PLU 2007 - 2008
29
StudentLifeandCampusResources
interested in opportunities for studying away for a year,
semester or January Term. The Wang Center also coordinates 
the biannual Wang Center Symposium, Wang Center Research
Grants and various on-campus activities to promote 
international perspectives, cultures, and interculturalism; and 
• The University Diversity Committee furthers the university’s
mission of multiculturalism through policy review and event
planning on both a social and educational level in the area of
multiculturalism that integrates both the academic and 
student life. 
The Elliott Press
253.535.7387
www.plu.edu/~ppa/elliott.html
The Elliott Press is PLU’s studio laboratory for the printing arts.
With the press’s large collection of letterpress type and
equipment, students design and produce printed texts using
traditional techniques that flourish today in the lively art form
known as fine printing. The press also houses a growing
collection of innovative artist books and is a working museum
where visitors may try their hands at the technology pioneered by
Gutenberg.
The Student Health Center
253.535.7337
www.plu.edu/~health
The Student Health Center, “caring, convenient, confidential,” is
staffed full time by two physician assistants. Also available weekly
are a consulting physician, a psychiatric physician assistant, and a
nurse practitioner.
Services provided include acute care for illness and injury,
physical exams for sports, travel, employment and reproductive
health, birth control, STD information and testing, chronic
disease monitoring, consultations for travel, smoking cessation,
substance abuse and eating disorders. Also offered are
immunizations, allergy shots, laboratory tests and health
education on a wide variety of topics. Completion of the
university health history form is required for registration.
PLU Student Health Insurance Program: Medical health
insurance is required for all domestic full-time undergraduate
students, and all full-time and part-time international students.
Students will be automatically enrolled and billed in the PLU
Student Health Insurance Plan if they do not waive-out of the
insurance plan before September 17, 2007. A student who is
covered by a comparable health insurance plan can waive-out of
the PLU Student Health Insurance Plan by providing evidence of
comparable primary insurance through an online waive-out form
during registration and no later than September 17, 2007. The
full array of costs, plan details and instructions are online at
www.plu.edu/health. PLU Health Insurance Plan is not available
to graduate students.
The immunization policy states that all students born after
December 31, 1956, are required to provide documentation of
two measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccinations received after
their first birthday. This information must be on file before a
student is permitted to register. Recommended vaccines are 
Hepatitis B, meningitis, and an up-to-date tetanus/diphtheria
immunization.
International students, faculty and scholars from countries at risk
for TB will be required to have a tuberculosis skin test. This test
is done at the Student Health Center after arrival at the
university. The cost is $20.
Questions about the immunization policy will be answered gladly
at the health center.
Information and Technology Services
(Library and Computing Services)
253.535.7500 and 253.535.7525
www.plu.edu/~libr and www.plu.edu/~comptelc
Information & Technology Services (I&TS) provides library 
and computing services for the campus.  Located in Mortvedt
Library, I&TS personnel are committed to making technology
work for everyone while striving to make research in both print
and electronic collections a rewarding experience.  More
information regarding I&TS services is available on the PLU
website.
Computer accounts are essential for all PLU students.  The PLU
ePass provides students with a PLU email account, an expanding
set of online student services, a rich collection of electronic
research sources and tools, and other services and resources for
the exclusive use of the PLU community. Students starting each
fall will receive mail early in the summer from the university with
instructions on requesting the ePass account online.
Anti-virus software is required on all student computers that
connect to the PLU network. PLU provides this software free.
Visit our web page to get additional information and download
the program: www.plu.edu/antivirus.
Check out books and multimedia equipment and materials
(e.g., videos, DVDs, digital cameras) with your student ID card.
This card with the barcode on the back serves as your PLU
library card.
General access computers are located throughout campus.  
The largest concentration is in Mortvedt Library, where the
Haley Center provides over 50 workstations for access to
electronic information resources and other research activities in
an atmosphere that promotes individual and group study,
immediate access to reference and technology help, and the
relaxing ambiance of a nearby espresso kiosk.  Also in the 
library is the Language Resource Center for foreign language
learning.
Personalized assistance in computing and library services can be
obtained in a variety of ways.  These I&TS departments are good
starting points:
• For assistance in obtaining the best information on a topic or
learning effective research strategies, visit the reference desk on
the main level of the library, call 253-535-7507, or visit them 
online at www.plu.edu/~libr or send email to ref@plu.edu.
From this web page you can also access “24/7 Librarian Live”
to work with a librarian over the network using chat and co-
browsing software.
Pdf rotate single page reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages
Pdf rotate single page reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate page and save; how to reverse page order in pdf
30
PLU 2007 - 2008
• For assistance with computer accounts, email, supported
software, and related resources, visit the Computing and
Telecommunication Services (CATS) help desk on the main
level of Mortvedt Library, call the help desk at 253-535-7525,
email them at comptelc@plu.edu or visit them online.
• For assistance with multimedia equipment or services
(including audio, television, and classroom technologies), visit
Multimedia Services on the main floor of the library, call them
at 253.535.7509, send email to media@plu.edu, or visit
www.plu.edu/~media.
• For support developing web resources or instruction in using
digital media and web development tools, visit the Digital
Media Center on the second floor of the library.  You can also
contact the DMC at 253.535.8728, dmc@plu.edu, or
www.plu.edu/~dmc.
Residence hall rooms all have Ethernet network connections.  To
connect to the network, students need an Ethernet card in
addition to ePass access and anti-virus software (above).  For
information or assistance on setting up a computer for access to
the network (ResNet), students should visit the CATS homepage
or contact the CATS help desk.  Ethernet cards for most
computers are available at the PLU bookstore.
Off-campus students need an Internet service provider in
addition to the PLU ePass.  These services usually entail a
monthly charge.  Additional information on connecting to the
PLU network from off campus can be found at
www.plu.edu/~comptelc.
Wireless network zones are located throughout campus,
including University Center, Mortvedt Library, Xavier Hall and
Rieke Center.  The Morken Center for Learning and Technology
has both fixed and wireless network, a digital multimedia lab, an
open lab for students, and department computing labs.
International Student Services
253.535.7194
www.plu.edu/~intserv
International Student Services provides assistance to international
students in adjusting to the university and in meeting both
education and personal needs. Services include orientation,
registration and on-campus liaison with other university offices.
Assistance with immigration and government regulations as well
as immigration procedures regarding temporary travel, work
applications, and extensions of stay is available. International
Student Services is located in the University Center on the lower
level with Student Involvement and Leadership.
KPLU-FM, National Public Radio
253.535.7758
www.kplu.org
KPLU is a public radio station licensed by the Federal
Communications Commission to the Board of Regents of Pacific
Lutheran University in the Tacoma/Seattle area at 88.5 FM.
With a network of eight booster signals, KPLU extends its service
throughout Western Washington and lower British Columbia.
Public radio stations are authorized by the federal government as
noncommercial to offer alternative programming not found on
commercial radio.
Recognized for its programming excellence, KPLU 88.5,
National Public Radio (NPR), is one of the nation’s leading
public radio stations. KPLU broadcasts NPR news, local and
regional news, and jazz to more than 500,000 listeners per week.
The KPLU news team files hundreds of stories for national
broadcast with NPR each year.
KPLU streams its exclusive, award-winning jazz, and news 24
hours a day on its Web site. KPLU is also now a leader in
worldwide jazz listening.
PLU is the only independent university in the Northwest
operating a full-power NPR member station.
Library Services
(see Information and Technology Services)
New Student Orientation
253.535.7195
www.plu.edu/~new
New Student Orientation assists students and their families with
the transition to PLU. The five-day fall program introduces
students to many dimensions of PLU life and includes meeting
with an advisor, talking in small groups with other new students,
becoming acquainted with campus services and having relaxed
time with other students before classes begin. Special activities 
are also planned for parents and families. While January and 
spring orientations aremore condensed, they also provide 
new students with an introduction to academic life and co-
curricular activities.
Off-Campus Student Services
253.535.7195
www.plu.edu/~offcamp
Student Involvement and Leadership (SIL) provides off-campus
students with a relaxing office and supportive staff. Off-campus
students are invited to seek involvement, resources, and support
through this office. SIL partners with ASPLU to coordinate
communication and programming and to advocate for
nonresidential students. In addition, the following resources are
available:
• Lounges: Especially designed for off-campus students on the 
upper level of the Hauge Administration Building, the first
floor of Rieke Science Center, and in the University Gallery in
Ingram Hall.
• Meal plans: PLU’s FlexPlan (25 meals per academic year) and
LuteBuck$ are convenient and economical meal options for
off-campus students.
• Off-campus housing: Ifyou are looking for off-campus
housing, check the off-campus notebooks in Residential Life
and the bulletin boards in the UC.
StudentLifeandCampusResources
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
rotate pdf pages on ipad; pdf page order reverse
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
pdf rotate single page; how to change page orientation in pdf document
PLU 2007 - 2008
31
StudentLifeandCampusResources
• ASPLU: Four elected members of ASPLU student government
are off-campus senators.
Center for Public Service
253.535.7173
253.535.7652
www.plu.edu/~pubsrvc
The Center for Public Service connects the PLU campus to the
surrounding communities by providing opportunities for
students, staff and faculty to serve community needs as part of
their university experience.
There are many ways PLU people can become involved in
community service at PLU. They can work with all ages—
preschoolers through senior citizens—at the Family and
Children’s Center, a coalition of social service agencies housed
together in PLU’s East Campus that closely cooperates with the
Center for Public Service. Students can also become involved in
community work through academic service-learning classes that
explore the relationship between an academic subject and
community service experience. The Center for Public Service is a
resource to faculty teaching these courses, which are available in
many departments, and can help students find out about them.
For a variety of volunteer work, individuals and student groups
can also use the Volunteer Center, part of the Center for Public
Service, to browse through listings of more than 100 volunteer
opportunities on and near the PLU campus and to learn about
residence hall or student club service projects.
To find out more about how to become engaged in the
community, call the Center for Public Service, or stop by
Ramstad Room 116.
Residential Life
253.535.7200
www.plu.edu/~rlif
“Your Place in the World.” That’s what Residential Life at
Pacific Lutheran University hopes you will explore while living
on campus. Whether through a conversation with a roommate,
astudy group, a late night run to a local coffee shop, or a
dialogue with a faculty member who is attending an event,
living in the residence halls provides students with an
opportunity to experiment with how what is learned in the
classroom can be applied in the world. For this reason, we
believe that life in the residence halls is an integral part of the
Lute experience. 
The university requires all full-time (12 or more semester hours)
students to live on campus unless they meet one of the following
conditions: 
• The student is living at home with parent(s), legal guardian(s),
spouse, or child(ren) 
• The student is 20 years of age or older on or before September 1
for the academic year, or February 1 for the spring semester. 
• They have attained junior status (60 semester hours) on or
before September 1 for the academic year or February 1 for
the spring semester. 
Residential Life at PLU aspires to provide safe, comfortable and
welcoming residence hall communities in which all students can
live, learn and grow. We offer a variety of housing options for
students to help us meet that goal. These include an all-women’s
residence hall, an intentional living and learning community
focused on language and cultural immersion, and several
“traditional” co-ed options. For students 20 years or age or older
or who have attained a minimum of junior standing, more
autonomous living options are available including an all-single
room hall and an apartment style residence hall. All halls include
informal lounges, study rooms, and common kitchen and
laundry facilities that allow residents to establish a comfortable
living pattern. 
Each residence hall is managed by a Resident Director (RD), a
live in professional staff member. The RD oversees housing and
facilities needs, serves as a resource for students, advises the
residence hall council  (RHC), and supervises the Resident
Assistants (RA). RAs are the primary contact for all residents.
They serve as a personal resource to assist with needs as they
arise, provide social activities and co-curricular programming.
The RHC is a team of volunteers who work to build identity
within the entire residence hall community. RHCs can also serve
as an advocate for students to the Residential Life Department
and the University at large. 
Student Code of Conduct
www.plu.edu/~slif
Within any community certain regulations are necessary. Pacific
Lutheran University adopts only those standards believed to be
reasonably necessary and admits students with the expectation
that they will comply with those standards. All members of the
university community are expected to respect the rights and
integrity of others. Conduct on-campus or off-campus which is
detrimental to students, faculty, staff, or the university, or 
which violates local, state, or federal laws, may be grounds for
sanctions or for dismissal. The university prohibits the 
possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages on campus 
and limits the hours when students may have visitors of the
opposite gender in their residence hall rooms. The Student 
Code of Conduct applies to all students and is available 
online at www.plu.edu/print/handbook. The student conduct
coordinator may be reached at 253.535.7195.
Student Activities
253.535.7195
www.plu.edu/~sil
Student activities are regarded as essential factors in higher
education. Some are related to courses of instruction such as
drama, music, and physical education; others are connected 
more closely to recreational and social life. Involvement in
student activities provides practical experience and at the same
time develops an understanding of self in relation to others. 
Co-curricular programs include student government (Associated
Students of PLU, and Residence Hall Association), sports
activities (varsity, intramural and club sports), student media
(newspaper, social justice journal, artistic magazine, radio and
television), student clubs and organizations, Campus Ministry
Council and community service programs. With over 100
student activities in which to become involved, there is sure to be
at least one that will enrich a person’s college experience.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
pdf save rotated pages; pdf reverse page order online
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to rotate pdf pages and save; save pdf rotate pages
32
PLU 2007 - 2008
Student Employment
253.535.7459
www.plu.edu/stuemp
Within the university, approximately 1,500 students will have on
campus employment. Campus employment provides excellent
opportunities for students to consider and connect their work
experience to their career possibilities with an emphasis on
vocation. Employment on campus is also excellent training for
students with limited experience as well as those students who
have significant work experience. Experience, convenience and
flexibility are major attractions to campus employment. Federal
work-study may be on or off campus.
The Student Employment Office, located in Ramstad Hall room
112, also manages the Washington State Work Study program.
This program is designed to provide, para-professional off
campus work experience for students in fields related to their
career goals. Contact our office at 253 535-7459.
Student Life
253.535.7191
www.plu.edu/~slif
Student Life at PLU seeks to promote the holistic development
of students and steward a dynamic campus community. We
engage students in purposeful experiential learning that
challenges them to make a difference in the world as they care for
themselves and others, and positively impact the diverse
communities in which they live.
The quality of life cultivated and fostered within the university is
an essential component of the academic community. The
environment produced is conducive to a life of vigorous and
creative learning. Pacific Lutheran University also recognizes that
liberal education is for the total person and that a
complementary relationship exists between students’ intellectual
development and the satisfaction of their other individual needs.
Interaction with persons of differing life experiences, application
of classroom knowledge to personal goals and aspirations, and
Co-curricular experiences are all available and total components
of education at PLU. In a time when there is a need for
meaningful community, the campus facilitates genuine
relationships among members of the university from diverse
religious, racial, and cultural backgrounds.
All of the services and facilities provided are intended to
complement the academic program. The services reflect changing
student needs, and the opportunities for student participation
include virtually all aspects of the university. Individual attention
is given to students’ concerns, including a variety of specific
services outlined here and on the web at www.plu.edu/~slif.
Student Services Center
253.535.7161
800.678.3243
www.plu.edu/~ssvc
The Student Services Center, located in Hauge Administration
Building, Room 102, offers a variety of services for students,
families and the PLU community. Questions or requests for
StudentLifeandCampusResources
registration assistance, copies of unofficial/official transcripts,
verification of enrollment, deferments, financial aid, account
financing, billing statements, and veteran’s assistance are some of
the services offered. We pride ourselves in a high quality of
service and are dedicated to assisting students through the
academic process with financial assistance and other resources.
If you need to access information regarding a student’s financial
aid and/or billing inquiries, you are required to have the student’s
PLU Identification Number and Personal Identification Number
(PIN). It is the student’s right to give these numbers to a parent
or significant other for access to education records. Pacific
Lutheran University has adopted a policy to protect the privacy
of education records. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act of 1974, popularly known as “FERPA”, governs the
university’s collection, retention and dissemination of
information about students.
Study Away
(See Wang Center for International Programs and Global
Educational Opportunities, pg. 84)
Summer Sessions
253.535.8628
www.plu.edu/~summer
The university offers an extensive summer school curriculum that
includes continuing education courses and special institutes.
These course offerings are open to all qualified persons. PLU
faculty typically offer innovative, experimental courses during
summer sessions. These experimental courses cover a broad range
of contemporary issues and perspectives in different academic
fields. Designed for undergraduates and graduate students alike,
the summer program serves teachers and administrators who seek
to satisfy credentials and special courses. 
The 2007 summer session, which begins on June 4, consists 
of three terms including a one-week workshop session. There are
courses taught in the evening, two nights per week for nine
weeks. Master of Business Administration courses are taught
during two six-week terms, two nights per week. Continuing
education courses are available through the School of Education
and offered at varying times throughout the summer.
Acombined class schedule is printed and available on campus
each year for the Summer Sessions and Fall Semester.
Descriptions of summer courses may be viewed online at
www.plu.edu/summer. Information about special institutes,
workshops and seminars may be view under the Special Topics
area at www.plu.edu/academics.
Non-matriculated students who enroll for the summer session
submit a signed Summer Sessions Non-Degree Registration Form
with the attached statement of good academic standing.
Volunteer Center
253.535.8318
www.plu.edu/~voluntr
PLU’s Volunteer Center, run by students and housed in the
Center for Public Service, seeks to give students opportunities to
put to work their dreams for a better world. The Volunteer
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
reverse page order pdf online; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
33
StudentLifeandCampusResources
Center has listings for over 100 organizations that need
volunteers. Students can stop by and browse through the
placement lists, or make an appointment with one of the
Volunteer Center coordinators who help match students with
organizations. Class projects, residence hall group activities, one
day or several, the Volunteer Center can help students help.
Wang Center for International
Programs
253.535.7577
www.plu.edu/wangcenter
As a globally-focused university, PLU provides students with
many challenging and rewarding opportunities to experience the
world, weaving global education through almost every aspect of
study and many co-curricular programs. The Wang Center for
International Programs is the university’s focal point for global
education, with the vision of educating to achieve a just, healthy,
sustainable and peaceful world, both locally and globally.  
Services provided by the Wang Center include: advising students
for study away, awarding student and faculty research grants, col-
laborating with faculty in offering J-Term and summer off-cam-
pus courses and directing semester abroad programs, organizing
biennial global symposia, assisting visiting scholars, and support-
ing student-driven co-curricular activities.    
With appropriate planning, it is possible for qualified students in
almost any major to successfully incorporate study away into
their degree plans. Majors in all fields are encouraged to partici-
pate in off-campus study; there is a wide range of opportunities
for January term, semester, academic year and summer programs
as well as international internships. Over 500 PLU students each
year incorporate study away in their academic experience.
To learn more about study away see Global Education
Opportunities, and visit the Wang Center for International
Programs online or in person. The office is open Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
(Also see Global Educational Opportunities, pg. 81)
Women’s Center
253.535.8759
www.plu.edu/~womencen
The Women’s Center is an on-campus resource center that serves
students, staff and faculty. Located on upper campus in the
house across the street from Ordal Hall (801 121st Street South),
the center provides advocacy, resources, and educational
programming for and about women and gender equity. Both
women and men are welcome to use the resources of the
Women’s Center and encouraged to take advantage of the safe,
supportive, and private atmosphere for support or network
groups. 
The staff at the Women’s Center offers private support and
assistance in dealing with sexual harassment, rape or sexual
assault, and dating/relationship issues. Throughout the year, the
center also provides a variety of opportunities for gathering and
celebration.
Writing Center
253.535.8709
www.plu.edu/~writing
The Writing Center provides a place for students to meet with
trained student consultants to discuss their academic, creative,
and professional writing. Student staff members help writers
generate topics, develop focus, organize material, and clarify
ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from
the classroom setting, student readers and writers talk seriously
about ideas and writing strategies. Most sessions are one-hour
meetings, but drop-in students with brief essays or questions are
welcome.
The Writing Center is located in Library 220 and is open
Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sunday from 4:00 to 9:00 p.m.
These hours may vary slightly from semester to semester.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate pdf page and save; rotate one page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
rotate pdf pages and save; pdf rotate pages separately
34
PLU 2007 - 2008
CurriculumInformation
C U R R I C U L U M   I N F O R M A T I O N
Academic Structure
College of Arts and Sciences
Division of Humanities
English
Languages and Literatures
Philosophy
Religion
Division of Natural Sciences
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science and Computer Engineering
Geosciences
Mathematics
Physics
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology
Economics
History
Marriage and Family Therapy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology and Social Work
School of Arts and Communication
Art
Communication and Theatre
Music
School of Business
School of Education and Movement Studies
Instructional Development and Leadership
Movement Studies and Wellness Education
School of Nursing
Interdisciplinary Programs
Chinese Studies
Environmental Studies
Global Studies (Complementary Major)
International Honors Program
Legal Studies
Publishing and Printing Arts
Scandinavian Area Studies
Women’s and Gender Studies (Complementary Major)
Other Academic Programs
Information and Technology
Military Science
Wang Center for International Programs
Degrees
Bachelor’s Degrees
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Bachelor of Arts in Communication (BAC)
Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)
Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (BAPE)
Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (BARec)
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Bachelor of Music (BM)
Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA)
Bachelor of Music Education (BME)
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (BSPE)
Master’s Degrees
Master of Arts (Conflict Analysis and Collaborative 
Problem Solving, Summer 2008)
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Arts in Education (Initial Certification)
Master of Arts (Marriage & Family Therapy)
Master of Business Administration
Master of Fine Arts (Creative Writing)
Master of Science in Nursing
Joint Degrees: MBA/MSN
Majors
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Anthropology
Art
Biology
Chemistry
Classics
Communication Studies
Computer Science
Economics
Concentrations:
Domestic Economic Analysis
International Economic Analysis
Mathematical Economics
The Modern Economic Enterprise
PLU 2007 - 2008
35
CurriculumInformation
English
Emphases:
Literature
Writing
French
Geosciences
German
History
Individualized Major
Mathematics
Music
Norwegian
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Social Work
Sociology
Concentrations:
Family/Gender
Crime/Deviance
Spanish
Theatre
Emphases:
Acting/Directing
Design/Technical
Interdisciplinary Majors
Chinese Studies
Environmental Studies
Scandinavian Area Studies
Complementary Majors
Global Studies
Concentrations:
Development and Social Justice
Responses to International 
Violence and Conflict
World Health
Globalization and Trade
Transnational Movements and 
Cultural Diversity
Women’s and Gender Studies
Bachelor of Arts in Communication (BAC)
Concentrations:
Conflict Management
Journalism
Media Performance and Production
Public Relations/Advertising
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Applied Physics
Biology
Chemistry
Engineering Science (3-2)
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Financial Mathematics
Geosciences     
Mathematics
Mathematics Education
Physics
Engineering Science (3-2)
Psychology
Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)
Certifications:
Elementary
Elementary and Special Education 
Secondary
Teaching Endorsements: Art
Biology
Chemistry
Earth Sciences
English/Language Arts
English as a second language (w/ 
Washington Academy of Languages)
French
German
History
Health and Fitness
Mathematics
Physics
Political Science
Reading
Science
Social Studies
Spanish
Special Education
Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (BAPE)
Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (BARec)
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)
Concentrations:
Finance
Human Resources and Organizations
Marketing
Professional Accounting
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Art
Concentrations: 
Two-Dimensional Media
Three- Dimensional Media
Design
Theatre
Emphases:
Acting/Directing
Design/Technical
Bachelor of Music (BM)
Concentrations:
Composition
Instrumental
Organ
Piano
Voice
Bachelor of Music Education (BME)
K-12 Choral
K-12 Instrumental (Band)
K-12 Instrumental (Orchestra)
Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
Basic BSN
LPN to BSN
ADN to BSN
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (BSPE)
Concentrations:
Exercise Science
Health and Fitness Management
Pre-Athletic Training
Pre-Physical Therapy
36
PLU 2007 - 2008
Minors
Anthropology
Art
Art History
Studio Art
Biology
Business
Chemistry
Chinese (language)
Communication and Theatre
Communication
Dance
Theatre
Computer Science & Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Information Science
Economics
English
Literature
Writing
French
Geosciences
German
Greek
History
Latin
Mathematics
Actuarial Science
Mathematics
Statistics
Music
Generalized
Specialized
Norwegian
Nursing
Health Services
Philosophy
Physical Education
Minors
Coaching
Fitness and Wellness Education
Personal Training
Sport Psychology
Sports and Recreation Management
Physics
Political Science
Conflict Resolution
Legal Studies
Political Science
Public Affairs
Psychology
Religion
Sociology and Social Work
Spanish
Special Education (Non-Teaching)
Interdisciplinary Minors
Chinese Studies
Environmental Studies
Global Studies
Legal Studies
Publishing and Printing Arts
Women’s and Gender Studies
FOR MASTERS DEGREES
See Graduate Studies on page 152.
Course Numberings
100-299 Lower-Division Courses: Open to first-year students
and sophomores unless otherwise restricted.
300-499 Upper-Division Courses: Generally open to juniors
and seniors unless otherwise specified.* Also open to graduate
students, and may be considered part of a graduate program
provided they are not specific requirements in preparation for
graduate study.
500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open to graduate
students only. If, during the last semester of the senior year, a
candidate for a baccalaureate degree finds it possible to complete
all degree requirements with a registration of fewer than 16
semester hours of undergraduate credit, registration for graduate
credit is permissible. However, the total registration for
undergraduate requirements and elective graduate credit shall not
exceed 16 semester hours during the semester. A memorandum
stating that all baccalaureate requirements are being met during
the current semester must be signed by the appropriate
department chair or school dean and presented to the dean of
graduate studies at the time of such registration. This registration
does not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later approved
by the student’s advisor and/or advisory committee.
* Note: Lower-division students may enroll in upper-division 
courses if prerequisites have been met.
Course Offerings
Most listed courses are offered every year. A system of alternating
upper-division courses is practiced in some departments, thereby
assuring a broader curriculum. The university reserves the right
to modify specific course requirements, to discontinue classes in
which the registration is regarded as insufficient, and to withdraw
courses. Most courses have a value of four semester hours.
Parenthetical numbers immediately after the course description
or title indicates the number of semester hour credit given.
GUR (General University 
Requirement) Key
A
Alternative Perspectives
AR
Art, Music, or Theatre
C
Cross-Cultural Perspectives
F
Inquiry Seminar
FW 
Inquiry Seminar: Writing
H1
International Honors: Origins of the Modern World
H2
International Honors: 200-level Courses
H3
International Honors: Concluding Course
LT
Literature
MR
Mathematical Reasoning
CurriculumInformation
PLU 2007 - 2008
37
AcademicInternship/CooperativeEducation
NS
Natural Sciences, Mathematics, or Computer 
Science
PE
Physical Education Activity Course
PH
Philosophy
R1
Religion: Biblical Studies (Line 1)
R2
Religion: Christian Thought, History, and 
Experience (Line 2)
R3
Religion: Integrative and Comparative Religious 
Studies (Line 3)
SM
Science and Scientific Method
SR
Capstone: Senior Seminar/Project
S1
Social Sciences Line 1 (Anthropology, History, or 
Political Science)
S2
Social Sciences Line 2 (Economics, Psychology, 
Social Work, or Sociology)
WR
Writing Requirement
Students are responsible for completing a Learning Agreement
including learning objectives, related activities, and academic
documentation of learning during their Academic Internship
experience. Each student must arrange for academic supervision
from a faculty sponsor. Faculty are responsible for insuring that
the work experience provides appropriate learning opportunities,
for helping to establish the learning agreement, and for
determining a grade.
Documentation of learning is established with a “Learning
Agreement” and usually includes completing academic
assignments and projects and periodic contact with the faculty
sponsor. Learning is guided by an on-site supervisor who acts as a
professional role model and mentor. The Learning Agreement,
developed by each student with the assistance of a faculty
sponsor, lists learning objectives, a description of how those
objectives will be accomplished, and how the student will
document what they have learned. The Learning Agreement is
signed by the student, the faculty sponsor, the program director,
and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy. Contact
(personal, phone, electronic, etc.) between the faculty sponsor
and the student must be sufficient to allow the sponsor to serve
as a resource and provide academic supervision. Site visits may be
made by the faculty sponsor or the Co-op program director in
agreement with the faculty sponsor.
Employers are responsible to: (1) provide opportunities for
students to achieve their learning objectives within the limits of
their work settings; (2) help students develop skills related to the
contextual aspects of the work world (such as relationships with
co-workers); and (3) facilitate students’ integration into their
work setting so that their employment proves valuable and
productive.
Students are required to register for at least one semester hour
after accepting an Academic Internship position. Throughout an
undergraduate academic career a student may receive a maximum
of 16 semester hours of credit through the Academic
Internship/Co-op courses. 
Course Offerings – Academic Internships & Cooperative
Education (AICE and COOP) 
AICE 276: Part-Time Internship
Asupervised educational experience in a work setting on a part-
time basis, no less than two four-hour work periods per week.
Intended for students who have not yet declared a major or for
students seeking an exploratory experience. Requires the
completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a
faculty sponsor. (1 to 8)
AICE 476: Part-Time Advanced Internship
Asupervised educational experience in a work setting on a part-
time basis, no less than two four hour work periods per week.
Intended for students enrolled in a major who are seeking a
professionally related experience. Requires the completion of a
Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (1 to 8)
COOP 276: Full-Time Internship
Asupervised educational experience in a work setting on a full-
time basis. Student must work at least 360 hours in their
internship. Intended for students who have not declared a major
or who are seeking an exploratory experience. Requires the
Academic Internship/ 
Cooperative Education
253.535.7324
www.plu.edu/~intern
intern@plu.edu
Academic Internship/Cooperative Education courses are unique
opportunities for “hands-on” job experience with directed
academic learning. Through internships students weave
opportunities for working and learning together. The program
features systematic cooperation between the university and an
extensive number of employers in the Puget Sound community,
though a student may participate in an academic internship
experience anywhere in the world.
Students gain an appreciation of the relationship between theory
and application, and may learn first hand about new
developments in a particular field. An Academic Internship
experience enables students to become aware of the changing
dimensions of work. It is a key component in PLU’s fabric of
investigative learning.
F
aculty:
Herbert-Hill, Director
TWO MODELS: An academic internship accommodates both
part-time and full-time work schedules. Part-time work allows
students to take on-campus courses concurrently. Afull-time
work experience requires students to dedicate the entire term to
their co-op employment. In most cases, students will follow one
or the other, but some departments or schools may develop
sequences that combine both full-time and part-time work
options.
THE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS: To be eligible for
admission into an Academic Internship or Co-op course, a
student must have completed 28 semester hours or 12 semester
hours for transfer students and be in good standing.
Students who wish to enroll in an Academic Internship must
contact their department faculty or the Director of the Co-op
Program to determine eligibility, terms for placement, areas of
interest, academic requirements, and kinds of positions 
available.
A
A
38
PLU 2007 - 2008
Anthropology
253.535.7294
www.plu.edu/~anthro
anthro@plu.edu
Anthropology as a discipline tries to bring all of the world’s
people into human focus. Though anthropology does look at
“stones and bones,” it also examines the politics, medicines,
families, arts, and religions of peoples and cultures in various
places and times. This makes the study of anthropology a
complex task, for it involves aspects of many disciplines, from
geology and biology to art and psychology.
Anthropology is composed of four fields. Cultural or social
anthropology studies living human cultures in order to create a
cross-cultural understanding of human behavior. Archaeology has
the same goal, but uses data from the physical remains of the past
cultures to reach it. Linguistic anthropology studies human
language. Biological anthropology studies the emergence and
subsequent biological adaptations of humanity as a species.
F
aculty:
Brusco, Chair; Andrews, Guldin, Huelsbeck, Klein,
Nosaka, Pine.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hours
Required: ANTH 102, 103, 480, 499.
Choose: ANTH 101 or 104; four semester hours from 330–345
(peoples courses); four semester hours from ANTH 350–465
(topics courses); eight additional hours in anthropology, at least
four of which must be above ANTH 321.
MINOR: 20 semester hours.
Required: ANTH 102.
Choose: ANTH 101 or 103 or 104; four semester hours from
courses listed ANTH 330–345; four semester hours from ANTH
350–499; and four additional semester hours in anthropology.
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS
In recognition of outstanding work, the designation with
Departmental Honors may be granted by vote of the
anthropology faculty based on the student’s performance in the
following areas:
• Anthropology course work: 3.50 minimum GPA.
• Demonstration of active interest in anthropological 
projects and activities outside of class work.
• Completion of a senior thesis. A paper describing
independent research must be conducted under the
supervision of departmental faculty. A proposal must be
approved by the faculty by the third week of class of the
fall semester for May and August graduates, and the
third week of class of the spring semester for December
and January graduates.
The departmental honors designation will appear on a
graduating anthropology major’s transcript.
Course Offerings – Anthropology (ANTH)
ANTH 101: Introduction to Human Biological Diversity – SM
Introduction to biological anthropology with a special focus on
human evolution, the fossil evidence for human development, the
role of culture in human evolution, and a comparison with the
development and social life of the nonhuman primates. (4)
ANTH 102: Introduction to Human Cultural Diversity – C, S1
Introduction to social-cultural anthropology, concentrating on
the exploration of the infinite variety of human endeavors in all
aspects of culture and all types of societies; religion, politics, law,
kinship and art. (4)
ANTH 103: Introduction to Archaeology and World
Prehistory – S1
Introduction to the ideas and practice of archaeology used to
examine the sweep of human prehistory from the earliest stone
tools to the development of agriculture and metallurgy and to
enrich our understanding of extinct societies. (4)
ANTH 104: Introduction to Language in Society – S1
Introduction to anthropological linguistics and symbolism,
including the origin of language; sound systems, structure and
meaning; language acquisition; the social context of speaking;
language change; nonverbal communication; and sex differences
in language use. (4)
ANTH 192: Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past
and Present – A, S1
Study of Makah culture through archaeology and history and by
interacting with the Makah. Active and service learning in Neah
Bay, visiting the Makah Nation. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. (4)
ANTH 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change – C, S1
Asurvey of global issues: modernization and development;
economic change and international trade; diminishing resources;
war and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity.
Cross-listed with HIST 210 and POLS 210. (4)
Anthropology
completion of a Learning Agreement in consultation with a
faculty sponsor. (12)
COOP 476: Full-Time Advanced Internship
Asupervised educational experience in a work setting on a full-
time basis. Student must work at least 360 hours in their
internship. Intended for students enrolled in a major or who are
seeking a professional experience. Requires the completion of a
Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (12)
COOP 477: International Work Experience
To be arranged and approved through the Wang Center for
International Programs and a faculty sponsor. Prerequisites:
Completion of a minimum of one full year (32 credits) in
residence prior to the program start. Recommended: A minimum
GPA of 3.00, relevant work experience or academic background,
language competency and significant cross-cultural experience.
(1–12)
COOP 576: Work Experience III
Asupervised educational experience at the graduate level.
Requires completion of a Cooperative Education Agreement in
consultation with a faculty sponsor and the student’s graduate
program advisor. (1–4)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested