display pdf in iframe mvc : Permanently rotate pdf pages software application dll windows winforms azure web forms 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks8-part285

PLU 2007 - 2008
79
EnvironmentalStudies•French•Geosciences
G
• GEOS 332: Geomorphology
• GEOS 334: Hydrogeology
Students majoring in a natural science discipline and who have
taken a higher-level Chemistry course (CHEM 120 or above)
will be allowed to substitute another course in consultation
with the Environmental Studies Committee.  
• Environment and Society - four semester hours
Select one course from the following which pursue the study
of institutions where environmental perspectives and 
policies are applied:
• ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global 
and Environmental
• ECON 311: Energy and Natural Resource Economics
• ECON 313: Environmental Economics 
• POLS 346: Environmental Politics and Policy
• Environment and Sensibility - four semester hours
Select one course from the following which examine values,
perception, and expression as they relate to environmental
issues:
• ENGL 234: Environmental Literature
• ENGL/RELI 239: Environment and Culture
• PHIL 230: Philosophy, Animals and the Environment
• INTC 241: Energy, Resources, and Pollution
• RELI 365: Christian Moral Issues (Environmental 
Ethics only)
• ENVT 350: Environmental Methods of Investigation -
four semester hours
Course Offerings – Environmental Studies (ENVT)
ENVT 104: Conservation of Natural Resources – NS, SM 
Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our
resources with specific reference to the Pacific Northwest. Cross-
listed with GEOS 104. (4)
ENVT 325: Ecology, Community and Culture in Australia
Students live in the community of Crystal Waters, Australia and
study permaculture design, participate in community life, and
explore Australian cultures and ecosystems. (4)
ENVT 350: Environmental Methods of Investigation
Study of a watershed using and integrating techniques and
principles of environmental sciences, political science, economics,
and ethics. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: Lines 1-3
completed or consent of instructor. (4)
ENVT 487: Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Selected topics as announced by the program. Course will address
current interdisciplinary issues in environmental studies. (1–4)
ENVT 491: Independent Studies
Opportunity to focus on specific topics or issues in
environmental studies under the supervision of a faculty 
member. (1-4)
ENVT 495: Internship in Environmental Studies
An internship with a private or public sector agency,
organization, or company involved in environmental issues. By
consent of the chair of Environmental Studies only. (4)
ENVT 499: Capstone: Senior Project – SR 
An interdisciplinary research project of the student’s design that
incorporates materials and methods from earlier courses and has
afocus reflecting the specific interest of the student. A substantial
project and a public presentation of the results are required.
Prerequisite: ENVT 350. (4)
French 
To view curriculum and course requirements, please go to
Department of Languages & Literature, page 100.
Geosciences
253.535.7563
www.nsci.plu.edu/geos
geos@plu.edu
The geosciences are distinct from other natural sciences. The
study of the earth is interdisciplinary and historical, bringing
knowledge from many other fields to help solve problems.
Geoscientists investigate continents, oceans, and the atmosphere,
and emphasize both the processes that have changed and are
changing the earth through time and the results of those
processes, such as rocks and sediments. Our fast-rising human
population is dependent upon the earth for food, water, shelter
and energy and mineral resources.
Study in the geosciences requires creativity and the ability to
integrate. Geologists observe processes and products in the field
and in the laboratory, merge diverse data, develop reasoning skills
that apply through geologic time and create and interpret maps.
The field goes beyond pure research science, and includes applied
topics like the relationships of natural events such as earthquakes
and volcanoes with human societies.
The Department of Geosciences recognizes that it is no longer
sufficient just to have knowledge of the facts of the field;
successful students must have quantitative skills and be able to
communicate clearly through writing and speaking. Laboratory
experiences are an integral part of all courses. Many courses
involve the use of microscopes, including the department’s
scanning electron microscope. Computers are used in most
courses to help students understand fundamental phenomena,
obtain current information, and communicate results. Field trips
are included in many courses.
Pacific Lutheran University is located at the leading edge of
western North America, in the Puget Lowland, between the
dramatic scenery of the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade
Range. Pierce County has diverse geology, which is reflected in
elevations that range from sea level to more than 14,000 feet.
Geosciences graduates who elect to work after completing a PLU
degree are employed by the U.S. Geological Survey, natural
resource companies, governmental agencies, and private-sector
geotechnical and environmental consulting firms. Graduates who
combine geosciences with education are employed in primary
and secondary education.
Careers in geosciences often require post-graduate degrees. Many
B.S. majors have been successful at major research graduate
schools.
F
aculty:
Whitman, Chair; Benham, Foley, Lowes, McKenney,
Todd.
Permanently rotate pdf pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf online; reverse page order pdf online
Permanently rotate pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page and save; how to reverse page order in pdf
80
PLU 2007 - 2008
Geosciences
G
DEGREE OFFERINGS
The Bachelor of Science degree is intended as a pre-professional
degree, for students interested in graduate school or working in
geosciences. The Bachelor of Arts degree is the minimum
preparation appropriate for the field and is best combined with
other degree programs, such as majors in social sciences or the
minor in Environmental Studies.
The department strongly recommends that all students complete
MATH 140 or higher before enrolling in 300-level and higher
courses in geosciences. The department also strongly encourages
students to complete the Chemistry and Physics requirements as
early as possible. Students should also note that upper-division
courses are offered on a two-year cycle. Early declaration of
majors or minors in geosciences will facilitate development of
individual programs and avoid scheduling conflicts.
All courses taken for the major must be completed with a grade
of C- or higher.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR - 42 to 44 semester hours
in following Geosciences courses:
• GEOS 201
• Plus at least two lower division from GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104,
105 or 106
• Eight semester hours from 324, 325, 326, 327, 329, 331 and 335
• Eight semester hours from GEOS 328, 330, 331, 332, 334 or 350
• One semester hour of GEOS 390
• One semester hour of GEOS 498
• Two semester hours of GEOS 499
• R
equir
ed: 
Geologic Field Experience (minimum of four
semester hours): Students completing the B.S. degree in
Geosciences are required to take a departmentally approved
field camp from another college or university. Student would
normally take this during the summer, after their junior year
or after their senior year depending upon their level of
preparation. This field experience may be a traditional field
geology course or a field-based course in Hydrology,
Environmental Geology or Geophysics, etc. Students must
have approval of the department chair before enrolling in the
Field Experience.
• Necessary supporting courses, minimum 26 semester 
hours, to include:
• CHEM 115 and 116
• PHYS 125, 126 (with 135,136 labs) OR PHYS 153, 154
(with 163, 164 labs)
• MATH 151 and either MATH 152 or CSCE 120
• R
ecommended:
BIOL 323 and additional courses are
recommended when paleontology is a major interest
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR - 32 semester hours in
following Geosciences courses:
• GEOS 201
• Plus at least two lower-division from GEOS 101, 102, 103,
104, 105, 106
• Eight semester hours from GEOS 324, 325, 326, 327, 329
• Eight semester hours from GEOS 328, 330, 331, 332, 334,
335, 350* 
• One semester hour of GEOS 390
• One semester hour of GEOS 498
• Two semester hours of GEOS 499
• R
equir
ed
Supporting non-geoscience course: CHEM 104 
or CHEM 115
• R
ecommended:
Geologic Field Experience (minimum of four
semester hours): Students completing the B.A. degree in
Geosciences are recommended to take a departmentally
approved field camp from another college or university.
Students would normally take this during the summer, after
their junior year or after their senior year depending upon
their level of preparation. This field experience may be a
traditional field geology course or a field-based course in
Hydrology, Environmental Geology or Geophysics, etc.
Students must have approval of the department chair before
enrolling in the Field Experience.
• Options reflect a student’s interests and are discussed with 
an advisor
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
See Department of Instructional Development and Leadership.
MINOR - 20 semester hours of courses
All courses for the minor must be completed with grade of C 
or higher.
R
equir
ed:
GEOS 201 and at least three upper division
Geosciences courses (a minimum of eight upper-division
semester hours).
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS
In recognition of outstanding work the designation with
Departmental Honors may be granted to Bachelor of Science
graduates by a vote of the faculty of the Department of
Geosciences, based upon the student’s performance in these areas:
• Course work: The grade point average in geoscience courses
must be at least 3.50.
• Written work: From the time a student declares a major in
geosciences, copies of outstanding work (e.g., laboratory
reports, poster presentations, written reports) will be kept for
later summary evaluation.
• Oral communication: Students must evidence ability to
communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their
participation in class discussions, seminars, help sessions, and
teaching assistantship work.
• Other activities: Positive considerations for honors include
involvement in the department, doing independent research,
geoscience-related employment, and participation in
professional organizations.
Course Offerings – Geosciences (GEOS)
Fall
GEOS 101, 102, 103, 104, 326, 327, 
330, 332, 335, 498
January Term
GEOS 103, 331, 334
Spring
GEOS 102, 103, 104, 201, 324, 325, 328,
329, 350, 499
Summer
GEOS 102
Alternate Years GEOS 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330,
331, 332, 334, 335, 350
GEOS 101: Our Changing Planet – NS, SM
Exploration of earth systems, including cycles in and connections
among the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.
Discussion of changes in and human impacts to these systems that
have taken place through time. Includes labs and field trips. (4)
GEOS 102: General Oceanography – NS, SM
Oceanography and its relationship to other fields; physical,
chemical, biological, climactic, and geological aspects of the sea.
Includes labs and field trips. (4)
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET If you need to permanently removing visible text and our redact function API and redact entire PDF pages.
rotate pdf page; reverse pdf page order online
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Redaction is the process of permanently removing visible our redact function API to redact entire PDF pages.
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; rotate individual pages in pdf
PLU 2007 - 2008
81
Geosciences
G
GEOS 103: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic 
Hazards – NS, SM
Study of the geologic environment and its relationship to
humans, with emphasis on geologic features and processes that
create hazards when encroached upon by human activity,
including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and
avalanches, and solutions to problems created by these hazards.
Includes labs and field trips. (4)
GEOS 104: Conservation of Natural Resources – NS, SM
Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our
resources with special reference to the Pacific Northwest. Includes
labs and field trips. Cross-listed with ENVT 104. (4)
GEOS 105: Meteorology – NS, SM
Afull, balanced, and up-to-date coverage of the basic principles
of meteorology. Examination of the impacts of severe weather on
humans and the environment. Includes labs. (4)
GEOS 106: Geology of National Parks - NS
Study of the significant geologic features, processes, and history
as illustrated by selected National Parks. Relationship between
human history and geology and the impact of geology on our
lives will be included. (4)
GEOS 201: Geologic Principles – NS, SM
Asurvey of geologic processes as they apply to the evolution of
the North American continent, including the interaction of
humans with their geologic environment. Students participate
actively in classes that integrate laboratory and field study of
rocks, minerals, fossils, maps and environmental aspects of
geology and emphasize developing basic skills of geologic inquiry.
This course meets state education certification requirements for
content in physical and historical geology. Includes labs and field
trips. (4)
GEOS 324: Igneous Petrology – NS, SM
Applied and theoretical study of the genesis, nature, and
distribution of igneous rocks, at microscopic to global scales.
Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201, 326, or consent of
instructor. (2)
GEOS 325: Structural Geology – NS, SM
The form and spatial relationships of various rock masses and an
introduction to rock deformation; consideration of basic
processes to understand mountain building and continental
formation; laboratory emphasizes practical techniques which
enable students to analyze regional structural patterns. 
Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of 
instructor. (4)
GEOS 326: Optical Mineralogy – NS, SM
Theory and practice of mineral studies using the petrographic
microscope, including immersion oil techniques, production of
thin sections, and determination of minerals by means of their
optical properties. Includes labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or
consent of instructor. (2)
GEOS 327: Stratigraphy and Sedimentation – NS, SM
Formational principles of surface-accumulated rocks, and their
incorporation in the stratigraphic record. This subject is basic to
field mapping and structural interpretation. Includes labs.
Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)
GEOS 328: Paleontology – NS, SM
Asystematic study of the fossil record, combining principles of
evolutionary development, paleohabitats and preservation, with
practical experience of specimen identification. Includes labs.
Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)
GEOS 329: Metamorphic Petrology – NS, SM
Consideration of the mineralogical and textural changes that
rocks undergo during orogenic episodes, including physical-
chemical parameters of the environment as deduced from
experimental studies. Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201,
326 or consent of instructor. (2)
GEOS 330: Maps: Images of the Earth – NS, SM
Maps as a basic tool for communicating spatial information. An
introduction to cartographic principles, processes and problems,
with emphasis on selection, presentation and interpretation of
information. Includes discussions of topographic maps, Global
Positioning Systems, digital maps, remotely sensed images and
aerial photographs. Includes labs. Prerequisite: Previous science
(geosciences preferred) or consent of instructor. (4)
GEOS 331: Maps: Computer-aided Mapping and 
Analysis – NS, SM
Computer-based Geographic Information Systems, digital maps,
and data sources. The creation, interpretation, and analysis of
digital maps from multiple data sources. Analysis of spatial
information from sciences, social sciences, and humanities using
sets of digital maps. Includes labs. Prerequisite: Previous science
(geoscience preferred), math or computer science course or
consent of instructor. GEOS 330 or familiarity with maps
recommended. (4)
GEOS 332: Geomorphology
Study of the processes that shape the Earth’s surface with
emphasis on the effects of rock type, geologic structure, and
climate on the formation and evolution of landforms. Includes
labs. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)
GEOS 334: Hydrogeology – NS, SM
Study of the hydrologic cycle, investigating surface and
groundwater flow, resource evaluation and development, wells,
water quality and geothermal resources. Emphasis on water
problems in the Puget Sound area, with additional examples
from diverse geologic environments. Includes labs. Prerequisite:
GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. (4)
GEOS 335: Geophysics – NS, SM
Study of the physical nature of the earth, its properties and
processes, employing techniques from seismology, heat flow,
gravity, magnetism, and electrical conductivity. Emphasis on
understanding the earth’s formation, structure, and plate
tectonics processes as well as geophysical exploration techniques.
Includes labs. Prerequisites: GEOS 201, one semester of
calculus, physics (high-school-level or above), or consent of
instructor. (4)
GEOS 350: Marine Geology – NS, SM
Study of the 70% of the earth beneath the oceans, focusing on
the extensive discoveries of the past few decades. Emphasis on
marine sediments, sedimentary processes, plate tectonic
processes, and the historical geology of the oceans. Includes labs.
Prerequisite: GEOS 102, or 201, or consent of instructor. (4)
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to VB.NET image editor control SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; pdf save rotated pages
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
to change view orientation by clicking rotate button. users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations permanently by clicking
pdf rotate single page; how to reverse pages in pdf
82
PLU 2007 - 2008
Geosciences•German•GlobalEducationOpportunities
G
GEOS 390: Field Trip – NS
Field and on-campus study of major geologic sites in western
U.S. Trips take place during spring break or at end of spring
semester. Prerequisite: GEOS 201 or consent of instructor. 
300- level geology courses preferred. (1)
GEOS 491: Independent Studies
Investigations or research in areas of special interest not covered
by regular courses. Requires regular supervision by a faculty
member. (1–4)
GEOS 495: Internship (1 to 12)
GEOS 497: Research
Experimental or theoretical investigation, in close cooperation
with a faculty member. Open to upper-division students. (1–4)
GEOS 498: Seminar – NS
Discussion of professional papers and introduction to directed
research for the Capstone project. Required of all majors in their
senior year. December graduates should complete the sequence
(498-499) in their final full year. (1)
GEOS 499: Capstone: Seminar – SR
Culminating experience applying geological methods and theory
through original literature or field or laboratory research under
the guidance of a faculty mentor, with written and oral
presentation of results. Required of all majors in their senior year.
Prerequisite: GEOS 498. (2)
German
To view curriculum and course requirements, please go to
Department of Languages & Literature, page 100.
Global Education Opportunities
253.535.7577
www.plu.edu/wangctr
wangctr@plu.edu
PLU is committed to a vibrant array of global educational
opportunities, linked to its mission and vision of educating to
achieve a just, healthy, sustainable, and peaceful world.
Both on- and off-campus opportunities abound. Academic majors
and minors provide on-campus study of global issues such as
development, global resources and trade, and human rights as well
as specific cultures and societies. Departmental courses and
multidisciplinary programs are described in detail in their respective
sections of this catalog. Please note among others the offerings in
anthropology, history, international business (under business),
languages and literatures, political science, and the following
multidisciplinary programs: the Americas, Chinese studies,
environmental studies, global studies, and Scandinavian studies.
Off-campus programs span the globe and the calendar. PLU
encourages majors in all fields to participate in off-campus study
–for a January term, semester, academic year, or summer term.
The following outline suggests the types of programs available to
undergraduates; consult the Wang Center for International
Programs for comprehensive and more detailed information.
FEATURED PROGRAMS
China
Offered every fall semester, this study away program is based at
Sichuan University in Chengdu.  The curriculum is centered
around Chinese culture and language, business, and global stud-
ies courses and includes unique study travel opportunities –
including an educational excursion to Tibet.  Service learning
assignments and part-time international internships provide
opportunities to apply knowledge gained in the classroom.
Students may arrange to spend the full year at Sichuan
University.  No prior Chinese language study is required.
Students earn up to 17 semester credit hours.  
England
Located in the Bloomsbury District, this program – offered every
fall and spring term – uses London as its classroom.  Students
explore the city’s exceptional resources through an interdiscipli-
nary study of literature, history, political science, theater, and art.
Academic and cultural learning is enhanced through extensive
co-curricular activities, weekend study tours, living with a British
family, and optional service learning.  Students earn up to 16
semester credit hours. 
International Internships
PLU offers internship opportunities to selected locations around
the globe, providing students the chance to apply their on-cam-
pus curriculum in an international work setting. International
internships can be completed concurrently with a study away
program (depending on the study away format and location) or
independently with supporting university coursework.  Every
year PLU students explore career possibilities and enhance their
skills by completing semester-long internships in England,
Namibia, and beyond.  
January Term
Every January a wide variety of off-campus “J-term” courses led
by PLU faculty take students around the globe to destinations
ranging from Neah Bay to New Zealand.  In January 2006, PLU
received national attention when it became the first U.S.
university to have students studying on all seven continents at
the same time.  Nearly 400 students participate annually in
these intensive J-term learning experiences, which fulfill many
degree requirements.  The application process occurs during the
preceding spring semester, with remaining openings filled during
summer and early fall.  See the Wang Center website for current
offerings: www.plu.edu/wangcenter/catalog.
Mexico
Designed for advanced Spanish language students with an
interest in Latin American Studies this fall semester program –
based in Oaxaca – explores the intersection of development,
culture, and social change through the lens of the dynamic and
evolving context of contemporary Mexico.  Student learning is
deepened through home stays, educational excursions, and the
opportunity for academic internships.  Prerequisites: completion
of Spanish 202 (301 preferred).  Students earn up to 16
semester credit hours.  
NNorway
This fall semester program explores contemporary global issues
through the lens of contemporary Norway. Particular areas of
focus are Norwegian approaches to democracy, conflict
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in burnAnnotationToImages: permanently burn drawn annotation on page in
pdf reverse page order online; rotate pdf pages
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
pdf rotate page and save; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
PLU 2007 - 2008
83
Global Education Opportunities
G
mediation and international development. Field study experience
and a final research project allow for analysis and reflection on a
topic related to the student’s academic discipline. Cross-cultural
learning is an integral part of this program that includes students
from PLU, Namibia and Norway. The program is open to all
students regardless of major, with special interest for students in
political science, communication, Global studies and
Scandinavian studies. Courses are taught in English. No prior
Norwegian language study is required. Students earn up to 16
semester credit hours.
Spain
Students take upper-intermediate and advanced level Spanish at
the Centro de Lenguas Modernas at the University of Granada.
With its Moorish past, rich cultural heritage, and natural beauty,
Granada provides an excellent setting to build Spanish language
skills.  The program is offered every fall and spring semester.
Prerequisites: completion of Spanish 202 for fall term; comple-
tion of Spanish 301 for spring term.  Students earn up to 16
semester credit hours in the fall and up to 18 in the spring,
which includes J-term. 
Tanzania
With a focus on post-colonial issues in Tanzania and Africa, the
program begins in late-July with an in-depth orientation at
Arusha and basic training in the Swahili language.  Through lec-
tures by local experts, visits to rural and wildlife areas, and
teaching conversational English to school children, students
work to develop an understanding of this region of the world.
During fall semester, students select three or four courses from
the wide offerings available at the University of Dar es Salaam.
All university courses are taught in English.  Students earn up to
16 semester credit hours.  
Trinidad and Tobago 
January to mid-May, this study away program provides students
with unique opportunities to explore the islands and learn about
the varied heritages of the country’s multicultural society.
During January students take a core course, which varies from
year to year, and begin preparations for the Carnival celebration.
From February to mid-May students take a second core course,
Caribbean Culture and Society, and choose two additional
courses from the regular offerings at the University of the West
Indies. Because of the direct enrollment feature at UWI, this
program is suitable for a wide variety of academic majors and
minors including studies in the natural sciences. Students earn
up to 18 semester credit hours. 
OTHER PROGRAMS
Sponsored Programs
Hundreds of PLU students participate in the featured programs
listed above every year. However, sometimes a student’s particu-
lar academic goals are better served by a different program.
Through collaborative partnerships with other universities and
agreements with study abroad program providers, PLU offers an
array of semester-long study away programs with courses in a
wide variety of academic disciplines. Short-term study away pro-
grams are also available during the summer months. PLU
awards academic credit for approved programs and locations.
For details call the Wang Center for International Programs at
253-535-7577. Or, visit the on-line study away catalog at
www.plu.edu/wangcenter/catalog.
Non-sponsored Programs
Opportunities to study abroad are made available through 
many other organizations and colleges in the United States.
Some U.S. students choose to enroll directly in an overseas 
university. In these cases, special arrangements must be made 
in advance for appropriate credit transfer. PLU financial aid is
not applicable.
Academic Planning for Study Away
With appropriate planning, it is possible for qualified students
in almost any major to successfully incorporate study away into
their degree plans. Prior to studying off-campus on semester or
yearlong programs and on short-term sponsored programs, stu-
dents work with their academic advisors to determine how
courses taken and credits earned will fit with their academic
goals and transfer back to PLU. Using a pre-departure academic
planning worksheet, the student’s intended course of study is
documented, approved by the appropriate academic chair, and
filed with the Wang Center.  
Application Process
Because off-campus study requires an additional level of inde-
pendence and the ability to adapt to other cultures, the applica-
tion, selection, and pre-departure review process is rigorous and
includes a comprehensive evaluation of student records.
Applications for off-campus study must be pre-approved by the
university. Students must submit applications to the Wang
Center by the relevant application deadline, which is typically
six to twelve months prior to the program start date. 
Application materials include, but are not limited to, an official
transcript, an essay, letters of recommendation, and an applica-
tion fee. Consult with the Wang Center for application require-
ments and deadlines by calling 253-535-7577 or visiting the
web site at www.plu.edu/wangcenter. The university reserves
the right to decline an application for off-campus study and/or
to cancel the participation of an accepted student before depar-
ture or during the program.
Grading Policy and Credits 
Students participating on approved study away programs receive
PLU credit and letter grades for their coursework. Courses, cred-
its and grades are recorded on the PLU transcript. However,
study away grades are only calculated into the PLU G.P.A. for
courses taught by PLU faculty and for students graduating with
honors and in the School of Business. Study away courses are
not pass/fail. 
Program Costs and Financial Aid
Financial aid may be applied to all PLU approved programs.
This includes State and Federal financial aid (with the 
exception of work study), university grants and scholarships, 
and government loans. While abroad, students continue to be
billed by PLU and are expected to maintain their payment plan
arrangements. Tuition remission benefits apply to the cost of
study away tuition on PLU approved programs, but not to
housing and meal charges. Tuition exchange benefits apply only
to the tuition component of these PLU-directed programs:
Norway, China, Mexico, Trinidad, and International
Internships. Tuition exchange benefits do not apply to any 
other study away programs offered through third party
providers, consortia, etc.
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. Effect VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify
rotate single page in pdf; how to rotate one page in pdf document
84
PLU 2007 - 2008
Global Studies
G
Grants for Global Involvement
The Wang Center for International Programs awards grants on a
competitive basis to students interested in advanced research and
experiential learning in a global context, building on previous
international experience. 
Post-graduation Opportunities
PLU graduates pursue their global interests in many ways 
after they complete their degrees. These include Fulbright
awards, Rotary scholarships, and Wang Teaching Fellowships 
in China. Contact the Wang Center at 253-535-7577 for 
more details.
Global Studies
253.535.8107
www.plu.edu/~glst
glst@plu.edu
The Global Studies Program aims to encourage and enable
students to achieve global literacy defined as a multidisciplinary
approach to contending perspectives on global problems, their
historical origins, and their possible solutions. To this end, the
Global Studies program offers courses and experiences designed
to equip students with the factual knowledge and analytical skills
necessary to comprehend, and engage with, foundational
questions of global analysis (e.g., the commonalities and
variations between human cultures), identifiable global themes
(e.g., war and peace, economic development, globalization and
trade, environmental sustainability), and the specifics of
particular contemporary global problems (e.g., regional 
conflicts, weapons proliferation, environmental degradation,
movement for political integration and autonomy, the 
AIDS crisis).
COURSE OF STUDY
Students electing the Global Studies major are required to declare
a primary major before they declare a Global Studies major. No
more than two courses (eight semester hours) can be taken in any
one discipline to fulfill the requirements for the issue
concentration for the Global Studies major. In addition, students
may not apply more than two courses (eight semester hours)
from each other major or minor.
F
aculty:
The Global Studies Committee administers this
program: Crawford, Chair, Cotten, Grosvenor, Keller, Martinez-
Carbajo, Nosaka, Storfjell.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
• Global Studies Core - 16 semester hours
• ANTH/HIST/POLS 210: Global Perspectives - The 
World in Change (4)
• Select two courses from the following three:
• ANTH 102: Introduction to Human Cultural 
Diversity (4)
• ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: 
Global and Environmental (4)
• HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
• GLST 499: Research Seminar (four semester hours) 
• Issue Area Concentrations - 16 semester hours
Four courses must be taken from one of the five
concentrations outlined below. At least three of the four
courses counted toward a concentration must be at the 300
level or higher.
• Language
Students must demonstrate proficiency in a language relevant
to their coursework and at a level consistent with Option 1 of
the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language
requirement. This may be accomplished through a proficiency
examination or through the equivalent of 16 semester hours
of coursework.
• Off-Campus Study Component
Majors are required to participate in an off-campus study
program overseas. While abroad students must earn eight
semester hours of credit related to the global studies core or
the student’s global studies concentration. At least four credits
must be related directly to the student’s global studies
concentration. For example, this study abroad requirement
could be met by taking two appropriate J-term courses, or by
eight semester hours of appropriate coursework taken during a
semester abroad. Language study coursework does not
necessarily count for this requirement; coursework must deal
with the contemporary world and its issues. Obtaining pre-
approval for credit is encouraged. Local internships related to
an area concentration and involving a cross-cultural setting
may be allowed in exceptional circumstances. The Global
Studies chair must approve exceptions.
• Senior Research Project
The senior project is a general university requirement in all
programs and majors. Students will normally satisfy this
requirement by completing a research project or paper in
GLST 499.
MINOR REQUIREMENTS - 20 semester hours
• ANTH/HIST/POLS 210: Global Perspectives - The 
World in Change (4)
• Select one course from the following three:
• ANTH 102: Introduction to Human Cultural
Diversity (4)
• ECON 111: Principles of Microeconomics: Global
and Environmental (4)
• HIST 215: Modern World History (4)
• Three courses in one concentration, at least two must be 
at the 300 level or higher. 
Students must take one semester of 200-level college coursework
in a foreign language or demonstrate equivalent proficiency.
Students must take at least four credit hours of study abroad
coursework related to the contemporary world and its issues. For
example, one appropriate January Term (J-Term) course that
would apply toward the student’s concentration.
CONCENTRATIONS*
• Development and Social Justice Courses:
• ECON 333: Economic Development: Comparative 
Third World Strategies (4)
• ENGL 233: Post-Colonial Literature (4)
• HIST 335: Central America and the Caribbean: 
History and Development (4)
PLU 2007 - 2008
85
Global Studies • Greek • Health Education
G
• HIST 340: Modern Japan (4)
• INTC 244: Post-Colonial Issues (4)
• INTC 245: History and Perspectives on Development (4)
• POLS 380: Politics of Global Development (4)
• SOCI 362: Families in the Americas (4)
• SPAN 301: Advanced Grammar and Composition 
(when crosslisted with International Core)(4)
• SPAN 322: Latin American Culture and 
Civilization (4)
• Responses to International Violence and Conflict
Courses:
• ANTH 375: Law, Politics, and Revolution (4)
• COMA 304: Intercultural Communication (4)
• COMA 340: Conflict and Communication (4)
• INTC 326: Quest for Global Justice (4)
• POLS 331: International Relations (4)
• POLS 332: International Conflict Resolution (4)
• POLS 431: Advanced International Relations (4)
• RELI 230: Religion and Culture (When the topic 
is: Religion, Violence and Colonialism) (4) 
• World Health 
Courses:
• ANTH 380: Sickness, Madness, Health (4)
• ECON 323: Health Economics (4)
• INTC 242: Population, Hunger, and Poverty (4)
• PHED 362: Healing Arts(4)
• RELI 230: Religion and Culture (When the topic 
is: Religion, Healing, and the Body)(4)
• Globalization and Trade 
Courses:
• ANTH 377: Money, Power and Exchange (4)
• BUSA 201: Value Creation in the Global Environment (4)
• BUSA 352: Global Management (3)
• BUSA 408: International Business Law and Ethics (3)
• BUSA 460: International Marketing (3)
• COMA 393: Communication Abroad: Studies
in Culture (4)
• ECON 331: International Economics (4)
• POLS 347: Political Economy (4)
• POLS 381: Comparative Legal Systems (4)
• POLS 383: Modern European Politics (4)
• Transnational Movements and Cultural Diversity
Courses:
• ANTH 330: Native North Americans (4)
• ANTH 360: Ethnic Groups (4)
• ANTH 387: Special Topics in Anthropology (When 
the topic is: First Nations) (4)
• ENGL 232: Women Writers of the Americas (4)
• ENGL 343: Voices of Diversity: Post-Colonial Literature
and Theory (4)
• FREN 221: French Literature and Films of the Americas (4)
• FREN 301: Advanced Grammar and Composition 
(When cross-listed with the International Core)(4)
• GERM 301: Advanced Grammar and Composition
(When cross-listed with the International Core) (4)
• HIST 344: Andean History (4)
• PSYC 335: Cultural Psychology (4)
• SPAN 341: Latino Experience in the US (4)
• RELI 227: Christian Theology (When the topic is: 
Theologies of Liberation and Democracy) (4)
• RELI 236: Native American Religious Traditions (4)
*Students may petition the Chair of Global Studies for the
inclusion of courses that meet issue concentration requirements
but that are not taught regularly enough to be listed here.
Course Offerings - Global Studies (GLST)
GLST 495: Internship
A project, usually undertaken during a study-abroad experience
and supervised by a PLU faculty member, that combines field
experience, research, and writing on issues related to the student’s
issue concentration in Global Studies. Local internships that
involve transnational issues and constituencies will also be
considered. Prerequisite: Prior consent of the chair of the 
Global Studies Committee and of the supervising PLU faculty
member. (4)
GLST 499: Capstone: Research Seminar – SR
Required of all students majoring in Global Studies, this is a
capstone seminar that culminates in the writing of an 
extensive research paper. Prerequisite: ANTH/HIST/
POLS 210. (4) 
Greek
To view curriculum and course requirements, please go to
Department of Languages and Literature, page 102.
Health Education
To view curriculum requirements, please go to Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership or Department of
Movement Studies and Wellness Education.
Course Offerings – Health Education (HEED)
HEED 262: Big Fat Lies – A
Investigation of body weight as both a source of social prejudice
and as a health issue. Issues of body image, social expectations
and ideals, and discrimination are addressed in the first half and
topics such as metabolism, dieting, heart disease, diabetes and
cancer are addressed as they relate to obesity in the second 
half. (4)
HEED 266: Nutrition, Health & Performance 
An examination of the role of dietary choices in the maintenance
of health, the prevention of disease and the optimizing of
physical performance. Topics covered include: consumer
nutrition skills, basic nutrients and nutritional science, energy
balance, sport and performance nutrition including the use of
supplements and ergogenic aids, lifespan nutrition, global
nutrition and food safety. (4)
HEED 281: Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care
Prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of all common injuries
sustained in athletics; physical therapy by employment of
electricity, massage, exercise, light, ice, and mechanical 
devices. (2)
86
PLU 2007 - 2008
Health Education • History
G
HEED 292: First Aid
Meets requirements for the American Red Cross Standard First
Aid and Personal Safety. (2)
HEED 360: Professional Practicum
Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher,
recreation supervisor, or health care provider. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval. (1 or 2)
HEED 365: The Aging Experience: Worlds of Difference – A
The way in which people’s location in the social system, the
historical periods they live during, and their personal biographies
shape the aging experience. Students will learn how these
influences may affect their lives and those with whom they 
work. (4)
HEED 366: Health Psychology 
This course examines how human physiology and psychology
interact and influence personal health choices and behavior
change. Topics surveyed include behavior change models; nicotine,
alcohol and drug use and abuse; stress and stress management;
psychological factors in the prevention, development and
treatment of chronic disease; death and dying. (4)
HEED 395: Comprehensive School Health 
This course explores the integrated nature of comprehensive
school health programs. Students will use their health knowledge
and resources to effectively communicate essential health 
content with an emphasis placed on environmental health,
intentional and unintentional injury prevention, consumer 
health and sexuality education. The course addresses program
planning, implementation and evaluation based on the needs 
of the learner. Prerequisites: PHED 279, HEED 266 and 
HEED 366. (4)
HEED 425: Health Promotion/Wellness Intervention
Strategies
Examination of strategies for improving the state of wellness
through healthier lifestyles. (2)
HEED 491: Independent Studies
Prerequisite: consent of the dean. (1–4)
HEED 495: Internship – SR
Pre-professional experiences closely related to student’s career and
academic interests. Prerequisites: Declaration of major,
sophomore status, and 10 hours in the major. (2–8)
HEED 499: Capstone: Senior Seminar – SR (2–4)
History 
253.535.7595
www.plu.edu/~history
hist@plu.edu
Through the study of history at Pacific Lutheran University
students gain an understanding and appreciation of the historical
perspective. Opportunities for developing analytical and
interpretative skills are provided through research and writing
projects, internships, class presentations, and study tours. The
practice of the historical method leads students off campus to
their hometowns, to Europe or China or the American West, and
to community institutions, both private and public. The
department emphasizes individual advising in relation to both
self-directed studies and regular courses. The university library
holdings include significant collections in American, European,
and non-Western history. Career outlets for majors and minors
are either direct or supportive in business law, teaching, public
service, news media, and other occupations.
F
aculty:
Ericksen, Chair; Benson, Carp, DiStefano, Halvorson,
Hames, Kang, Kraig, Sobania, Wichert.
BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR
Minimum of 32 semester hours, including:
• Four semester hours - American field 
• Four semester hours - European field 
• Four semester hours - non-Western field. 
Students are expected to work closely with the department’s
faculty advisors to insure the most personalized programs and
instruction possible. 
Majors are urged to meet the foreign language requirement of 
the College of Arts and Sciences under either Option I or
Option II. 
Those majors who are preparing for public school teaching can
meet the state history requirement by enrolling in History 460. 
All majors are required to take four semester hours of historical
methods and research and four semester hours of seminar credit.
Completion of the seminar course satisfies the core requirement
for a senior seminar/project. 
For the major at least 16 semester hours must be completed at
PLU, including HIST 301 and 494 or 496 or 497.
MINOR
• 20 semester hours with a minimum of 12 from courses
numbered above 300. 
• The minor in history emphasizes a program focus and a
program plan, which is arranged by the student in
consultation with a departmental advisor. 
• For the minor at least 12 semester hours must be completed 
at PLU, including eight of upper-division courses.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
See Department of Instructional Development and Leadership.
Course Offerings – History (HIST)
Courses in the Department of History are offered in the
following fields:
American Field
HIST 251, 252, 253, 294, 305, 352,
355, 356, 357, 359, 381, 451, 460,
461, 471, 494
European Field
HIST 107, 108, 321, 322, 323, 324, 
325, 328, 329, 332, 334, 360, 
364, 497
Non-Western Field HIST 109, 205, 210, 215, 220, 231, 
310, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 
344, 380, 496
All Fields
HIST 301, 401, 491, 495
PLU 2007 - 2008
87
History
H
HIST 107: History of Western Civilization – S1
Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilizations.
Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise of
Christianity, and Medieval Europe. (4)
HIST 108: History of Western Civilization – S1
Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilizations. Europe
from the Renaissance to the present. (4)
HIST 109: East Asian Societies – C, S1
A historical overview of the traditional cultures, traditions, and
lives of the people of China and Japan. Discussion of the lives of
peasants, emperors, merchants, and warriors in each society. (4)
HIST 205: Islamic Middle East to 1945 – C, S1
An introductory survey course on the history of the Middle East
from the time of Muhammad in the 7th century through World
War II. (4)
HIST 210: Global Perspectives: The World in Change – C, S1
A survey of global issues: modernization and development;
economic change and international trade; diminishing resources;
war and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural diversity.
(Although cross-listed with ANTH 210 and POLS 210, students
may receive history credit only when this course is registered as a
history class.) (4)
HIST 215: Modern World History – C, S1
Surveys major features of the principal existing civilizations of the
world since 1450: East Asia, India and southern Asia, the Middle
East, Eastern Europe, Western civilization, sub-Saharan Africa,
and Latin America. (4)
HIST 220: Modern Latin American History – C, S1
Introduction to modern Latin American history, from 1810 to
the present. (4)
HIST 231: World War Two in China and Japan, 
1931–1945 – C, S1
An introduction to the experience of World War II on the home
front in East Asia. What happened in China and Japan during
the war years? How were the Chinese and Japanese people
mobilized for war, how did they survive the atrocities, and how
did the widespread use of martial violence affect the development
of East Asian societies, cultures, and politics? These are some of
the questions that will be considered as we reconstruct the
history of World War II in China and Japan through a variety of
media including memoirs, films, scholarly works and
contemporary literature. (4)
HIST 232: Tibet in Fact and Fiction - C, S1
The history of Tibet, emphasizing Tibet’s relationship with China
and the West. How have outsiders imagined Tibet, and how have
stereotypes affected international relationships? Students will
explore the present crisis stemming from China’s occupation of
Tibet, and also confront the powers of myth, the emergence of
China as a world power, and the agonies of globalization. (4) 
HIST 251: Colonial American History – S1
The history of what became the United States, from the settlement
of America to the election of Thomas Jefferson as the third
President of the United States in 1800. It will pay particular
attention to three periods - the years of settlement, the era of
adjustment to an imperial system around the turn of the 18th
century, and the revolt against that system in the second half of the
18th century, which culminated in the creation of the American
union. Emphasizes certain themes: the origins of racism and
slavery, the course of the religious impulse in an increasingly
secularized society, and finally, the ideological and constitutional
transition from royal government and the rights of Englishmen to
republicanism, and popular sovereignty. (4)
HIST 252: 19th-Century American History – S1
From Jefferson to Theodore Roosevelt; interpretation of era from
social, political, economic, and biographical viewpoints. (4)
HIST 253: 20th-Century American History – S1
Trends and events in domestic and foreign affairs since 1900;
affluence, urban growth, and social contrasts. (4)
HIST 294: The United States Since 1945 – S1
Selected topics in recent U.S. history such as the Cold War, the
Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Women’s
Movement, Watergate, and the Iran-Contra Affair. Enrollment
restricted to first-year students and sophomores. (4)
HIST 301: Introduction to Historical Methods and 
Research – S1
Focus on historical methodology, research techniques, and the
writing of history from a wide range of historical primary
sources. Required for all history majors before taking the senior
seminar. (4)
HIST 305: Slavery in the Americas – A, S1
The comparative history of slavery in Africa, the Caribbean, and
the Americas with special attention to the United States.
Comparative perspectives on Atlantic slave trade, the origins of
slavery and racism, slave treatment, the rise of antislavery
thought, the maturation of plantation society, slave revolts,
selection conflict and war, and the reconstruction of society after
emancipation. (4)
HIST 310: Contemporary Japan – S1
Major domestic, political, economic, and socio-cultural
developments since 1945. Special attention given to U.S.-Japan
interactions. (4)
HIST 321: Greek Civilization – S1
The political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from
the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Special attention to the
literature, art, and intellectual history of the Greeks. Cross-listed
with CLAS 321. (4)
HIST 322: Roman Civilization – S1
The history of Rome from the foundation of the city to CE 337,
the death of Constantine. Emphasis on Rome’s expansion over
the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attention to
the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roman context. Cross-
listed with CLAS 322. (4)
HIST 323: The Middle Ages – S1
Europe from the disintegration of the Roman Empire to 1300;
reading and research in medieval materials. (4)
HIST 324: Renaissance – S1
Europe in an age of transition - 1300 to 1500. (4)
88
PLU 2007 - 2008
History
H
HIST 325: Reformation – S1
Political and religious crises in the 16th century: Lutheranism,
Zwinglianism, Anglicanism, Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman
Catholic reform; Weber thesis, the beginnings of Baroque arts. (4)
HIST 327: The Vikings – S1
The world of the Vikings; territorial expansion; interaction of the
Vikings with the rest of Europe. Cross-listed with SCAN 327. (4)
HIST 328: 19th-Century Europe – S1
The expansion of European civilization from 1800 to 1914. (4)
HIST 329: Europe and the World Wars: 1914–1945 – S1
World War I; revolution and return to “normalcy;” depression
and the rise of fascism; World War II. (4)
HIST 332: England: Tudors and Stuarts – S1
Political, social, economic, legal, and cultural developments. (4)
HIST 334: Modern Germany, 1848-1945 – S1
The Revolutions of 1848 and unification of Germany;
Bismarckian and Wilhemian empires; Weimar Republic and the
rise of National Socialism; the Third Reich. (4)
HIST 335: Latin American History: Central America & the
Caribbean – C, S1
Survey of the major aspects of Central American and Caribbean
history from colonial to modern times. Use of selected case
studies to illustrate the region’s history. Study in inter-American
relations. (4)
HIST 336: Southern Africa – C, S1
Examination of the history of pre-colonial African kingdoms,
Western imperialism, settler colonialism, and the African struggle
for independence. Emphasis on the period since 1800. (4)
HIST 337: The History of Mexico – C, S1
The political, economic, social, and cultural changes that have
taken place in Mexico from 1350 to the present. (4)
HIST 338: Modern China – C, S1
The beginning of China’s modern history, with special emphasis
on the genesis of the Chinese revolution and China’s position in
an increasingly integrated world. (4)
HIST 339: Revolutionary China – C, S1
Beginning in 1911, an examination of the course of the Chinese
revolution, China’s liberation, and the changes since 1949. (4)
HIST 340: Modern Japan – C, S1
Study of how Japan became the modern “miracle” in East Asia.
Primary focus on traditions that enabled Japan to change rapidly,
the role of the challenge of the West in that change, the
industrialization of Japan, the reasons for war with the U.S., and
the impact of the war on contemporary Japan and its social and
economic institutions. (4)
HIST 344: The Andes in Latin American History – C, S1
The history of the Andean countries (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador)
from the 15th through the 20th centuries. (4)
HIST 345: American Business and Economic History, 1607-
1877 - S1
Surveys the history of the American economy from pre-
Columbian Indian societies through the English mercantilist
system, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the
Civil War to the end of Reconstruction. Investigates influence of
non-economic factors such as warfare, slavery, and the social
standing of women on economic trends. (4)
HIST 347: American Business and Economics History, 
1877-Present, S1
Surveys the history of American business and the economy from
the rise of big business and labor unions after the American Civil
War through the era of globalization. Topics include
technological change, government regulation, business
organization, economic thought, business ethics, the role of the
entrepreneur, and the place of women and minorities in
American business society. (4)
HIST 352: The American Revolution – S1
Study of the era of the American Revolution from the end of the
Seven Year’s War in 1763 through Thomas Jefferson’s defeat of
John Adams in 1800. Focuses on both American and British
political, social, economic, and ideological conflicts that brought
on the Revolution; the military strategy and tactics that won the
war for the Americans and lost it for the British; the making of
the Constitution and the opposition to it; and the challenges that
faced the American people living in the new Republic. (4)
HIST 355: American Popular Culture – S1
Study of motion pictures, popular music, radio and television
programs, comic strips and paperback fiction. Insights into the
values and ideas of American culture from watching it at play. (4)
HIST 356: American Diplomatic History – S1
The practice, function, and structure of American foreign policy
with particular emphasis on the twentieth century. (4)
HIST 357: African American History – A, S1
Experiences, struggles, ideas, and contributions of African-
Americans as they developed within and strongly shaped the
course of U.S. (and global) history. It focuses simultaneously on
major social and legal issues like slavery or Jim Crow segregation
and African-Americans’ actions and identities framed in the
context of systemic white supremacism. It also examines and
evaluates aspects of daily life and personal experiences and
expressions of individual African-Americans between the 17th
century and contemporary times. (4)
HIST 359: History of Women in the United States – A, S1
A focused, thematic examination of issues and evidence related to
women’s experiences from the colonial period to the present. (4)
HIST 360: Holocaust: Destruction of the European Jews – A, S1
Investigation of the development of modern anti-Semitism, 
its relationship to fascism, the rise of Hitler, the structure of 
the German dictatorship, the evolution of Nazi Jewish policy, 
the mechanics of the Final Solution, the nature of the
perpetrators, the experience and response of the victims, the
reaction of the outside world, and the post-war attempt to 
deal with an unparalleled crime through traditional judicial
procedures. (4)
HIST 362: Christians in Nazi Germany
This course will study the response of Christians in Germany to
Hitler and the Holocaust, analyzing why some Christians
opposed the regime but also why a large number found Hitler’s
ideology and policies attractive. (4)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested