display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate pdf page permanently Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks16-part272

PLU 2007 - 2008
159
Graduate Studies • Policies and Standards
to be sent by the institution directly to the Office of Admission at
PLU.
Refer to individual programs for application deadlines.
Application packets are available from the Office of Admission or
the individual graduate program.
• In summary, the following items must be on file in the 
Office of Admission before an applicant will be considered 
for admission:
• The completed application form.
• A statement of professional and educational goals.
• A résumé.
• The $40.00 non-refundable application fee.
• An official transcript from each institution of higher
learning attended. All transcripts must be sent directly to
the Office of Admission at PLU from the institution
providing the transcript.
• Two letters of recommendation.
• TOEFL test scores for all international students (see
international students section for details). The School of 
Business also accepts IELTS scores. 
• Additionally, specific programs require the following:
• Master of Business Administration: GMAT or GRE.
• Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing: see MFA
section.
• Master of Arts in Education: GRE, WEST-E and
WEST-B for MAE with Residency Certification and
interview with admission team.
• Master of Arts  (Marriage and Family Therapy):
Autobiographical statement; personal interview for
finalists.
• Master of Science in Nursing: GRE and Nursing 
Addenda Forms.
All records become part of the applicant’s official file and can be
neither returned nor duplicated for any purpose.
An offer of admission is good for one year in all programs except
for Marriage and Family Therapy, Master of Arts in Education,
and Project Lead. Admitted students who have not enrolled in
any course work for one year after the semester for which they
were admitted must reapply.
Advanced Payment: A $300 advance tuition payment is required
for all international graduate students, and for U.S. graduate
students (except in the MBA Program). This payment guarantees
a place in the student body after formal admission to the specific
program.
Regular - Those students approved unreservedly for admission to
graduate study are granted regular status. An undergraduate grade
point average of 3.0 or higher is required for regular status (except
in the MBA program, which requires a minimum of 2.75).
Provisional - In some programs, newly admitted students are
assigned provisional status until certain program prerequisites
have been met. Students who fail to qualify for regular status
because of grade point average or lack of completion of specific
prerequisites may be granted provisional status.
Note: Students who have applied for graduate studies before
completing their undergraduate work may be admitted as regular or
provisional status students with the condition that work cannot
begin until they have successfully completed their bachelor’s degree
and official transcripts with the degree have been received by the
Office of the Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies. International
students lacking adequate English skills are not officially admitted. 
Non-matriculated - Students holding a bachelor’s degree who wish
to pursue course work with no intention of qualifying for an
advanced degree at PLU are classified as non-matriculated students.
A non-matriculated student may take a maximum of nine semester
hours of 500-level courses. A non-matriculated student may take an
unlimited number of continuing education hours.
Full-time - Graduate students enrolled for eight or more
semester hours in fall or spring semester are considered full-time.
Half-time - Graduate students enrolled for at least four but less
than eight semester hours in fall or spring semester are
considered half-time.
CHANGE OF STUDENT STATUS
Provisional to Regular - Student status will be changed from
provisional to regular after the following conditions have been
met: satisfactory fulfillment of course deficiencies; satisfactory
completion of eight semester hours of graduate work with a
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher; or satisfactory
completion of departmental or school requirements.
Non-matriculated to Regular/Provisional - Student status will
be changed from non-matriculated to regular/provisional after
the non-matriculated student completes the normal application
process and is accepted into a regular degree program. Credit
earned during non-matriculated classification may count toward
a graduate degree, but only as recommended by the faculty
advisory committee and approved by the dean of graduate
studies after the student has been admitted to a degree program.
No such credit can be counted that carries a grade lower than B-
. In all cases, a letter indicating change of status will be
forwarded to the student, with a copy to the advisor and/or
program director.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
To allow ample time for visa and other departure procedures,
international applicants should have their application and all
supporting documents on file in the Office of Admission no less
than four months before a proposed date of entry. The following
documents are necessary before an application can be processed.
• Formal application for admission and statement of goals 
with the $40.00 non-refundable application fee (which 
cannot be waived for any reason).
• Official transcripts with English translation from each
college or university attended in the United States, home
Policies and Standards
INTERVIEWING OF APPLICANTS
Before seeking admission to a graduate program, students are
advised to speak with the program director. In certain programs,
a personal interview is a requirement as part of the application
process. See specific program requirements for details.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
A student may be admitted to a graduate program with regular
or provisional student status, and may enroll as a full-time or
half-time student.
Rotate pdf page permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; pdf reverse page order
Rotate pdf page permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate all pages in pdf; how to reverse pages in pdf
160
PLU 2007 - 2008
country, or other country. All transcripts must be sent directly to
the PLU Office of Admission from the institution providing the
transcript.  
• Two letters of recommendation from school officials or
persons of recognized standing. Applicants transferring from a
U.S. college or university should request their international
student advisor to send a recommendation.
• Demonstrated university level proficiency in the English 
language. Minimum requirements are as follows:
• For all graduate programs, except business and nursing,
minimum scores of 213 on the Computer-Based Test
(CBT) or 80 on the Internet-Based Test (IBT) are required
on the Official Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL). The PLU TOEFL score request code is: 459702.
• Master of Business Administration
• Minimum TOEFL-IBT score of 88 or TOEFL-CBT
score of 230
• Minimum IELTS score of 6.5 accepted in place of
TOEFL scores
• International students lacking adequate English 
proficiency are not officially admitted. Prospective MBA
students who are lacking required English proficiency
may contact the PLU School of Business at
253.535.7330 or Embassy CES at 253.535.8660 for
more information regarding ESL instruction and 
conditional admission to the MBA Program.
• Master of Science in Nursing
• Minimum combined TOEFL-IBT score of 86, with 
minimum individual scores of 26 in speaking, 20 in 
writing, 20 in reading, and 20 in listening.
• The TOEFL requirement is waived for applicants who
hold current United States Registered Nurse licensure.
• Official scores from specific tests as required for certain
programs or concentrations. See individual master’s programs
for further information.
International students are required to submit a non-refundable
$300.00 advance payment following an offer of admission. This
payment is the student’s acknowledgment of acceptance and is
credited to the student’s account to be applied toward expenses of
the first term of enrollment.
An I-20 form (Certificate of Eligibility for Non-Immigrant
Student Status) will be issued only after all documents have been
received, the application has been reviewed, the student has been
offered admission and accepted, a certification of finances has
been received, and the $300.00 advanced payment has been
received. Certification from banks or embassies is permissible. A
financial statement form is available on the Web or from the
Office of Admission upon request. The I-20 form should be
taken to the U.S. Consulate when requesting a visa to come to
the United States for a graduate program.
International students are required by immigration regulations to
enroll as full-time students (a minimum of eight credit hours per
semester). They are also required to submit the appropriate
medical forms to the university’s Health Service. Students may
also be required to have a physical exam.
Before enrolling for classes, all international students are required
to have health and medical insurance, which is obtained through
the university after arrival on campus.
International students must also report to International Student
Services at 253.535.1794, upon registration for purposes of
immigration and university record-keeping.
ADVISING
Upon admission each student will be assigned an advisor
responsible for assisting the student in determining a program of
study. When appropriate, the advisor will chair the student’s
advisory committee. Students are encouraged to meet with their
advisors early in their programs.
HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE
A minimum of 32 semester hours is required. Individual
programs may require more than the minimum number of
semester hours, depending upon prior preparation and specific
degree requirements. Any prerequisite courses taken during the
graduate program shall not count toward fulfillment of graduate
degree requirements.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Graduate work from another institution may be accepted for
transfer upon petition by the student and approval by the
program director. Eight semester hours may be transferable to a
32-semester-hour program.
In degree programs requiring work beyond 32 semester hours,
more than eight semester hours may be transferred. In any case,
the student must complete at least 24 semester hours of the
degree program at Pacific Lutheran University.
TIME LIMIT
All requirements for the master’s degree, including credit earned
before admission, must be completed within seven years. The
seven-year limit covers all courses applied to the master’s degree,
credit transferred from another institution, comprehensive
examinations, research, and final oral examination. The seven-year
limit begins with beginning date of the first course applicable to
the graduate degree. (See also Satisfactory Progress Policy.)
RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT
All candidates for the master’s degree must complete 24 semester
hours of Pacific Lutheran University courses.
IMMUNIZATION POLICY
All graduate students are required to provide a university health
history form with accurate immunization records of measles,
mumps, rubella, and tetanus-diphtheria to Health Services.
Students born before January 1, 1957, must provide
documentation for tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster within the
last 10 years. All international students are required also to have a
tuberculosis skin test. This test will be done at Health Services
after arrival at the university. The cost is $20.00. Students with
questions or concerns about the immunization policy should
contact Health Services at 253.535.7337. PLU Health Insurance
Plan is not available to graduate students.
COURSES TAKEN ON A PASS/FAIL BASIS
If a graduate student’s program includes a course where students
may elect a letter grade or the pass/fail option, graduate students
must opt for the letter grade.
Graduate Studies • Policies and Standards
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document inputFilePath) ' get the 1st page Dim page
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
this VB.NET image editor control SDK online tutorial page. NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
rotate all pages in pdf and save; rotate all pages in pdf file
Graduate Studies • Policies and Standards
PLU 2007 - 2008
161
COURSES ACCEPTABLE FOR GRADUATE CREDIT
All 500-numbered courses described in this catalog are graduate
level. In some graduate programs, a limited number of 300-level
and 400-level courses may be accepted for graduate credit. (See
Degree and Course Offerings for graduate course descriptions.) A
maximum of four semester hours of continuing education credit
may be accepted toward a master’s degree. The School of
Business does not accept continuing education coursework. This
applies to continuing education credit taken at PLU or
transferred from another university. All courses accepted for any
master’s degree are subject to the approval of the program
director and the dean of graduate studies.
ENTRY-LEVEL MASTER OF SCIENCE OF NURSING
All required undergraduate level coursework in Nursing (or its
equivalent) in the Entry-Level Master of Science in Nursing
Program is considered part of the Entry-level MSN graduate
program.
ALUMNI DISCOUNTS
PLU alums who matriculate in a PLU Master’s program before
June 1, 2008 are eligible for the 10% alumni discount. This
discount will not be available to PLU alums newly matriculating
in graduate programs after June 1, 2008.
GRADUATE CREDIT FOR SENIORS
If, during the last semester of the senior year, a candidate for a
baccalaureate degree finds it possible to complete all degree
requirements with a registration of fewer than 16 semester hours
of undergraduate credit, registration for graduate credit may be
permissible. However, the total registration for undergraduate
requirements and elective graduate credit shall not exceed 16
semester hours during the semester. A memorandum stating that
all baccalaureate requirements are being met during the current
semester must be signed by the appropriate department chair or
school dean and presented to the dean of graduate studies at the
time of such registration. This registration does not apply toward
a higher degree unless it is later approved by the student’s
graduate program advisor and/or advisory committee.
PETITIONS
It is the student’s responsibility to formally petition the graduate
program’s director or School’s dean for transfer credit, change of
program or advisor, or any exception to policy. Petition forms
may be obtained from advisors.
STANDARDS OF WORK
The minimum standard acceptable for the master’s degree is a
grade point average of 3.00 in all graduate work. Graduate-level
credit will not be given for any class in which the grade earned is
lower than a C.
A student whose grade point average falls below 3.00 is subject to
dismissal from the program. In such instances, the
recommendation for dismissal or continuance is made by the
student’s advisory committee and acted upon by the dean of
graduate studies.
ACADEMIC PROBATION
A student pursuing the master’s degree who fails to maintain a
cumulative grade point average of 3.00 may be placed on
academic probation. When such action is taken, the student will
be notified by letter from the director or dean of the individual
program. A graduate student on probation who fails to attain a
cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in the next term of
enrollment may be dismissed from the program. A graduate
student cannot earn a master’s degree with less than a 3.00
cumulative grade point average in all graduate-level work.
THESIS AND RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS
Students are required to present evidence of ability to do
independent research. This can be demonstrated in three ways.
See each program section for explanation of research options
within each graduate program.
The first method is a thesis. Those students writing theses must
submit their original theses for binding and microfilming by
ProQuest of Ann Arbor, Michigan. In addition, a Dissertation
Services publishing form and an abstract of 150 words or fewer
must be submitted with the publishing fee, to Office of the
Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies, no later than three weeks
before graduation. Fees for microfilming, publishing abstracts,
and binding original theses for the permanent PLU library
collection are paid by students (see Tuition and Fees section).
The second method is a research paper. If a program requires or
students elect research paper options, one original paper must be
submitted to the Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies with 
an abstract of 150 words or fewer, no later than three weeks
before graduation. Research papers will be microfilmed at 
PLU and placed in the PLU library collection. Microfilming fees
are paid by students.
Theses and research papers that have been approved and signed
must be submitted to the Office of the Provost and Dean of
Graduate Studies not later than three weeks before graduation.
All theses and papers presented must be clean, error-free, and fol-
low the approved style manual for the respective academic pro-
gram. Details are available from the University Archivist, who
reviews all manuscripts to ensure that they conform to university
requirements.
The third method of fulfilling research requirements used in
some programs is paper presentations or culminating projects in
specific courses designed to comprehensively integrate a pro-
gram’s material while promoting independent research and study.
EXAMINATIONS
Written comprehensive examinations through the submission of
documented entries are required in all School of Education and
Movement Studies graduate programs at three separate points.
These must be passed before continuing in subsequent semesters.
An oral defense of the thesis is presented under the direction of
the student’s adviser and must be completed successfully no later
than three weeks before commencement.
GRADUATION
All courses must be completed, final grades recorded,
examinations passed, and thesis/research requirements fulfilled in
order for a degree to be awarded. Graduate students must apply
for graduation by the following dates:
Graduation
Graduation
Approved Theses
Date
Application Due
Due
December 2007
May 1, 2007
December 1, 2007
May 2008
December 1, 2007
May 1, 2008
August 2008
December 1, 2007
August 1, 2008
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
commonly used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in display 90 permanently burn drawn annotation on page in web
reverse pdf page order online; how to rotate just one page in pdf
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document inputFilePath); // get the 1st page PDFPage page
pdf rotate single page; pdf rotate pages and save
162
PLU 2007 - 2008
Note: The thesis/research paper(s) must be signed by the major advi-
sor and have been read by the entire committee before submission to
the Office of the Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies.
Graduation Application forms are available in Student Services,
on the Registrar’s Office Web site and outside Student Services
on the information wall.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND DEADLINES
It is the responsibility of each graduate student to know and
follow the procedures outlined in this catalog and to abide by
established deadlines. See individual master’s programs and
concentrations for specific degree requirements.
• Upon acceptance, meet with the assigned advisor as soon as 
possible to establish the program of study.
• Register for thesis or research paper as required. Deadline: the 
last acceptable registration date is the semester in which the 
student expects to receive his or her degree.
• Apply for graduation. File your application for graduation 
with the Registrar’s Office. Students are responsible for 
ordering their own cap and gown.
Note: If a student fails to complete the necessary requirements for
graduation, the application for graduation will not automatically
be forwarded to the next commencement date.
• Take comprehensive written and/or oral examination under
the direction of the major advisor or advisory committee.
Deadline: no later than four weeks before commencement.
• Submit theses and research papers in final form to Office of
the Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies three weeks prior to
graduation. At this time the binding/microfilming fee must be
paid.
will be extended. Applications and information may be obtained
from the Financial Aid Office or by visiting our Web site.
A limited number of graduate fellowships are available. Contact
the Office of the Provost or individual graduate program directors
for applications and information. The priority date for submission
of applications for the academic year beginning in September is
April 15th; fellowships are awarded on a rolling basis.
Satisfactory Progress Policy
Graduate and professional students must meet the same
satisfactory progress requirements as undergraduate students in
order to continue receiving financial assistance, with the
following exceptions:
• Minimum grade point average: Each graduate program 
monitors the grade point average of its students. In general, 
graduate students must maintain a minimum grade point 
average of 3.00.
• Minimum credit requirement for graduate financial assistance:
Enrollment Status
Minimum/Term
Minimum/Year
Full-time
8
16
3/4-time
6
12
1/2-time
4
8
Note: Less than half-time enrollment will cause a student loan to be
cancelled and may jeopardize deferment status.
• Maximum graduate financial aid time allowed:
1. The maximum number of full-time graduate credit hours
that may be attempted is 72, and the maximum time
allowed to complete a graduate degree is 4.5 years.
2. The maximum number of part-time graduate credit hours
that may be attempted is 72, and the maximum allowed to
complete a graduate degree is 7 years.
Master of Arts (Conflict Analysis and Collaborative Problem Solving) (MA)
Tuition and Fees
In some programs, tuition charges for graduate students are
determined by the number of semester hours for which a student
registers and are based on a semester hour rate.
Tuition per semester hour for 2007–2008
$784.00
Thesis binding/microfilming (subject to change) $70.00
Thesis copyrighting
$65.00
Research paper or project microfilming
$10.00
Graduation fee
$75.00
In other programs, tuition charges are determined by a cohort
price rather than semester hours. Information on the cohort
tuition charges for individual programs is available from the
deans or directors responsible for those programs.
Financial Aid
253.535.7134, 800.678.3243
www.plu.edu/~faid 
Financial assistance for graduate students is available in the forms
of Federal Perkins, Federal Stafford, Federal Nursing, and
Graduate PLUS loans, graduate fellowships, federal or state work
study, and a limited number of scholarships. To apply for
assistance, students must complete the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (www.fafsa.ed.gov). Students must be
admitted to a graduate program before an offer of financial aid
Division of Social Sciences
Master of Arts in Conflict Analysis 
and Collaborative Problem Solving
Proposed start date pending funding: Summer 2008
The Proposed Master of Arts Degree in Conflict Analysis and
Collaborative Problem Solving (CAPS) and the post-baccalaureate
Certificate are designed to enhance leadership capabilities in the
field of conflict prevention/management/resolution. The program
is accomplished by the NGO incorporated as the Conflict
Resolution, Research and Resource Institute (CRI).
The program will offer a healthy, problem-solving approach to
conflict completed with a required supervised field placement.
The content of the programs balances and synthesizes
constructive ideas, analytical concepts and practical skills.
Considered equally important, the academic and experiential
program components will merge in providing meaningful
training that will enable early and mid-career professionals to
build their leadership capacity.
Faculty: PLU/CRI committee is composed of participating
department designated faculty members and two CRI personnel.
The committee members are approved by the Dean of Graduate
Studies. The CAPS Program Director is nominated by
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
able to change view orientation by clicking rotate button C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export to HTML file and create multi-page tiff file
rotate individual pdf pages reader; rotate individual pages in pdf
How to C#: Cleanup Images
property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the To identify blank page through the property BlankPageDetected, if there is a blank page
how to change page orientation in pdf document; pdf reverse page order online
PLU 2007 - 2008
163
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
committee membership and appointed by the Dean of 
Graduate Studies.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
MASTER’S DEGREE - 32 semester hours
The 32 semester hours for the master’s degree will consist of the
following required and elective courses:
• Required
• CAPS 501: Conflict Analysis and Collaborative Problem 
Solving (2)
• CAPS 520: Negotiating and Mediating (4)
• CAPS 530: Cultural Contexts (2)
• CAPS 580: Supervised Field Placement (12)
• CAPS 599: Summary Seminar (4)
• Electives
• Eight semester hours: Four in discipline course work and 
four in academic learning through independent study
The elective course work will vary among the given cohort
participants since various professional occupations will be
represented. Some participants may enroll in PLU master’s level
courses, while others without existing PLU courses at the MA
level, may select 400-level courses that can be enhanced to meet
an MA standard, i.e., POLS 401 or SOCW 465.
After the elective courses are fulfilled, each cohort participant will
engage in an independent study project directly related to her/his
person’s chosen field.
CERTIFICATE - 20 semester hours
The 20 semester hours for the certificate in Conflict Analysis and
Collaborative Problem Solving will require all of the following
courses:
• CAPS 501: Conflict Analysis and Collaborative Problem 
Solving (2)
• CAPS 520: Negotiating and Mediating (4)
• CAPS 530: Cultural Contexts (2)
• CAPS 580: Supervised Field Placement (12)
Course Offerings - Conflict Analysis and Collaborative
Problem Solving (CAPS)
CAPS 501: Conflict Analysis and Collaborative Problem
Solving
This team-taught, two-week intensive workshop introduces the
program’s core concepts applied to contexts and cases. It employs
conflict analysis discussions and interactive simulations to work
with concepts such as underlying interests, unstated perceptions,
vertical and horizontal intra-organizational bargaining, causes
and cures of resistance, positional negotiations, and cooperative
problem solving, and relevant technical constraints and
capabilities. (2)
CAPS 520: Negotiating and Mediating
Through the application of theoretical frameworks and analysis
of case studies in a workshop setting, this course provides
practice in identifying strategies for potentially preventing as well
as managing conflict. In particular, it will consider negotiating
techniques as well as various roles for mediators. It emphasizes
the identification of collaboration methods that can produce
mutually beneficial outcomes and the development of
communication and group facilitation skills. The course amply
employs interactive learning strategies. (4)
CAPS 530: Cultural Contexts
In today’s complex human environments, everyone working
within an organization should develop an awareness of how basic
cultural assumptions deeply affect behavior and perceptions.
Since leadership capabilities include identifying cultural
perceptions, the course covers academic concepts useful in
assessing how diverse groups react and interact; such as, cultural
relativity or ethnocentrism, and the processes of enculturation,
acculturation, assimilation, and syncretism. Discussions will
include case studies of each concept. (2)
CAPS 580: Supervised Field Placement
As apprenticeships, these full-time professional experiences at the
heart of the CAPS program will be supported at two levels, by a
field supervisor at the placement site, and by a CRI Field
Placement Supervisor. (12)
CAPS 599: Summary Seminar
In this interactive seminar, participants will reconsider the
program’s core concepts introduced in CAPS 501 as informed by
their intensive field experiences. Also, each participant will
engage in planning a project of her/his choice and prepare a
relevant proposal. (4)
School of Education and Movement Studies
Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
Master of Arts in Education
253.535.8342
www.plu.edu/~educ
F
aculty:
Hillis, Director of Graduate Studies, Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership
Purpose 
The purpose of the graduate programs in education is to provide
qualified persons with opportunities to develop their skills in
teaching and prepare themselves for educational leadership and
service roles requiring advanced preparation. The major fields of
concentration are designed to provide maximum flexibility in an
experience-oriented environment. Graduate concentrations are
offered in Residency Certification, Educational Leadership,
Administrative Certification. Requirements for each
concentration are listed separately following this section.
Accreditation
The School of Education and Movement Studies is accredited by
the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE).
Coordinating Master’s Degree with Continuing and
Professional Certification Program
Students holding an Initial or Residency Certificate may
coordinate the Master of Arts in Education degree with the
requirements for Continuing or Professional Certification.
Graduate students pursuing the Continuing or Professional
Certificate should discuss their programs with the program
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB 4, false); //only posterize the second page of
save pdf rotate pages; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
164
PLU 2007 - 2008
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
coordinator or their advisor in the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership. Students intending to work
toward a master’s degree must complete formal application for
admission to the Office of Admissions. Students intending to
complete requirements for the Professional Certificate must
complete a formal application to the Office of Partnerships and
Professional Development.
Admission
For regular admission to master’s degree programs and to
professional certificate programs, applicants must have completed
a BA or BS degree from a regionally accredited institution of
higher education and must submit recommendations and test
scores from appropriate screening tests. Students may be required
to have a personal interview with the director of graduate
programs before admission. (See individual concentrations for
tests and prerequisites specific to the concentration.) Students
admitted provisionally must fulfill the following requirements in
order to be granted regular status: Completion of 12 hours of
graduate course work with a minimum grade point average of
3.00.
Examinations
Students complete comprehensive examination through the
submission of documented entries (DEs). DEs are completed at
scheduled points throughout each program and must meet
acceptable levels for students to continue in the program.
PROJECT LEAD - 32 semester hours
Director: Michael Hillis
Concentration Objective
Recognizing that all educators in today’s schools, both teachers
and administrators, must work together as education leaders,
PLU faculty have designed an innovative program to enhance the
skills of 21st century educators with a focus on leadership.
Project Lead is for practicing educators who are committed to
enhancing their leadership and instructional roles. During the
program, PLU faculty and MA students collaborate in the
investigation of five important themes:
• Inquiry and Action, Ambiguity and Knowledge
• Power, Privilege, and Difference
• Advanced Cognition, Development, and Learning
• Individuals, Communities, and Organizations
• Leadership
These themes guide the creation of a personalized professional
project and provide the basis for grappling with important
questions that frame the work of educators in today’s classrooms,
schools, and communities.
Prerequisites
Beyond the general prerequisites, applicants must hold a valid
teaching certificate and should ordinarily have successfully
completed one year of teaching or related professional experience.
A grade point average of at least 3.00 and Graduate Record Exam
(GRE) or other admission test approved by the faculty
coordinator and completed in the past five years are required.
Students not meeting some of these requirements may be granted
provisional status
• REQUIRED COURSES - 28 semester hours
• EDUC 545: Inquiry and Action, Ambiguity and 
Knowledge (2) 
• EDUC 550: Leadership I (1–4)
• EDUC 551: Leadership II (1–4)
• EDUC 552: Leadership III (1–4)
• EDUC 553: Leadership IV (1–4)
• EDUC 586: Sociology of Education (3)
• EDUC 599: Thesis (3 or 4)
• Educational Psychology required
• EPSY 512: Group Process and the Individual (2)
• EPSY 563: Practicum in Group Process and Leadership (2)
• EPSY 565: Advanced Human Development (4)
• Elective Courses - four semester hours
Candidates may take/transfer in an approved elective.
• PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM
Director: Michael Hillis
The Principal and Program Administrator Program educates
creative, energetic, reform-minded administrators for the
leadership positions in Washington schools. To achieve this,
the program aims to develop leaders that:
• Respond to the diversity of their community
• Engage community support systems
• Understand the purpose and use of accountability measures
• Create an environment of instructional leadership
• Model a deep understanding of the ethical issues in
schooling and leadership
• Required Courses:
• EDUC 570: Introduction to Educational Leadership (2)
• EDUC 571: Schools and their Communities (2)
• EDUC 573: Practicum (3)
• EDUC 574: Instruction and Curriculum: Theory and 
Development
• EDUC 575: Managing School Change and Reform (2)
• EDUC 576: Personnel Development (3)
• EDUC 577: School Finance (2)
• EDUC 578: School Law (2)
• EDUC 579: Leading Schools for Today (2)
• EDUC 595: Internship in Educational Administration (4)
• EDUC 596: Graduate Seminar (4)
• EDUC 599: Thesis (4)
MA WITH CERTIFICATION (RESIDENCY)
Director: Michael Hillis
The MA with Certification Program is designed for qualified
candidates who possess a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts
and seek a career of service as teachers. Course work leads to the
Master of Arts in Education: Classroom Teaching degree and
Washington State Residency Teaching Certificate with
endorsements in grades K-8 (Elementary Education) and grades
4-12 (Subject Matter Specific). Candidates complete an
internship in public schools.
Full-time students entering the program may expect to complete
all requirements in 14 months (full-time student load). A strong
emphasis in the program is placed on developing the skills
PLU 2007 - 2008
165
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
necessary for the integration of curriculum across grade levels
with specific attention to the middle level (grades 5-8). The
program is distinguished by active and early involvement in the
schools and by membership with a cohort group of peers.
Students entering the program in the same term will progress
through courses and practical together, which allows them to
share insights and experiences. Because of the involvement in
public school programs, students should be able to take courses
and participate in practical during the day.
Concentration Objective
The primary aim of the program is to educate teachers who are
ready to assume a variety of roles in 21st-century schools. Faculty
work with students to develop understandings and skills for their
functions as leaders, inquirers, and curriculum/instructional
specialists. Course work in the program is designed around
specific themes that serve as a focus for individual and group
projects and intersect with the functions of teachers as leaders,
inquirers, and curriculum/instructional specialists.
Program Overview
Students enrolled in the MA with Certification Program begin
studies in mid-June and complete program requirements the
following August. In addition to course work required for the
residency certificate, students complete an inquiry project
culminating in a thesis as well as documented entries that allow
MA candidates to demonstrate mastery of the program’s core
values.
The inquiry project, an empirical study grounded in the internship
experience, is designed to assist MA candidates in becoming
familiar with the purposes, theories, and processes of educational
inquiry. The intent is to provide the opportunity for program
participants to explore an educational topic in a systematic way in
order to enrich their understanding of the topic, and generally, the
strengths and limitations of educational inquiry.
An important program component is the completion of a year-
long internship in a public school. For the intern experience,
students are clustered at sites selected by the university as
representative of programs reflecting specific attention to current
trends in education.
Prerequisites
For regular admission, applicants must have completed a
baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution of
higher education. A minimum grade point average of 3.00 and
official scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or other
admission examination approved by the director are required.
Applicants are invited to meet with the program director before
submitting the completed application in order to clarify
questions about the program and admissions procedures.
Admission Procedures
Interested candidates should submit application to PLU’s
graduate studies programs. Applications are available from the
Office of Admission. Screening of applicants and admission to
the incoming class will begin January 31 and continue until the
class is full. Enrollment in the MA with Residency Certification
Program is limited and admission to the program is competitive.
Application and admission procedures include:
• Completed application will consist of the following:
• Graduate Application Form including:
• Two recommendations with at least one academic 
reference
• Statement of Goals
• Resume
• A passing score on all three sections of the Washington
Educator Skills Test Basic. Six test dates are available during
the year; check the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership website for the dates.
• Transcripts from all colleges attended.
• Official copies of GRE or MAT scores
• A passing score on at least one West-E test.
• Applications will be reviewed by a committee in the 
Department of Instructional Development and Leadership.
• Selected applicants will be invited to the campus for a group
interview.
• Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision.
• Accepted applicants will return a confirmation card and 
non-refundable $300 deposit.
Required Courses
• Program requirements include successful completion of the 
following courses:
• EDUC 503: Tutorial in Reading Instruction (1)
• EDUC 511: Strategies for Language/Literacy 
Development (2)
• EDUC 520: Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
• EDUC 538: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (2)
• EDUC 544: Inquiry in Communities, Schools and
Classrooms (2) 
• EDUC 556: Secondary and Middle School 
Curriculum (3) 
• EDUC 560: Practicum (2)
• EDUC 562: Schools and Society (3) 
• EDUC 563: Integrating Seminar (3-4) 
• EDUC 564: The Arts, Mind, and Body (2) 
• EDUC 565: The Art and Practice of Teaching (6) 
• EDUC 568: Internship (6)
• EDUC 599: Thesis (3)
• EPSY 566: Advanced Cognition, Development, and
Learning (3) 
• EPSY 583: Current Issues in Exceptionality (2-4) 
Course Offerings – Education (EDUC)
EDUC 501: Workshops
Graduate workshops in special fields for varying lengths of time.
(1-4)
EDUC 503: On-Campus Workshops in Education
On-campus graduate workshops in education for varying lengths
of time; enrollment subject to advisor’s approval.
EDUC 505: Issues in Literacy Education
Initial course required for all students in the master’s program in
literacy education. Overview of historical and current theory,
practice, definitions, and research in language and literacy
acquisition and development in and out of schools. Required of
any track option selected. (2)
EDUC 506: Foundations of School Library Media Center
Management
Functions of the school library media center with particular
166
PLU 2007 - 2008
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of the school library
media specialist within instructional and administrative arenas. (2)
EDUC 507: Principles of Information Organization,
Retrieval, and Service
Exploration of a broad range of data and information in primary
and secondary sources, including document, bibliography, full-
text, statistical, visual, and recorded formats. (2)
EDUC 508: Principles of Bibliographic Analysis and Control
The organization and structure of a broad range of information
formats with an emphasis on the analysis of standard
bibliographic components prescribed by national bibliographic
databases. (2)
EDUC 509: Foundations of Collection Development
The philosophical bases and parameters of collection
development in the school library media center. (2)
EDUC 510: The Acquisition and Development of Language
and Literacy
Investigation of how young children acquire their first language
and what they know as a result of this learning. (2)
EDUC 511: Strategies for Language/Literacy Development
The developmental nature of literacy learning with emphasis on
the vital role of language and the interrelatedness and
interdependence of listening, speaking, reading, and writing as
language processes. Prerequisite: EDUC 510. (2)
EDUC 513: Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and
Instruction
Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for
assessing and facilitating students’ development in reading,
writing, listening, and speaking. Prerequisite: EDUC 510;
highly recommended to be taken at the end of the track
sequence. Cross-listed with SPED 513. (4)
EDUC 515: Professional Seminar: Continuing Level, Teachers
The preparation and sharing of selected topics related to the
minimum generic standards needs of the individual
participants. Required for the continuing level certification of
teachers. (2)
EDUC 516: Teacher Supervision
Identification and development of supervisory skills for teachers
who work with other adults in the classroom. (1)
EDUC 526: Special Topics in Children’s Literature
Students explore the various themes of social issues found in
children’s literature through discussion groups and the
construction of text sets and thematic units used in elementary
and middle school classrooms. (2)
EDUC 527: Multicultural Children’s Literature
Exploration of multi-cultural issues in the context of children’s
literature. (2)
EDUC 528: Children’s Literature in K-8 Curriculum
Investigation of genres of contemporary children’s literature and
development of a personal repertoire for classroom use. (2)
EDUC 529: Adolescent Literature in the Secondary
Curriculum
Genres in adolescent literature and exploration of strategies for
integration of young adult materials across the middle and
secondary school curriculum. (2)
EDUC 530: Children’s Writing
Current theory and practice in the teaching and learning of
writing in elementary classrooms. (2)
EDUC 537: Media and Technology for School Library Media
Specialists
The management of media and technology services in the school
library media center. Special emphasis on emerging technologies
used in K-12 instructional programs (CD-ROM, interactive
video, distance learning, computer technologies). (2)
EDUC 538: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-12)
The use of language as a tool for learning across the curriculum,
and the roles of language in all kinds of teaching and learning
in K-12 classrooms. Strategies for reading/writing in content
areas, thematic teaching, topic study, and integrating
curriculum. (2)
EDUC 544: Inquiry in Communities, Schools, and
Classrooms
Knowledge of evaluation techniques, including portfolios, and of
research design; ability to interpret educational research; to
identify, locate, and acquire typical research and related literature;
to use the results of research or evaluation to propose program
changes and write grants. (2) 
EDUC 545: Inquiry and Action into Social Issues and
Problems
Seminar synthesizing inquiry into social problems in educational
and community settings. Critical examination of contemporary
social issues that affect the success of youth and adults. (2)
EDUC 550: Leadership I
Introduction to the role and function of the principalship with
emphasis on team building and interpersonal professional
relationships and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite:
Admission to the graduate program or permission of graduate
advisor. (1–4)
EDUC 551: Leadership II
The principal as an instructional leader who oversees curriculum,
student achievement, and assessment, and supervises teachers in
their work. (1–4)
EDUC 552: Leadership III
The principal as a manager of resources and community
relations. Local, state, and federal issues in school finance and
communicating with school stakeholders the mission and services
of the school. (1–4)
EDUC 553: Leadership IV
The principal as a developer of personnel. Study of contemporary
federal, state, and local statutes, regulations, and case law related
to working with personnel issues, including legal principles in
hiring, firing, in-service and staff development, support services,
and contract negotiation. (1–4)
EDUC 554: Leadership V
The principal as a change agent. Study of current issues in
administration. (1–4)
EDUC 556: Secondary and Middle School Curriculum
A variety of facts of secondary and middle school programs:
finance, curriculum, discipline, evaluation, classroom
management, the basic education bill, legislative changes and
special education. Critical issues in the education scene 
today. (3)
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
PLU 2007 - 2008
167
EDUC 560: Practicum
Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in schools. Designed
for MA/Cert Program. (2)
EDUC 562: Schools and Society
Individual and cooperative study of the socio-cultural and
cultural, political, legal, historical, and philosophical foundations
of current practices of schooling in America. Prerequisite:
Admission to the MA/Cert Program or consent of instructor. (3)
EDUC 563: Integrating Seminar
Students work cooperatively and individually to integrate
education course work, field experience, and individual
perspective during graduate degree programs. May be repeated
for credit. (1–4)
EDUC 564: The Arts, Mind, and Body
An exploration of methods to facilitate creativity and meaning-
making in the classroom through visual, musical, non-
verbal/physical movement, and dramatic arts. (2)
EDUC 565: The Art and Practice of Teaching
Through application projects, micro-teaching experiences, and
reading representing different perspectives, participants will
practice and assess a variety of options for designing,
implementing, and assessing lessons and units that integrate
mathematics, science, social science, language arts, and physical
education in K-8 classrooms. (6)
EDUC 568: Internship in Teaching
Internship in classroom settings. Fourteen weeks of teaching
under the direct supervision of cooperating teachers and
university supervisors. Designed for students in the MA/Cert
program. (6)
EDUC 585: Comparative Education
Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems
of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying
knowledge for greater understanding of the diverse populations
in the K-12 educational system. (3) 
EDUC 586: Sociology of Education
Viewing the educational system as a complex and changing social
institution. Emphasis on value orientations from diverse human
populations and their impact on K-12 education and educational
issues. (3)
EDUC 587: History of Education
A study of great men and women whose lives and writings have
shaped and continue to shape the character of American
education. (3)
EDUC 589: Philosophy of Education
Philosophical and theoretical foundations of American education
as well as the social philosophy of growing diverse populations in
the K-12 schools. (3)
EDUC 590: Graduate Seminar
A workshop for all Master of Arts candidates in the School of
Education. Candidates should register for this seminar for
assistance in fulfilling requirements. No credit is given, nor is
tuition assessed.
EDUC 595: Internship in Educational Administration
Students will register for 2 semester hours in each of two
semesters. Internship in educational administration jointly
planned and supervised by the School of Education and public
and/or private school administrators in full compliance with
state requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate
program or to the credentialing program; completion of
educational administration concentration; consultation with
advisor. (2, 2)
EDUC 596: Graduate Seminar
Students register for 1 semester hour in each of two semesters.
Professional seminars are scheduled and presented by candidates,
their university professors, and professional colleagues in the
schools in partnership. Prerequisites: Completion of coursework
in educational administration concentration. (1,1)
EDUC 597: Independent Study
Projects of varying length related to educational issues or
concerns of the individual participant and approved by an
appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1–4)
EDUC 598: Studies in Education
A research paper or project on an educational issue selected
jointly by the student and the graduate advisor. Prerequisites:
Admission to the graduate program; EDUC 544, 545; minimum
of 26 hours of coursework leading to the MA; consultation with
the student’s advisor. (2)
EDUC 599: Thesis
The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate’s major
field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate’s
graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their
thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee.
(3 or 4)
Course Offerings – Educational Psychology (EPSY)
EPSY 501: Workshops
Graduate workshops in special fields for varying lengths of time.
(1–4) 
EPSY 512: Group Process and the Individual
A human interaction laboratory to facilitate the exploration of
the self concept through the mechanisms of interpersonal
interactions and feedback. Emphasis placed on the acquisition of
skill in self-exploration, role identification, and climate-making.
(2)
EPSY 535: Foundations of Guidance
The focus is on developing an understanding of the services and
processes available to assist individuals in making plans and
decisions according to their own life pattern. (4)
EPSY 536: Affective Classroom Techniques
Exploration of various techniques designed to facilitate
understanding of self and others; methods for working with
students. Prerequisite: Student teaching or graduate status.
Laboratory experience as arranged. (2)
EPSY 550: Beginning Practicum
Learn and practice the basic counseling skills in a structured and
closely supervised environment. Clients used in this practicum
will be relatively high functioning and will usually be seen in an
observation room. (3)
168
PLU 2007 - 2008
Master of Arts in Education (MAE)
EPSY 555: Practicum
In addition to those skills learned in Beginning Practicum, learn
and practice various counseling approaches, skills and techniques
with individuals from diverse populations in community or various
school settings. Prerequisites: EPSY 550 and EPSY 561. (3)
EPSY 560: Communication in Schools
The study of the theories and concepts of those helping skills
needed to facilitate problem-solving and personal and academic
growth with applications to the classroom and to interactions
with professional colleagues. Prerequisite: Admission to
MA/Cert program. (3)
EPSY 561: Basic Relationships in Counseling
A study of the theory, process, techniques, and characteristics of
the counseling relationship. (4)
EPSY 563: Practicum in Group Process and Leadership
A human interaction laboratory which explores interpersonal
operations in groups and facilitates the development of self-
insight; emphasis on leadership and development of skill in
diagnosing individual, group, and organizational behavior
patterns and influences. Students will co-facilitate a laboratory
group. Prerequisite: EPSY 512. (2)
EPSY 565: Advanced Human Development
Consideration of the implications of the theory, concepts, and
research from psychology on development, motivation, learning,
and instruction. Emphasis will be on exploring ideas and
processes that are directly related to classroom teaching. This
course will help teachers understand the skills needed for
teaching and become more aware of the complexities of learning
and instruction. (4)
EPSY 566: Advanced Cognition, Development, and Learning
The study of principles and current thought and research in
cognition, development, and learning. Prerequisite: Admission
to the MA/Cert program or consent of instructor. (3)
EPSY 569: Career Guidance
A study of careers, theories of choice, and guidance techniques. (4)
EPSY 570: Fieldwork in Counseling and Guidance
A culminating practicum of field experience in schools or
agencies using theory, skills, and techniques previously learned.
Students incorporate consultation experience following the
Adlerian model. (4)
EPSY 575: Mental Health
Basic mental health principles as related to interpersonal
relationships. Focus on self-understanding. Laboratory
experiences as arranged. (4)
EPSY 578: Behavioral Problems
Adlerian concepts provide the basis for observation, motivation,
modification, and life style assessment. Skills for assisting people
in developing responsibility for their own behavior. Laboratory
experience as arranged. (4)
EPSY 583: Current Issues in Exceptionality
The characteristics of exceptional students and current issues
involving the educator’s role in dealing with their special needs.
(2–4)
EPSY 597: Independent Study
Projects of varying length related to educational issues or
concerns of the individual participant and approved by an
appropriate faculty member and the dean. (1–4)
EPSY 598: Studies in Education
A research paper or project on an educational issue selected
jointly by the student and the graduate advisor. It will be
reviewed by the student’s graduate committee. (2)
EPSY 599: Thesis
The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate’s major
field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate’s
graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their
thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee.
(3 or 4)
Course Offerings – Special Education (SPED) 
SPED 501: Off-Campus Workshops in Special Education
Off-campus graduate workshops in special education for varying
lengths of time. (1-4)
SPED 503: On-Campus Workshops in Special Education
On-campus graduate workshops in special education for varying
lengths of time. (1-4)
SPED 513: Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and
Instruction
Understanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for
assessing and facilitating students’ development in reading,
writing, listening, and speaking. Cross-listed with EDUC 513.
SPED 520: Teaching Students with Special Needs in
Elementary Programs
Introduction and overview of services for students with special
needs in elementary programs. Includes procedural and
substantive legal issues in special education, program
modification, and classroom management. (2)
SPED 521: Teaching Students with Special Needs in
Secondary Programs
Introduction and overview of services for students with special
needs in secondary programs. Includes procedural and
substantive legal issues in special education, program
modification, and classroom management. (2)
SPED 522: The Role of Health Professionals in Special
Education
Introduction of health professionals in the school to learners with
special needs. Topics include roles of parents as well as medical
concerns, early intervention, teaming, substance abuse, and
suicide prevention. (3)
SPED 523: Educational Procedures for Students with Mild
Disabilities
An introduction to teaching procedures for students with mild
disabilities. Includes concepts in characteristics, assessment, and
instructional practices. (3)
SPED 524: Educational Procedures for Students with
Developmental Disabilities
An examination of the emotional, social, physical, and mental
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested