display pdf in iframe mvc : How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks4-part281

PLU 2007 - 2008
39
A
Anthropology
ANTH 220: Peoples of the World – S1
Exploration of the world’s cultures through anthropological films,
novels, and eyewitness accounts. Case studies chosen from Africa,
Native America, Asia, the Pacific, and Euro-America provide an
insider’s view of ways of life different from our own. (2)
ANTH 225: Past Cultures of Washington State – S1
Native Americans have lived in Washington State for at least the
last 12,000 years. Cultures of the people in coastal and interior
Washington beginning with the first northwesterners. An
examination of the ways that cultures change through time until
the emergence of the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest
European visitors to the area. (2)
ANTH 230: Peoples of the Northwest Coast – A, S1
Asurvey of the ways of life of the native peoples of coastal
Washington, British Columbia, and Southeastern Alaska from
European contact to contemporary times, including traditional
methods of fishing, arts, potlatches, status systems, and wealth
and their impact on the modern life of the region. (2)
ANTH 330: Cultures and Peoples of Native North 
America – A, S1
Acomparative study of Native North American cultures from
their arrival on the continent through today. Examination of
U.S. and Canadian laws, policies, and conflicts, issues of
sovereignty, and religious rights. (4)
ANTH 332: Prehistory of North America – S1
An archaeological reconstruction of economic, social, political,
and religious life in North America from the time the first settlers
entered the continent during the Ice Ages to the Mound Builders
of later times and ultimately to the first contact with European
settlers. (4)
ANTH 333: Native American Health – A, S1
Opportunity to study the health status of Native Americans.
Overview of the history and culture of selected Native American
tribes and nations, perspectives on health and illness, trends in
population and health status, and traditions of Native American
healing. (4)
ANTH 334: The Anthropology of Contemporary 
America – A, S1
An investigation of American social patterns and problems
designed to give insights from a cross-cultural perspective;
exploration of American solutions to common human problems;
adetermination of what is unique about the “American 
Way.” (4)
ANTH 335: The Aztecs – C, S1
“The temple steps ran red with blood,” thus goes the collective
cry in Spanish descriptions of Aztec sacrifice.  This course
examines this fascinating culture using ethnohistoric and
archaeological information.  The objectives are to understand the
nature of Aztec culture and how it helps provide a more realistic
perspective of Mesoamerican prehistory. (4)
ANTH 336: Peoples of Latin America – C, S1
Millions of Americans have never been north of the equator.
Who are these “other” Americans? This survey course familiarizes
the student with a broad range of Latin American peoples and
problems. Topics range from visions of the supernatural to
problems of economic development. (4)
ANTH 338: Jewish Culture – A, S1
An exploration of American Jewish culture through its roots in
the lifeways of Eastern European Ashkenazic Jews and its
transformation in the United States. Emphasis on Jewish history,
religion, literature, music, and humor as reflections of basic
Jewish cultural themes. (4)
ANTH 340: Anthropology of Africa – C, S1
Study of Africa’s diverse cultures. Focus on early studies of
villages and topics such as kinship, religion, and social structure,
and on more recent studies of urban centers, the impact of
colonialism, popular culture, and post-colonial politics. (4)
ANTH 341: Ho‘ike: Cultural Discovery in Hawai‘i – A, S1
The history and cultural diversity of Hawai‘i. Spend time in
Honolulu and on the island of Kaua‘i, visiting cultural sites and
working with community based organizations. Anthropological
writings, history, and literature will provide a wider perspective
and a framework for analysis of our experiences. (4)
ANTH 342: Pacific Island Cultures – C, S1
Peoples of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia. Developments
in the Pacific region are explored, including economic
development, migration, environmental degradation, political
movements, gender roles, the impact of Western media, tourism,
and cultural revivalism. How shifting theoretical models have
informed the representation of Pacific cultures will also be
considered. (4)
ANTH 343: East Asian Cultures – C, S1
Asurvey of the cultures and peoples of Eastern Asia,
concentrating on China but with comparative reference to Japan,
Korea, and Vietnam. Cultural similarities as well as differences
between these nations are stressed. Topics include religion, art,
politics, history, kinship, and economics. (4)
ANTH 345: Contemporary China – C, S1
An immersion into the culture and society of the People’s
Republic of China; contemporary politics, kinship, folk religion,
human relations; problems and prospects of development and
rapid social change. (4)
ANTH 350: Women and Men in World Cultures – C, S1
An overview of the variation of sex roles and behaviors
throughout the world; theories of matriarchy, patriarchy, mother
goddesses, innate inequalities; marriage patterns, impact of
European patterns; egalitarianism to feminism. (4)
ANTH 352: The Anthropology of Age – C, S1
This course examines the broad diversity of how cultures define
the behavioral strategies of people as they age, how aging
differentially is experienced by men and women, and how
intergenerational family relationships change as individuals make
transitions between life stages. Global issues of health,
development, and human rights are considered. (4)
ANTH 355: Anthropology and Media – C, S1
Exploration of mass media produced and consumed in diverse
cultural contexts. Examination of how mass media cultivate
forms of gendered, ethnic, religious, and racial identities, and
how different forms of media engage with the dynamic forces of
popular culture and the political agendas of states and political
opposition groups. (4)
How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate individual pages in pdf; permanently rotate pdf pages
How to rotate pdf pages and save permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate one page in pdf
40
PLU 2007 - 2008
Anthropology
A
ANTH 360: Ethnic Groups – A, S1
Examines the nature of ethnic groups in America and abroad; the
varying bases of ethnicity (culture, religion, tribe, “race,” etc.);
problems of group identity and boundary maintenance; ethnic
symbols; ethnic politics; ethnic neighborhoods; and ethnic
humor. (4)
ANTH 361: Managing Cultural Diversity – A, S1
Practical guidelines on how to approach people of other cultures
with sensitivity and empathy and with an eye toward mutually
rewarding interaction. Learn how to avoid negative attitudes
toward cultural diversity and develop a positive curiosity about
the global diversity represented in workplaces, schools, and
neighborhoods. (2)
ANTH 365: Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab
Methods in Archaeology – S1
Laboratory interpretation of archaeological materials. Techniques
used in interpreting past human ecology, technology, and
economy. Analytical procedures for bone, stone, ceramic, and
metal artifacts; analysis of debris from food processing activities.
Analysis of materials from archaeological sites. (1-4)
ANTH 368: Edible Landscapes - The Foraging Spectrum – S1
The course examines foragers in Africa, North America, and
Australia.  Using classic ethnographic literature, it provides a
cultural ecological perspective of foraging societies in a variety of
environments.  It also examines how foraging studies inform
archaeological research, and the challenges that these peoples now
face in a rapidly changing world. (4)
ANTH 370: The Archaeology of Ancient Empires – C, S1
The origins of agriculture, writing, cities, and the state in many
parts of the world, comparing and contrasting the great
civilizations of antiquity, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India,
Asia, Mesoamerica, and South America. (4)
ANTH 375: Law, Politics, and Revolution – C, S1
Astudy of politics and law through the political structures 
and processes of traditional and contemporary societies; 
concepts of leadership, factionalism, feuds, power, authority,
revolution, and other reactions to colonization; law and 
conflict resolution; conflicts of national and local-level legal
systems. (4)
ANTH 377: Money, Power, and Exchange – S1
What are the cultural meanings of money, products, wealth, and
exchange? How do they vary in different cultures? How products
and favors acquire magical meanings, circulating through gifts
and barter and how magical meanings change, moving to
different cultures. The power of exchange, creating complex
social relationships at local, global levels. (4)
ANTH 380: Sickness, Madness, and Health – C, S1
Across-cultural examination of systems of curing practices and
cultural views of physical and mental health; prevention and
healing; nature and skills of curers; definitions of disease;
variation in diseases; impact of modern medical and
psychological practitioners. (4)
ANTH 385: Marriage, Family, and Kinship – C, S1
Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-culturally, including
the ways in which religion, myth, magic, and folklore serve to
articulate and control domestic life; how changing systems of
production affect marriage and domestic forms; and how class
and gender systems intertwine with kinship, domestic forms, and
the meaning of “family.” (4)
ANTH 386: Applied Anthropology – S1
Exploration of the uses of the anthropological approach to
improve human conditions. Focus on anthropologists’
involvement and roles in applied projects. Review of theoretical,
ethical, and practical issues. Field component. (4)
ANTH 387: Special Topics in Anthropology - S1
Selected topics as announced by the department. Courses will
address important issues in archaeology and cultural
anthropology. (1–4)
ANTH 392: Gods, Magic, and Morals – C, S1
Anthropology of religion; humanity’s concepts of and
relationships to the supernatural; examination of personal and
group functions that religions fulfill; exploration of religions both
“primitive” and historical; origins of religion. Cross-listed with
RELI 392. (4)
ANTH 465: Archaeology: The Field Experience –- S1
Excavation of a historic or prehistoric archaeological site, with
emphasis on basic excavation skills and record keeping, field
mapping, drafting, and photography. The laboratory covers
artifact processing and preliminary analysis. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor. (1–8)
ANTH 480: Anthropological Inquiry – S1
Historic and thematic study of the theoretical foundations of
sociocultural anthropology; research methods; how theory and
methods are used to establish anthropological knowledge.
Required of majors in their junior or senior year. (4)
ANTH 491: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Readings
Reading in specific areas or issues of anthropology under
supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Departmental
consent. (1–4)
ANTH 492: Independent Studies: Undergraduate Fieldwork
Study of specific areas or issues in anthropology through field
methods of analysis and research supported by appropriate
reading under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite:
Departmental consent. (1–4)
ANTH 499: Capstone: Seminar in Anthropology – SR
Examine anthropological methods and apply anthropological
theory to an investigation of a selected topic in contempor-
ary anthropology. Required of majors in their junior or 
senior year. Prerequisite for other students: Departmental
approval. (4) 
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET shows you how to redact whole PDF pages. String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document
save pdf after rotating pages; how to rotate one page in pdf document
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently? developers process target image file and save edited image
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
41
Art
A
• Eight additional semester hours in two-dimensional media
• Eight additional hours in three-dimensional media
• Four semester hours in Art History or theory (ARTD 390, 
or as approved by the department faculty)
• Requirements and electives in area of emphasis; and 
ARTD 499 (Capstone: Senior Exhibition)
• ARTD 116 or courses in teaching methods may not be
included
Candidates who are enrolled in the School of Arts and
Communication (SOAC) must satisfy general university
requirements, including either the Distributive Core or the
International Honors Program.
CONCENTRATIONS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
Courses listed below with (R) under each concentration area may
be repeated.
• Two-Dimensional Media
Areas of Emphasis: A minimum of three courses required in
one area.
Students may apply Independent Study courses ARTD 491:
Special Projects and ARTD 498: Studio Projects to any of the
areas under the Two Dimensional Media Concentration. Both
courses may be repeated.
Drawing/Painting:
ARTD 160: Drawing 
ARTD 260: Intermediate Drawing 
ARTD 360: Life Drawing (R)
ARTD 365: Painting I
ARTD 465: Painting II (R)
Printmaking:
ARTD 370: Printmaking I
ARTD 470: Printmaking II (R)
Film Arts:
ARTD 226: Black and White Photography
ARTD 326: Color Photography
ARTD 426: Digital Photography
Independent Study (may be applied to any area):
ARTD 491: Special Projects (R)
ARTD 498: Studio Projects (R)
(R)–may be repeated for credit
• Three-Dimensional Media
Areas of Emphasis: A minimum of three courses required in
one area.
Students may apply Independent Study courses ARTD 491:
Special Projects and ARTD 498: Studio Projects to any of the
areas under the Three-Dimensional Media Concentration.
Both courses may be repeated.
Ceramics:
ARTD 230: Ceramics I
ARTD 330: Ceramics II
ARTD 430: Ceramics III (R)
Sculpture:
ARTD 250: Sculpture I
ARTD 350: Sculpture II (R)
Art
253.535.7573
www.plu.edu/~artd 
artd@plu.edu
In this time of rapidly changing concepts and an almost daily
emergence of new media, emphasis must be placed on a variety
of experiences and creative flexibility for the artist and the
designer. Students with professional concerns must be prepared
to meet the modern world with both technical skills and the
capacity for innovation. The department’s program therefore
stresses individualized development in the use of mind and hand.
Students may choose among a generalized program leading to a
Bachelor of Arts degree; a specific specialized program for the
Bachelor of Fine Arts, in which each candidate develops some
area of competence; or a degree program in art education for
teaching on several levels.
Some students go directly from the university into their field of
interest. Others find it desirable and appropriate to attend a
graduate school. Many alumni have been accepted into
prestigious graduate programs, both in this country and abroad.
The various fields of art are competitive and demanding in terms
of commitment and effort. Nonetheless, there is always a place
for those who are extremely skillful or highly imaginative or,
ideally, both. The department’s program stresses both, attempting
to help each student reach that ideal. Instructional resources,
when coupled with dedicated and energetic students, have
resulted in an unusually high percentage of graduates being able
to satisfy their vocational objectives.
F
aculty:
Avila, Ebbinga Co-chairs; Geller, Hallam, Mathews,
Stasinos; assisted by Cornwall, Sobeck, Sparks, Watts
Majors are urged to follow course sequences closely. It is
recommended that students interested in majoring in art declare
their major early to ensure proper advising. Transfer students’
status shall be determined at their time of entrance. The
department reserves the right to retain, exhibit, and reproduce
student work submitted for credit in any of its courses or
programs, including the senior exhibition. A use or materials fee
is required in certain courses.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR
34 semester hours, including:
• ARTD 160, 250, 230 or 350, 365, 370, 499
• Art History sequence (ARTD 180, 181, 380)
• ARTD 116 or courses in teaching methods may not be 
applied to the major.
• A maximum of 44 semester hours may be applied toward 
the degree. 
• Candidates for the bachelor of arts degree are enrolled in 
the College of Arts and Sciences and must meet the College
of Arts and Sciences requirements.
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR 
60 semester hours minimum, including:
• ARTD 160; 226; either 230 or 350; the Art History
sequence (180, 181, 380)
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; how to rotate page in pdf and save
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate single page in pdf reader
42
PLU 2007 - 2008
Art
A
ARTD 181: History of Western Art II – AR
Asurvey of Western art and architecture from the Renaissance
to the 20th century. (4)
ARTD 196: Design I: Fundamentals – AR
An introduction to design through the study of basic
techniques, color theory, and composition. (4)
ARTD 226: Black and White Photography – AR
Astudio class in photography as an art form. Primary
concentration in basic camera and darkroom techniques.
Students produce a portfolio of prints with an emphasis on
creative expression and experimentation. (4)
ARTD 230: Ceramics I – AR
Ceramic materials and techniques including hand-built and
wheel-thrown methods, clay and glaze formation. Includes a
survey of ceramic art. (4)
ARTD 250: Sculpture I – AR
Focus on techniques and processes in various mediums with
attention to conceptualization and craftsmanship in three-
dimensional space. Metal, wood, plaster, synthetics, video, and
tools used in fabrication processes. Text required. Includes a
Video survey of contemporary and historical artists. (4)
ARTD 260: Intermediate Drawing – AR
Drawing taken beyond the basics of 160. Expansion of media
forms, and solutions to compositional problems. Possibility of
pursuing special individual interests, with permission.
Prerequisite: ARTD 160 or consent of instructor. (4)
ARTD 296: Design II: Concepts – AR
An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a
methodical and organized manner. Includes projects in a variety
of design areas. Prerequisite: ARTD 196 or consent of
instructor. (4)
ARTD 326: Color Photography – AR
Exploration of the issues of both painters and photographers.
Students learn to make color prints and process color negatives.
Includes a historical survey of color photography as well as
perspectives of contemporary artists. (4)
ARTD 330: Ceramics II – AR
Techniques in ceramic construction and experiments in glaze
formation. Prerequisite: ARTD 230. (4)
ARTD 331: The Art of the Book I – AR
This studio course explores the history, aesthetics and creative
dimensions of book design and typography. Cross-listed with
ENGL 313. (4)
ARTD 341: Elementary Art Education
Astudy of creative growth and development; art as studio
projects; history and therapy in the classroom. (2)
ARTD 350: Sculpture II – AR
Fall semester has a focus on foundry (cast aluminum, bronze, and
iron), using lost wax and lost foam processes. Spring semester has
afocus on welding fabrication utilizing gas, MIG, and ARC.
There is an emphasis on mixed media sculpture. Includes a
Video survey of contemporary and historical artists. May be
taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 250. (4))
ARTD 360: Life Drawing – AR
An exploration of human form in drawing media. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTD 160 or consent of
instructor. (2)
Independent Study (may be applied to any area):
ARTD 491: Special Projects (R)
ARTD 498: Studio Projects (R)
(R)–may be repeated for credit
• Design Concentration
Required basic sequence:
ARTD 196: Design I: Fundamentals
ARTD 296: Design II: Concepts
ARTD 396: Design: Graphics I
Elective courses:
ARTD 398: Drawing: Illustration (R)
ARTD 492: Design: Workshop
ARTD 496: Design: Graphics II
(R)–may be repeated for credit
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
See Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
MINORS
Students pursuing a BFA or BA in Art may minor in Art History,
but not Studio Art, which is reserved for non-majors.
Studio Art -20 semester hours, including:
• ARTD 380
• Four semester hours in two-dimensional media
• Four semester hours in three-dimensional media
• Eight semester hours of studio art electives drawn from
upper-division courses.
• Courses in teaching methods (ARTD 341 and ARTD 440)
may not be applied to the minor.
Art History - 24 semester hours, including:
• ARTD 180 and ARTD 181
• 12 semester hours in art history/theory electives
• Four semester hours in studio electives
• Non-concentration courses (ARTD 116), practical design
courses (ARTD 196, 296, 396, 398, 492, 496), and courses
in teaching methods (ARTD 341, 440) may not be 
applied to the minor. 
Publishing and Printing Arts - 24 semester hours 
The Publishing and Printing Arts minor is cross-listed with the
Department of English. See the description of that minor under
Publishing and Printing Arts.
Course Offerings – Art (ARTD)
Studio
160, 196, 226, 230, 250, 260, 296, 326, 330, 341, 350, 360,
365, 370, 396, 398, 426, 430, 465, 470, 491, 492, 496, 498
History and Theory
180, 181, 380, 390, 440, 497
ARTD 160: Drawing – AR
Acourse dealing with the basic techniques and media of
drawing. (4)
ARTD 180: History of Western Art I – AR
Asurvey tracing the development of Western art and
architecture from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. (4)
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
also is able to change view orientation by clicking rotate button for C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations
rotate pdf page; rotate a pdf page
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text example describes how to redact whole PDF pages. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document
rotate single page in pdf; pdf rotate page
PLU 2007 - 2008
43
Art
A
School of Arts and Communication
253.535.7150
www.plu.edu/~soac
soac@plu.edu
The School of Arts and Communication is a community of
artists and scholars—students, faculty, and staff—dedicated to
the fulfillment of the human spirit through creative expression
and careful scholarship. The School of Arts and Communication
offers professional education to artists and communicators
ARTD 365: Painting I – AR
Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics.
Prerequisite: ARTD 160. (4)
ARTD 370: Printmaking I – AR
Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and
photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio, and screen
printing. Prerequisite: ARTD 160 or consent of instructor. (4)
ARTD 380: Modern Art – AR
The development of art from 1900 to the present, with a brief
look at European and American antecedents as they apply to
contemporary directions. (4)
ARTD 387: Special Topics in Art - AR
This course in intended for unique opportunities to explore
artistic expression, provided by visiting artists or artists in
residence who intend to focus on a particular style, element or
technique used in creative and artistic expression. (1-4) 
ARTD 390: Studies in Art History – AR
Aselected area of inquiry, such as a history of American art,
Asian art, the work of Picasso, or similar topics. May be
repeated for credit. (4)
ARTD 396: Design Graphics I – AR
Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on
technical procedures and problems in mass communication.
Prerequisite: ARTD 196 and ARTD 296 or consent of
instructor. (4)
ARTD 398: Drawing: Illustration – AR
Advanced projects in drawing/illustration. Exposure to new
concepts and techniques adaptable to fine art and commercial
applications. Prerequisites: ARTD 160 and ARTD 196. May be
repeated once. (4)
ARTD 426: Digital Photography – AR
An introduction to computer-assisted photography in which
students learn applications, develop aesthetic strategies, and
engage the ethical issues of this new technology. Emphasis on
creative exploration and problem solving within the Macintosh
environment. Prerequisites: ARTD 226 and 326 or consent of
instructor. May be taken twice. (4)
ARTD 430: Ceramics III – AR
Individual research into ceramic construction, kiln operations,
and experiments in glaze formation. May be taken twice.
Prerequisite: ARTD 330. (4)
ARTD 440: Secondary Art Education
Astudy of instruction in the secondary school including
appropriate media and curriculum development. (2)
ARTD 465: Painting II – AR
Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics. May be
taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 365. (4)
ARTD 470: Printmaking II – AR
Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and
photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio, and screen
printing. May be taken twice. Prerequisite: ARTD 370. (4)
ARTD 487: Special Topics in Art - AR
This course is intended for unique opportunities to explore
artistic expression provided by visiting artists or artists in
residence who intend to focus on a particular style, element, or
technique used in creative and artistic expression. (1-4) 
ARTD 491: Independent Studies: Special Projects – AR
Exploration of the possibilities of selected studio areas,
including experimental techniques. Emphasis on development
of individual styles, media approaches, and problem solutions.
May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Junior status,
minimum of two courses at 200 level or above in affected
medium with minimum 2.5 GPA, consent of instructor 
and department chair. (1-4)
ARTD 492: Design: Workshop – AR
Atutorial course which may deal with any of several aspects of
the design field with particular emphasis on practical experience
and building a portfolio. May be taken twice. (2 or 4)
ARTD 496: Design: Graphics II
Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on
technical procedures and problems in mass communication.
Explores advanced techniques with multiple color, typography,
and other complex problems. Prerequisite: ARTD 396. (4)
ARTD 497: Research in Art History – Theory
Atutorial course for major students with research into a
particular aspect of art history or theory. May be repeated for
credit. Prerequisites: Senior status, consent of instructor, and
program approval by department faculty. (1-4)
ARTD 498: Studio Projects/Independent Study – SR
Atutorial program for students of exceptional talent. In-depth
individual investigation of a particular medium or set of
technical problems. Only one project per semester may be
undertaken. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Declared
major in art, senior status, consent of instructor, written
proposal, program approval by department faculty. Students
meeting the above requirements but with less than a 3.00 GPA
in the major may be required to present additional evidence of
eligibility. (1-4)
ARTD 499: Capstone: Senior Exhibition – SR
Students work closely with their advisors in all phases of the
preparation of the exhibition. Must be taken in the student’s
final semester. Prerequisites: Declared major in art (BFA or BA),
senior status, reasonable expectation of completion of all
department and university requirements for graduation. Meets
the senior seminar/project requirement. (2) 
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
commonly used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF the default local path or adjust save location in btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in display
reverse page order pdf; rotate all pages in pdf
44
PLU 2007 - 2008
ArtsandSciences
A
within the framework of a liberal arts education. The school
encourages all of its members to pursue their artistic and
scholarly work in an environment that challenges complacency,
nurtures personal growth, and maintains a strong culture of
collegial integrity.
Members of the School of Arts and Communication strive to
create art and scholarship that acknowledges the past, defines
the present, and anticipates the future. Art, communication,
music, and theatre are mediums of understanding and change
that reward those who participate in them, whether as artist,
scholar, learner, or audience. Performances by students, faculty,
and guests of the school enhance the cultural prosperity shared
by Pacific Lutheran University and its surrounding environs.
The school promotes venues for collaboration between artists
and scholars, among artistic and intellectual media, and between
the university and the community.
F
aculty
:
Inch, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of
Art, Communication and Theatre, and Music. 
DEGREES OFFERED
• Bachelor of Arts in Communication (BAC)
• Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in art and theatre
• Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA)
• Bachelor of Music Education (BME)
Students may also earn the Bachelor of Arts (BA), but this
degree is awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences.
Candidates for all degrees must meet general university
requirements and the specific requirements of the Departments
of Art, Communication and Theatre, or Music.
For details about the Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE) in
art, communication and theatre, or music, see the School of
Education and Movement Studies.
For course offerings, degree requirements, and programs in the
School of Arts and Communication, see Art, Communication
and Theatre, and Music.
Course Offerings – School of Arts and Communication
(SOAC)
SOAC 295: Pre-Internship
Provides first- and second-year students with an opportunity to
apply curricular theory and practice to professional and social
arenas. Students will work with the School of Arts and
Communication internship coordinator to design and plan an
internship, its learning goals and contract. (1)
SOAC 299: Keystone
The “Keystone” course is intended to introduce freshmen and
sophomores to the process of educational assessment and
program competencies. Focus is on integrating student 
learning objectives with student experience through initial
development of portfolio projects and other assignments. Not
repeatable. (1)
NOTE: A maximum of four combined credits in Keystone and
Capstone credits may count toward the Communication Major.
Keystone is a requirement for Communication and Theatre Majors,
optional for Art and Music Majors.
SOAC 341: Integrating Arts in the Classroom
Methods and procedures for integrating the arts (music, visual,
drama, dance) in the classroom and across the curriculum.
Offered for students preparing for elementary classroom
teaching. Meets state certification requirements in both music
and art. (2)
SOAC 395: Pre-Internship
Provides junior-level and senior-level students with an
opportunity to apply curricular theory and practice to
professional and social arenas. Students will work with the
School of Arts and Communication internship coordinator 
to design and plan an internship, its learning goals and 
contract. (1)
SOAC 399: Keystone
This “Keystone” course is intended for upper-division students 
to develop the process of educational assessment and program
competencies. Focus is on integrating student learning objectives
with student experience through initial development of portfolio
projects and other assignments. Not repeatable. (1)
SOAC 495: Internship
Provides junior-level and senior- level School of Arts and
Communication students with an opportunity to apply
curricular theory and practice to professional and social arenas.
Students will work with the School of Arts and Communication
internship coordinator to design and complete an internship, its
learning goals and contract. May be repeated for credit. (1-8)
SOAC 499: Capstone - SR
Capstone course for undergraduate degrees in the School of Arts
and Communication (Art, Communication, Music and Theatre).
Focus is on integrating student learning objectives with student
experience through development and presentation of portfolio
projects and other assignments. (2-4)
College of Arts and Sciences
Division of Humanities
English
Philosophy
Languages and Literatures
Religion
Division of Natural Sciences
Biology
Geosciences
Chemistry
Mathematics
Computer Science and
Physics 
Computer Engineering
Division of Social Sciences
Anthropology
Political Science
Economics
Psychology
History
Sociology and Social Work
Marriage and Family Therapy
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED: Bachelor of Arts,
Bachelor of Science
Major Requirement: A major is a sequence of courses in one
area, usually in one department. A major should be selected by
PLU 2007 - 2008
45
ArtsandSciences•Biology
A
the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be approved by
the department chair (or in case of special academic programs,
the program coordinator). Major requirements are specified in
this catalog.
Recognized Majors:
Anthropology
Applied Physics
Art
Biology
Chemistry
Chinese Studies 
(Interdisciplinary)
Classics
Communication Studies
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Economics
Engineering Science Dual 
Degree(3-2)
English
Environmental Studies 
(Interdisciplinary)
French
Geosciences
German
Global Studies 
(Interdisciplinary)
History
Individualized Study
Mathematics
Music
Norwegian
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Scandinavian Area Studies
(Interdisciplinary)
Social Work
Sociology
Spanish
Theatre
Women’s and Gender 
Studies (Interdisciplinary)
Not more than 44 semester hours earned in one department may
be applied toward the bachelor’s degree in the college. 
College of Arts and Sciences Requirements
In addition to meeting the entrance requirement in foreign
language (two years of high school language, one year of college
language, or demonstrated equivalent proficiency), candidates in
the College of Arts and Sciences (all BA, BS, BARec, BAPE
[excluding BAPE with certification], and BSPE degrees) must
meet Option 1, 2, or 3 below. 
Candidates for the BA in English, for the BA in Education with
concentration in English, for the BA in Global Studies, for the
BBA in International Business, and for election to the Areté
Society must meet Option 1.
• Option 1
Completion of one foreign language through the second year
of college level. This option may also be met by completion of
four years of high school study in one foreign language with
grades of C or higher, or by satisfactory scores on a proficiency
examination administered by the PLU Department of
Languages and Literatures.
• Option 2
Completion of one foreign language other than that used to
satisfy the foreign language entrance requirement through the
first year of college level. This option may also be met by
satisfactory scores on a proficiency examination administered
by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures.
• Option 3
Completion of four semester hours in history, literature, or
language (at the 201 level, or at any level in a language other
Biology
253.535.7561
www.nsci.plu.edu/biol
biology@plu.edu
To learn biology is more than to learn facts: it is to learn how to
ask and answer questions, how to develop strategies that might
be employed to obtain answers, and how to recognize and
evaluate the answers that emerge. The department is therefore
dedicated to encouraging students to learn science in the only
way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to
independently question it, probe it, try it out, experiment with
it, experience it.
The diversity of courses in the curriculum provides broad
coverage of contemporary biology and allows flexible planning.
Each biology major completes a three-course sequence in the
principles of biology. Planning with a faculty advisor, the student
chooses upper-division biology courses to meet individual needs
and career objectives. Faculty members are also committed to
helping students investigate career opportunities and pursue
careers that most clearly match their interests and abilities.
Students are invited to use departmental facilities for
independent study and are encouraged to participate in ongoing
faculty research.
F
aculty:
M. Smith, Chair; Alexander, Auman, M.D. Behrens,
Carlson, Crayton, Dolan, Egge, Ellard-Ivey, Johnson, Lerum,
Main, Siegesmund, J. Smith, Teska.
BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR 
The major in biology is designed to be flexible in meeting the
needs and special interests of students. For either the Bachelor of
Arts or Bachelor of Science degree the student must take the
principles of biology sequence (BIOL 161, 162, 323).
Completion of this sequence (or an equivalent general biology
sequence at another institution) is required before upper-division
biology courses can be taken. Each of these courses must have
been completed with a grade of C- or higher and cumulative
biology GPAmust be at least 2.00. Courses not designed for
biology majors (BIOL 111, 116, 201, 205, 206) ordinarily
cannot be used to satisfy major requirements. Independent study
(BIOL 491) and internship may be used for no more than four
of the upper-division biology hours required for the BS degree,
and for no more than two of the upper-division biology hours
required for the BA degree. Students who plan to apply biology
credits earned at other institutions toward a PLU degree with a
biology major should be aware that at least 14 hours in biology,
numbered 324 or higher and including 499, must be earned in
residence at PLU. Each student must consult with a biology
than that used to satisfy the foreign language entrance
requirement) in addition to courses applied to the general
university requirements, and four semester hours in symbolic
logic, mathematics (courses numbered 100 or above),
computer science, or statistics in addition to courses applied to
the general university requirements. 
Courses used to satisfy either category of Option 3 of the College
of Arts and Sciences requirement may not also be used to satisfy
general university requirements. 
46
PLU 2007 - 2008
advisor to discuss selection of electives appropriate for
educational and career goals. Basic requirements under each plan
for the major are listed below.
BACHELOR OF ARTS: 34 semester hours in Biology
• BIOL 161, 162, 323, and 499
• Plus: 20 additional upper-division biology hours. 
• Required supporting courses: CHEM 115 and MATH 140. 
• Recommended supporting courses: PHYS 125 (with
135 Lab) and PHYS 126 (with 136 Lab).
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE: 42 semester hours in Biology
• BIOL 161, 162, 323, and 499
• Plus: 28 additional upper-division biology hours
• Required supporting courses: Chemistry 115 and 116, 331
(with 333 Lab)
• MATH 151
• PHYS 125 (with 135 Lab) or PHYS 153 (with 163 Lab)
• PHYS 126 (with 136 Lab) or PHYS 154 (with 164 Lab)
BIOLOGY SECONDARY EDUCATION
Students planning to be certified to teach biology in high school
should plan to complete a BA or BS in biology. Upper-division
biology course selection should be made in consultation with a
biology advisor. See the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership section of the catalog for biology
courses required for certification.
MINOR 
• At least 20 semester hours selected from any biology
courses. 
• A grade of C- or higher must be earned in each course, and
total Biology GPA must be at least 2.00. 
• Course prerequisites must be met unless written permission
is granted in advance by the instructor. 
• Applicability of non-PLU biology courses will be
determined by the department chair. 
• At least eight of the 20 credit hours in biology must be
earned in courses taught by the Biology Department 
at PLU
• For students applying only eight PLU biology hours toward
the minor, those hours cannot include independent study
(BIOL 491) or internship (BIOL 495) hours.
Course Offerings – Biology (BIOL)
Fall
BIOL 111, 116, 161, 201, 205, 323, 324, 
326, 329, 407, 411, 424, 441, 475, 
491, 495, 499
January Term
BIOL 115, 333, 365, 491, 495, 499
Spring
BIOL 162, 206, 327, 328, 332, 
340, 348, 361, 364, 403, 425, 426, 444,
448, 491, 499
Summer
BIOL 111, 205, 206, 491, 495
Alternate Year BIOL 333 (J-Term)
BIOL 111: Biology and the Modern World – NS, SM
An introduction to biology designed primarily for students who
Biology
are not majoring in biology. Fundamental concepts chosen 
from all areas of modern biology. Lecture, laboratory, and
discussion. (4)
BIOL 115: Diversity of Life – NS, SM
An introduction to the rich diversity of living organisms, their
evolution, classification, and ecological and environmental
significance. This course also examines the threats to bio-
diversity as well as conservation strategies. Includes lecture,
discussion, lab, and field trips. Not intended for biology 
majors. (4) 
BIOL 116: Introductory Ecology – NS, SM
Astudy of the interrelationships between organisms and their
environment examining concepts in ecology that lead to
understanding the nature and structure of ecosystems and how
humans impact ecosystems. Includes laboratory. Not intended
for biology majors. (4)
BIOL 161: Principles of Biology I: Cell Biology – NS, SM
Cellular and molecular levels of biological organization; cell
ultrastructure and physiology, Mendelian and molecular
genetics, energy transduction. Includes laboratory. Co-
registration in Chemistry 104, 120, or 125 recommended. (4)
BIOL 162: Principles of Biology II: Organismal Biology –
NS, SM
An introduction to animal and plant tissues, anatomy, and
physiology, with special emphasis on flowering plants and
vertebrates as model systems, plus an introduction to animal 
and plant development. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite:
BIOL 161. (4)
BIOL 201: Introductory Microbiology – NS, SM
The structure, metabolism, growth, and genetics of
microorganisms, especially bacteria and viruses, with emphasis
on their roles in human disease. Laboratory focuses on
cultivation, identification, and control of growth of bacteria.
Prerequisite: CHEM 105. Not intended for biology 
majors. (4)
BIOL 205: Human Anatomy and Physiology I – NS, SM
The first half of a two-course sequence. Topics include matter,
cells, tissues, and the anatomy and physiology of four systems:
skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine. Laboratory includes
cat dissection and experiments in muscle physiology and
reflexes. Not designed for biology majors. (4)
BIOL 206: Human Anatomy and Physiology II – NS, SM
The second half of a two-course sequence. Topics include
metabolism, temperature regulation, development, inheritance,
and the anatomy and physiology of five systems: circulatory,
respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive. Laboratory
includes cat dissection, physiology experiments, and study of
developing organisms. Not designed for biology majors.
Prerequisite: BIOL 205. (4)
BIOL 323: Principles of Biology III: Ecology, Evolution, and
Diversity – NS, SM
Evolution, ecology, behavior, and a systematic survey of life on
earth. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 162 or consent
of department chair. (4)
B
PLU 2007 - 2008
47
Biology
B
BIOL 324: Natural History of Vertebrates – NS, SM
Classification, natural history, and economic importance of
vertebrates with the exception of birds. Field trips and laboratory.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 326: Animal Behavior – NS
Description, classification, cause, function, and development of
the behavior of animals emphasizing an ethological approach and
focusing on comparisons among species. Includes physiological,
ecological, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Prerequisite:
BIOL 323 or consent of instructor. (4)
BIOL 327: Ornithology – NS, SM
The study of birds inclusive of their anatomy, physiology,
behavior, ecology and distribution. Special emphasis on those
attributes of birds that are unique among the vertebrates.
Laboratory emphasis on field identification, taxonomy, and
anatomy/topology. Prerequisite: BIOL 323 or consent of
instructor. (4)
BIOL 328: Microbiology - NS, SM
The structure, physiology, genetics, and metabolism of
microorganisms with emphasis on their diversity and ecology.
The laboratory emphasizes design, implementation, and
evaluation of both descriptive and quantitative experiments as
well as isolation of organisms from natural sources. Prerequisite:
BIOL 323; one semester organic chemistry recommended. (4)
BIOL 329: Entomology – NS, SM
Entomology is the scientific study of insects, the most diverse
group of animals on earth. This course examines insect structure,
physiology, ecology, and diversity. The laboratory emphasizes
identification of the common orders and families of North
American insects. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 332: Genetics – NS
Basic concepts considering the molecular basis of gene
expression, recombination, genetic variability, as well as
cytogenetics, and population genetics. Includes tutorials and
demonstration sessions. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 333: Comparative Ecology of Latin America
Acomparative study of the structure and function of biotic
communities, and the ecological and evolutionary forces that
have shaped plants and animals. Topics include dispersal, natural
selection, physiological ecology, natural history, and systematics.
Conservation biology, development, and indigenous rights will
be highlighted. Taught in Central or South America.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323 or consent of instructor. (4)
BIOL 340: Plant Diversity and Distribution – NS, SM
Asystematic introduction to plant diversity. Interaction between
plants, theories of vegetational distribution. Emphasis on higher
plant taxonomy. Includes laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite:
BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 348: Advanced Cell Biology – NS, SM
Deals with how cells are functionally organized, enzyme kinetics
and regulatory mechanisms, biochemistry of macromolecules,
energy metabolism, membrane structure and function,
ultrastructure, cancer cells as model systems. Laboratory includes
techniques encountered in cellular research: animal/plant cell
culture, cell fractionation, use of radiotracers, biological assays,
membrane phenomena, spectrophotometry, respirometry.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323 and one semester of organic chemistry
or consent of instructor. (4)
BIOL 361: Comparative Anatomy – NS, SM
Evolutionary history of the vertebrate body, introduction to
embryology, and extensive consideration of the structural and
functional anatomy of vertebrates. Includes laboratory
dissections following a systems approach. Mammals are featured
plus some observation of and comparison with human cadavers.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 364: Plant Physiology – NS, SM
Physiology of plant growth and development. Emphasis on seed-
plants, but includes other plant groups as model systems. Topics
include: photosynthesis, secondary plant metabolism including
medicinal compounds, hormones, morphogenesis. Includes
laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 323; organic chemistry
recommended. (2)
BIOL 365: Plant Anatomy – NS, SM
Tissue organization and cellular details of stems, roots, and
leaves of seed plants, with emphasis on development and
function. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (2)
BIOL 387: Special Topics in Biology - NS
Selected topics as announced by the department. May be
repeated for credit. (1-4)
BIOL 403: Developmental Biology – NS, SM
The embryonic and larval development of multicellular
organisms (primarily animals). Examples are chosen from
popular contemporary model systems, and the emphasis is on
cellular and molecular aspects of development. The laboratory
includes descriptive and quantitative experiments, as well as
student-planned projects. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 407: Molecular Biology – NS, SM
An introduction to molecular biology, emphasizing the central
role of DNA: structure of DNA and RNA, structure and
expression of genes, genome organization and rearrangement,
methodology and applications of recombinant DNA technology.
Laboratory features basic recombinant DNA techniques.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 411: Histology – NS, SM
Microscopic study of normal cells, tissues, organs, and organ
systems of vertebrates. The emphasis is mammalian. This study
is both structurally and physiologically oriented. Includes
laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 424: Ecology – NS
Organisms in relation to their environment, including
organismal adaptations, population growth and interactions, and
ecosystem structure and function. Prerequisite: 
BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 425: Marine Biology – NS, SM
The ocean as environment for plant and animal life; an
introduction to the structure, dynamics, and history of marine
ecosystems. Lab, field trips, and term project in addition to
lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
48
PLU 2007 - 2008
Biology•Business
B
BIOL 426: Ecological Methods - NS, SM
An examination of methodology used for discerning structure
and function of natural ecosystems: description of the physical
environment, estimation of population size, quantifying
community structure, and measurement of productivity.
Includes an introduction to general statistical techniques.
Writing of scientific papers and a focus on accessing the
scientific literature. Lecture, laboratory, and field work.
Prerequisite: BIOL 323 or consent of instructor. (4)
BIOL 441: Mammalian Physiology – NS, SM
An investigation of the principles of physiological regulation.
Part I: fundamental cellular, neural, and hormonal mechanisms
of homeostatic control; Part II: interactions in the cardiovascular,
pulmonary, renal, and neuromuscular organ systems. Laboratory
allows direct observation of physiological regulation in living
animals. Prerequisites: BIOL 323, CHEM 115; anatomy and
biochemistry recommended. (4)
BIOL 444: Neurobiology
Neurobiology is the study of the nervous system and its
relationship to behavior and disease. This course examines the
structure and function of neurons and glia, neural development,
gross organization of the brain, sensory and motor systems and
higher functions such as learning, memory and speech.
Prerequisite: BIOL 162. (4)
BIOL 448: Immunology – NS
Consideration of the biology and chemistry of immune
response, including theoretical concepts, experimental strategies
and immunochemical applications. Prerequisites: Any two of 
the following courses in Biology: 328, 332, 348, 403, 407, 
411, 441. (4)
BIOL 475: Evolution – NS
Evolution as a process: sources of variation; forces overcoming
genetic inertia in populations; speciation. Evolution of genetic
systems and of life in relation to ecological theory and earth
history. Lecture and discussion. Term paper and mini-seminar
required. Prerequisite: BIOL 323. (4)
BIOL 491: Independent Studies
Investigations or research in areas of special interest not covered
by regular courses. Open to qualified junior and senior majors.
Prerequisite: Written proposal for the project approved by a
faculty sponsor and the department chair. (1–4)
BIOL 495: Internship in Biology
An approved off-campus work activity in the field of biology
with a private or public sector agency, organization, or company.
Students will be expected to adhere to and document the
objectives of a learning plan developed with and approved by a
faculty sponsor. Credit will be determined by hours spent in the
working environment and the depth of the project associated
with the course of study. Prerequisites: BIOL 323 and consent
of chair. (1-4)
BIOL 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR
The goal of this course is to assist students in the writing and
presentation of a paper concerning a topic within biology which
would integrate various elements in the major program. A
proposal for the topic must be presented to the department early
in the spring term of the junior year. The seminar may be linked
to, but not replaced by field or laboratory independent study or
internship experience. (2)
School of Business
253.535.7244
www.plu.edu/busa
business@plu.edu 
MISSION
The mission of the PLU School of Business is to be a bridge
connecting students with the future by integrating competency-
based business education, engaging a diverse, globalized society,
using technologies that improve learning, exemplifying lives of
service, and fostering faculty development and intellectual
contribution.
See Graduate Studies for information on the Master of Business
Administration program or visit the School of Business MBA website
at www.plu.edu/mba.
AFFILIATIONS
The PLU School of Business is a member of AACSB
International -The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of
Business. The BBA, MBA and professional accounting programs
are nationally accredited by the AACSB International. The
school is privileged to have a student chapter of Beta Gamma
Sigma, the national business honor society recognized by
AACSB. PLU is accredited regionally by the Northwest
Association of Schools and Colleges.
F
aculty:
Frame, Interim Dean, Pratt, Associate Dean; Albers,
Barnowe, Berniker, DeLange, Finnie, Gibson, Harmon, Hegstad,
C. S. Lee, C. Lee, MacDonald, Myers, Pham, Ptak, Ramaglia,
Simpson, Tuzovic, Van Wyhe, Wolf, Zabriskie.
Objectives of the Undergraduate Business Program
• To prepare students for positions in commercial and not-for-
profit organizations by providing them the basic knowledge of
how these organizations function and equipping them with
the necessary competencies to work effectively. These
competencies include (1) leadership, (2) critical/creative
thinking, (3) effective communication, (4) team effectiveness,
and (5) taking initiative and managing change.
• To help students see the interconnections among the many
aspects of their world by integrating the liberal arts with
professional business education.
• To identify and challenge students to adopt high standards 
for ethical practice and professional conduct.
• To prepare students for lives of service to the community.
• To prepare students to use contemporary technologies and to
embrace the changes caused by technological innovation.
• To inculcate a global perspective in students.
Admission Criteria
The professional Bachelor of Business Administration degree
program is composed of an upper-division business curriculum
with a strong base in liberal arts.
To be admitted to the School of Business, a student must:
• Be officially admitted to the university, and
• Have completed at least 32 semester credit hours, and
• Have successfully completed with a minimum grade of
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested