topics, concepts, issues, and methods of
inquiry in political science. Emphasis on student research,
writing, and presentation. By departmental consent only. (4)
PLU 2007 - 2008
137
Pre-Professional Studies
P
Optometry
Although two years of pre-optometry study is the minimum
required, most students accepted by a school of optometry have
completed at least three years of undergraduate work. A large
percentage of students accepted by schools of optometry have
earned a baccalaureate degree. For those students who have not
completed a baccalaureate degree, completion of such a degree
must be done in conjunction with optometry professional studies.
The requirements for admission to the schools of optometry vary.
However, the basic science and mathematics requirements are
generally uniform and include:
• BIOL 161, 162, 323
• CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331 (with laboratory 333),
332 (with laboratory 334)
• One year of college mathematics, including calculus 
(at least through MATH 151)
• PHYS 125 and 126 or PHYS 153 and 154 
(with appropriate laboratories)
In addition, each school of optometry has its own specific
requirements. Check with a health science advisor.
Pharmacy
Although the pre-pharmacy requirements for individual schools
vary (check with a health science advisor), the following courses
are usually required: one year of general chemistry with
laboratory; one year of organic chemistry, with laboratory; college-
level mathematics (often including calculus); one year of English
composition. Other courses often required include microbiology,
analytical chemistry, statistics and introductory courses in
communication, economics, and political science. For example,
the University of Washington School of Pharmacy has approved
the following courses as being equivalent to the first two years of
its program leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree: 
• BIOL 161, 162, 201 or 328
• CHEM 115, 116, 320, 331 (with laboratory 333),
332 (with laboratory 334 or 336)
• MATH 128 or 151; STAT 231
• WRIT 101
• A second course in writing; electives from humanities 
and social sciences. 
• Total credits should not be fewer than 60 semester hours.
Physical Therapy
Acceptance to schools of physical therapy has become
increasingly competitive in recent years, and students interested
in physical therapy are strongly encouraged to meet with a health
science advisor as early as possible to determine prerequisites for
specific schools. All physical therapy programs are doctoral
programs. Therefore, potential applicants should plan on
completing a baccalaureate degree in conjunction with satisfying
admission requirements. The School of Physical Education offers
a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education with a pre-
physical therapy track. 
The requirements for admission to schools of physical therapy
vary. However the basic science and mathematics requirements
are generally uniform and include: 
• BIOL 161, 162, 323
• CHEM 115, 116, 331; MATH 140; PHYS 125 and 126 
(with laboratories)
• In addition to the principles of biology sequence, applicants 
must complete courses in anatomy and physiology. 
• This admission requirement is met by either the combination 
of BIOL 205 and 206 or the combination BIOL 361 and 441.
Biology majors should take BIOL 361 and 441, the clear
preference of several schools of physical therapy. 
In addition to the science and mathematics requirements, the
various schools have specific social science and humanities
requirements.
Check with a health science advisor regarding these
requirements.
LAW
253.535.7595
www.plu.edu/~legalstd
Preparation for law school at PLU is an advising system rather
than a curriculum of prescribed major/minor or otherwise
organized courses. The primary reason for such an approach is
that the admissions committees of U.S. law schools generally
recommend that applicants be well and broadly educated. They
tend to seek applicants who are literate and numerate, who are
critical thinkers and articulate communicators. In essence, they
value exactly what a sound liberal arts education provides—
indeed, requires.
Therefore, regardless of their declared majors and minors,
students considering law school are encouraged to demonstrate
proficiency in courses selected from across the disciplines and
schools while undergraduates at PLU. An appropriate curricular
program should be structured from a mix of the students’
personal academic interests, their professional inclinations, and
coursework aimed at developing intellectual skills and resources
apt to generate success in legal study and practice.
Recent successful PLU applicants to law schools have taken such
diverse courses as those in the anthropology of contemporary
America, social science research methods, American popular
culture, English Renaissance literature, newswriting and
argumentation, recent political thought, international relations,
free-lance writing, intermediate German, animal behavior,
neuropsychology, public finance, logic, and moral philosophy.
Diversity and challenge are crucial to preparation for the study 
of law.
However, pre-law students are also advised to take courses,
chosen in consultation with the pre-law advisor, that will help
them to identify, develop, and explore perspectives on the
character of U.S. law. Courses in U.S. government and history,
judicial and legislative processes, research materials and methods,
and internships may be particularly useful in this regard. Finally,
students with an interest in the law are encouraged to participate
in the activities of PLU’s chapter of Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity
International, a professional service organization composed of
law and pre-law students, legal educators, attorneys, judges, and
government officials.
Regardless of their major or minors, students interested in pre-
law advising and activities are invited to register with the Pre-Law
Center in the Department of Political Science.
138
PLU 2007 - 2008
MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC)
253.535.8740
www.plu.edu/~rotc
rotc@plu.edu
The objective of the military science instruction within Army
ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) is to prepare
academically and physically qualified college women and men for
the rigor and challenge of serving as an officer in the United
States Army-Active, National Guard, or Reserve. To that end, the
program stresses service to country and community through the
development and enhancement of leadership competencies which
support and build on the concept of service leadership. 
Army ROTC is offered to PLU students on campus. The lower-
division courses are open to all students and are an excellent
source of leadership and ethics training for any career. They do
not require a military commitment for non-scholarship students.
The upper-division courses are open to qualified students.
ROTC is traditionally a four-year program; however, an
individual may complete the program in two or three years.
Contact the PLU Military Science Department for details. 
Participation in the introductory Military Science courses at PLU
is open to all students. Students may choose to continue in the
advanced courses with the goal of receiving a commission after
successful completion of the program and receiving a university
degree. Students seeking a commission are often recipients of an
ROTC scholarship. Being commissioned in the military and/or
receiving a scholarship involves meeting requirements established
by the United States military. For specific requirements in
contracting or scholarship eligibility, students may contact the
Military Science Department. 
Financial assistance in the form of two-, three-, and four-year
scholarships is available to qualified applicants. Scholarships
awarded are $20,000 for tuition plus a book allowance of $900
and a monthly stipend of $250-$400. Students in upper-division
courses not on scholarship also receive a $350-$400 stipend. To
be commissioned an officer in the United States Army, a
graduate must complete the military science curriculum,
including successful completion of a four-week advanced camp
during the summer before the senior year. Additional
information on the Army ROTC program may be obtained by
writing Army ROTC, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA
98447.
F
aculty:
Lt. Colonel Boice, Chair
The basic course consists of two hours of academic instruction
and military training per week each semester of the first and
second years. Students beginning the course as sophomores can
compress the basic course by attending additional academic
instruction. There is no military commitment for non-
scholarship students in the basic course.
The advanced course consists of additional academic instruction
and physical conditioning plus a four-week advanced summer
training at the Leader Development and Assessment Course
(LDAC) at Fort Lewis, Washington.
Students are furnished with uniforms and selected textbooks for
military science courses.
Pre-Professional Studies
P
Course Offerings – Military Science Basic – (MILS)
MILS 111, 112: Introduction to Military Science
An introduction to the United States Army. Includes an
introduction to military science and its organization, leadership,
land navigation, map reading, operation orders, and the
traditions of the United States Army. Provides a look at the
military as a profession and its ethical base. Course includes
Army Physical Fitness Test and training. (2, 2)
MILS 211, 212: Introduction to Leadership
A continuation of basic officer skills. Areas of emphasis are team
building, squad tactics, operations orders, land navigation, ethics
and professionalism, total fitness and military first aid. (2, 2)
Course Offerings – Military Science Advanced – (MILS)
MILS 311, 312: Leadership and Management
A survey of leadership/management and motivational theories. An
orientation on the competencies required for the small unit leader.
Includes tactics, communications and land navigation. (3, 3)
MILS 411, 412: Professionalism and Ethics
Covers Army values, ethics, and professionalism, responsibilities
to subordinates, self, and country, law of land warfare, and the
resolution of ethical/value dilemmas. Also covers logistic and
justice systems and the interaction of special staff and command
functions. (3)
Note: A maximum of 24 semester hours earned in ROTC programs
may be applied toward a baccalaureate degree at PLU. 
Students receiving more than 12 semester hours of ROTC credit
toward a PLU degree are required to take one of the following:
• HIST 231: World War Two in China and Japan, 1931-
1945 - C, S1 (4)
• HIST 329: Europe and the World Wars, 1914-1945 - S1 (4)
• HIST 352: The American Revolution - S1 (4)
• HIST 356: American Diplomatic History - S1 (4)
• HIST 381: The Vietnam War and American Society - S1 (4)
• INTC 221: The Experience of War - I2 (4)
• NTC 222: Prospects for War and Peace - I2 (4)
• PHIL 125: Ethics and the Good Life - PH (4)
• PHIL 353: Special Topics: Focus on Military Ethics or 
War - PH (4)
• RELI 365: Christian Moral Issues - R2 (4)
THEOLOGICAL STUDIES
Students intending to attend seminary should complete the
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Besides the general
degree requirements, the Association of Theological Schools
recommends the following:
English: literature, composition, speech, and related studies. At
least six semester-long courses.
History: ancient, modern European, and American. At least
three semester-long courses.
Philosophy: orientation in history, content, and methods. At
least three semester-long courses.
Natural Sciences: preferably physics, chemistry, and biology. At
least two semester-long courses.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested