display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate pages in pdf online control application system web page html wpf console 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks14-part270

PLU 2007 - 2008
139
Pre-Professional Studies • Psychology
P
Social Sciences: psychology, sociology, economics, political
science, and education. At least six semesters, including at least
one semester of psychology.
Foreign Languages - one or more of the following: Latin,
Greek, Hebrew, German, French. Students who anticipate post-
graduate studies are urged to undertake these disciplines as early
as possible (at least four semesters).
Religion: a thorough knowledge of Biblical content together with
an introduction to major religious traditions and theological
problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture
as outlined above. At least three semester-long courses. Students
may well seek counsel from the seminary of their choice.
Of the possible majors, English, philosophy, religion and the
social sciences are regarded as the most desirable. Other areas are,
however, accepted.
A faculty advisor will assist students in the selection of courses
necessary to meet the requirements of the theological school of
their choice. Consult the Religion Department chair for further
information.
Psychology
253.535.7294
www.plu.edu/~psyc
psyc@plu.edu
Psychology is a scientific discipline that seeks to understand
human and nonhuman behavior. Psychology is also a profession
that seeks to change behavior for the betterment of humankind.
Through its curriculum, research activities, and use of
community resources, the Department of Psychology provides
students with a balanced exposure to psychology as a scientific
discipline and profession.
The major in psychology (a) introduces students to scientific
methods of psychology, to theories and research findings from
the core areas of psychology, and to the history of psychology; (b)
provides students with opportunities to explore advanced topics
in scientific and professional psychology, conduct psychological
research, and gain exposure to the practice of psychology in
community settings; and (c) helps prepare students for
postgraduate work in psychology or in related professions, such
as social work, education, medicine, law, and business. The major
is an excellent general preparation for employment in a variety of
settings.
The psychology program is designed to meet the needs of a
variety of students. To this end, two degrees are offered: the
Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. Either degree
provides a solid foundation in psychology, and either can serve as
preparation for postgraduate study or employment. However, for
those students who intend to pursue the doctorate in psychology
following graduation from PLU, the Bachelor of Science degree
is likely to provide an especially strong preparation. The Bachelor
of Science degree is also an excellent pre-professional degree for
those students who plan to enter the fields of dentistry, medicine
(all branches, including psychiatry), public health, or veterinary
medicine. Many in business, education, nursing, and social work
find a double major with psychology to be a valuable addition to
their training.
F
aculty:
Shore, Chair; Anderson, R.M. Brown, Ceynar, Graham,
Grahe, Hansvick, Moon, Moritsugu, Taylor, Toyokawa.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR 
36 credit hours in psychology including: 
• PSYC 101, 242, 499
• One of PSYC 310, 320, or 330
• One of PSYC 440, 442, 446 or 448
• At least two semester hours from PSYC 495, 496, or 497
• 16 semester hours of elective psychology courses
• STAT 232 (psychology class) and accompanying lab are 
required.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR
40 semester hours in psychology including:
• PSYC 101, 242, 481
• One of  PSYC 310, 320, 330
• Two of PSYC 440, 442, 446, 448
• One lab section selected from PSYC 441, 443, 447, 449
• At least two semester hours from PSYC 495, 496, or 497
• 14 semester hours of elective psychology courses 
• STAT 232 (psychology class) and accompanying lab
• 20 semester hours in mathematics and natural science are
required. Of the 20 hours, at least four semester hours must be
in mathematics and at least eight semester hours in biology. 
Those students who, after graduating from PLU, plan to enter
schools of dentistry, medicine, public health, or veterinary
medicine should note the specific pre-professional mathematics
and science requirements in the appropriate sections of this
catalog.
MINOR
20 semester hours, of which:
At least 12 semester hours must be taken in residence. If a
statistics course is used as part of the 20-hour requirement, then
it must be STAT 232 (psychology class) taught by a member of
the psychology department. 
The minor in psychology is designed to supplement another
major in the liberal arts or a degree program in a professional
school, such as business, education, or nursing.
PSYC 110, 111, and 113 do not count toward the major or minor.
Course Prerequisites 
A grade of C- or higher must have been earned in a course in
order for it to qualify as a prerequisite and to apply towards the
major.
Experiential Learning
All Psychology majors are required to take a minimum of two
semester hours of PSYC 495, 496 or 497.
Capstone
Psychology majors are required to complete a capstone project
and present this project as part of PSYC 499 (for BA majors) or
PSYC 481 (for BS majors) at the Psychology Research
Conference held every term. 
Rotate pages in pdf online - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf permanently; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
Rotate pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
140
PLU 2007 - 2008
COURSE OFFERINGS: Psychology- (PSYC)
PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology – S2 
An introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental
processes. Topics include learning, memory, perception, thinking,
development, emotion, personality, mental illness, and social
behavior. (4) 
PSYC 110: Study Skills
Effective techniques for college study. Note-making, study
methods, examination skills, time management, educational
planning. Class work supplemented by individual counseling.
Does not meet general university requirements or psychology
major or minor requirements. (1)
PSYC 111: College Reading
Improvement of college-level reading skills. Previewing,
skimming, scanning, rapid reading, critical reading, and study
reading. Does not meet general university requirements or
psychology major or minor requirements. (1)
PSYC 113: Career and Educational Planning: Finding 
Your Way
Personal decision-making process applied to career and
educational choices, self-assessment, exploration of the world 
of work, educational planning, reality testing, and building
career-related experience. Does not meet general university
requirements or psychology major or minor requirements. (1)
PSYC 221: The Psychology of Adjustment – S2
Problems in personal adjustment to everyday issues. Exploration
of possible coping solutions. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (2)
PSYC 242: Advanced Statistics and Research Design
A continuation of Statistics 231 and accompanying lab taught by
members of the psychology department. Topics include single-
and multi-factor experimental designs and analysis of variance,
multiple regression, quasi-experiments, surveys, and non-
parametric statistical techniques. Students will learn to use
computer programs to carry out statistical analysis and will have
the opportunity to design and conduct their own research study.
Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: STAT 232 and
accompanying lab taught by members of the psychology
department. (4)
PSYC 310: Personality Theories – S2
Strategies for the study of personality. Review of theories and
research. Discussion of implications for counseling. Prerequisite:
PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 320: Development Across the Lifespan – S2
Biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development from
conception through adulthood to death. Prerequisite: PSYC
101. (4)
PSYC 330: Social Psychology – S2
The study of how an individual’s thoughts and behaviors are
influenced by the presence of others. Research and theory
concerning topics such as person perception, attitudes, group
processes, prejudice, aggression and helping behaviors are
discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 335: Cultural Psychology – S2
The study of the relation between culture and human behavior.
Psychology
P
Topics include cognition, language, intelligence, emotion,
development, social behavior, and mental health. Prerequisite:
PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 345: Community Psychology – S2
Intervention strategies that focus primarily on communities and
social systems. Particular stress on alternatives to traditional
clinical styles for promoting the well-being of communities and
groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 360: Psychology of Language – S2
The study of language as a means of communication and
structured human behavior. Topics include biological foundations
of language, psycholinguistics, speech perception and production,
sentence and discourse comprehension, nonverbal
communication, language acquisition, bilingualism, language
disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 370: Gender and Sexuality – S2
Study of the social, biological and cultural factors that contribute
to human sexuality and gender-related behavior. Topics include
sexual identity, typical and atypical sexual behavior, reproduction,
communication, intimate relationships, masculinity and
femininity. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 375: Psychology of Women – A, S2
Exploration of psychological issues pertinent to women. Includes
such topics as sex differences; psychological ramifications of
menarche, child bearing, menopause, sexual harassment, and rape;
women’s experiences with work and achievement, love and
sexuality, and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 380: Psychology of Work – S2
Integrating career planning into the study of human behavior in
work settings. Application and extension of psychological
principles to the individual operating within an organization
context - including measuring and facilitating job performance,
worker motivation, human factors, and group processes.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101. (4)
PSYC 385: Consumer Psychology – S2
Social psychological principles applied to consumer attitude-
formation and decision-making - e.g., perception of
advertisements, influence of reference groups and opinion
leaders, and learning effects upon repeat purchasing. Emphasis
on audience, message, and media factors. Prerequisite: PSYC
101. (4)
PSYC 395: Research Laboratory
Experience in evaluating and conducting research in a designated
area of psychology. May be offered from time to time as an
elective to accompany various 300-level courses. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor. (2)
PSYC 401: Workshop
Selected topics in psychology as announced. (1–4)
PSYC 405: Workshop on Alternative Perspectives – A, S2
Selected topics in psychology as announced which help fulfill the
university requirement in alternative perspectives. (1 to 4)
PSYC 410: Psychological Testing – S2
Survey of standardized tests; methods of development,
standardization; limitations and interpretations of tests.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101, STAT 232 or consent of instructor. (4)
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
pdf reverse page order; rotate pages in pdf and save
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
how to rotate just one page in pdf; pdf rotate single page and save
PLU 2007 - 2008
141
Psychology
P
PSYC 415: Abnormal Psychology – S2
Models of psychopathology. Diagnosis and treatment of
abnormal behaviors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101; STAT 232 or
consent of instructor. (4)
PSYC 420: Adolescent Psychology – S2
Physical development, mental traits, social characteristics, and
interests of adolescents; adjustments in home, school, and
community. Prerequisite: PSYC 320. (4)
PSYC 430: Peace Psychology – S2
Theories and practices for development of sustainable societies
through the prevention of destructive conflict and violence.
Focus upon nonviolent management of conflict and pursuit of
social justice by empowering individuals and building cultures of
peace. Prerequisite: PSYC 330 or consent of instructor. (4)
PSYC 435: Theories and Methods of Counseling and
Psychotherapy – S2
Introduction to basic methods of counseling and psychotherapy,
and examination of the theories from which these methods
derive. Prerequisites: PSYC 310, 345, 410, or 415; or consent of
instructor. (4)
PSYC 440: Human Neuropsychology – S2
Study of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological
mechanisms of behavior and mental function. Topics include
perception, voluntary action, spatial processing, language,
memory, emotion, social behavior, and consciousness.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101, 242. (4)
PSYC 441: Experimental Research Laboratory in
Neuropsychology
Experiments and demonstrations related to neuropsychological
phenomena. Emphasis on methodology in research on the brain
and behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 440 or concurrent enrollment
in PSYC 440. (2)
PSYC 442: Learning: Research and Theory – S2
A critical overview of the research data on human and animal
learning, and of the theoretical attempts to understand those
data. Prerequisite: PSYC 101, 242. (4)
PSYC 443: Experimental Research Laboratory in Learning
Experiments and demonstrations related to conditioning and
learning in humans and animals. Emphasis on methodology in
learning research. Prerequisite: PSYC 442 or concurrent
enrollment in PSYC 442. (2)
PSYC 446: Perception – S2
The study of our interactions with the physical world and the
nature of our understanding of it. Includes such topics as color
vision, dark adaptation, hearing music and speech, taste, smell,
pain, and sensory physiology. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, 242. (4)
PSYC 447: Experimental Research Laboratory in Perception
Experiments and demonstrations of perceptual events. Emphasis
on methodology in perception research. Prerequisite: PSYC 446
or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 446. (2)
PSYC 448: Cognitive Psychology – S2
The study of human thought. Topics include attention,
perception, memory, knowledge and concept formation,
language, problem-solving, and reasoning. Prerequisites: PSYC
101, 242. (4)
PSYC 449: Experimental Research Laboratory in Cognition
Experiments and demonstrations related to human cognition.
Emphasis on methodology in research on cognition.
Prerequisite: PSYC 448 or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 448.
(2)
PSYC 481: Psychology Research Seminar – SR
An advanced course providing students the opportunity to design
and conduct ongoing research and review current research in
psychology. Directed toward helping students perform research
studies that may be suitable for submission to journals or
presentations at conferences. To maximize the effectiveness of the
course, students are encouraged to give advance consideration to
areas and designs for possible research. Prerequisites: PSYC 101,
242, and consent of instructor. (2)
PSYC 483: Seminar – S2
Selected topics in psychology as announced. Prerequisite:
consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (2–4)
PSYC 491: Independent Study
A supervised reading, field, or research project of special interest
for advanced undergraduate students. Prerequisite: Consent of
supervising faculty. (1-4)
PSYC 493: History and Systems of Psychology
Historical development, contemporary forms, and basic
assumptions of the major psychological theories and traditions.
Prerequisites: One of PSYC 440, 442, 446, or 448; and one of
PSYC 310, 320, 330. (4)
PSYC 495: Internship
A practicum experience in the community in the clinical, social,
and/or experimental areas. Classroom focus on case
conceptualization and presentation. Prerequisite: Sophomore
standing plus one course in psychology and consent of the
department. (1–6)
PSYC 496: Research Practicum
Research experience under the direct supervision of a faculty
member, students may design and/or conduct research in a
designated area of psychology. May be repeated for up to 8 credits.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or consent of instructor. (1-4)
PSYC 497: Teaching Apprenticeship
Teaching experience under the direct supervision of a faculty
member. Course provides the opportunity to learn how to
effectively communicate information, understand classroom
management, and develop teaching skills. Students will serve as a
teaching assistant for a psychology course. Prerequisite: Grade of
B or better in class you will be a TA for, a minimum 3.0 overall
G.P.A., junior standing at time the course is offered, consent of
instructor. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. (1-4)
PSYC 499: Capstone Seminar – SR
Required for Psychology majors earning the B.A. degree.
Students will complete and present a project at an on-campus
Psychology Research Conference held fall and spring terms. The
project may be adapted from an upper-division psychology
course, or as advanced research or internship project, completed
by the student (see the Department’s handout on the capstone
for more details and project options). Prerequisite: Senior
standing or permission of instructor. (2)
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
pdf rotate pages and save; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
rotate single page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages individually
142
PLU 2007 - 2008
Publishing and Printing Arts • Recreation • Religion
Publishing and Printing Arts
253.535.7241
www.plu.edu/~ppa
For more than 30 years Pacific Lutheran University’s Department
of English has offered a way to help students translate a love of
books into an exciting professional career in publishing. The
distinctive interdisciplinary curriculum in Publishing and
Printing Arts (PPA) is highly respected by employers because it
combines pre-professional skills and experience with the solid
foundation of a liberal arts education. This six-course minor is
designed to give students with talents and interests in writing,
graphic design, communications, or business a head start into 
the world of publishing and a broad variety of related
professions.
The PPA program readily complements majors concerned with
language and the written word, such as English, languages,
education, public relations, journalism, marketing, and graphic
design. But students majoring in a wide spectrum of
disciplines—from biology to music to anthropology—have
discovered the value of a PPA minor, too. It both helps to
connect them to publishing career opportunities in those fields
and provides a richer understanding of the complex roles that
written communications of all sorts play in our lives and in our
modern world.
F
aculty:
S. Robinson, Director.
PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR
• Three core courses are required - 12 semester hours
• ENGL 311/COMA 321: The Book in Society 
• ENGL 312/COMA 322: Publishing Procedures 
• ENGL 313/ARTD 331: The Art of the Book I
In addition to the above 12 semester hour core, students take
three elective courses (12 semester hours) selected from at least
two of the following categories:
• Writing/Editing
• All English writing courses beyond WRIT101, including 
ENGL 403
• Approved courses in Communication: COMA 213, 230,
270, 311, 320, 323, 329, 360, 420
• Marketing/Management
• Approved courses in Business: BUSA 203, 308, 309, 310, 
363, 365, 378, 467, 468
or in Communication: COMA 361, 421, 422, 461
• Design/Production
• Approved courses in Art: ARTD 226, 326, 370, 396, 
398, 426, 470, 496
• ENGL 314 or COMA 325, 327, 424, 462
Up to two courses (eight semester hours) can be counted toward
both a PPA minor and other requirements, such as general
university requirements, another minor, or a major.
To earn a minor in Publishing and Printing Arts, students must
acquire practical experience in publishing-related work outside
the classroom.
P
Recreation
To view curriculum requirements, please go to Department of
Movement Studies and Wellness Education, page 110.
Course Offerings: Recreation (RECR) 
RECR 296: Teaching Methods: Recreation Activities
Learning to plan and implement a variety of recreational activities,
including outdoor education. Prerequisite: PHED 279. (2)
RECR 330: Programming and Leadership in Sport and
Recreation
Examines the principles, procedures, techniques, and strategies
essential to successfully program and lead experiences for diverse
populations in sport, fitness, recreation and leisure service
organizations. (4)
RECR 360: Professional Practicum
Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher,
recreation supervisor, or health care provider. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval. (1–2)
RECR 387: Special Topics in Recreation
Provides the opportunity for the exploration of current and
relevant issues in the areas recreation studies. (1-4)
RECR 483: Management in Sport and Recreation
Examines the principles, procedures, techniques, and strategies
essential to successfully manage human resources, finances and
marketing in sport, fitness, recreation and leisure service
organizations. (4) 
RECR 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisite: Consent of the dean. (1–4)
RECR 495: Internship - SR
Pre-professional experiences closely related to student’s career and
academic interests. Prerequisites: Declaration of major, junior
status, and a minimum of ten hours of RECR coursework (2–8)
RECR 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR(2–4)
Religion
253.535.8106
www.plu.edu/~reli 
reli@plu.edu
Religion is an attempt to understand the meaning of human
existence. Different religious and cultural communities express
that meaning in many ways. Located within an ELCA-related
university, the Department of Religion stands within a Lutheran
Christian and global context.
In a university setting this means the serious academic study of
the Bible, of the history of the Christian tradition, of Christian
theology, and of world religious traditions. Critical study calls for
open and authentic dialogue with other religious traditions and
seeks to understand a common humanity as each tradition adds
its unique contribution. It calls for a critical yet constructive
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Free online C# class source code for deleting specified PDF pages in .NET console application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document.
permanently rotate pdf pages; how to change page orientation in pdf document
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
pdf rotate page; rotate pdf pages
PLU 2007 - 2008
143
Religion
R
interchange with contemporary society. Finally, it calls for a
sharing of insights with other disciplines in the university as each
sheds light on the human condition.
To these ends the Department of Religion offers a wide range of
courses and opportunities. Furthermore it calls students, majors
and non-majors alike, to consider questions of meaning,
purpose, and value in a society that all too often neglects these
questions.
F
aculty:
Torvend, Chair; Batten, Breazeale, Crawford, Finitsis,
Finstuen, Hickey-Tiernan, Ihssen, Killen, Komjathy, Oakman,
O’Brien, Peterson, Trelstad,  Zbaraschuk
University Distributive Core Requirements
Eight semester hours are required for students entering as first-
year students or sophomores. Four lower-division hours should
be taken before the end of the sophomore year.
Transfer students entering as juniors or seniors are required to
take four semester hours from religion lines 1 or 2 only, unless
presenting eight transfer hours of religion from other regionally
accredited colleges or universities. Courses offered through
correspondence, on-line, and independent studies are not
accepted to meet the core requirement in Religion.
The Distributive Core requirement in Religion
(eight semester hours) 
Students are required to take one course in either Line 1, 2 or 3.
After the first course is completed students are required to take a
different course in a different line. No more than four semester
hours are permitted in any one line under the requirement:
• Line 1: Biblical Studies (R1) - RELI 211, 212, 330, 331, 332
• Line 2: Christian Thought, History, and Experience (R2) -
RELI 121, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 360, 361, 
362, 364, 365, 367, 368
• Line 3: Integrative and Comparative Religious Studies (R3) -
RELI 131, 132, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239,
390, 391, 392, 393
Perspectives on Diversity Requirement
The following Religion courses also fulfill the University
Perspectives on Diversity Requirement.
• Cross-Cultural: RELI 131, 132, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237,
247, 341, 344, 347, and 392
• Alternative Perspectives: RELI 236, 257, 351, 354, 357,
368 and 393
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR - 32 semester hours
• Requirements:
• Four semester hours in Biblical Studies (R1)
• Four semester hours in Christian Thought, History and 
Experience (R2)
• Four semester hours in Integrative and Comparative 
Religious Studies (R3)
• Twelve semester hours in upper-division courses (300 
or higher)
• Four semester hours in RELI 301: Research in Religion 
• Four semester hours in RELI 499: Capstone
• Transfer majors will normally take 20 semester hours in 
residence.
• Majors should plan their program early in consultation with
departmental faculty. Closely related courses taught in other
departments may be considered to apply toward the religion
major in consultation with the chair of the department.
• The B.A. in Religion requires completion of the College of
Arts and Sciences requirements.
• A minimum grade of C- in all courses in the major or minor
department and a cumulative 2.00 GPA in those courses is
required.
MINOR 
(Teacher Education Option) 
24 semester hours; at least four hours in each of the three lines. 
Transfer minors under this option normally take 16 semester
hours in residence. 
Intended primarily for parochial school teachers enrolled in the
Department of Instructional Development and Leadership.
MINOR 
16 semester hours with no more than eight in one of the lines
listed above. 
Transfer minors under this option must take at least eight
semester hours in residence.
Course Offerings – Religion (RELI) 
RELI 121: The Christian Tradition – R2
The study of selected theological questions and formulations
examined in their social and historical contexts. (4)
RELI 131: The Religions of South Asia – C, R3
Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism — their origins and
development, expansion, and contemporary issues. (4)
RELI 132: The Religions of East Asia – C, R3
Confucianism, Taoism, Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, Shinto,
and the “new religions” of Japan — their origins, development,
and contemporary issues. (4)
RELI 211: Religion and Literature of the Old Testament – R1
Literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the Old
Testament, including perspectives on contemporary issues. (4)
RELI 212: Religion and Literature of the New 
Testament – R1
Literary, historical, and theological dimensions of the New
Testament, including perspectives on contemporary issues. (4)
RELI 220: Early Christianity – R2
Origins, thought, and expansion of the Christian Church;  the
growth of Christian involvement in culture to the end of the
papacy of Gregory I (604 CE). (4)
RELI 221: Medieval Christianity - R2
A study of the ideas, practices, forms of community among
Christians from 600-1350, with an emphasis on how they
understood their relationship to God, each other, and the natural
world. (4)
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to rotate all pages in pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET read barcodes from PDF, C#.NET OCR scan PDF. C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer
rotate individual pages in pdf; rotate pages in pdf
144
PLU 2007 - 2008
RELI 222: Modern Church History – R2
Beginning with the Peace of Westphalia (1648), interaction of
the Christian faith with modern politics, science, and
philosophy; expansion in the world, modern movements. (4)
RELI 223: American Church History – R2
Interaction of religious and social forces in American history,
especially their impact on religious communities. (4)
RELI 224: The Lutheran Heritage – R2
Lutheranism as a movement within the church catholic: its
history, doctrine, and worship in the context of today’s pluralistic
and secular world. (4)
RELI 225: Faith and Spirituality – R2
Reflection on Christian lifestyles, beliefs, and commitments. (4)
RELI 226: Christian Ethics – R2
Introduction to the personal and social ethical dimensions of
Christian life and thought with attention to primary theological
positions and specific problem areas. (4)
RELI 227 (247, 257): Christian Theology – R2
Survey of selected topics or movements in Christian theology
designed to introduce the themes and methodologies of the
discipline. RELI 247 for cross cultural GUR and RELI 257 for
alternative perspective GUR. (4)
RELI 230: Religion and Culture – R3
Explores the interrelation and interaction of religion and culture
in a variety of world religious traditions. Incorporates recognized
methodologies in academic religious studies. (4)
RELI 231: Myth, Ritual, and Symbol – R3
The nature of myth and its expression through symbol and
ritual. (4)
RELI 232: The Buddhist Tradition – C, R3
Introduction to the history and practice of Buddhist tradition in
its South Asian, East Asian, and Western cultural contexts. (4)
RELI 233: The Religions of China – C, R3
Introduction to the major religious movements of China. (4)
RELI 234: The Religions of Japan – C, R3
Introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan. (4)
RELI 235: Islamic Traditions – C, R3
An introduction to the history, teachings, and practices of 
Islam. (4)
RELI 236: Native American Religious Traditions - A, R3
Introduction to a variety of Native American religious traditions,
emphasizing the way in which religion works to construct
identity, promote individual and collective well being and acts as
a means of responding to colonialism. Approaches the topic
using academic religious studies methodologies. (4)
RELI 237: Judaism – C, R3
Historical development of Judaism’s faith and commitment from
early Biblical times to the present. (4)
RELI 239: Environment and Culture – R3
Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by
human culture and values. Major conceptions of nature,
Religion
R
including non-western perspectives and issues in eco-justice.
Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual
frameworks, history, and spirituality. Cross-listed with ENGL
239. (4)
RELI 301: Research in Religion
Introduces majors to the scholarly questions, literature,
bibliographical assessment, forms of scholarly criticism in the
field, and the necessary elements in the creation of a research
paper in the field. Topic and content to be determined by the
instructor. Required for majors. (4)
RELI 330: Old Testament Studies – R1
Major areas of inquiry: the prophets, psalms, wisdom literature,
mythology, theology, or biblical archeology. (4)
RELI 331: New Testament Studies – R1
Major areas of inquiry: intertestamental, synoptic, Johannine, or
Pauline literature, or New Testament theology. (4)
RELI 332: Jesus of History, Christ of Faith– R1
Historical survey of “Life of Jesus” research; form and redaction
criticism of the gospel tradition; the religious dimensions of
Jesus’ life and thought. Prerequisite: One lower-division RELI
course or consent of instructor. (4)
RELI 360: Studies in Church Ministry – R2
The church in human service: the congregation, the church-
related college, contemporary contexts of world mission. (4)
RELI 361 (341, 351): Church History Studies – R2
Selected area of inquiry, such as American-Scandinavian church
history, religious experience among American minority
communities, and the ecumenical movement. RELI 341 for 
cross cultural GUR and RELI 351 for alternative perspective
GUR. (4)
RELI 362: Luther – R2
The man and his times, with major emphasis on his writing and
creative theology. (4)
RELI 364 (344, 354): Theological Studies – R2
Selected topic or movement within Christian theology. RELI 344
for cross cultural GUR and RELI 354 for alternative perspective
GUR. (4)
RELI 365: Christian Moral Issues – R2
In-depth exploration from the perspective of Christian ethics of
selected moral issues such as peace and violence, the
environment, sexuality, political and economic systems, hunger,
and poverty. (4)
RELI 367 (347, 357): Major Religious Thinkers, Texts, and
Genres – R2
In-depth study of major figures, texts, or genres in Christian and
non-Christian religious traditions, focusing especially on the
theology and religious thought of these traditions. Fulfills either
line 2 or 3 as appropriate. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (4)
RELI 368: Feminist and Womanist Theologies – A, R2
A study of major theological themes and issues through global
women’s perspectives on gender. (4)
PLU 2007 - 2008
145
Religion • Scandinavian Area Studies
S
RELI 390 (393): Topics in Comparative Religions – R3
Historical study of specific non-Christian religions such as the
traditions of India and China, Judaism, and Islam. RELI 393 for
alternative perspective GUR. (4)
RELI 391: Sociology of Religion – R3
Multi-cultural investigation of religious experience, belief, and
ritual in relation to their social settings with particular attention
to new forms of religion in America. Cross-listed with SOCI
391. (4)
RELI 392: God, Magic, and Morals – C, R3
Anthropology of religion. Cross-listed with ANTH 392. (4)
RELI 491: Independent Studies
Intended for religion majors, advanced and graduate students;
consent of the department is required. (1–4)
RELI 499: Capstone: Research Seminar – SR
Discussion of common readings and a major research and writing
project with public presentation around the student’s area of
interest. (4)
Scandinavian Area Studies
253.535.7314
www.plu.edu/~scan 
scan@plu.edu
Scandinavian Area Studies is an interdisciplinary program that
offers a unique perspective on Scandinavia past and present,
while developing useful analytical, cross-cultural and
communicative skills. Students can easily combine their study of
Scandinavia with other majors drawn from disciplines from
many university departments. The program reflects both the
Scandinavian heritage of the university and the dynamic profile
of the Scandinavian cultures within the world community today.
F
aculty:
Berguson, Chair and Program Director; Hegstad,
Grosvenor, Reiman, Rønning, Storfjell, Trelstad.
Students enrolled in the Scandinavian Area Studies program are
expected to demonstrate the equivalent of:
• Two years of Norwegian, Swedish or Danish language
instruction (16 semester hours)
• Eight semester hours in Scandinavian cultural history
• Four semester hours in Scandinavian literature
MAJORS - A total of 40 semester hours
• Students will choose from an approved list of additional
Scandinavian and cross-disciplinary courses in accordance with
personal interests and goals and in consultation with the
program director
• Eight semester hours as follows:
• Cross-disciplinary course (four semester hours)
• Elective course (four semester hours)
• Senior Project (four semester hours)
With the approval of the Scandinavian Studies director, selected
January-term, summer, experimental courses and an internship
may be included in the major program.
No more than eight semester hours may be offered to meet both
the Scandinavian Area Studies major and general university
requirements or requirements for a second major. Such cross-
application of courses must be approved by the Scandinavian
Studies director.
The cross-disciplinary courses listed below offer an opportunity
to view the Scandinavian countries in comparison with other
world regions. They are regular departmental offerings in which
students enrolled in the Scandinavian Area Studies major focus
their reading and work assignments to a significant extent on the
Nordic region. Students must consult with the program director
concerning registration for these courses.
Students are encouraged, though not required, to study in
Scandinavia as part of their program. 
Financial aid applies to PLU’s partnership program,
“Contemporary Global Issues: The Norwegian Approach,” 
that takes place each fall semester at Hedmark University
College in Norway. Study opportunities are also available at 
a variety of other institutions in Norway, Sweden and 
Denmark. Appropriate coursework completed abroad 
should be submitted to the Scandinavian Studies director for
approval toward the major.
Students interested specifically in Norwegian language and
literature study are referred to the description of the Norwegian
major listed under the Department of Languages and
Literatures. All core Scandinavian courses are taught within this
department.
SCANDINAVIAN COURSES
• Languages: 
• NORW 101, 102: Elementary (4, 4) 
• NORW 201, 202: Intermediate – C (4, 4) 
• NORW 301: Conversation and Composition – C (4) 
• NORW 302: Advanced Conversation and Composition (4)
• Cultural History:  (All courses taught in English)
• SCAN 150 Introduction to Scandinavia (4)
• SCAN 321: Topics in Scandinavian Culture and 
Society - S1 (4)
• SCAN/POLS 322: Scandinavia and World Issues (4) 
• SCAN 327: The Vikings (4)
• Literature: (All courses taught in English)
• SCAN 241: Scandinavian Folklore – LT (4)
• SCAN 341: Topics in Scandinavian Literature - LT (4)
• SCAN 422: Scandinavian Literature in the 19th and 20th 
Centuries - LT (4)
• Cross-disciplinary Courses Sometimes Applicable to the 
Scandinavian Area Studies Major 
Consult with the program director to determine applicability.
• ECON 335: European Economics Integration (4)
• ENGL 334: Special Topics in Children’s Literature (4)
• HIST 325: Reformation – S1 (4)
• MUSI 106: Music of Scandinavia – AR, C (4)
• POLS 331: International Relations – S1 (4)
• POLS 380: Politics of Global Development – S1 (4)
• POLS 384: Scandinavian Government and Policy – S1 (4)
• RELI 361: Church History Studies – R2 (4)
146
PLU 2007 - 2008
Scandinavian Area Studies • Sign Language • Social Sciences
Division of Social Sciences 
253.535.7669
The faculty within the Division of Social Sciences seek to provide
a challenging education in the social sciences that critically
analyzes the past and the present social history and structures of
human interaction. Instruction is vibrant and relevant to the
time and world in which we live and encourages responsible
citizenship for today and tomorrow. Through classroom learning
and applied settings such as supervised internships, students in
the social sciences acquire an understanding of society while
developing the analytical tools with which to provide solutions to
a diverse range of social problems.
The Division of Social Sciences fully supports interdisciplinary
programs. The programs in Global Studies, Legal Studies, and
Women’s and Gender Studies are housed within the division. In
addition, Social Sciences faculty also participate actively in other
interdisciplinary programs including Chinese Studies,
Environmental Studies, and the International Honors Program.
Also administered within the division, the Center for Economic
Education serves to broaden knowledge of economic principles
among K-12 teachers and their students in the Pacific Northwest.
The Forest Foundation Severtson Undergraduate Fellowship
supports students conducting research in the social sciences.
F
aculty:
Peterson, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of
Anthropology, Economics, History, Marriage and Family
Therapy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Social
Work.
As a division within the College of Arts and Sciences, the
S
Sign Language
To view curriculum requirements, please go to Communication and
Theatre, page 58.
Course Offerings – Sign Language (SIGN) 
SIGN 101, 102: Sign Language – A
An introduction to the structure of American Sign Language and
to the world of the hearing impaired. Basic signing skills and
sign language vocabulary; finger spelling; the particular needs
and problems of deaf people. (4, 4)
Course Offering – Scandinavian Area Studies (SCAN) 
SCAN 150: Introduction to Scandinavia
Introduction to studying and understanding the cultures and
societies of the Nordic region (Denmark, Finland, Iceland,
Norway, Sweden, Åland, the Faeroes and Greenland). In addition
to brief geographical and historical overview, the course uses film,
literature and art to investigate the contemporary societies from
such perspectives ar identity construction, the environment,
international peace-building efforts, and minority Sámi,
Greenlandic and minority populations. Taught in English. (4)
SCAN 241: Scandinavian Folklore - LT
Through reading of myths, folktales, ballads and legends, the
course critiques the role of folk narrative as an expression of
belief, identity and world view in traditional and contemporary
Scandinavian societies. Examples of folk culture in music, art and
film supplement the readings. Course conducted in English. (4)
SCAN 321: Topics in Scandinavian Culture and Society
This course concentrates on special topics such as Nordic
colonialism, urban and rural space, the role of migrations in a
changing society, and construction of national identity. Course
taught in English, and may be repeated for credit for different
topic areas. (4)
SCAN 322: Scandinavia and World Issues - S1
This course traces the involvement of the Scandinavian countries
in world organizations, such as the United Nations and the roles
the countries have played in world politics. The focus will be on
the Nordic approach to democracy, aid to developing countries
and peace making, as well as initiatives, projects and activities in
which Scandinavians are currently involved around the world.
Cross-listed with POLS 322. (4)
SCAN 327: The Vikings - S1
The world of the Vikings; territorial expansion; interaction of the
Vikings with the rest of Europe. In English. Cross-listed with
HIST 327. (4)
SCAN 341: Topics in Scandinavian Literature - LT
Selected literary works provide an in-depth study of topics such
as women’s literature, film and the novel, conflict and peace, and
immigrant literature. Course is conducted in English; readings
are in translation for non-majors. May be repeated for credit for
different topic areas. (4)
SCAN 422: Scandinavian Literature in the 19th and 20th
Centuries - LT
Representative works are studied within their social, historical
and literary contexts. Readings include drama, novels, short
stories and poetry. Course is conducted in English; readings are
in translation for non-majors. (4)
SCAN 491: Independent Studies (1-4)
SCAN 492: Independent Studies (1-4)
SCAN 495: Internships (2-4)
SCAN 499: Capstone: Senior Project - SR
A research paper, internship or other approved project. Open
only to Scandinavian Area Studies majors. (4)
For courses in Norwegian language, go to Languages and Literatures,
page 104.
MAJOR IN NORWEGIAN
A minimum of 36 semester hours, including NORW 101–102,
201–202, 301–302, and SCAN 341 or 422.
MINOR IN NORWEGIAN
20 semester hours, which may include NORW 101–102
PLU 2007 - 2008
147
Sociology and Social Work 
S
Sociology and Social Work
253.535.7294
www.plu.edu/~soci
Sociology and social work, as distinct disciplines, are concerned
with understanding contemporary social issues, policies, and
solutions. While sociology emphasizes research, interpretation,
and analysis, social work emphasizes intervention and practice.
The disciplines share an interest in human relationships and
experience, contemporary family life and family policies, ethnic
diversity and race relations, poverty and social stratification,
social justice and community organization. Both disciplines
encourage hands-on learning through field placements,
internships, and service learning projects.
Students may major or minor in either sociology or social work,
or complete a double major in sociology and social work. Social
work majors are encouraged to minor in sociology.
F
aculty:
Gregson, Chair; Ciabattari, Leon-Guerrero, Keller,
Moran, Oka, Renfrow, Russell (Social Work Director), Suarez.
SOCIOLOGY
Sociology examines the processes and structures which shape
social groups of all sizes, including friends, families, workplaces,
and nations. The study of sociology provides students with
unique interpretive tools for understanding themselves and others
in a changing world. Sociology has broad appeal to those who are
interested in developing practical skills and analytical talents.
Some of the practical pursuits enabled by sociological training 
are in the areas of program development, counseling, research,
criminal justice, management, and marketing. The academic
preparation is valuable to those interested in pursuing degrees 
in law, administration, social work, theology, or the social
sciences.
The department’s curriculum offers a variety of courses in
sociological analysis while permitting an optional concentration in
the specialized areas of family/gender or crime/deviance. The
curriculum is deliberately flexible to permit students to study
individual subject areas, or to pursue majors or minors in the field.
Division of Social Sciences offers programs in each constituent
department leading to the BA degree. Additionally, a BS degree is
offered in psychology and an MA degree is offered in Marriage
and Family Therapy. Course offerings and degree requirements
are listed under:
• Anthropology
• Economics
• History
• Marriage and Family Therapy
• Political Science
• Psychology
• Sociology and Social Work
See also sections specific to affiliated degrees and programs for
Chinese Studies, Environmental Studies, Global Studies, Legal
Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies.
Students majoring in business, nursing, education, and computer
science find the sociological minor particularly useful for
broadening their understanding of social rules and relationships,
programs and solutions, and continuity and change.
The faculty is attentive to the individual needs of students in their
efforts to provide academic excellence to a diverse student body.
BACHELOR OF ARTS
• General Major - 40 semester hours, including:
• SOCI 101, 232, 240, 330, 496, 499
• 12 semester hours in sociology chosen in consultation
with the department
• STAT 233 for Sociology and Social Work majors
• Major with Concentration in Family/Gender - 40 semester 
hours including:
• SOCI 101, 232, 330, 440, 496, 499
• 12 semester hours in sociology chosen in consultation 
with the department
• STAT 233 for Sociology and Social Work majors
• Major with Concentration in Crime/Deviance - 40 semester
hours including:
• SOCI 101, 232, 336, 413, 496, 499
• 12 semester hours of sociology chosen in consultation 
with the department
• STAT 233 for Sociology and Social Work majors
• Revised requirements for those majoring in both sociology 
and social work - 80 semester hours including:
• SOCW 245, 250, 350, 360, 460, 465, 475, 476, 485, 
486, and 499
• SOCI 101, 232, 496, 499
• 16 elective credits (recommended courses include:
SOCI 240, 296 and 330)
• STAT 233 for Sociology and Social Work majors
• BIOL 111 and PSYC 101
• Minor: 20 semester hours, including:
• SOCI 101
• 16 semester hours of sociology chosen in consultation 
with the department
• STAT 233 may be included in the minor
• Sociology minors are required to attain a minimum 
grade of C- in sociology classes
• Continuation Policies
To remain in the major, junior and senior level students must:
• maintain a minimum 2.50 overall grade point average, and
• maintain a minimum 2.50 grade point average in
sociology courses.
Transfer Student Policy
The department accepts, for transfer credit from another college
or university, only those courses equivalent to SOCI 101
(Introduction to Sociology) and SOCI 240 (Social Problems). If
students wish to have additional courses considered for transfer
to either their major or minor requirements, they must first meet
with the department chair. The student should bring to this
initial meeting the following:
148
PLU 2007 - 2008
• College/university transcripts
• College catalogs
• Course syllabi and other supporting materials (from the
term when the course was completed)
• Completed coursework (exams, papers)
Declared majors/minors will be required to fill out one petition
per transfer course.
HONORS IN SOCIOLOGY
Departmental honors are awarded by vote of the sociology
faculty to outstanding majors. Criteria for selection include a
high grade point average, election to Alpha Kappa Delta,
International Sociology Honor Society, and exceptional
performance in senior seminar.
Prerequisite Note: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor is
prerequisite to all 300- and 400-level courses.
Course Offerings – Sociology (SOCI) 
SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology – A, S2
An introduction to the discipline of sociology. Features an
analysis of contemporary American society with emphasis on the
interconnections of race, class, and gender. Sociological concepts
include socialization, social roles, stereotypes, power, and
stratification. (4)
SOCI 232: Research Methods – S2
An overview of the methods to explore, describe, and analyze the
social world. General issues in the design and implementation of
research projects, as well as specific issues that arise in conducting
interviews and field observations, constructing and administering
surveys, analyzing existing data, and planning program
evaluations. Required for junior sociology and social work
majors. Prerequisite: SOCI 101, junior status. Instructor
consent is required. (4)
SOCI 240: Social Problems – A, S2
Critical examination of poverty, discrimination, drugs, crime,
homelessness, violence, and family breakdown. Course addresses
contemporary social problems, an analysis of their social roots,
and an evaluation of the policies designed to eradicate them. (4)
SOCI 296: Social Stratification – S2
An examination of the forms, causes, and consequences of social
stratification. The course focuses on inequality based on class,
race, and gender, exploring how and why individuals have
different access to society’s valued resources, services, and
positions, and the consequences of these opportunities (or
blocked opportunities) for different groups of people.
Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or 240. (4)
SOCI 326: Delinquency and Juvenile Justice – S2
An examination of juvenile delinquency in relation to the family,
peer groups, community and institutional structure. Includes
consideration of processing of the delinquent by formal agencies
of control. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)
SOCI 330: The Family – S2
An examination of the institution of the family from historical,
multi-cultural, and contemporary perspectives, with emphasis on
how families and family life are affected by social forces such as
the economy, race and ethnicity, religion, and law. Topics
include: relationships, love, authority, conflict, sexuality, gender
issues, child rearing, communication patterns, and violence in the
context of family life. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or PSYC 335 or
consent of instructor. (4)
SOCI 336: Deviance – S2
A general introduction to a variety of nonconforming, usually
secretive, and illegal behavior, such as corporate crime, drug
dealing, prostitution, industrial spying, child abuse, and suicide,
with emphasis on the conflict of values and life-experiences
within a society. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of
instructor. (4)
SOCI 351: Sociology of Law – S2
An examination of the social control of law and legal institutions;
the influence of culture and social organization on law, legal
change, and the administration of justice. Includes examples of
how law functions within the major theoretical models.
Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or consent of instructor. (4)
SOCI 387: Special Topics in Sociology – S2
Selected topics as announced by the department. Prerequisite:
Departmental consent. (1–4)
SOCI 391: Sociology of Religion – S2
An investigation of the American religious scene with particular
emphasis on the new religious movements, along with attention
to social settings and processes which these new religions reflect
and produce. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or one religion course or
consent of instructor. Cross-listed with RELI 391. (4)
SOCI 413: Crime and Society – S2
An examination of criminal behavior in contemporary society in
relation to social structure and the criminalization process with
particular attention to the issues of race, gender, and class.
Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or 336, or consent of instructor. (4)
SOCI 440: Sex, Gender, and Society – A, S2
An analysis of sexuality and gender from individual and cultural
perspectives. Gender stereotypes and socialization; transsexuality
and cross-gender systems; communication and relationships;
sexual attitudes, behaviors, and lifestyles; work and family issues;
violence; gender stratification and feminism. Prerequisite: SOCI
101 or WMGS 101, or consent of instructor. Core course for
Women’s and Gender Studies minors. (4)
SOCI 491: Independent Studies
Readings or fieldwork in specific areas or issues of sociology
under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite:
Departmental consent. (1–4)
SOCI 495: Internship
Students receive course credit for working in community
organizations and integrating their experiences into an academic
project. Placements are usually arranged by the student and may
include the public school system, private and public social service
organizations, criminal justice system agencies, local and state
governmental agencies, and businesses. Departmental consent is
required. (1–4)
SOCI 496: Major Theories – S2
An analysis of influential sociological theories of the 19th and
Sociology and Social Work
S
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested