display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate individual pages in pdf SDK control API wpf azure winforms sharepoint 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks7-part284

PLU 2007 - 2008
69
Dance•Economics
D
ECON 101 for purposes of major and minor requirements.
ECON 499 meets the senior seminar/project requirement.
For students planning graduate work in economics or business,
additional math preparation will be necessary. For specific
courses, consult your major advisor.
CONCENTRATIONS
The Economics Department offers the following concentrations:
• Domestic Economic Analysis - Minimum of 51 
semester hours
As well as the required courses for the major listed above, the
following courses are required for this concentration:
• ECON 495, POLS 345 and 346
• Twelve semester hours chosen from among:
• ECON 321, 322, 323, 325, 327
• One course selected from: ECON 344, BUSA 202 
or 302, MATH 348, or CSCE 120
• International Economic Analysis - Minimum 51 
semester hours
As well as the required courses for the major listed above, the
following courses are required for this concentration:
• ECON 495, POLS 331 and POLS 347
• Twelve semester hours chosen from among:
• ECON 311, 313, 315, 333, 335, 338
• Plus one course selected from ECON 344, BUSA 202 
or 302, MATH 348, or CSCE 120
• Mathematical Economics - 52 semester hours
As well as the required courses for the Economics major listed
above, the following courses are required for this concentration:
• ECON 344, 345
• MATH 151, 152, 253
• Eight semester hours of Economics electives
• The Modern Economic Enterprise - Minimum 48 
semester hours*
As well as the required courses for the major listed above, the
following courses are required for this concentration:
• ECON 325, 341, 495*
• ECON 321 or ECON 323
• Minimum of nine semester hours of Business electives 
(BUSA 200 level or higher, BUSA 201 recommended)
* BUSA 495 may be substituted for ECON 495 with a
minimum of three semester hours.
MINOR - 24 semester hours
• ECON 101 or 111; 102; 301 or 302
• Twelve additional semester hours of electives, four of which
may be in Statistics
HONORS
Outstanding students may choose to pursue graduating in
economics with honors. In addition to meeting all other major
requirements, in order to be granted departmental honors a
student must:
• Have an overall university grade point average of 3.50 or
better;
Economics
253.535.7595
www.plu.edu/~econ
traviskm@plu.edu
“By virtue of exchange, one person’s property is beneficial to all
others.”
—Frederic Bastiat
Economics is the study of how people establish social
arrangements for producing and distributing goods and services
to sustain and enhance human life. Its main objective is to
determine an efficient use of limited economic resources so that
people receive the maximum benefit at the lowest cost.
The economics discipline embraces a body of techniques and
conceptual tools that are useful for understanding and analyzing
our complex economic system.
F
aculty:
Travis, Chair; Damar, Hunnicutt, Ng’ang’a, Peterson,
Reiman, St. Clair.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR - Minimum of 40 semester hours
• Required Courses for all Economic Majors:
• ECON 101 or 111, 102, 301, 302, 499
• Four semester hours selected from STAT 231 or MATH 341
• Additional Required Courses for General Major:
• Twelve semester hours of electives in Economics
• One course selected from:
• ECON 343, 344, BUSA 202 or 302, MATH 348 or 
up to four semester hours in Computer Science
Agrade point average of 2.50 in all classes included in the 40
semester hours toward the major.
With departmental approval, ECON 111 may be substituted for
Dance
For curriculum information, see Department of Communication
and Theatre, page 56.
Course Offerings – Dance (DANC)
DANC 170: Introduction to Dance - AR 
This is a survey dance course that explores the history, roots, and
cultural significance of dance as an art form. (4) 
DANC 222: Jazz Dance Level I - PE 
Cross-listed with PHED 222. (1) 
DANC 240: Dance Ensemble - PE  
Cross-listed with PHED 240. (1) 
DANC 462: Dance Production - PE  
An advanced choreography course combining choreography,
costume design, staging, and publicity techniques for 
producing a major dance concert. Cross-listed with 
PHED 462. (2)
Rotate individual pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
save pdf rotate pages; rotate individual pages in pdf
Rotate individual pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate single page in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf preview
70
PLU 2007 - 2008
• Take four hours beyond the standard major in Economics
498, Honors Thesis (Students apply for admission to this
course in the second semester of their junior year. The
department grants admission to Economics 498, Honors
Thesis, based on the student’s prior work in economics and
the quality of the general research proposal);
• Present the results of the work completed in Economics
498, Honors Thesis, at a meeting of Omicron Delta 
Epsilon (the economics honorary).
ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCIETY 
(Omicron Delta Epsilon)
The department offers membership in Omicron Delta Epsilon,
the International Economics Honorary Society, to qualified
Economics majors. For specific criteria, see any departmental
faculty member.
Course Offerings – Economics (ECON)
ECON 101: Principles of Microeconomics – S2
Introduces the study of economic decision making by firms and
individuals. Economic tools and concepts such as markets,
supply and demand, and efficiency applied to contemporary
issues. Students cannot take both ECON 101 and 111 for 
credit. (4)
ECON 102: Principles of Macroeconomics – S2
Introduces the economy as a whole and major issues such as
inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and international
trade. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111. (4)
ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global and
Environmental - S2
Analysis of public policy and private behavior; appropriate
pricing, resource valuation, taxes and subsidies, trade policies,
sustainable development, and income growth and distribution.
Students cannot take both ECON 101 and 111 for credit. (4)
ECON 301: Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis – S2
Theory of consumer behavior; product and factor prices under
conditions of monopoly, competition, and intermediate markets;
welfare economics. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent
of instructor; MATH 128, 140, or 151. (4)
ECON 302: Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis – S2
National income determination including policy implications
within the institutional framework of the U.S. economy.
Prerequisites: ECON 102; MATH 128, 140, or 151. (4)
ECON 311: Energy and Natural Resource Economics – S2
An intensive economic analysis of natural resource scarcity and a
comparison of actual, optimal and sustainable use of energy and
natural resources. Comparative international analysis of the relative
roles of markets and government in the development and
allocation of natural resources over time. Themes include dynamic
efficiency, intergenerational fairness, and sustainability. Case studies
of key natural resource sectors including: renewable and
exhaustible energy, non-energy minerals, forestry, and fisheries.
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)
Economics
E
ECON 313: Environmental Economics - S2 
Examines the theory of externalities, pollution regulation, open-
access conditions as a basis for environmental degradation,
methods of non-market valuation of environmental amenities,
and valuation of a statistical life. Attention will be given to both
domestic and global examples. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or
111, or consent of instructor. (4)
ECON 315: Investigating Environmental and Economic
Change in Europe – S2
An introduction to the environmental economic problems and
policy prospects of modern Europe. Focus on economic
incentives and policies to solve problems of air and water
pollution, sustainable forestry, global warming, and wildlife
management in Austria, Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic,
and Italy. (4)
ECON 321: Labor Economics – S2
Analysis of labor markets and labor market issues; wage
determination; investment in human capital, unionism and
collective bargaining; law and public policy; discrimination; labor
mobility; earnings inequality, unemployment, and wages and
inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or consent of
instructor. (4)
ECON 322: Money and Banking – S2
The nature and role of money; monetary theory; tools and
implementation of monetary policy; regulation of intermediaries;
banking activity in financial markets; international consequences
of and constraints on monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102
or consent of instructor. (4)
ECON 323: Health Economics – S2
Analysis of health care markets including hospitals, providers,
and insurer/managed care organizations; demand for care;
economics of insurance; role of government and regulation;
access to care; non-price competition; impact of new 
technology; analysis of reform. Prerequisites: ECON 101 
or 111 (4)
ECON 325: Industrial Organization and Public Policy – S2
An analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of
American industry and public policies that foster and alter
industrial structure and behavior. Prerequisites: ECON 
101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)
ECON 327: Public Finance - S2
Public taxation and expenditure at all governmental levels; the
incidence of taxes, the public debt and the provision of public
goods such as national defense, education, pure air, and water.
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111 or consent of 
instructor. (4)
ECON 331: International Economics – S2
Regional and international specialization, comparative costs,
international payments and exchange rates; national policies that
promote or restrict trade. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, or
consent of instructor. (4)
ECON 333: Economic Development: Comparative Third
World Strategies – C, S2
Analysis of the theoretical framework for development with
applications to alternative economic development strategies used
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages on ipad
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate pages in pdf
PLU 2007 - 2008
71
Economics•EducationandMovementStudies
E
in the newly emerging developing countries. Emphasis on
comparison between countries, assessments of the relative
importance of cultural values, historical experience, and govern-
mental policies in the development process. Prerequisites:
ECON 101 or 111, or consent of instructor. (4)
ECON 335: European Economic Integration – S2
An introduction to integration theory and its application to the
problems and policy prospects for deepening European
integration. Economic analysis of the development of economic
institutions in the European Union. Topics include: German
unification, enlargement, the European monetary system,
Scandinavian participation, and relevance of the European
integration model for the developing world. Prerequisites:
ECON 101 or 111 (4)
ECON 338: Political Economy of Hong Kong and 
China – S2
In 1997, the British returned Hong Kong to China. This 
course examines the unique economic relationship that exists
between the strongly capitalistic former colony and the People’s
Republic of China. Can these two diverse systems coexist? 
Will they eventually converge to a common system? Where 
does Taiwan fit into the picture? While in Hong Kong and
southern China we will utilize the expertise of a series of 
speakers to explore the economy, history, and traditions of the
area and to enhance the many experiential activities of the
course. (4)
ECON 341: Strategic Behavior – S2
An introduction to game theory and analysis of interactive
decision processes. Interactive game playing, cases, and examples
drawn primarily from economics, but also includes sports,
political science, business, and biology. Prisoner’s Dilemma,
sequential games, Nash equilibrium, mixed and pure strategies,
collective action and bidding strategies, bargaining.
Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111. (4)
ECON 344: Econometrics – S2
Introduction to the methods and tools of econometrics as the
basis for applied research in economics. Specification, estimation,
and testing in the classical linear regression model. Prerequisite:
ECON 101 or 111; STAT 231 or equivalent. Cross-listed with
STAT 344. (4)
ECON 345: Mathematical Topics in Economics – S2
An introduction to basic applications of mathematical tools used
in economic analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 101 or 111, ECON
102 or consent of instructor. (4) 
ECON 386: Evolution of Economic Thought – S2
Economic thought from ancient to modern times; emphasis on
the period from Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes; the classical
economists, the socialists, the marginalists, the neoclassical
economists, and the Keynesians. Prerequisite: ECON 101 or
111; ECON 102; ECON 301 or 302 (4) 
ECON 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisites: ECON 301 or 302 and consent of the
department. (1–4)
ECON 495: Internship – S2
Aresearch and writing project in connection with a student’s
approved off-campus activity. Prerequisites: ECON 101 
or 111, sophomore standing, and consent of the department.
(1–4)
ECON 498: Honors Thesis – S2
Independent research supervised by one or more faculty
members. Research proposal and topic developed by the student
in the junior year. Application to enroll is made in the second
semester of the junior year. Prerequisite: Economics major and
consent of the department. (4)
ECON 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR
Seminar in economic problems and policies with emphasis on
encouraging the student to integrate problem-solving
methodology with tools of economics analysis. Topic(s) 
selected by class participants and instructor. Prerequisite: 
ECON 101 or 111 and 301 or 302. May be taken 
concurrently. (4)
ECON 500: Applied Statistical Analysis
An intensive introduction to statistical methods. Emphasis on the
application of inferential statistics to concrete situations. (3) 
ECON 520: Economic Policy Analysis
An intensive introduction to the concepts of macroeconomics
and microeconomics with an emphasis on policy formation
within a global framework. (3) 
School of Education and 
Movement Studies
253.535.7272
www.plu.edu/~educ
educ@plu.edu
The faculty of the School of Education and Movement Studies
come together representing two disciplines, highlighting both
their distinctiveness and overarching similarities.
The degree programs delivered within the two departments, and
the communities each serves, are diverse and expand well beyond
the traditional conceptualization of public school education with
regard to both the locations for service and age of the learner.
However, both programs maintain a philosophy that education is
the unifying element within each discipline. Further, both
disciplines require students to develop the knowledge, values,
skills and competencies central to educating others for lifelong
learning across a wide range of educational environments within
society.
The programs offered within both departments seek to prepare
individuals for “lives of thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership
and care–for other people, for their communities, and for the
earth” (PLU 2010, p.1). The students who complete our
programs are competent in their knowledge and skill as
appropriate for their discipline, seek to care for, support, and
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
rotate pages in pdf permanently; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
how to rotate one page in pdf document; rotate pdf pages and save
72
PLU 2007 - 2008
EducationalPsychology•EngineeringdualDegreepro-
E
nurture equitably the diverse individuals they serve, and provide
leadership as stewards of their communities and professions. The
notion of education as lifelong learning, critical to focused and
sustaining lives, is a fitting constant across the shared work of
these disciplines.
Faculty: Lee, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of
Instructional Development and Leadership and Movement
Studies and Wellness Education.
DEGREES
• Degrees offered are:
• Bachelor of Arts in Education (B.A.E.)
• Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (B.A.P.E.)
• Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (B.A.Rec)
• Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (B.S.P.E.)
• Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)
Candidates for all degrees must meet general university
requirements and the specific requirements of the Departments
of Instructional Development and Leadership and Movement
Studies and Wellness Education.
For course offerings, degree requirements, and programs in the
School of Education and Movement Studies, see the
Departments of Instructional Development and Leadership or
Movement Studies and Wellness Education.
Educational Psychology
To view curriculum requirements, please go to the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership.
Course Offerings – Educational Psychology (EPSY)
EPSY 361: Psychology for Teaching
Principles and research in human development and learning,
especially related to teaching and to the psychological growth,
relationships, and adjustment of individuals. For Music
Education Majors only. (3)
EPSY 368: Educational Psychology
Principles and research in human learning and their implications
for curriculum and instruction. For secondary students who are
not seeking certification in physical education or special
education. Taken concurrently with EDUC 424. (4)
See Graduate School of Education and Movement Studies section for
graduate-level Educational Psychology courses, page 166.
Engineering Dual-degree Program
253.535.7400
www.nsci.plu.edu/3-2program
nsci@plu.edu 
The Dual-degree Engineering Program at Pacific Lutheran
University provides students with the opportunity to combine a
liberal arts education with rigorous study in engineering.
Students who complete the program earn two degrees - one from
PLU and the other from an engineering school accredited by
ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology).
For the well- prepared student, the total length of study is five
years - three years at PLU and two years at the engineering
school; hence, the program is sometimes referred to as the
“Three-Two Engineering Program.”
Most subdisciplines of engineering are available to students in 
the Dual-degree program, including electrical, mechanical, civil,
chemical, aerospace and biomedical engineering. Formal
agreements exist with Columbia University in New York City
and Washington University in St. Louis. At both schools, 
Dual-degree students form a community. They share residence
facilities and often are enrolled in many of the same courses.
PLU students who have participated in the Dual-degree 
program report their rich cultural and academic experiences at
both schools and are routinely very pleased with their decision 
to have participated in the dual-degree program.
THE PLU PROGRAM
The Dual-degree student is awarded a PLU degree when the
PLU requirements are satisfied and the program of study at the
engineering school is completed.
The PLU degree that typically is awarded is the Bachelor of Arts
in physics. The BA in physics is well recognized by engineering
schools and is the most frequently awarded degree by four-year
schools with dual-degree programs. The physics degree can be
selected by Dual-degree students in all engineering
subdisciplines, but students wishing to study chemical
engineering may wish to consider the option of obtaining the BA
in chemistry from PLU.
TRANSFER TO NON-AFFILIATED ENGINEERING
SCHOOLS
Occasionally, PLU students choose to transfer to an engineering
school that does not participate in the Dual-degree program.
PLU nonetheless recognizes these students as participants in the
Dual-degree program and awards the appropriate PLU degree
upon successful completion of their program at the engineering
school. Since the PLU curriculum may not mesh smoothly with
courses at unaffiliated institutions, the total time for degree
completion may be more than five years.
Student Advising
Individual departments do not provide advice on the Dual-
degree program. All prospective Dual-degree students, regardless
of their intended engineering subdiscipline, should consult with
the Dual-degree director (in the Physics Department) very early
in their academic program.
PLU and the participating engineering schools recommend that
Dual-degree students use their time at PLU to secure their
academic foundations in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.
Math skills are particularly important to develop, and poor math
skills are the most frequent reason prospective engineering students
fail to succeed in the program. While at PLU, students should
concentrate on the fundamentals and enroll in the engineering
courses at the Three-Two affiliated engineering school.
PLU REQUIREMENTS
In order to earn a PLU degree in the Dual-degree program, the
following requirements must be satisfied:
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for Page. |. Home ›› XDoc.Tiff ›› C# Tiff: Rotate Tiff Page. & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy
pdf rotate all pages; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for .NET. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF
pdf rotate single page reader; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
73
EngineeringdualDegreeprogram
E
• Completion of the following science and mathematics 
courses - 44 semester hours
• MATH 151, 152, 253 (12 semester hours)
• MATH 351 or PHYS 354 (4 semester hours)
• PHYS 153, 154, 163, 164, 223 (14 semester hours)
• CHEM 115, 116 (eight semester hours)
• CSCE 131, 144 (six semester hours)
• Completion of the general university requirements as
specified in the catalog, except that the following general
requirements are waived for all dual-degree (3-2) students:
• Completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours on the 
PLU transcript;
• Completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours from 
courses numbered 300 and above;
• The requirement that at least 20 of the minimum 40 
semester hours of upper-division work must be taken 
at PLU;
• The requirement that the final 32 semester hours of a 
student’s program be completed in residence at PLU;
• The requirement that the senior seminar/project be
completed at PLU. Senior projects from the engineering
school (a characteristic of ABET-accredited schools) will
satisfy the PLU senior project requirement for Dual-degree
students upon approval of the project by the appropriate
PLU department chair.
B.A. IN PHYSICS - 12 additional semester hours
• Completion of an additional 12 semester hours of electives 
in science and mathematics from the following courses:
• MATH 331, 356
• PHYS 240, 331, 333, 334, 336
• CSCE 245
• CHEM 341 may be substituted for PHYS 333.
The particular courses chosen will depend on the intended
subdiscipline and the engineering school’s entrance requirements.
Students should consult with the program director before
choosing their electives.
B.A. IN CHEMISTRY - 19 additional semester hours
Completion of organic chemistry (CHEM 331, 332, 333, 334)
and physical chemistry (CHEM 341, 342, 343)
THE ENGINEERING SCHOOL PROGRAM
The course of study at the engineering school will depend on
both the school and the subdiscipline. Between Columbia
University and Washington University, approximately 20
different engineering subdisciplines are available to Dual-degree
students. These include the more common subdisciplines (civil,
chemical, electrical, mechanical) and others such as operations
research, applied mathematics, earth and environmental
engineering and systems science. Details are available from the
PLU program director.
ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS
For admission to their engineering program, Columbia
University requires a cumulative PLU grade point average of 3.00
or higher, and a grade point average of 3.00 or higher in
pertinent mathematics and science courses. For Washington
University, the required grade point average is 3.25 both overall,
and in science and mathematics courses. Students who do not
meet these requirements are considered on a case-by-case basis.
Although students who choose to transfer to another engineering
school may be able to gain admission with slightly lower grades
than those required by Columbia University and Washington
University, all prospective engineering students are well advised
to use the higher standard as a more realistic indication of what
will be expected of them in the engineering school.
Engineering schools often do not allow pass-fail courses; thus,
PLU students are advised not to enroll in mathematics, science
or engineering courses for pass-fail grading.
Columbia University requires that students attend at least two
full-time years at PLU before transferring.
For more information, contact the dual-degree program director in
the Department of Physics or visit the program website at
www.nsci.plu.edu/3-2program.
English
253.535.7698
www.plu.edu/~english
english@plu.edu
English offers excellent preparation for any future requiring
integrative thinking, skill in writing, discernment in reading, an
appreciation of human experience and aesthetic values, and the
processes of critical and creative expression. Business,
government, technology, education, and publishing are areas
where our graduates frequently make their careers.
Our program offers emphases in literature and writing, as well as
concentrations in children’s literature and publishing. The
English Department also supports the study abroad programs,
and we offer study tours to such places as Africa, Australia, and
the Caribbean.
F
aculty:
Albrecht, Chair; Barot, Bergman, Campbell, Carlton,
Eyler, Jansen, Kaufman, Levy, Marcus, D.M. Martin, Oestreich,
Rahn, Robinson, Seal, Skipper, B. Temple-Thurston.
Foreign Language Requirement
All English majors must complete at least two years of a foreign
language at the university level, or the equivalent (see College of
Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirements, Option I).
ENGLISH MAJOR (Emphasis on Literature)
The English major with an emphasis on literature introduces
students to the great literary traditions of Britain, North
America, and the English-speaking world. The major in literature
places courses organized by historical period at the heart of the
student’s program, allowing students to read the great works that
define the periods, and to explore the ways in which cultural
contexts shape the literary imagination. Students who select the
emphasis on literature can expect to learn how sensitive readers
engage texts through their own speaking and writing, following
their insights into the rich pleasures of literary language and
growing more sophisticated in constructing effective interpretive
arguments. They will also be introduced to the ways in which
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
how to rotate page in pdf and save; pdf rotate single page
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
load, create, convert and edit PDF document (pages) in C# other file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy and
pdf reverse page order preview; how to rotate just one page in pdf
74
PLU 2007 - 2008
English
E
major critical traditions frame our approaches to literature and
define the issues that keep literature meaningful and relevant in
our lives.
Students considering English with an emphasis on literature as a
major, but who are still undecided, might begin with a 200-level
course. Even though no 200-level course is required for majors,
students may request that one appropriate 200-level course be
substituted for one similar Periods and Surveys course at the 300
level. Students are encouraged to take Shakespeare early in the
major.
Courses offered through correspondence, on-line, and
independent studies are not accepted to meet the literature
requirement.
Major Requirements - At least 36 and up to 44 semester hours
in English beyond Writing 101, at least 20 hours must be upper
division.
The following course distributions are required of majors 
with an emphasis on literature:
A. Shakespeare - four semester hours
• ENGL 301: Shakespeare
B. Periods and Surveys - At least four semester hours from 
each of the following four areas:
• Early
• ENGL 351: English Medieval Literature
• ENGL 352: Chaucer
• ENGL 353: English Renaissance Literature
• Middle 
• ENGL 361: English Restoration and 18th-Century
• ENGL 362: English Romantic and Victorian 
Literature
• ENGL 371: Studies in American Literature, 
1820-1920
• Late
• ENGL 367: 20th-Century British Literature
• ENGL 372: 20th Century American Poetry
• ENGL 373: 20th-Century American Fiction 
and Drama
• Literature and Difference
• ENGL 341: Feminist Approaches to Literature
• ENGL 343: Post-Colonial Literature and Theory
• ENGL 374: American Ethnic Literature
C. Capstone Senior Seminar/Project - At least four 
semester hours
The capstone senior seminar project is a general university
requirement in all programs and majors. Students will
customarily satisfy this presentation requirement in English
in their seminar course as a culmination of their
undergraduate education, in the senior year. Under certain
circumstances, students may substitute an appropriate 300-
level course taken in the senior year.
• ENGL 428: Seminar - Critical Theory
• ENGL 451: Seminar – Author
• ENGL 452: Seminar - Theme, Genre
D. Writing - At least four semester hours of any writing 
course at the 200- to 400- levels
E. Electives - Eight semester hours
ENGLISH MAJOR (Emphasis on Writing):
The writing emphasis at PLU has been designed for a broad
spectrum of students, from those wishing to focus on fiction and
poetry, to those interested in more pragmatic types of writing, to
those set on exploring theoretical issues in rhetoric and
composition.
Major Requirements - At least 36 and up to 44 semester 
hours in English (excluding Writing 101) and distributed 
as follows:
A. Writing
Aminimum of 20 semester hours in writing and with least 
12 upper-division semester hours. 
1. At least 12 semester hours must be from two of the
following of the following areas:
a.Imaginative Writing
• ENGL 227: Imaginative Writing I
• ENGL 327: Imaginative Writing II
• ENGL 326: Writing for Children
b.Expository Writing
• ENGL 221: Research and Writing
• ENGL 323: Writing in a Professional Setting
• ENGL 328: Advanced Composition for Teachers
c. Creative Nonfiction
• ENGL 224: Travel Writing
• ENGL 225: Autobiographical Writing
• ENGL 324: Free-lance Writing
• ENGL 325: Personal Essay
2. Capstone Senior Seminar/Project - At least four 
semester  hours
The senior project, generally taken in the senior year,
includes a capstone presentation consistent with the
general university requirements, Students must select
from the following courses:
• ENGL 425, 426: Writing on Special Topics
• ENGL 427: Imaginative Writing III
• ENGL 428: Seminar: Critical Theory
3. Elective - At least four semester hours
B. Literature - 12 semester hours, with at least four 
upper-division hours
Students are encouraged to take literature courses which 
contribute to their goals as writers, and which expand their 
experience with the history and genres of writing.
C. Elective - At least four semester elective hours in 
English beyond Writing 101
MINORS
• Emphasis on Literature
20 semester hours (excluding WRIT 101), distributed as
follows: four hours of Shakespeare, eight hours from Periods
and Surveys (see Literature Major Requirements), and eight
hours of electives.
PLU 2007 - 2008
75
English
E
• Emphasis on Writing
20 semester hours (excluding WRIT 101), with at least 12
semester hours in upper division, distributed as follows: 12
semester hours in writing, four semester hours in literature,
four semester hours of elective.
• Emphasis on Publishing and Printing Arts - 24 semester
hours. See separate listing under Publishing and Printing Arts.
• Special Competence in Children’s Literature (not a minor)
Students completing ENGL 333 and eight semester hours
from ENGL 326, 334, 335 or other approved courses (all with
grades of B or higher) will be recognized for special
competence in children’s literature.
• Prospective Teachers
Students preparing to teach English in secondary schools
should arrange for an advisor in both English and Education.
Please also see the Department of Instructional Development
and Leadership section of this catalog.
SECONDARY EDUCATION
Students preparing to teach in junior or senior high school may
earn either a Bachelor of Arts in English with certification from
the School of Education and Movement Studies, or a Bachelor 
of Arts in Education with a teaching major in English. See course
requirements in Department of Instutional Development and
Leadership. The English major with an emphasis in literature and
the English major with an emphasis in writing may both be
pursued by prospective teachers. Secondary education students
must fulfill all requirements for the English major: Option 1 of
the Foreign Language Requirements (two years of a foreign
language at the university level, or the equivalent); at least 36 and
no more than 44 credit hours in English; and all the specific
requirements for the major either in literature or in writing. State
certification for teachers also mandates the following
requirements, which are an overlay to the major. Courses taken
to satisfy the major can also be courses that satisfy the state
certification requirements.
• English literature: One course
• American literature: One course
• Comparative literature: One course
• (ENGL 214, 216, 217, 218, 232, 233, 341, 343,
appropriate seminar)
• Linguistics or structure of language: One course 
(ENGL 403)
• Writing/Composition: One course (ENGL 328 is 
especially recommended)
Prospective teachers may take EDUC 529: Adolescent Literature
in the Secondary Curriculum as an elective in the English major.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
Students preparing to teach in elementary schools following the
Language Arts curriculum, must take 24 semester hours
minimum in English, and are advised to follow the structure of
the English major in satisfying state certification requirements.
Consult your advisor in the Department of Institutional
Development and Leadership.
GRADUATE PROGRAM
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (Low-Residency): 
See Graduate Section.
Course Offerings – English (ENGL)
All literature courses fulfill the general university core requirement 
in literature.
• Lower-Division Courses
The following courses were designed for students who are not
English majors, and for students considering an English major,
to satisfy the general university requirement in literature.
Upper- division courses in literature offered by the
Department of English will satisfy the general university
requirement in literature as well, but the following courses are
particularly recommended. These lower-division courses in
literature give primary attention to the act of reading in
different contexts and genres. The courses emphasize for
students the ways in which framing the reading experience by
different kinds of questions reveals different texts, and enriches
the imaginative experience of reading, leading more to insight
on the part of the reader than final answers.
• Topics in Literature
ENGL 213
• Genres
ENGL 214, 215, 216, 217, 218
• Traditions in Literature
ENGL 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 241, 251
• Upper-Division Courses
Designed particularly for upper-division students, usually 
but not exclusively with the major in mind.
• British Literature
ENGL 301, 351,352, 353, 361, 362, 367
• American Literature
ENGL 371, 372, 373, 374
• Special Studies
ENGL 333, 334, 335, 341, 343, 428, 451, 452, 491, 597
• Writing, Language, and Theory
WRIT 101, ENGL 221, 224, 225, 227, 323, 324, 325, 
326, 327, 328, 403, 421, 425, 426, 427, 428
• Publishing and Printing Arts
ENGL 311, 312, 313, 314
ENGL 213: Topics in Literature: Themes and Authors – LT
Avariable-content course that focuses on the act of reading and
interpreting texts. (4)
ENGL 214: Poetry – LT
Astudy of poems and conventions of poetry from the classics to
modern projective verse. (4)
ENGL 215: Fiction – LT
Examines the development of short fiction, concentrating on
themes and techniques of the genre. Stresses the Euro-American
tradition. (4)
ENGL 216: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural
Perspectives – C, LT (4)
Avariable-content course that focuses on literature form non-
Euro-American societies. Because course topics may vary
considerably, course may be repeated for credit with approval of
department chair. (4)
76
PLU 2007 - 2008
English
E
ENGL 217: Topics in Literature: Emphasis on Alternative
Perspectives – A, LT 
Avariable-content course that focuses on literature that fosters an
awareness and understanding of diversity in the United States.
Because course topics may vary considerably, courses may be
repeated for credit with approval of department chair. (4)
ENGL 218: Drama – LT
An introduction to the basic elements of drama (plot, character,
language) and on the traditional genres (tragedy, comedy). (4)
ENGL 221: Research and Writing – WR
Strategies for writing academic research papers are practiced,
including developing appropriate research topics, locating and
using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating generalizations,
and using paraphrase and citation accurately. (2 or 4)
ENGL 224: Travel Writing – WR
Writing about travel, while traveling or upon return. Students
keep travel journals, produce short travel essays, and read selected
travel writers. (4)
ENGL 225: Autobiographical Writing – WR
Reading autobiography and writing parts of one’s own, with an
emphasis on how writing style and personal identity complement
each other. (4)
ENGL 227: Imaginative Writing I – WR
Abeginning workshop in writing poetry or short fiction.
Includes a study of techniques and forms to develop critical
standards and an understanding of the writing process.
Prerequisite: WRIT 101 or its equivalent, Advanced Placement,
or consent of instructor. (4)
ENGL 230: Contemporary Literature – LT
Emphasis on the diversity of new voices in American fiction such
as Toni Morrison, Leslie Silko, Nicholson Baker, Joyce Carol
Oates, Cormac McCarthy, and Amy Tan, from the emergence of
post-modernism to the most important current fiction. (4)
ENGL 231: Masterpieces of European Literature – LT
Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaissance
literature. Cross-listed with CLAS 231. (4)
ENGL 232: Women’s Literature – A, LT
An introduction to fiction, poetry, and other literatures by
women writers. Includes an exploration of women’s ways of
reading and writing. (4)
ENGL 233: Post-Colonial Literature – C, LT
Writers from Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and
the Caribbean confront the legacy of colonialism from an
insider’s perspective. Emphasis on fiction. (4)
ENGL 234: Environmental Literature – LT
Examines representations of nature in literature, and the ways in
which humans define themselves and their relationship with
nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts
from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry,
fiction, and non-fiction. (4)
ENGL 239: Environment and Culture
Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by
human culture and values. Major conceptions of nature, including
non-Western perspectives and issues in eco-justice. Critical
evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual frameworks,
history, and spirituality. Cross-listed with RELI 239. (4)
ENGL 241: American Traditions in Literature – LT
Selected themes that distinguish American literature from British
traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current
branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing
selfhood, coping with racism. (4)
ENGL 251: British Traditions in Literature – LT
Selected themes that define British literature as one of the great
literatures of the world, from Anglo-Saxon origins to post-
modern rebellions: for example, identity, society, and God; love
and desire; industry, science, and culture. (4)
ENGL 301: Shakespeare – LT
Study of representative works of the great poet as a central figure
in the canon of English literature. (4)
ENGL 311: The Book in Society
Acritical study of the history of book culture and the role of
books in modern society. Cross-listed with COMA 321. (4)
ENGL 312: Publishing Procedures
Aworkshop introduction to the world of book publishing,
involving students in decisions about what to publish and how to
produce it. Cross-listed with COMA 322. (4)
ENGL 313: The Art of the Book I
This studio course explores the history, aesthetics and creative
dimensions of book design and typography. Cross-listed with
ARTD 331. (4)
ENGL 314: The Art of the Book II
Individual projects in typography and fine bookmaking. (4)
ENGL 323: Writing in Professional Settings – WR
Students working in professional settings analyze the rhetorical
demands of their job-related writing. (4)
ENGL 324: Free-Lance Writing – WR
Aworkshop in writing for publication, with primary emphasis
on the feature article. (4)
ENGL 325: Personal Essay – WR
Students write essays on topics of their choice, working
particularly on voice and style. (4)
ENGL 326: Writing for Children – WR
Aworkshop in writing fiction and non-fiction for children and
teenagers, with an introduction to the varieties of contemporary
children’s literature. (4)
ENGL 327: Imaginative Writing II – WR
An advanced workshop in writing poetry or short fiction. Some
attention will be given to procedures for submitting manuscript
for publication. (4)
ENGL 328: Advanced Composition for Teachers – WR
Students are introduced to philosophical, social, and pragmatic
issues confronting teachers of writing. Required for certification
by the School of Education and Movement Studies. (4)
PLU 2007 - 2008
77
English
E
ENGL 333: Children’s Literature – LT
An introduction to a rich literary tradition, with analysis in
depth of such authors as H.C. Anderson, Tolkien, Lewis, Potter,
Wilder, and LeGuin. (4)
ENGL 334: Special Topics in Children’s Literature – LT
Content varies each year. Possible topics include genres, themes,
historical periods, and traditions. May be repeated for credit with
different topic. (4)
ENGL 335: Fairy Tales and Fantasy – LT
Fairy tales are told and interpreted; interpretive models and
theories from several psychological traditions are explored.
Fantasy is looked at both as image and as story. (4)
ENGL 341: Feminist Approaches to Literature – A, LT
Introduction to a variety of feminisms in contemporary theory as
frameworks for reading feminist literature and for approaching
traditional literature from feminist positions. (4)
ENGL 343: Voices of Diversity: Post-Colonial Literature and
Theory – C, LT
Introduces perspectives of post-colonial theorists as a framework
for understanding the relationship of colonialism and its legacies
to the works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and other 
ex-colonial territories. (4)
ENGL 351: English Medieval Literature – LT
Asurvey of the first two periods of English literature: Old
English, including the epic Beowulf, and Middle English,
ranging from the romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to
the beginnings of English drama in Everyman. (4)
ENGL 352: Chaucer – LT
Astudy of Geoffrey Chaucer’s major works, especially The
Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, and of the
intellectual, social, and political circumstances of their
production in 14th-century England. (4)
ENGL 353: English Renaissance Literature – LT
Studies the Golden Age of English literature. Selected poets from
Wyatt to Marvell, including Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare,
Donne, and Jonson; selected playwrights from Kyd to Webster;
selected prose from More to Bacon and Browne. (4)
ENGL 361: Restoration and 18th-Century Literature – LT
Surveys the lively drama, neoclassical poetry, gothic fiction, and
early novel of a period marked by religious controversy and
philosophical optimism. (4)
ENGL 362: Romantic and Victorian Literature – LT
Asurvey of the richly varied writers of 19th-century England
seen in the context of a rapidly changing social reality-from
romantic revolutionaries and dreamers to earnest cultural critics
and myth-makers. (4)
ENGL 367: 20th-Century British Literature – LT
Asurvey of England’s literary landscape from the rise of
modernism through mid-century reactions to contemporary
innovations. (4)
ENGL 371: Studies in American Literature, 1820-1920 – LT
The mutual influence of literary traditions and American culture
in idealism, realism, and naturalism. (4)
ENGL 372: 20th-Century American Poetry – LT
Major voices in American poetry from Frost and Eliot, Williams
and Pound, through the post-war generation to recent poets. (4)
ENGL 373: 20th-Century American Fiction and Drama – LT
Major authors and forms, both conventional and experimental. (4)
ENGL 374: American Ethnic Literatures – A, LT
Attention to the literatures and popular traditions of America’s
ethnic communities. Includes African and Asian Americans,
Native Americans and Latino/as. (4)
ENGL 387: Topics in Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture
Provides writers with a grounding in Rhetoric, the art of shaping
discourse to respond to cultural context and to produce cultural
and social effects. Strategies for generating discourse, appealing to
audiences, and crafting a style will be studied in light of their
historical origins, theoretical assumptions, social and ethical
implications, and practical utility. Recommended for writing
majors. (4)
ENGL 403: The English Language
Studies in the structure and history of English, with emphasis on
syntactical analysis and issues of usage. (4)
ENGL 421: Tutorial in Writing – WR
Guided work in an individual writing project. A plan of study
must be approved before the student may register for the 
course. (1-4)
ENGL 425: Writing on Special Topics – SR, WR
Writing in a wide range of academic and creative genres
determined by their particular educational goals, students will
shape their papers to meet the rhetorical demands of publications
relevant to their academic or professional future. (4)
ENGL 427: Imaginative Writing III – SR, WR
An advanced workshop in writing poetry or short fiction. Some
attention will be given to procedures for submitting manuscript
for publication. For seniors only. (4)
ENGL 428: Seminar: Critical Theory – LT, SR
Issues in literary studies and in rhetorical theory are discussed in
relationship to influential movements such as reader-response,
cultural studies, feminism, and deconstruction. Recommended
for prospective graduate students. (4)
ENGL 451: Seminar: Author – LT, SR
Concentrated study of the work, life, influence, and critical
reputation of a major author in the English-speaking world. The
course includes careful attention to the relations of the author to
cultural contexts, the framing of critical approaches through
literary theory, substantial library research, and a major writing
project. (4)
ENGL 452: Seminar: Theme, Genre – LT, SR
Concentrated study of a major literary theme or genre, as it
might appear in various periods, authors, and cultures. The
course includes careful attention to practical criticism, the
framing of critical approaches through literary theory, substantial
library research, and a major writing project. (4)
ENGL 491: Independent Studies
An intensive course in reading. May include a thesis. Intended
for upper-division majors. (4)
78
PLU 2007 - 2008
EnvironmentalStudies
E
implementation and implications of environmental
decisions. The courses must be from different departments:
• ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global and 
Environmental
• ECON 311: Energy and Natural Resource Economics
• ECON 313: Environmental Economics 
• POLS 346: Environmental Politics and Policy
• The Environment and Sensibility - Four semester hours
Select one course from the following, which examine the
ways in which nature exists in human consciousness, values,
and perceptions. Students receive guidance in careful
reading, thoughtful writing, and sensitive attentiveness to
nature and to environmental issues: 
• ENGL 234: Environmental Literature
• PHIL 230: Philosophy, Animals and the Environment
• RELI 365: Christian Moral Issues (Environmental 
Ethics only)
• Elective Courses - Four semester hours
Select one course that integrates and applies environmental
concepts within a special topic area. Courses listed in the specific
line requirements may be used as an electiveif they havenot been
used to satisfy that line requirement. This course should be
selected in consultation with their program advisor:
• BIOL 333: Comparative Ecology in Latin America
• ECON 315: Investigating Environmental and Economic 
Changes in Europe
• ENVT 325 Ecology: Community and Culture in Australia
• ENVT 487: Special Topics in Environmental Studies 
• HIST 370: Environmental History of the United States
• INTC 241: Energy, Resources, and Pollution 
• INTC 242: Population, Hunger, and Poverty
or additional approved courses that meet outcomes/objectives
• Advanced Integrative Courses - Eight semester hours
All majors must complete the following courses. It is
expected that they will have completed all of the other
requirements before these final courses.
• ENVT 350: Environmental Methods of Investigation
• ENVT 499: Capstone: Senior Project
Additional Requirements:
• A minor or major in another discipline.
• An internship is required, either for the capstone project or 
as a separate experience. Students must complete a Learning
Agreement and receive approval for their internship by the 
chair of Environmental Studies.
• A minimum of 20 hours of upper-division credits is required
in the major.
MINOR REQUIREMENTS 
20 semester hours, completed with grade of C or higher.
• Environment and Science - Eight semester hours
Select two courses from the following which examine the 
scientific foundations of environmental problems. The 
courses must be from different departments:
• BIOL 115: Diversity of Life
• BIOL 116: Introductory Ecology
• BIOL 424: Ecology
• BIOL 426: Ecological Methods
• CHEM 104: Environmental Chemistry
• ENVT/GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources
Environmental Studies
253.535.7128
www.plu.edu/~envt
envt@plu.edu
The Environmental Studies Program at PLU examines the
relationship between humans and the environment through a
wide variety of perspectives within the university curriculum.
The integrative approach of the program, essential to the
development of an understanding of the global impact of human
civilization on the natural environment of our planet, encourages
students to blend many perspectives on environmental issues into
their program of study. 
The program, in keeping with the broad liberal arts objectives of
the university, offers a major or a minor in Environmental
Studies. Students have the opportunity to link environmental
themes to any area of the curriculum they select in their
complementary major or minor. 
The program is overseen by an interdisciplinary faculty
committee. Students interested in the Environmental Studies
major or minor should meet with the chair of the Environmental
Studies Committee.
F
aculty:
Acommittee of faculty administers this program: Teska,
Chair; Aune, Behrens, Bergman, McKenna, McKenney, Naasz,
Olufs, O’Brien, Todd, Whitman.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
36 semester hours, completed with grade of C or higher. 
• Foundations for Environmental Studies - Four 
semester hours
Select one of the following courses, which introduce students to
environmental issues through a multidisciplinary and integrated
approach. These courses involve the construction and
interpretation of arguments from a variety of perspectives:
• ENVT/GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources 
• ENGL/RELI 239: Environment and Culture 
• Disciplinary Breadth
Students are required to take courses that provide an 
in-depth study and exposure to environmental issues within
disciplines.
• The Environment and Science - Eight semester hours
Select two courses from the following, which emphasize the
understanding of scientific reasoning and arguments, the
interpretation of data and relationships in the natural world,
and the scientific context of environmental issues. The
courses must be from different departments:
• BIOL 115: Diversity of Life
• BIOL 116: Introductory Ecology 
• BIOL 424: Ecology
• BIOL 426: Ecological Methods
• CHEM 104: Environmental Chemistry 
• GEOS 332: Geomorphology
• GEOS 334: Hydrogeology
• The Environment and Society - Eight semester hours
Select two courses from the following, which focus on the
understanding of the institutions within which
environmental decisions are made and investigate the
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested