display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate pdf page and save control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks2-part276

PLU 2007 - 2008
19
POLS 373: 
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (4)
POLS 374: 
Legal Studies Research (4)
POLS 380: 
Politics of Global Development (4)
POLS 381: 
Comparative Legal Systems (4)
POLS 383: 
Modern European Politics (4)
POLS 384:
Scandinavian Government and Politics (4)
POLS 385 
Canadian Government and Politics (4)
POLS 386: 
The Middle East (4)
POLS 401: 
Workshops and Special Topics (1 to 4)
POLS 431: 
Advanced International Relations (4)
POLS 450: 
Internship in Politics (1 to 8)
POLS 458: 
Internship in Public Administration 
(1 to 8)
POLS 464: 
Internship in the Legislative Process 
(1 to 12)
POLS 471: 
Internship in Legal Studies (1 to 4)
SCAN/POLS 322: Scandinavia and World Issues (4)
SCAN 327: 
The Vikings (4)
Social Sciences, Line 2 (Economics, Psychology, Social Work,
or Sociology) – S2
ECON 111: 
Principles of Microeconomics: Global and 
Environmental (4)
ECON 101:
Principles of Microeconomics (4)
ECON 102: 
Principles of Macroeconomics (4)
ECON 301: 
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis (4)
ECON 302: 
Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis (4)
ECON 311: 
Energy and Natural Resource Economics (4)
ECON 313: 
Environmental Economics (4)
ECON 315: 
Investigating Environmental & Economic
Change in Europe (4)
ECON 321: 
Labor Economics (4)
ECON 322: 
Money and Banking (4)
ECON 323: 
Health Economics (4)
ECON 325: 
Industrial Organization and Public 
Policy (4)
ECON 327: 
Public Finance (4)
ECON 331: 
International Economics (4)
ECON 333: 
Economic Development: Comparative 
Third World Strategies (4)
ECON 335: 
European Economic Integration (4)
ECON 338: 
Political Economy of Hong Kong and 
China (4)
ECON 341: 
Strategic Behavior (4)
ECON 344: 
Econometrics (4)
ECON 345: 
Mathematical Topics in Economics (4)
ECON 386: 
Evolution of Economic Thought (4)
ECON 495: 
Internship (1 to 4)
ECON 498: 
Honors Thesis (4)
PSYC 101: 
Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSYC 221: 
The Psychology of Adjustment (2)
PSYC 310: 
Personality Theories (4)
PSYC 320: 
Development Across the Lifespan (4)
PSYC 330: 
Social Psychology (4)
PSYC 335: 
Cultural Psychology (4)
PSYC 345: 
Community Psychology (4)
PSYC 360: 
Psychology of Language (4)
PSYC 370: 
Gender and Sexuality (4)
PSYC 375: 
Psychology of Women (4)
PSYC 380: 
Psychology of Work (4)
PSYC 385: 
Consumer Psychology (4)
PSYC 405: 
Workshop on Alternative Perspectives 
(2 or 4)
PSYC 410: 
Psychological Testing (4)
PSYC 415: 
Abnormal Psychology (4)
PSYC 420: 
Adolescent Psychology (4)
PSYC 430: 
Peace Psychology (4)
PSYC 435: 
Theories and Methods of Counseling 
and Psychotherapy (4)
PSYC 440: 
Human Neuropsychology (4)
PSYC 442: 
Learning: Research and Theory (4)
PSYC 446: 
Perception (4)
PSYC 448: 
Cognitive Psychology (4)
PSYC 483: 
Seminar (1 to 4)
SOCI 101: 
Introduction to Sociology (4)
SOCI 232: 
Research Methods (4)
SOCI 240: 
Social Problems (4)
SOCI 296:
Social Stratification (4)
SOCI 326: 
Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (4)
SOCI 330: 
The Family (4)
SOCI 336: 
Deviance (4)
SOCI 351: 
Sociology of Law (4)
SOCI 387: 
Special Topics in Sociology (1 to 4)
SOCI 391: 
Sociology of Religion (4)
SOCI 413: 
Crime and Society (4)
SOCI 418: 
Advanced Data Applications (2 to 4)
SOCI 440: 
Sex, Gender, and Society (4)
SOCI 462: 
Suicide (4)
SOCI 496: 
Major Theories (4)
SOCW 101/190:  Introduction to Social Work (4)
SOCW 175: 
January on the Hill (4)
SOCW 245: 
Human Behavior and the Social
Environment (4)
SOCW 250: 
Social Policy I: History of Social Welfare (4)
SOCW 350: 
Social Policy II: Social Policy Analysis (4)
SOCW 360: 
Social Work Practice I: Interviewing and
Interpersonal Helping (0 or 4)
SOCW 460: 
Social Work Practice II: Families and 
Groups (4)
SOCW 465: 
Social Work Practice III: Macropractice (4)
Writing Requirement – WR
ENGL 221: 
Research and Writing (2 or 4)
ENGL 224: 
Travel Writing (4)
ENGL 225: 
Autobiographical Writing (4)
ENGL 227: 
Imaginative Writing I (4)
ENGL 323: 
Writing in Professional Settings (4)
ENGL 324: 
Free-Lance Writing (4)
ENGL 325: 
Personal Essay (4)
ENGL 326: 
Writing for Children (4)
ENGL 327: 
Imaginative Writing II (4)
ENGL 328: 
Advanced Composition for Teachers (4)
ENGL 421: 
Tutorial in Writing (1 to 4)
ENGL 425: 
Writing on Special Topics (4)
ENGL 427: 
Imaginative Writing III (4)
WRIT 101: 
Inquiry Seminars: Writing (4)
WRIT 201: 
Writing Seminar for International 
Students (4)
WRIT 202: 
Advanced Writing Seminar for International
Students (4)
GeneralUniversityRequirements
Rotate pdf page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate all pages in pdf preview; rotate pages in pdf permanently
Rotate pdf page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order; rotate all pages in pdf and save
20
PLU 2007 - 2008
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
Students are expected to be familiar with the academic procedures of
the university. The procedures of greatest importance to students are
listed in this section of the catalog. Additional information about
these procedures is available in the Office of the Registrar and the
Office of the Provost.
Academic Integrity
Both the value and the success of any academic activity, as well as
the entire academic enterprise, have depended for centuries on
the fundamental principle of absolute honesty. The university
expects all its faculty and students to honor this principle
scrupulously.
Since academic dishonesty is a serious breach of the universally
recognized code of academic ethics, it is every faculty member’s
obligation to impose appropriate sanctions for any demonstrable
instance of such misconduct on the part of a student.
The university’s policy on academic integrity and its procedures
for dealing with academic misconduct are detailed in the Student
Handbook at www.plu.edu/print/handbook.
Academic Responsibilities and
Deadlines
It is the responsibility of each undergraduate student to know
and follow the procedures outlined in this catalog and to abide
by the established deadlines.
Advising
The university expects that all students will benefit from
assistance in planning academic programs consistent with their
educational goals. Both to help students make their initial
adjustment to the academic load at PLU and to provide counsel
throughout their academic careers, the university has established
anetwork of faculty and administrative staff advisors as well as
an Academic Advising Office.
Academic Advisors
All students enrolled in degree programs have advisors whose
overall responsibility is to guide academic progress. Until
students have attained junior standing, they are required to meet
with their advisor (and receive a current Registration Access
Code) prior to registering for an upcoming term. In their work
with individual students, advisors often work closely with and
refer students to personnel in a number of student services
offices. At the time of entry, each first-year student is assigned an
academic advisor, usually according to interests expressed by the
student. 
Students who wish to explore the general curriculum before
choosing a major program are assigned to professional advisors in
the Academic Advising office or trained faculty or administrative
staff who will help them to make educational plans appropriate
to their interests and talents. All academic advisors are supported
by educational planning workshops and by resources available
through the Academic Advising Office. 
Transfer students who are ready to declare their major are assigned
to a designated transfer advisor. Transfer students who wish to
explore educational goals are assigned an academic advisor in the
Academic Advising Office. 
Progress toward general university requirements can be accessed
by the student and the advisor online via the Curriculum,
Advising, Program Planning (CAPP) report available on Banner
Web. In addition, advisors receive an advising file for each
student they advise. 
Major Advisors
Upon formal declaration of a major, students are assigned faculty
major advisors within the major department, which in many
cases will replace the current academic advisor. Major advisors
guide students’ progress toward their chosen degree goals.
Students are always welcome to see a professional academic
advisor in the Academic Advising Office in addition to their
major advisor. Students and advisors are expected to meet
regularly, though the actual number of meetings will vary
according to individual needs. Students are responsible for
meeting with their advisor who serves as an academic guide as
students make choices and determine their educational goals. 
Academic Standing Policy
The following terms are used to describe academic standing at
PLU. Academic standing is determined by the Committee for the
Admission and Retention of Students, which reserves the right to
review any student’s record to determine academic standing.
Academic standing will be reviewed at the end of each semester
and term.
Good Standing
All students enrolled at the university are expected to stay in
good academic standing. Good standing requires a cumulative
grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 or higher.
Academic Warning
• First-year students completing their first semester: First-year
students completing their first semester whose GPA is below
2.00 are placed on first semester warning. Students will receive
A C A D E M I C   P O L I C Y   A N D   P R O C E D U R E S
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
how to rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pdf page permanently
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
save pdf rotated pages; pdf reverse page order online
PLU 2007 - 2008
21
first semester warning notification and are required to follow
the guidelines set forth in the letter. For these students, first
semester warning is noted permanently on their academic
transcript.
• Continuing students: All other students whose most recent
semester GPA was less than 2.00, but whose cumulative GPA
is 2.00 or higher will receive an academic warning notification.
Students are required to follow the guidelines set forth in the
letter. For these students, academic warning is not noted on
the transcript.
Academic Probation
Students are placed on academic probation if their cumulative
GPA falls below 2.00. Students on academic probation must
satisfactorily complete each course they attempt in the subsequent
semester. Satisfactory completion means no grades of “W”
(withdrawal), “I” (incomplete), “E” or “F” for the term. Students
who do not satisfactorily complete each course attempted in a
probationary semester are dismissed from the university. Academic
probation is noted permanently on the transcript. Students who
successfully complete January Term or summer term course(s) and
who achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 will be considered
in good academic standing. Students who complete a January
Term or summer term course(s) and who achieve a term GPA of
2.00 or higher but whose cumulative GPA still remains below
2.00 must raise their cumulative GPA to at least 2.00 with their
coursework in the next Fall or Spring semester.
Continued Probation
Students whose cumulative GPA remains below 2.00 after a
probationary semester, but whose semester GPA for their first
probationary semester is above 2.00 are granted an additional
semester of probation. Students on continued probation must
satisfactorily complete each course they attempt. Satisfactory
completion means no grades of “W” (withdrawal), “I”
(incomplete), “E” or “F” for the term. At the end of the
continued probationary semester, students must have earned a
cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 and must have satisfactorily
completed each course or they are dismissed from the university.
Continued probation is noted permanently on the transcript.
First Academic Dismissal
Students are given a first academic dismissal from the university
if they fail to meet the conditions set forth in the requirements
for students on academic probation or on continued probation.
Anotation of first academic dismissal will be made on the
transcript. Students are dismissed after fall and spring semester.
Students dismissed after the fall semester may remain in their
January Term courses, but are withdrawn from their spring
semester courses unless the committee grants reinstatement (see
below). Students dismissed after the spring semester are
withdrawn from all summer term courses.
If there were extraordinary circumstances that the student
believes warrant consideration of an appeal, students may apply
for reinstatement by petitioning the Committee for the
Admission and Retention of Students (in care of the Director of
Advising). If the petition is approved, students are reinstated on
continued probation and must earn a semester GPA of 2.00 or
better. At the end of the following semester, students must have
reached the 2.00 cumulative GPA. Students who are reinstated
must also satisfactorily complete each course they attempt.
Satisfactory completion means no grades of “W” (withdrawal),
“I” (incomplete), “E” or “F” for the term.
Second Academic Dismissal
Students who are reinstated after the first academic dismissal
must earn a semester GPA of at least 2.00 in order to be granted
one additional semester of continued probation to reach the
required 2.00 cumulative GPA. Students who fail to attain at
least a 2.00 term GPA in the semester after reinstatement, or
who fail to achieve a 2.00 cumulative GPA or higher in the
second semester after reinstatement are given a second academic
dismissal. These students are not allowed to petition the
Committee for the Admission and Retention of Students for
reinstatement.
Eligibility for Student Activities
Any regularly enrolled, full-time student (12 semester hours or
more) is eligible for participation in university activities.
Limitations on a student’s activities based upon academic
performance may be set by individual schools, departments or
organizations. A student on academic probation is not eligible for
certification in intercollegiate competitions and may be advised
to curtail participation in other extracurricular activities.
Midterm Advisory Letters
In the seventh week of each fall and spring semester, instructors
may choose to send warning letters to students doing work below
Clevel (2.00) in their classes. No transcript notation is made,
and academic standing is not affected.
Class Attendance
The university assumes that all registered students have freely
accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance.
Course grades reflect the quality of students’ academic
performance as a whole, which normally includes regular
participation in the total class experience and is evaluated
accordingly. Absences may lead to a reduction of a student’s final
grade. In the event of unavoidable absence, students are expected
to inform the instructor. Assignment of make-up work, if any, is
at the discretion of the instructor.
Classifications of Students
First-year:
Students who have met first-year entrance 
requirements.
Sophomore: Students who have satisfactorily completed 30 
semester hours.
Junior:
Students who have satisfactorily completed 60 
semester hours.
Senior:
Students who have satisfactorily completed 90 
semester hours.
Graduate 
Student:
Students who have met graduate entrance 
requirements and have been accepted into the
Division of Graduate Studies. 
Non-matriculated Undergraduates: Undergraduate students
who are attending part-time for a maximum of nine semester
hours but are not officially admitted to a degree program.
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Related APIs (PDFDocument.cs): public override void DeletePage(int pageId). Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file
rotate pdf pages individually; pdf reverse page order preview
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPage(page, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
rotate single page in pdf reader; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
22
PLU 2007 - 2008
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
Non-matriculated Graduate Students: Graduate students who
are attending part-time for a maximum of nine semester hours
but are not officially admitted to a degree program.
Course Load
The normal course load for undergraduate students during fall
and spring semesters is 13 to 17 semester hours per semester,
including physical education. The minimum full-time course
load is 12 semester hours. The minimum full-time load for
graduate students is eight semester hours. A normal course load
during the January term is four semester hours with a maximum
offive semester hours.
• In order for a student to take a full course load, the student
must be formally admitted to the university. See the
Admission section of this catalog for application procedures.
• Students who wish to register for 18 or more hours in a 
semester are required to have at least a 3.00 grade point 
average or consent of the registrar.
• Students engaged in considerable outside work may be
restricted to a reduced academic load.
Credit By Examination
Students are permitted, within limits, to obtain credit by
examination in lieu of regular enrollment and class attendance.
No more than 30 semester hours may be counted toward
graduation whether from the College Level Examination
Program (CLEP) or any other examination. Exceptions to this
rule for certain groups of students or programs may be made,
subject to recommendation by the Educational Policies
Committee and approval by the faculty. Credit by examination is
open to formally admitted, regular-status students only and does
not count toward the residency requirement for graduation.
To receive credit by examination, students must complete a
Credit By Examination Registration Form available on the
display wall located across from the Student Services Center,
obtain the signatures of the respective departmental dean or chair
plus instructor and arrange for the examination. The completed
form must be returned to the Registrar’s Office by the add/drop
deadline for the appropriate term.
CLEP subject examinations may be used to satisfy general
university requirements as determined by the Registrar’s Office. 
CLEP subject examinations may be used to satisfy requirements
for majors, minors or programs as determined by the various
schools, divisions and departments.
CLEP general examinations are given elective credit only.
CLEP examinations are subject to recommendations by the
Educational Policies Committee and approval by the faculty.
Official CLEP transcripts must be submitted for evaluation of
credit.
The university does not grant credit for college-level general
equivalency diploma (GED) tests.
Credit Restrictions
Credit is not allowed for a mathematics or a foreign language
course listed as a prerequisite if taken after a higher-level course.
For example, a student who has completed Spanish 201 cannot
later receive credit for Spanish 102. 
Repeating Courses
An undergraduate may repeat any course. The cumulative grade
point average is computed using the highest of the grades earned.
Credit toward graduation is allowed only once. Students should
be aware that repeated courses are not covered by financial aid
funding and cannot be counted towards full time status for
financial aid. Students should consult the Financial Aid office
before repeating any course.
Grading System
Students are graded according to the following designations:
Grade
Points per Hour
Credit Awarded
A Excellent
4.00
Yes
A-
3.67
Yes
B+
3.33
Yes
B Good
3.00
Yes
B-
2.67
Yes
C+
2.33
Yes
CSatisfactory
2.00
Yes
C-
1.67
Yes
D+
1.33
Yes
DPoor
1.00
Yes
D-
0.67
Yes
E Fail
0.00
No
The grades listed below are not used in calculating grade point
averages. No grade points are earned under these designations.
Grade
Description
Credit Awarded
P
Pass
Yes
F
Fail
No
I
Incomplete
No
IP
In Progress
No
AU
Audit
No
W
Withdrawal
No
WM
Medical Withdrawal
No
NG
No Grade Submitted
No
Pass (P) and Fail (F) grades are awarded to students who select
the pass/fail option or who are enrolled in exclusive pass/fail
courses. These grades do not affect a student’s grade point
average. 
Pass/Fail Option
The pass/fail option permits students to explore subject areas
outside their known abilities by experiencing courses without
competing directly with students who are specializing in those
areas of study. Grades of A through C- are regarded as pass;
grades of D+ through E are regarded as fail. Pass/fail grades do
not affect the grade point average.
• The pass/fail option is limited to eight credit hours (regardless 
of repeats, pass or fail).
• Only one course may be taken pass/fail in fulfillment of 
general university or core requirements or of the College of 
Arts and Sciences requirement.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
int pageIndex = 2; doc.UpdatePage(page, pageIndex); // Save the PDFDocument. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; doc.Save
rotate pages in pdf and save; rotate individual pages in pdf
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf rotate page; saving rotated pdf pages
PLU 2007 - 2008
23
• The pass/fail option may not be applied to a course taken for 
fulfillment of a major or minor program. An exception to this 
is allowed for one course in the major or minor field if it was 
taken before the major or minor was declared.
• Students must file their intention to exercise the pass/fail 
option with the Student Services Center by the deadline listed 
in the academic calendar.
• The pass/fail option is limited to undergraduate students only.
Exclusive Pass/Fail Courses
Some courses only award pass/fail grades. The goals of these
courses are typically concerned with appreciation, value
commitment, or creative achievement. Exclusive pass/fail courses
do not meet major or university requirements without faculty
approval. If a student takes an exclusive pass/fail course, the
student’s individual pass/fail option is not affected.
Grade Changes
Faculty may not change a grade once it has been recorded in the
registrar’s records unless an error was made in assigning the origi-
nal grade. The error must be reported to the Registrar by the end
of the following long term after which it was entered (by the
Spring grade submission deadline for Fall and January, and by
the Fall grade deadline for Spring and Summer). Any grade
change requested after the designated date must be approved by
the respective Department Chair and Dean. The Grade Change
policy does not apply to “I” or “IP” grades, which are subject to
separate policies.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete (I) grades indicate that students did not complete
their work because of circumstances beyond their control. An
Incomplete Contract is required and must be signed by the
student and the instructor. To receive credit, all work must be
completed and a passing grade recorded. Incompletes from
Spring and Summer terms are due six weeks into the Fall
Semester. Fall and J-Term incompletes are due six weeks into the
Spring Semester. The earned grade is recorded immediately
following the I designation (for example IB) and remains on the
student record. Incomplete grades that are not completed are
changed to the default grade assigned by the instructor on the
Incomplete Contract. If an Incomplete Contract was not
submitted or a default grade not indicated, the incomplete grade
will be defaulted to an E or F grade upon expiration of the time
limit for submitting grades for an incomplete from that term. An
incomplete does not entitle a student to attend the class again
without re-enrollment and payment of tuition.
In Progress
In Progress (IP) grade signifies progress in a course that normally
runs more than one term to completion. In Progress carries no
credit until replaced by a permanent grade. A permanent grade
must be submitted to the registrar within one year of the original
IP grade submission. Any IP grade that is not converted to a per-
manent grade within one year will automatically convert to an
Incomplete (I) and will then be subject to the policy governing
Incomplete grades.
Medical Withdrawal
Medical Withdrawal is entered when a course is not completed
due to medical cause. A medical withdrawal does not affect a
student’s grade point average. See Withdrawal from the
University.
No Grade
Atemporary grade entered by the Registrar’s Office when no
grade has been submitted by the faculty member by the
established deadline.
Second Bachelor’s Degree earned
simultaneously
Astudent may earn two baccalaureate degrees at the same time.
For a second bachelor’s degree awarded simultaneously,
requirements for both degrees, in addition to GURs must be
completed prior to any degree being awarded. A minimum of 16
semester hours must be earned in the second degree that are
separate from hours applied to the first degree. At least eight of
the 16 semester hours that are earned for the second degree must
be upper division hours. Students must complete all GURs
required for each degree. (For example, a student earning a BA
and BFA must complete the College of Arts & Sciences language
requirement. Though it is not required of the BFA, it is a
requirement for a BA). Students must consult with advisers from
both departments in regards to meeting the specific requirements
for each major. Students cannot be awarded two degrees within
the same discipline. (Example: BA and BS in Psychology).
Second Bachelor’s Degree earned by
returning students
Students cannot return to have additional majors or minors
posted to their records once they graduate unless they complete
an entirely new degree. Students who return to PLU to earn a
second bachelor’s degree after earning a first bachelor’s degree or
those who earned their first degree at another institution must
meet the following requirements:
• Apply for admission through the Office of Admission and
acceptance under the current catalog.
• Earn a minimum of 32 new semester hours that apply to the
degree.
• If the previous degree was earned at PLU, require the
completion of any new GURs.
• If the previous degree was earned at another institution,
require the completion of all GURs not met via a course-by-
course evaluation of previous transcripts.
• Second bachelor’s degrees will not be awarded for a discipline
in which the student has already received a major or degree.
(Example: BS in Chemistry when the student already has a 
BA in Chemistry).
Graduation
Students expecting to fulfill degree requirements within the academic
year (including August) are required to file an application for
graduation with the Registrar’s Office by the following dates:
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Description: Convert to PDF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. DocumentType.PDF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original tiff page size.
pdf page order reverse; pdf expert rotate page
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; how to rotate page in pdf and save
24
PLU 2007 - 2008
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
Degree Completion
Bachelor’s and Master’s Deadline
December 2007
May 1, 2007
January 2008
May 1, 2007
May 2008
December 1, 2007
August 2008
December 1, 2007
December 2008
May 1, 2008
January 2009
May 1, 2008
All courses must be completed, final grades recorded and
university requirements fulfilled in order for a degree to be
awarded.
There are four degree award dates (August, December, January,
and May). Degrees are formally conferred at December and May
commencements. Students with a January degree dates participate
in the December commencement. Students with an  August degree
date must consult with the Registrar’s Office to determine
participation. The actual date of graduation is recorded on the
permanent records.
Students who plan to transfer back to Pacific Lutheran University
for a degree must apply for graduation before or during the first
semester of their junior year so that deficiencies may be met
before they leave campus.
Time Limits
Students are expected to meet all requirements for the
undergraduate degree within a six-year period. Students who
remain at PLU for longer than six years must meet the
requirements of the most current PLU catalog in order to earn a
degree. Students who are readmitted to the university must 
meet the requirements of the current PLU catalog to earn a degree.
Graduation Honors
Degrees with honors of cum laude, magna cum laude, and
summa cum laude are granted. A student must earn a
cumulative grade point average of 3.50 for cum laude, 3.75 for
magna cum laude, and 3.90 for summa cum laude. (Applicable
to undergraduate level only.) 
Graduation honors are determined by the cumulative grade point
average of all PLU coursework (defined as courses taught by PLU
faculty for PLU). Students must complete a minimum of 64
semester hours at PLU to be eligible for graduation honors.
Study Away courses at a PLU-approved program count towards
the 64-hour minimum, but do not count towards graduation
honors unless the courses are taught by PLU faculty. Term hon-
ors will be determined on the same basis as graduation honors.
Dean’s List: A Dean’s List is created at the end of Fall and Spring
semesters. To be eligible, a student must have attained a semester
grade point average of 3.50 with a minimum of 12 graded
semester hours. (Applicable to undergraduate level only.) 
Honor Societies 
• Areté Society: Election to the Areté Society is a special 
recognition of a student’s commitment to the liberal arts
together with a record of high achievement in relevant course
work. The society was organized in 1969 by Phi Beta Kappa
members of the faculty to encourage and recognize excellent 
scholarship in the liberal arts. Student members are elected by
the faculty fellows of the society each spring. Both juniors and
seniors are eligible; however, the qualifications for election as a
junior are more stringent. Students must have:
 attained a high grade point average (for seniors, normally
above 3.70; for juniors, normally above 3.90);
 completed 110 credit hours in liberal studies;
 demonstrated the equivalent of two years of college work in
foreign language;
 completed one year of college mathematics (including
statistics or computer science) or four years of college
preparatory mathematics in high school and one college
mathematics course; and
 completed a minimum of three semesters in residence at 
the university.
The university also has chapters of a number of national honor
societies on campus, including the following:
• Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting)
• Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology)
• Alpha Psi Omega (Theatre)
• Beta Gamma Sigma (Business)
• Mu Phi Epsilon (Music)
• Phi Alpha (Social Work)
• Pi Kappa Delta (Forensics)
• Psi Chi (Psychology)
• Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics)
• Sigma Theta Tau International (Nursing)
• Sigma Xi (Scientific Research)
Non-Credit Informal Study
To encourage liberal learning of all kinds, above and beyond
enrollment in courses leading toward formal degrees, the
university offers a variety of opportunities for informal study:
Guest of University Status 
Any professional persons who wish to use university facilities for
independent study may apply to the provost for cards designating
them as guests of the university.
Auditing Courses
To audit a course requires the permission of the instructor and is
enrollment on a non-credit basis. An auditor is not held
accountable for examinations or other written work and does not
receive a grade. If the instructor approves, the course may be
entered upon the transcript as audit. Auditing a class is the same
price as regular tuition.
Visiting Classes
Members of the academic community are encouraged to visit
classes that interest them. No fee is charged for the privilege.
Doing so requires the permission of the instructor.
Registration Procedures
Students register by using Banner Web, an online registration
system. In addition to registering, Banner Web also offers
PLU 2007 - 2008
25
AcademicPolicyandProcedures
students the ability to add or drop a class, check their schedules,
and access final grades. Banner Web may be accessed through the
PLU home page (www.plu.edu). Students may contact the
Student Services Center with registration questions.
• Students are not officially enrolled until their registration has 
been cleared by the Student Accounts Office.
• Students are responsible for selecting their courses. Advisors 
are available to assist with planning and to make suggestions.
• Students should be thoroughly acquainted with all registration
materials, including the current catalog and class schedule. 
• Students are also encouraged to study carefully the
requirements of all academic programs in which they may
eventually declare a major.
Adding or Dropping a Course
All add or drop activity must be completed by the listed add/drop
deadline for the specific term or semester.Please refer to the Class
Schedule or go online at www.plu.edu/~regi for the most current
information. Students may add a course without an instructor
signature only during the first five business days of a full or half
semester-length class. A student may drop a course without an
instructor’s signature only during the first ten business days of a full
semester-length class or of a half semester-length class. In most
cases, adding and dropping can be accomplished using Banner
Web. See the January Term and summer schedules for the add/drop
periods for those terms. Any registration changes may result in
additional tuition charges and fees and may also affect the student’s
financial aid (if applicable). A $50 Late Registration Fee is charged
for any registration changes after the printed deadline dates.
Early Registration for Returning Students
Returning students will receive registration time appointments to
register for summer/fall terms and for January and spring terms.
Registration dates are determined by the number of hours,
including transfer hours, completed by the student. Students may
register for each new term or summer session on or after the
designated date.
Early Registration Program for Entering Students
Early registration for entering students occurs during June or
January, depending on whether students begin in the fall or spring
semester. Early registration is conducted by the Advising Office.
Registration materials are sent to all accepted entering students
well in advance of their arrival on campus for their first semester.
Most students meet in person with a registration counselor as
they register for courses. Students may also register by phone.
Withdrawal from a Course
Official Withdrawal
Astudent may withdraw from a class with an instructor’s
signature after the add/drop deadline and before the withdrawal
deadline published on the calendar page of the specific term
Class Schedule. Tuition is not refunded, a $50 late registration
fee is charged and any additional tuition will be charged for
adding any other classes. A grade of “W” is recorded on the
student’s academic transcript.
If a student is enrolled in a class, has never attended and did not
drop the course before the published deadline, tuition will be
charged to the student’s account, unless the instructor’s signature
has been obtained. If the student obtains the instructor’s signature,
tuition is not charged, but a $50 late registration fee is assessed.
The add/drop form may be obtained from the Student Services
Center, filled in, instructor signature obtained, and returned to
the Student Services Center by the appropriate dates that impact
fee assessment. The add/drop form may also be found online at
www.plu.edu/~regi.
Withdrawal from the University
Withdrawal during the term
Students are entitled to withdraw honorably from the university
if their record is satisfactory and all financial obligations are
satisfied. Students must complete and sign the “Notification of
Student Withdrawal” form in the Student Services Center. Partial
tuition refunds may be available depending on when the student
withdraws. Refer to the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog
for more information. Grades of “W” will appear on the
student’s transcript for the term.
Withdrawal from a future term
Students are required to notify PLU if they do not plan to
return for the following term. Students are entitled to withdraw
honorably from the university if their record is satisfactory and
all financial obligations are satisfied. Students must complete
and sign the “Notification of Student Withdrawal” form in the
Student Services Center.
Medical Withdrawal
Students may also petition to withdraw completely from the
university for a term for medical reasons. The student must
complete a Medical Withdrawal Petition, provide written
evidence from a physician and a personal explanation to the
Vice President for Student Life. This must be completed in a
timely manner and in no case later than the last day of a class
in any given term. If granted, the grade of WM will appear on
the student’s transcript. Physician clearance is required prior to
re-enrollment.
For more information contact Student Life, 105 Hauge
Administration Building, 253.535.7191 or slif@plu.edu.
26
PLU 2007 - 2008
S T U D E N T   L I F E   A N D   C A M P U S   R E S O U R C E S
The university offers many support services for students and provides
arich array of resources to encourage academic success. Students are
encouraged to become familiar with the offices and services described
in this section of the catalog. Additional information about these
resources is available from each of the offices or from the Office of
Student Life and the Office of the Provost.
Academic Assistance Center
253.535.7518
www.plu.edu/~aast
The Academic Assistance Center provides students with trained,
certified peer tutors and a comfortable environment where
learning, risk taking, and discovery can occur. Registered PLU
students use the free services of the center to develop effective
study strategies and to supplement or reinforce their classroom
experience. 
Tutoring takes place on campus, usually in the Academic
Assistance Center (AAC), located in the Library. However, study
and test-review sessions may occur in separate locations such as
the science or music buildings, and drop-in math tutoring is
available in the Math Lab, located in Morken 233. Students
taking foreign languages can attend weekly informal conversation
groups led by our language tutors. All ability levels are welcome
at these conversations. 
Tutoring sessions are set up by advance appointment (drop-ins
are welcome, but may not find tutors available). During fall and
spring semesters, the AAC, located in Library 124, is open
Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.,
Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., and Sunday from 5:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. Hours and services are limited during 
J-term and summer sessions. Students should stop by the 
office, call, or e-mail to learn more about our services or 
request an appointment. The Academic Assistance website
provides information on tutoring and weekly updates on 
study sessions.
Athletics
253.535.7352
www.plu.edu/athletics
The Athletic Department provides leadership for over more than
500 student-athletes involved in 20 varsity sports. 
PLU varsity teams are affiliated with the Northwest Conference
that is comprised of nine private colleges and universities located
in Oregon and Washington. The Division III “Lutes” are highly
competitive and have won ten national championships over the
years and 211 Northwest Conference championships to date.
Division III athletics is unique from Division I and II schools by
its practice of not offering athletic scholarships.
Intramural opportunities exist throughout the academic year,
including J-Term, and involved some 800 students who
participate in multiple sports. Among the intramural programs
offered are: basketball, dodgeball, flag football, soccer, coed
volleyball and volleyball. Five club sports attract another 150
participants and include men’s and women’s lacrosse, men’s and
women’s ultimate frisbee and cheer.
In addition to sport activities, athletics is responsible for
operation of the Names Fitness Center and the Swimming Pool.
Both facilities are involved with campus health and wellness
activities and are available to students.
Located on lower campus, the athletic facilities include baseball,
softball and soccer fields, tennis courts, a running track and area
for field events and football practice. Volleyball and basketball
games are held in Olson Auditorium, which also contains
racquetball courts. The fieldhouse and Memorial Gym are also
scheduled for campus events and academic classes.
Lute Club, an organized booster club, attracts alumni, parents
and community members with various activities, including a
spring golf tournament. This organization provides varsity teams
with resources for out-of-region travel and capital equipment
purchases.
PLU Bookstore: 
Garfield Book Company
253.535.7665
luteworld.plu.edu (online open 24/7/365)
Garfield Book Company serves as the PLU bookstore. It is
owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran University for the
benefit of students, faculty and staff. The bookstore sells
textbooks and supplies required for classes. School supplies, 
PLU clothing and gifts, cards, and convenience store items are
also available. Computer software at discounted prices is 
available or can be special ordered. Personal computer systems 
at educational prices can be purchased through the bookstore.
Special book orders are welcome. To order your textbooks 
online, visit using luteworld.plu.edu, your student ID and 
birth date.
StudentLifeandCampusResources
PLU 2007 - 2008
27
StudentLifeandCampusResources
Campus Concierge
253.535.7411
www.plu.edu/~concierg/
concierg@plu.edu
The Campus Concierge Center is the welcoming hub and main
source for campus information for phone callers and walk-up
patrons. The Concierge can help, whether you need a bandage,
to sew on a button, or forgot a pen on your way to class.
Students, staff and visitors can purchase tickets, add LuteBuck$
to their account, send a package, receive and send facsimiles or
make copies. The Concierge also has “emergency” homework
supplies such as computer disks, writing manuals, dictionaries,
blue books and Scantron cards.
Campus Ministry
253.535.7464
www.plu.edu/~cmin
Pacific Lutheran University by its very nature is a place for the
interaction between faith and reason. Opportunities for the
mutual celebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. 
Chapel worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday
mornings during each semester. The University Congregation
worships and celebrates the Lord’s Supper each Saturday evening
and Sunday morning. The University Pastors are available to
provide care, support and spiritual direction to the university
community. 
Several denominations and religious groups have organizations
on campus. Numerous student-initiated Bible study and
fellowship groups are offered. 
The Campus Ministry Office is available to provide resources or
to connect individuals with organizations that can meet a variety
of ministry needs. The Campus Ministry Council, an elected
student and faculty committee, coordinates these activities in a
spirit of openness and mutual respect.
Campus Safety and Information
253.535.7441
www.plu.edu/campussafety
The personal safety of the PLU community is the primary focus
of Campus Safety and Information. Campus Safety officers are
available to escort students, provide vehicle jump starts, respond
to medical emergencies and fire alarms, and provide general
telephone information services.
Visitor information is available 24 hours a day, seven days a
week, through the Campus Safety Office. Vehicle registration for
parking on campus is required and is available through the
Campus Safety Web site. A PLU ePass is required.
Pacific Lutheran University is private property and the university
reserves the right to restrict access to the campus and buildings.
Career Development
253.535.7459
www.plu.edu/~career
The Career Development department provides students with a
holistic approach to understanding that career development is a
process that continues over their lifetime. Students are assisted in
integrating their personal values, interests, personality style and
skills in choosing their career direction. Services include career
counseling, workshops, career assessments and a comprehensive
website with career resources. Campus-wide events, such as the
fall and spring Career, Internship and Graduate Program Fair are
also offered. In addition to providing a place to identify and
explore one’s vocation and career, the department provides
opportunities to acquire practical skills including resume writing,
interview preparation, job search strategies and career
management skills. Students can post their resume on College
Central Network and search for current job postings.
Computing and Telecommunications
(see Information and Technology Services)
Conferences and Events
253.535.7450
www.plu.edu/~events
Conferences and Events schedules university facilities for
workshops, seminars, lectures, banquets, meetings and more.
Students interested in scheduling an event must first work with
Student Involvement and Leadership (253.535.7195) for
approval and to develop an event plan prior to contacting
Conferences and Events to reserve facilities.
Counseling Center
253.535.7206
www.plu.edu/~slif/cc
Realizing that a students’ emotional health is important for their
academic success, the Counseling Center provides a wide range
of counseling and supportive services. Trained and experienced
mental health professionals offer both individual and group
counseling/support services. Additionally, a consulting
psychiatrist is available for assessment and medication evaluation.
All services are confidential and offered at no cost for registered
students.
Dining Services
253.535.7472
www.plu.edu/~dining
Dining Services is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran
University and provides a wide variety of services for students,
faculty, staff and the community. The Dining Facility at The
University Center is newly remodeled for the start of school in
Fall of 2007. There are several outlets throughout the PLU
Community:
• The University Center Dining Hall
This is the main outlet and is located in the University Center,
offering a wide variety of options during breakfast, lunch and
dinner. For breakfast 7 days a week, you can use your Dining
Dollars to get a complete meal. Saturday Dinner and lunches
Monday through Saturday also allow you to use your Dining
Dollars when you visit any of our fresh stations to assemble
your meal. Use your all-you-care-to-eat function for Sunday
brunch and dinners Sunday through Friday. Accepts Dining
Dollars, LuteBuck$ and AYCTE function.
28
PLU 2007 - 2008
• The Columbia Center Café
You can find the Columbia Center building on lower campus.
Convenient meals will be offered for lunch and dinner.
Accepts Dining Dollars and LuteBuck$. 
• The Convenience Store
The C-Store is located on the main floor of the University
Center. You’ll find everything from school supplies and snacks
to a quick panini and espresso. Accepts Dining Dollars,
LuteBuck$ and cash.
• The Kelley Café
Located on lower campus in the Morken Center, offers many
local and organic options along with signature cookies and
espresso. Accepts Dining Dollars and LuteBuck$.
• Espresso Carts
For your convenience, we operate espresso locations
throughout campus where you can find many coffee choices
and snacks. Accepts Dining Dollars and LuteBuck$.
With the exception of South Hall residents, students living on
campus must enroll in one of several meal plan packages. Off-
campus and South Hall residents are encouraged to purchase a
Dining Services meal plan tailored to their specific needs. Meal
plan options can be found on the Dining Services website at
www.plu.edu/~dining/mealplans.htm.
Is there an upcoming celebration in your student’s life? The Send
aSmile Gift Program is designed to help make someone’s day.
Convenient on-campus delivery of gifts can be ordered at
www.plu.edu/~dining/gift.htm.
Disability Support Services
253.535.7206
www.plu.edu/~dss
The university complies with the Americans With Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 in providing reasonable accommodations to students with
documented disabilities who are registered at PLU.   Students
with disabilities have access to and receive the benefit of any
program or activity operated by PLU.  The university has zero
tolerance for discrimination on basis of a disability. Reasonable
accommodation will be provided by Disability Support Services
at no cost to the student on a case-by-case basis following 
review of recommendations made in the student’s 
documentation of a disability.
Information on required documentation of a physical,
psychological/psychiatric, learning disability or Attention 
Deficit /Hyperactivity Disorder is available from Disability
Support Services, Ramstad 106, or on the Web at
www.plu.edu/~dss.
Dispute Resolution
Policies and procedures at the university are intended to maintain
an orderly educational environment conducive to student
learning and development. In order to fulfill institutional
responsibility and at the same time follow procedures that are
fair, consistent, and protective of each person’s rights, appropriate
dispute resolution procedures have been established. If a student
has reason to believe that an academic or administrative action is
unjust, capricious, or discriminatory, these procedures are
available for the student to seek redress.
The University Dispute Resolution Committee is comprised of
six individuals trained in dispute resolution. They are Michelle
Ceynar (253.535.7297), Tom Huelsbeck (253.535.7202), Fran
Lane Rasmus (253.535.7141), Teri Phillips (253.535.7187),
Leon Reisberg (253.535.7280) and Pam Deacon (253.535.7618).
Any of the committee members may be contacted to receive
assistance. 
Copies of dispute resolution procedures are available for review 
at the office of each committee member. Students with
disabilities who want to appeal a decision regarding an
accommodation should contact the Director of the Counseling
Center (253.535.7206), the ADA Compliance Officer.
Diversity Center
253.535.8750
www.plu.edu/~diverse
Pacific Lutheran University is committed to the mission of
providing a diverse and inclusive education for all students.
Graduates of PLU are people capable of effective lives in an
expanding, diverse world. Every student at PLU is required to
take courses in Alternative Perspectives and in Cross-Cultural
Perspectives. Multiculturalism, outside of the classroom, is
experienced through social and educational programming from a
variety of sources. The Diversity Center is staffed by an Associate
Director and Diversity Advocates. Diversity Advocates are diverse
PLU students working together to bring multicultural awareness
to our campus and surrounding communities. They provide
support to students and clubs that work with diversity-related
issues and raising and sustaining general awareness on campus
about current educational, political, and social issues related to
race, ethnicity, gender, age, and sexuality. They are available to
help all students, staff, and faculty who have interest in areas of
multiculturalism. The Diversity Center is located on the ground
floor of the University Center.
Other campus resources in the area of multiculturalism are:
• The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership helps
different clubs and organizations that support the efforts of
underrepresented populations programs and work within the
PLU community; 
• Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University (ASPLU) 
and Residence Hall Association (RHA) both have formal
leadership positions that program events both social and
educational for the entire student body on a variety of
multicultural issues;
• The Women’s Center strives to increase understanding of
gender issues, empower women to explore options in their
lives, and motivate both women and men toward greater
involvement in these social justice issues, as leaders, as allies,
and agents of change, on campus and in the world;
• The Wang Center for International Programs provides 
extensive support and education for students, faculty and staff 
StudentLifeandCampusResources
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested